357 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2015
  2. networkedlearningcollaborative.com networkedlearningcollaborative.com
    1. Threequestions guided our investigation: How do young people themselves talk abouttheir social network site and its role in their lives? How are social network sitesseen to be supporting young people’s interpersonal needs? How are young peopleusing social network sites for creative and communicative purposes, if at all?

      These three questions to be asked to those 11 high school age people seem to be appropriate and basic enough to get the most answers out of the students.

    2. Madden,

      so close, yet so far away to being a distant relative of mine

    1. Some defenders of the new digital cultures have acted as though youths can simply acquire these skills on their own without adult intervention or supervision. Children and youths do indeed know more about these new media environments than most parents and teachers. In fact, we do not need to protect them so much as engage them in critical dialogues that help them to articulate more fully their intuitive understandings of these experiences.

    2. The Pew study did not consider newer forms of expres-sion, such as podcasting, game modding, or machinima. Nor did it count other forms of creative expression and appropria-tion, such as music sampling in the hip-hop community. T

      Why did the Pew study not consider newer forms of expression in their studies?

    3. urpose of the study, a media creator is someone who has created a blog or Web page; posted original artwork, photography, stories, or videos online; or remixed online content into their own new creations.

      Definition of media creator.

    4. They developed much of their skill and knowledge through their participation in the informal learning communi-ties of fans and gamers.

      Shows how different communities can help others learn new things they didn't know to help them do the things they love.

    5. hrough the joint participation of thousands of other volunteer youths and adults working on his project worldwide, the Firefox Web browser was born. Today, Firefox enjoys more than 60 times as many users as Netscape Navigator. By age 19, Ross had the venture capital needed to launch his own start-up company. His interest in computing originally was sparked by playing the popular video game

      Playing the game, Sims City, helped Blake Ross create his own web browser, Firefox. Did not know the game could help spread ideas like this.

    6. Injecting digital technologies into the classroom necessarily affects our relationship with every other communications technology, changing how we feel about what can or should be done with pencils and paper, chalk and black-board, books, films, and recordings

      I think this might be the main reason that a lot of educators have been hesitant to integrate new technologies into our system. It comes back to the idea that if it's not broken don't fix it. however, it completely ignores the fact that just because something has worked for so long doesn't mean that it will continue to work.

    7. some type of informal mentorship whereby what is known by the most experienced is passed along to novices

      The only problem I have with this point is that a lot of my experience with mentorship on the internet comes by a "trial through fire" in which criticism comes in non-constructive ways.

    8. Indeed, many of these youths were frustrated with school

      This is why interactive experience is vital to the future of our education system. Limited examples already exist like the FIRSTRobtics program

  3. Sep 2015
    1. Contrary to popular stereotypes, these activities are not restricted to white, suburban males. In fact, urban youths (40 percent) are somewhat more likely than their suburban (28 per-cent) or rural (38 percent) counterparts to be media creators. Girls aged 15–17 (27 percent) are more likely than boys their age (17 percent) to be involved with blogging or other social activities online. The Pew researchers found no significant dif-ferences in participation by race or ethnicity

      I'm not too surprised by this statistic, though I do find it interesting that I have never noticed it. A lot of the memes and funny videos I watched include satires of urban pop culture and lifestyles.

    2. —learning how to campaign and govern; how to read, write, edit, and defend civil liberties; how to pro-gram computers and run a business; how to make a movie and find distribution—

      The curriculum in today's schooling fail to prepare students for a world after graduation. Many, if not all the skills mentioned here were not touched on in my high school or middle school.

    3. Yet Schrier was surprised by another phenomenon: the young people took the game’s representation of historical evidence at face value, acting as if all of the information in the game were authentic.

      This could be very dangerous.

    4. that game players seek to identify and exploit the rules of the system in order to beat the game.26

      Not going to lie, I've used cheats before in the Sims only to make more money. I wasn't trying to beat the game or manipulate the system, I just wanted my Sim to have a car... oops.

    5. Ex-panding access to computers will help bridge some of the gaps between digital haves and have nots,

      It's hard to think that every individual doesn't have access to a computer in this technological based world.

    6. Some cities, such as Tempe, Arizona, charge users a fee

      I wonder why they charge a fee while other communities don't?

    7. Children and youths do indeed know more about these new media environments than most parents and teachers.

      "Generation gap"

    8. Beck and Wade conclude that gamers were more open to taking risks and engaging in competition but also more open to collaborating with others

      A huge benefit from playing video games.

    9. even if sometimes only through the “second lives” offered by massively multiplayer games or online fan communities.

      "Second lives" communities such as the Sims have a huge fan base following.

