Esther Dyson to keynote I Annotate 2017

We are excited and honored to announce that digital pioneer Esther Dyson will deliver the opening keynote at I Annotate this year in San Francisco on Thursday morning, May 4, 2017.

Across her multifaceted career, Dyson has engaged deeply in the fields where annotation thrives, including education, journalism, publishing, research, science, and technology. This year’s I Annotate themes of fact checking, digital literacy, and user engagement connect directly to her experience. “I’m especially excited to speak at I Annotate,” says Dyson, “I started my career as a fact-checker for Forbes magazine and have a longtime passion both for the truth and for freedom of speech.” Dyson was also an early investor in Flickr, which pioneered web based image annotation, and social tagging company Del.icio.us, which give her an intimate familiarity with the technical goals and user benefits that an interoperable annotation paradigm can bring.

Hypothesis: Meeting the Audrey Test for educational technology

Anyone working on or with educational technology should take the work of Audrey Watters—widely known as the “Cassandra” of #edtech—very seriously. If your work withers under Audrey’s critical gaze, you’ve got more work to do. In that spirit, I wanted to hold Hypothesis up to the kind of scrutiny that Audrey might provide.

Back in 2012, Audrey posted “The Audrey Test”: Or, What Should Every Techie Know About Education? on her must-read Hack Education blog. The Audrey Test includes a short list of questions that she suggests every #edtech project, product, or company should answer in order to meet the high expectations we should all hold when we are working on educational tools that engage in what we should think of as “high stakes environments with other people’s children.”

How does Hypothesis fare in The Audrey Test?

Register now for I Annotate 2017

Join us for I Annotate 2017, the fifth annual gathering dedicated to advancing digital annotation practices and technologies. With events in San Francisco during 3-6 May, I Annotate will continue to expand the annotation community to include more participants from education, journalism, publishing, research, science, and technology, focusing on themes of fact checking, user engagement, and digital literacy.

Our millionth annotation

It was getting close to midnight and the Hypothesis team was watching the counter of total annotations tick up: 999,646…999,752…999,845…by 10:37pm Pacific Time it was 999,959 and we knew we’d reach one million annotations that night. People all over the world were busy taking notes using Hypothesis—students, journalists, researchers, scientists, scholars—most without knowing that our team and the annotation community on social media were rooting for their work. Countdown tweets for a #millionannotations were starting to gather an audience. Who would add the millionth annotation?

Marketing Hypothesis

I’m incredibly excited—and deeply honored—to be joining the team at Hypothesis, where I’ll be leading marketing:

My first—very short—story for Hypothesis is about how the idea of a common platform for digital annotation first captured my imagination, embodied in the idea of a personal notebook. My notebook links to all the places online where I engage, but lives with me. Instead of being scattered across the world, my collected notes and references would be in just one place where I could always find them, flip through my pages, add new thinking, and—most powerfully of all—share and connect with other people. I started with this simple story, but Hypothesis and the people it connects are already telling many stories, with so many more to come.