    10. young people who create and circulate their own media are more likely to respect the intellectual property rights of others because they feel a greater stake in the cultural economy.13

      Agree 110%. You never put a thought into respecting others work online until your own is copied without permission.

    11. Informal learning communities can evolve to respond to short-term needs and temporary interests

      Kids might be more interested in learning if they can see short term goals in the near future. Long term goals are usually frustrating to have to wait for and kids may become discouraged.

    12. While formal education is often conservative, the informal learning within popular culture is often experi-mental.

      Experiments lead to success and failures. Both of these results help students learn.

    13. affinity spaces,”10 and explores why people learn more, participate more actively, and engage more deeply with popular culture than they do with the contents of their textbooks.

      Reading straight from a textbook is boring. Being hands on and involved will help students flourish.

    14. Our goals should be to encourage youths to develop the skills, knowledge, ethical frameworks, and self-con-fidence needed to be full participants in contemporary culture.

      We need to revamp our education system in the United States if we ever want to meet these goals.

    15. Yet these activities become widespread only if the culture supports them

      I think that technology fluency needs to be recognized, supported, and taught in schools.

    16. black hole that consumes resources that might be better devoted to traditional classroom activities (in the more critical version).

      Computers are either seen as one extreme or the other. Black box of magic vs. black hole of despair.

    17. Historically, we have valued creative writing or art classes not only because they help to identify and train future writers and artists, but also because the creative process is valuable on its own; every child deserves the chance to express him- or her-self through words, sounds, and images, even if most will never write, perform, or draw professionally.

      I love this. I was always more interested in creative writing, history, and the arts then I ever was in science or math. However, I was told I would never get a job so I decided to go to school to be a nurse of all things.... no wonder I changed my major!

    18. The study also does not include even more widespread practices, such as computer or video gaming, that can require an extensive focus on constructing and performing as fictional personas.

      Video games are always seen in a bad light. However, if used correctly, I think video games can be extremely educational.

    19. The Pew researchers found no significant dif-ferences in participation by race or ethnicity

      "Love is blind." Anyone, regardless of where they are from or what they look like, can use the Internet. It doesn't discriminate.

    20. a media creator is someone who has created a blog or Web page; posted original artwork, photography, stories, or videos online; or remixed online content into their own new creations.

      With the usage of sites such as Tumblr, all of my friends and myself included, can be considered a media creators.

    21. Indeed, many of these youths were frustrated with school; some dropped out

      Many students need an outlet, for many the Internet is that for them.

    22. —learning how to campaign and govern; how to read, write, edit, and defend civil liberties; how to pro-gram computers and run a business; how to make a movie and find distribution

      All of these skills were learned by the usage of online games and the Internet. Many schools don't even teach students some of these points.

    23. the Firefox Web browser was born

      Shocking to see that Firefox was created from the mind of a 14 year old. Technology sees no age barriers.

    24. Heather Lawver was 14 years old. She wanted to help other young people improve their reading and writing skills, so she established an online publication with a staff of more than 100 people across the world.

      People have instant access to people all over the world with the use of the Internet.

    25. The Sims Online

      One of my favorite childhood games! Loved being able to choose my own destiny.

    26. Yet many young people seem willing to lie to access those communities.

      It is so easy for youths to simply put they are of age to engage in adult orientated activities online. Alas, I am seeing many adults who simply allow youths to engage in this activity. e.g. Parents buying mature rated video games for their underage child and allowing them to participate in online gaming communities meant for adult gamers with adult themes and language.

    27. Young people are creating new modes of expression that are poorly understood by adults, and as a result they receive little to no guidance or supervision

      New "leet speak" is getting created almost daily. It's almost like a secret type of chatting that adults and teachers need to be up to speed with in order to guide students and youths on the web.

    28. Yet Schrier was surprised by another phenomenon: the young people took the game’s representation of historical evidence at face value, acting as if all of the information in the game were authentic.

      I've heard of this happening with games like Assassin's Creed

    29. Even if these opportunities were not for-mally valued by our educational institutions or listed on a resume when applying for a job, the skills and self-confidence gathered by moving across all of these online communities surely would manifest themselves in other ways, offering yet another leg up to youths on one side and another disadvantage to youths on the opposite side of the participation gap

      Definitely why we should close the tech opportunity gap with youths...

    30. There are three core flaws with the laissez-faire approach. The first is that it does not address the fundamental inequalities in young people’s access to new media technologies and the opportunities for participation they represent (what we call the participation gap). The second is that it assumes that children are actively reflecting on their media experiences and thus can articulate what they learn from their participation (the transparency problem). The third is that it assumes children, on their own, can develop the ethical norms needed to cope with a com-plex and diverse social environment online (the ethics challenge).

      1st) Fairfield county is a great example of this: Children in Greenwich have the latest tech in class (heard they are even given take home iPads); while children in Bridgeport are lucky to even get a projector in class.

      2nd) Children just "go with the flow" when it comes to tech and the web. They post and read post without any real take-back from what they are reading.

      3rd) The web can be a creepy and scary place for children. It can also be a hub of bullying for youths. Many children are still realizing the consequences of their online activity.

    31. The first is that it does not address the fundamental inequalities in young people’s access to new media technologies and the opportunities for participation they represent (what we call the participation gap). The second is that it assumes that children are actively reflecting on their media experiences and thus can articulate what they learn from their participation (the transparency problem). The third is that it assumes children, on their own, can develop the ethical norms needed to cope with a com-plex and diverse social environment online (the ethics challenge).

      1st) Fairfield County is a perfect example. Children in Greenwich have better tech in class rooms and at home (heard a rumor they are getting issued iPads); while the children in Bridgeport are lucky to get a projector in the class.

      2nd) Most children just "go with the flow" when it comes to tech or social media. There is little reflection on what they read or post at times.

      3rd) The web can be a creepy and scary place for children. It can also be a hub of bullying activity for youths. Most youths are still figuring out the consequences of what they post or read online.

    32. will be able to collaborate better with people from diverse cultural backgrounds.

      Cultural backgrounds are nil when it comes to reaching a goal or accomplishing an objective in the gaming world. I'm glad that this mindset is also being applied to the "real" world...

    33. Beck and Wade conclude that gamers were more open to taking risks and engaging in competition but also more open to collaborating with others and more willing to revise earlier assumptions.

      About 90% of the guys I served with in the USMC were (and still are) gamers... And we def are some risk taking, competitive guys...

    34. Yet the new par-ticipatory culture offers many opportunities for youths to engage in civic debates, participate in community life, and even become political leaders

      This reminds me of a photo I saw circulating my FB feed a few years back... (not that I am endorsing this particular political party... Just goes well with this passage...) Image Description

    35. David Buckingham argues that young people’s lack of interest in news and their disconnection from politics reflects their per-ception of disempowerment.

      I like this statement! We can't blame society for our feelings of disempowerment when we don't take the time to become somewhat literate and verse in news and politics.

      "An illiterate country is easy to deceive..."

    36. Informal learning communities can evolve to respond to short-term needs and temporary interests, whereas the institu-tions supporting public education have changed little despite decades of school reform. Informal learning communities are ad hoc and localized; formal educational communities are bureaucratic and increasingly national in scope. We can move in and out of informal learning communities if they fail to meet our needs; we enjoy no such mobility in our relations to formal education.

      I see this as:

      Informal = fun, more learning happening, good for the community, easy to access and easy to change

      Formal = boring, bureaucratic, rigid

    37. A focus on expanding access to new technologies carries us only so far if we do not also foster the skills and cultural knowledge necessary to deploy those tools toward our own ends.

      The Arab Spring is a great example of this...

      Revolutions through the use of technologies! Image Description

    38. black hole that consumes resources that might be better devoted to traditional classroom activities (in the more critical version).

      Like I stated before, this was the mindset of the 90's. I hear from current educators that more tech classes and tech related activities used in classrooms now, but that they are still looked at as taking less precedence to good ole' books, paper and pen...

    39. Not every member must contribute, but all must believe they are free to contribute and that what they contribute will be appropriately valued.

      A valuable lesson for future educators!

    40. Too often neglected, except as a source of risk, these communication and entertainment–focused activities, by contrast with the information-focused uses at the centre of public and policy agendas, are driving emerging media literacy.

      Saw this is some of the other student's blog posts. There seems to be a concern of some sort on what youths posts, publish and share on the web. Though, rightfully so... It'll be our jobs as educators to "teach them the ways" when it comes to the web and technology so they can steer clear of the risks...

      Teach them we must...

      Image Description

    41. The study also does not include even more widespread practices, such as computer or video gaming, that can require an extensive focus on constructing and performing as fictional personas.

      Growing up in the 90's, almost all my teachers (as well as many adults in my life) always talked badly about gaming. Like it was going to poison our youth or something...

      Funny how the average age of today's gamer is 35 years old [http://www.theesa.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/ESA-Essential-Facts-2015.pdf]

    42. Nor did it count other forms of creative expression and appropria-tion, such as music sampling in the hip-hop community.

      Might explain why urban youths are somewhat more likely than their suburban or rural counterparts to be media creators...

    43. Indeed, many of these youths were frustrated with school; some dropped out and others chose to graduate early. They developed much of their skill and knowledge through their participation in the informal learning communi-ties of fans and gamers.

      Brilliant teens who became bored/frustrated with the draconian rubrics of school and took to their tech communities in order to become successful.

      And the establishment is always hating on video games...

    44. This research suggests some tendency to read “professional” sites as more credible than “amateur” mate-rials, although students lack a well-developed set of standards for distinguishing between the two.

      I believe I understand how to distinguish "professional" and "amateur" materials; I usually use sites from an .edu website or even a library database compared to using community based webpages like wikipedia because anyone can write information in the page.

    45. Ex-panding access to computers will help bridge some of the gaps between digital haves and have nots,

      I have recently saw newly hired teachers make a gofundme.com page in raising money in purchasing new technologies for the students such as iPads because they actually use programs to better educate students.

    46. Children and youths do indeed know more about these new media environments than most parents and teachers.

      it sure seems like the younger the youth, the more they understand new media environments such as my 6 year old 2nd cousin knowing how to maneuver an iPad and IPhone better than me

    47. David Buckingham argues that young people’s lack of interest in news and their disconnection from politics reflects their per-ception of disempowerment.

      I have never really been interested in politics anyways because it just confuses the hell out of me, but I do attempt to follow news.

    48. While formal education is often conservative, the informal learning within popular culture is often experi-mental.

      informal learning makes me believe that it's more hands on compared to simply reading and writing things being discussed

    49. Participants in the beta-reading process learn both by receiving feedback on their own work and by giving feedback to others, creating an ideal peer-to-peer learn-ing community

      I wonder, is this what we are supposed to be doing to one another's blog?

    50. In fact, urban youths (40 percent) are somewhat more likely than their suburban (28 per-cent) or rural (38 percent) counterparts to be media creators. Girls aged 15–17 (27 percent) are more likely than boys their age (17 percent) to be involved with blogging or other social activities online.

      the world wide web is availble to all people, who are prepaired to share there work on a global scale

    51. more than half of all American teens—and 57 percent of teens who use the Internet—could be consid-ered media creators

      where living in a time were our generation has the most powerful tool created by man, in the form a flip opened square which gives us access to so many other greater tools to create music, art, literture, etc

    52. Participatory culture is emerging as the culture absorbs and responds to the explosion of new media technologies that make it possible for average consumers to archive, annotate, appropriate, and recirculate media content in powerful new ways.

      participatory culture is like a domino effect; usually when a person in my friend group recommends an app, for the most part, the app is then downloaded among the rest of the group.

    53. The tools available to a culture matter, but what that cul-ture chooses to do with those tools matters more.

      tools are made everyday, but it really depends on how people interpret it to make people use or not use it. That's how I feel like how things have always been like fashion trends for example. You can go with the last new hairdo, or you can do what you want.

    54. Rather than dealing with each technology in isolation, we would do better to take an ecological approach, thinking about the interrelationship among different communication technol-ogies, the cultural communities that grow up around them, and the activities they support.

      People criticize the use of technology, but I open my arms to what it can actually offer me and others in society.

    55. every child deserves the chance to express him- or her-self through words, sounds, and images, even if most will never write, perform, or draw professionally.

      I am an arts and crafts coordinator at a day camp during the summer so I make sure I to remind the children everyday that they choose whatever they want their project's look to be, because it's their chance to interpret themselves individually, artistically

    56. One-third of teens share what they create online with others, 22 percent have their own Web sites, 19 percent blog, and 19 percent remix online content

      I would never think I'd become part of these percentages before starting this class.

    1. it sure seems like the younger the youth, the more they understand new media environments such as my 6 year old 2nd cousin knowing how to maneuver an iPad and IPhone better than me

      I agree most of my swimmers know more about my phone then I do. If I leave it sitting on a chair and a swim meet and it isn't locked I usually find all my information changes. They are like mini tech ninjas.

    1. eschewed privacy

      What does eschewed privacy mean?

    2. they wish to avoid paternalistic adults who use safety and protection as an excuse to monitor their everyday sociality

      In some cases, paternalistic adults use safety and protection as safety and protection. It is not to say that there is no curiosity, but some parents are looking out for the people on the other side of their children's screens.

    3. I could portray myself as the person that I wanted to be. I took on fictitious identities in an effort to figure out who I was.

      These fictitious identities may not be all that fictitious. If you are portraying yourself as a different person, the person you want to be, then will you eventually turn out to be that person? Or if you already have that idea of the person you want to be, then somewhere along the way did you grow to be that person?

    4. He doesn’t want to ostracize her on Facebook,

      A more reasonable approach would not to address her on Facebook, but perhaps, face to face with his sister, or even a direct message to only her.

    5. As a result, the imagined audience defines the social context. In choosing how to present themselves before dis-connected and invisible audiences, people must attempt to resolve context collapses or actively define the context in which they’re operating

      Yes. Makes sense. How is one going to connect with the people that matter, if one does not know who they think matters.

    6. He used a different style of speaking when he addressed white political leaders than when he addressed southern black congregations.

      Reminds me of Ebonics and how that was a big issue with education and schools with funding as another language.

    7. A context collapse occurs when people are forced to grapple simultaneously with otherwise unrelated social contexts that are rooted in different norms and seemingly demand different social responses.

      Seems difficult for these "diverse audiences" to understand that the 'norms' were just as ridiculous as their thought processes to conceive that their high school teacher was some sort of teetotaler. By realizing that a person is human and not idealizing them in any sort of way, gives them the respect that the person deserve as a human being.

    8. Im not sure I can agree with the statement that "technology doesn't change anything important" because technology has already changed so much in the world and we see what it can do.

    9. Everyone wants to be understood

    10. People don't seem to listen to teen or youth voices but sometimes they are the ones that have the best point of view or the best ideas. You never know what will come of it unless you lend a listening ear.

    11. To teens, these technologies—and the properties that go with them—are just an obvious part of life in a networked era, whereas for many adults these affordances reveal changes that are deeply disconcerting.

      Social media has always been a part of the lives of most teens today making it seem more natural and comfortable. Adults, however find social media to be disconcerting because its a new part of communication that is being introduced into their lives.

    12. What Skyler meant is simply that social acceptance depends on the ability to socialize with one’s peers at the “cool” place. Each cohort of teens has a differ-ent space that it decides is cool.

      MySpace was Skyler's and her peers' meeting spot. Much like FB today... Tell someone you don't have FB and be prepared to looked at oddly.

    13. In 2006, seventeen-year-old Bly Lauritano-Werner wrote a piece for Youth Radio

      Here is the piece by Bly Lauritano-Werner

    14. arguing that social norms around privacy have changed in order to justify their own business decisions regard-ing user privacy.

      Yes us giving up our privacy in content silos like facebook or advertising networks like Google is very profitable.

    15. As British sociologist Paul Willis argued in the 1980s, when youth attempt to change their socioeconomic standing, they often risk alienating their home community

      The idea that one should be able to change their social standing is embedded in our society but it puts them into a different, "transitional" group, no longer equals to the original group and not yet equals to a new group.

    16. In most cases where people share to maintain privacy, they do because they do not want someone to have power over them.

      that's just disturbing that someone would actually attempt to have power over someone rather than worry about themselves.

    17. tchotchkes

      as embarrassing as it sounds, I had no idea that this is how you spelled tchotchkes and I've used it so much.

    18. Some admitted to using this freedom in problematic or destructive ways—recounting acts of ganging up on girls whom they deemed annoying or using a combination of wits and trickery to manipulate Facebook administrators into providing data.

      all i am reading is cyberbulling

    19. may be amusing to watch Kramer face embarrassment when he and George accidentally run into Kramer’s mother on Seinfeld,

      not may be, but it is amusing watching Kramer's face and body movements basically with anything he does besides running into his mother with George

    20. it’s easy to get lost in the back-and-forth on Twitter.

      especially when there's a fight between celebrities or even people in my town Image Description

    21. Journalists, parents, and technologists seem to believe that a willingness to share in public spaces—and, most certainly, any act of exhibitionism and publicity—is incompatible with a desire for personal privacy

      there are certain blogs on tumblr dedicated to this sort of thing. girls and guys run blogs and post photos of themselves wearing less than what is thought to be acceptable for the internet, but they never post anything with their face. so yes they are being exhibitionists, but they still want some degree of privacy by not letting people know what they actually look like.

    22. prompting parents to fret over conversations that adults deem inappropriate or when teens share “TMI” (too much information)

      kids may view this as annoying at the time but if viewed from the parental aspect theyre only looking out for their children and making sure they way they represent themselves online doesnt leave a bad image for the rest of the family

    23. In an effort to learn more about him, the committee members Googled him. They found his MySpace profile. It was filled with gang symbolism, crass language, and references to gang activities. They recoiled.

      A prime example of how employers, or even academic institutions, will Google you when you apply.

    24. What the drive-in was to teens in the 1950s and the mall in the 1980s, Facebook, texting, Twitter, instant messaging, and other social media are to teens now.

      The changing of times through tech!

    25. But they also track celebrities like Kanye West and Kim Kardashian to imagine the freedoms they would have if they were famous.

      Scary thought!

    26. The internet presented me with a bigger world, a world populated by people who shared my idiosyncratic interests and were ready to discuss them at any time, day or night.

      I have heard the "birth" of the internet being discussed as the 2nd Global Exchange in some sorts (the Columbian Exchange being the 1st)...

    27. It used to be the mall, but for the youth discussed in this book, social network sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram are the cool places. Inevitably, by the time this book is published, the next generation of teens will have inhab-ited a new set of apps and tools, making social network sites feel passé. The spaces may change, but the organizing principles aren’t different.

      Such great metaphors in regards to "cool hangout spots" that teens frequent. Teens want to gather an express themselves socially. Gathering spots used to be malls, movie theaters, etc. in order to congregate and socialize.

      The new "malls" are social media sites... The new "movie theaters"... Netflix...

    28. I had spent my own teen years online, and I was among the first generation of teens who did so. But that was a different era; few of my friends in the early 1990s were interested in computers at all.

      Total opposite in my own life... Remember being with friends at a peer's house and getting excited that his family was getting the "new cable modem" that just came out and changing over from 56k dial up...

    29. So many people talk about youth engagement with social media, but very few of them are willing to take the time to listen to teens, to hear them, or to pay attention to what they have to say about their lives,

      Totally agree with this statement! Many older generations tend to criticize or negatively critique the teens' social media habits. Yet, they are failing to realize that a teen's social media engagement is in actuality almost always a subtle representation of that teen's self...

    30. I’ve met les-bian, gay, and transgendered teens who extensively share to appear straight so that people don’t ask about their sexuality, and I’ve met abused teens who tell extravagant stories about their lives so that no one asks what’s really happening at home.

      It's sad that these teens need to falsely represent who they are because they are scared of the repercussion from their peers.

    31. “subtweeting,” to refer to the practice of encoding tweets to render them meaningless to clueless outsiders

      Most commonly used to call people out on a situation without actually tagging them in the post. Still creates drama.

    32. journalists often referred to this application in the same breath as sexting or the sharing of inappro-priate sexual images.

      Sure, I bet some teens do use Snapchat to share nude photos of themselves but assuming that ALL teens only use the app for this purpose is ridiculous.

    33. Teens do think through the social cost to what they post, but they don’t always get it right

      Neither do adults. I've seen plenty of vulgar posts by adults across all social media platforms regardless of their age.

    34. Linda Tripp’s decision to record Monica Lewinsky’s confession and paparazzi using long-range cam-eras to capture celebrities from afar.

      Both complete violations of privacy.

    35. perhaps this young man is simply including gang signals on his MySpace profile as a survival technique.

      An individual's "front stage" and "back stage" appearances can vary due to who they are surrounded by or who they are trying to impress. Their "front stage" persona may not reflect their inner beliefs at all.

    36. I came to realize that, taken out of context, what teens appear to do and say on social media seems peculiar if not outright problematic

      Social media, like any type of communication not done face to face, can be misinterpreted.

    37. Many teens complain about parents who look over their shoulders when they’re on the computer or friends who copy and paste updates and forward them along.

      Teens seem to be worried about their appearances online however they tend to overshare information about themselves to their "intended" audience without a second thought.

    38. it’s often hard to remem-ber that viewers who aren’t commenting might also be watching

      Just because someone didn't comment on a social media post doesn't mean they didn't see it.

    39. Because social media often brings together multiple social con-texts, teens struggle to effectively manage social norms

      Social media seems to exemplify the hardships of the already turbulent teenage years - teens now have to try to "fit in" in person with their peers and also online.

    40. because he wants to have control over a given social situation

      Having control over social media interactions with others online is an uneasy task since the other person can control what they want to say about you on your own posts.

    41. Turkle was critical of some people’s attempts to use fictitious iden-tities to harm others,

      Term "Catfishing"

    42. ree people of the burdens of their “material”—or physically embodied—identities, enabling them to become a better version of themselves

      I disagree. I think people make themselves look different online than they are in their everyday lives to impress their audience.

    43. they are whimsical responses to sites’ requirement to provide a login handle

      Most individuals don't purposely deceive others by choosing a username other than their first and last name. Sometimes the site has certain requirements for usernames and more than not the username one prefers is already taken.

    44. Facebook was the primary place where friend groups collide. Other services—like Tumblr or Twitter—were more commonly used by teens who were carving out their place in interest-driven communities.1

      Facebook creates a divide between groups while Twitter and Tumblr creates interest-based group environments.

    45. relished the anonymous norms of the site

      People like being anonymous.

    46. teens responded to social media sites’ requests for information by providing inaccurate information that actually contains meaningful signals about friendship and sociality.

      The information the teens provide is inaccurate but has a meaning behind it. This doesn't mean they are being dishonest with stating their best friend is their sister on Facebook.

    47. Instead, they’re simply refusing to play by the rules of self-presentation as defined by these sites.

      Teens are rebellious in nature and will do so in real life and on their social media platforms.

    48. In doing so, they ignore teens’ privacy while undermining their struggles to manage their identity

      It is hard for adults to comprehend the vast world of social media as teenagers because it wasn't created yet when they were young.

    49. given and what is given off. In other words, what we convey to others is a matter of what we choose to share in order to make a good impression and also what we unintentionally reveal as a byproduct of who we are and how we react to others.

      "front stage" vs. "back stage" actions

    50. They may want to be seen as cool among their peers, even if adults would deem their behav-ior inappropriate.

      Image is everything.

    51. Teens who try to manage context collapses by segregating information often suf-fer when that information crosses boundaries

      It is extremely difficult in today's society to try and keep two completely separate personas on one social media account.

    52. They have long seen revealing clothing as an indica-tor of teens’ rejection of privac

      Revealing clothing and revealing social media posts outrage parents.

    53. The idea that teens share too much—and therefore don’t care about privacy—is now so entrenched in public discourse that research showing that teens do desire privacy and work to get it is often ignored by the media.

      The media often seems to underestimate teens and their ability to grasp basic concepts such as privacy.

    54. Mean-while, technology executives like Facebook’s founder Mark Zucker-berg and Google chairman Eric Schmidt reinforce the notion that today’s teens are different

      Every generation of teenagers will differ by how they were influenced by society and media as a whole.

    55. generational disconnect

      A perfect term for the issue.

    56. What’s at stake is not whether someone can listen in but whether one should

      I think everyone thinks about this. Is it respectful to act like you're not listening into a conversation when in fact you actually are?

    57. she thinks that everything online is bad, and you seem to get it, and you’re an adult.

      Many individuals born in the technological revolution of the late 1990s and early 2000s seem to think that older adults, especially their own parents, have no knowledge of the online world.

    58. privacy is always rooted in context

      Isn't everything?

    59. The ability to understand how context, audience, and identity inter-sect is one of the central challenges people face in learning how to navigate social media.

      that's basically making assumptions on people just based on what you see on the outside instead of knowing what they are feeling and thinking inside, which is wrong on all levels.

    60. Without knowing the teen, my guess was that he was genuine in his college essay. At the same time, I also suspected that he would never dare talk about his desire to go to a prestigious institution in his neighborhood because doing so would cause him to be ostracized socially, if not physically attacked.

      extremely hard to choose a side so as of now, still indecisive.

    61. as adults have started participating in social media and, especially, Facebook.

      not my mother, she thinks Facebook is the "devil," hahaha

    62. For Heather, social media is not only a tool; it is a social lifeline that enables her to stay connected to people she cares about but can-not otherwise interact with in person.

      I have the same opinion of social media as Heather because as time goes on, people go their ways and I want to stay in touch and without their personal info, it can difficult to do so. Social media assists me letting me know people's current situation instead of hearing it in a gossip form.

    63. AIM screen names either,

      perfect example of throwback thursday

    64. They may want to be seen as cool among their peers, even if adults would deem their behav-ior inappropriate.

      by the time children reach middle school they care less and less about what mommy and daddy think and crave the attention, opinions and acceptance from their peers

    65. Teens’ determination to set their own agenda can be nerve-racking for some parents, particularly those who want to protect their children from every possible danger. Coming of age is rife with self-determination, risk taking, and tough decision-making.

      parents' need to read this quote to understand that teens do all these things to grow up like they did when they were younger but why is it so hard for them to understand?

    66. . Most teens are not compelled by gadgetry as such—they are compelled by friendship.

      gadgets are fun and all but I do believe that friendship does fuel the use of gadgetry.

    67. Teens continue to occupy an awkward position between childhood and adulthood, dependence and independence. They are struggling to carve out an identity that is not defined solely by family ties. They want to be recognized as someone other than son, daughter, sister, or brother. These struggles play themselves out in familiar ways, as teens fight for freedoms while not always being willing or able to accept responsibilities. Teens simultaneously love and despise, need and reject their parents and other adults in their lives. Meanwhile, many adults are simultaneously afraid of teens and afraid for them.

      this whole paragraph is so true in my eyes. it explains fully the struggles of teens and the issues adults deal with that pertain to those teens.

    68. They felt that ano-nymity gave them a sense of freedom they didn’t feel they could have on sites for which constructing an identity

      being anonymous gives someone freedom, but it also provides protection from being embarrassed or being made fun of, or even liking something that people dont normally like. for example on tumblr people can ask blogs questions on anon to get an answer without getting hate from other blogs or being embarrassed about asking that blog that question

    69. A popular T-shirt designed by John Slabyk and sold on the website Threadless sums up the disillusionment with failed technological utopias:they lied to usthis was supposed to be the futurewhere is my jetpack,where is my robotic companion,where is my dinner in pill form,where is my hydrogen fueled automobile,where is my nuclear-powered levitating house,where is my cure for this disease

      that's actually hilarious

    70. The Walkman music player was viewed as an evil device that would encourage people to disappear into separate worlds, unable to communicate with one another.11

      I believe that walkmans and iPods defiantly give people a "walking soundtrack" which is rude because how can people ask simple questions and requests when people can't hear what they are saying due to the lack of attention to the world right in front of them. At least be courteous and put the volume to a level where you can listen to the music while engaging in what the world has to say.

    71. Search engines make it easy to surface esoteric interac-tions.

      that's why search engines can be dangerous

    72. How they interact and with whom they interact in the school lunchroom is different than at afterschool music lessons than via group text messaging services.

      interacting with so many different people can create different types of dialogue between each of these groups. One's musically inclined friends will know what tonguing it on the triplets means whereas their other friends could be totally lost

    73. many adults fear networked technologies for the same reasons that adults have long been wary of teen participation in public life and teen socialization in parks, malls, and other sites where youth congregate.

      understandable but most times, teens use their tech as a resource more than anything else

    74. he only wants his family to stop “embarrass-ing” him.

      felt the same exact way when my mom added me on facebook and instagram and twitter in middle school. i didnt want her monitoring my internet interactions at all.

    75. Rather than being seen as a subcultural practice, participat-ing in social media became normative.

      social media really did become a norm

    76. When social media sites offer streams of content—as is common on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram—people often imagine their audience to be the people they’re following

      on instagram their is a "discover or popular page" in which anyone can view your posts. they usually are posted to the page based on what other people you follow are liking or what other people in your area are liking.

    77. Yet, on Facebook, this has proven to be intrac-table and confusing, given the complex and constantly changing pri-vacy settings on that site.

      posting something on facebook and tagging someone in that post enables it to be posted to their wall, and anyone who's friends with them but not with you is able to view, like, and comment on that post as well.

    78. When teens interact with social media, they must regularly contend with collapsed contexts and invisible audiences as a part of everyday life.4

      after high school many of my friends and myself added a few of our favorite teachers on Facebook. the collapsed context happens when you post something intended to be for your friends to view but they comment or like and you instantly become embarrassed because you forgot you added them and you once viewed them as a figure of authority

    79. Friendster, in particular, was designed as a matchmaking service. I

      the early Tinder

    80. ols like email, instant messaging, and online forums are still used by teens. B

      i'd say email is used the most out of three

    81. eens turn to a plethora of popular services to socialize, gossip, share information, and hang out.

      beyond true

    82. “If you’re not on MySpace, you don’t exist.”

      such a typical quote about social media

    83. I had met, perhaps he imagined the audience of his MySpace profile to be his classmates, family, and community—not the college admissions committee.

      which context for which audience should one be speaking in? depending on the audience one would speak a certain way saying certain phrases or words that they wouldn't say in any other context. for example speaking in class one wouldn't use slang like they would with their friends.

    84. As in many schools I’ve visited over the years, friendships at this school in Nashville were largely defined by race, gender, sexuality, and grade level, and those networks were immediately visible based on whom students were talking to or sitting with. By and large, the students were cordoned off in their own section on the sides of the stands while parents and more “serious” fans occupied the seats in the center.

      sounds very similar to my high school football or other sporting events

    85. how little things change. I’m guessing a lot of the drama is still the same, it’s just the format is a little differ-ent. It’s just changing the font and changing the background color really.”

      this reminds me of life as well from when you were a teen to early-mid 20's; life still happens with drama but it's just the way things are perceived that's different

    86. the more things had changed, the more they seemed the same.

      very interesting line

    87. déjà vu

      literally get deja vu all the time

    88. 2005 to 2012

      7 years of fuel adds up...jeez louise

    89. she thinks that everything online is bad, and you seem to get it, and you’re an adult.

      being a 90's born, I relate to how he thinks his parents believe the internet is bad to use but compared to 2006 to currently now, my parens came around to the internet and use it frequently