1,133 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2018
    1. A U.S. poll featured on the National Institutes of Health website suggests that children who go to bed earlier also sleep longer.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Correlation

      Highlight:

      A U.S. poll featured on the National Institutes of Health website suggests that children who go to bed earlier also sleep longer.

    2. Analyzing the sleep and lifestyle data they collected, researchers found that children with early bedtimes—those asleep by 8:30 p.m.—had “better health-related quality of life.” And their moms had improved mental health, too.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Correlation

      Highlight:

      Analyzing the sleep and lifestyle data they collected, researchers found that children with early bedtimes—those asleep by 8:30 p.m.—had “better health-related quality of life.” And their moms had improved mental health, too.

    3. Analyzing the sleep and lifestyle data they collected, researchers found that children with early bedtimes—those asleep by 8:30 p.m.—had “better health-related quality of life.” And their moms had improved mental health, too.

      CredCo Indicator:Inference - Type of Claims

      Question:Is a general or singular causal claim made? Highlight the section(s) that supports your answer.

      Answer:General Causal Claim

      Highlight:

      Analyzing the sleep and lifestyle data they collected, researchers found that children with early bedtimes—those asleep by 8:30 p.m.—had “better health-related quality of life.” And their moms had improved mental health, too.

    4. CredCo Indicator:Tone - Exaggerated Claims

      Question:Does the author exaggerate any claims? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    5. Nobody seems to get enough, and the struggle is daily.

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Sort of

      Highlight:

      Nobody seems to get enough, and the struggle is daily.

    6. Yikes!

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Sort of

      Highlight:

      Yikes!

    7. But whatever you choose to incorporate into your bedtime routine, know that a regular routine can set you and your child up for success.

      CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Naturalistic

      Question:Does the author suggest that something is good because it is natural, or bad because it is not natural (the naturalistic fallacy)?

      Answer:Sort of

      Highlight:

      But whatever you choose to incorporate into your bedtime routine, know that a regular routine can set you and your child up for success.

    8. According to the National Sleep Foundation, the blue light emitted from screens can delay the release of sleep-inducing melatonin, increase alertness and reset the body’s internal clock to a later schedule.

      CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Naturalistic

      Question:Does the author suggest that something is good because it is natural, or bad because it is not natural (the naturalistic fallacy)?

      Answer:Sort of

      Highlight:

      According to the National Sleep Foundation, the blue light emitted from screens can delay the release of sleep-inducing melatonin, increase alertness and reset the body’s internal clock to a later schedule.

    9. [Chart titled, “At what time should your child go to bed” with wake up times, ages 5-12, and sleeping times]

      CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Naturalistic

      Question:Does the author suggest that something is good because it is natural, or bad because it is not natural (the naturalistic fallacy)?

      Answer:Sort of

      Highlight:

      [Chart titled, “At what time should your child go to bed” with wake up times, ages 5-12, and sleeping times]

    10. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Appeal to Fear

      Question:Does the author exaggerate the dangers of a situation and use scare tactics to persuade (the appeal to fear fallacy)?

      Answer:No

    11. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Slippery Slope

      Question:Does the author say that one small change will lead to a major change (use a slippery slope argument)? Highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    12. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - False Dilemma

      Question:Does the author present a complicated choice as if it were binary (construct a false dilemma)? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    13. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Straw Man

      Question:Does the author present the counterargument as a weaker, more foolish version of the real counterargument (use a Straw Man Argument)? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    14. CredCo Indicator:Confidence - Acknowledge Uncertainty

      Question:Do they acknowledge uncertainty or the possibility that things might be otherwise? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    15. CredCo Indicator:Confidence - Extent Claims Justified

      Question:To what extent does their confidence in their claims seem justified?

      Answer:Somewhat justified

    16. National Sleep Foundation,

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Organizations

      Question:Highlight each organization cited:

      Answer:Cited Organization 1

      Highlight:

      National Sleep Foundation,

    17. A U.S. poll featured on the National Institutes of Health website suggests that children who go to bed earlier also sleep longer.

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 2

      Highlight:

      A U.S. poll featured on the National Institutes of Health website suggests that children who go to bed earlier also sleep longer.

    18. Growing Up in Australia study, during which researchers tracked thousands of families beginning in 2004. Every two years, these families took part in a series of interviews that allowed researchers to check in on the state of their physical and mental health.

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 1

      Highlight:

      Growing Up in Australia study, during which researchers tracked thousands of families beginning in 2004. Every two years, these families took part in a series of interviews that allowed researchers to check in on the state of their physical and mental health.

    19. Question:Which of the following types of sources are cited in the article? Check all that apply. If Other, please highlight.

      Answer:Organizations

    20. Question:Which of the following types of sources are cited in the article? Check all that apply. If Other, please highlight.

      Answer:Studies

    21. CredCo Indicator:Single Study Article

      Question:Is this article primarily about a single scientific study?

      Answer:No

    22. CredCo Indicator:Clickbait Title

      Question:Is the headline clickbaity?

      Answer:Not at all clickbaity

    23. CredCo Indicator:Title Representativeness

      Question:Question: Does the title of the article accurately reflect the content of the article?

      Answer:Somewhat Representative

    24. Question:Rate your impression of the credibility of this article

      Answer:Medium credibility

    1. CredCo Indicator:Inference - Convincing Evidence

      Question:How convincing do you find the evidence given for the primary claim?

      Answer:Fairly Convincing

    2. "Smoking doesn't seem to blunt the effects of coffee," Gunter said. "It didn't matter whether you smoked or not. There was still a potential beneficial affect of coffee on mortality."

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Experts are cited

      Highlight:

      "Smoking doesn't seem to blunt the effects of coffee," Gunter said. "It didn't matter whether you smoked or not. There was still a potential beneficial affect of coffee on mortality."

    3. "The fact that we saw the same relationships in different countries is kind of the implication that its something about coffee rather than its something about the way that coffee is prepared or the way it's drunk," he said.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Experts are cited

      Highlight:

      "The fact that we saw the same relationships in different countries is kind of the implication that its something about coffee rather than its something about the way that coffee is prepared or the way it's drunk," he said.

    4. People who drank two to four cups a day had an 18% lower risk of death compared with people who did not drink coffee, according to the study. These findings are consistent with previous studies that had looked at majority white populations, said Veronica Wendy Setiawan, associate professor of preventative medicine at USC's Keck School of Medicine, who led the study on nonwhite populations.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Experts are cited

      Highlight:

      People who drank two to four cups a day had an 18% lower risk of death compared with people who did not drink coffee, according to the study. These findings are consistent with previous studies that had looked at majority white populations, said Veronica Wendy Setiawan, associate professor of preventative medicine at USC's Keck School of Medicine, who led the study on nonwhite populations.

    5. "Given these very diverse populations, all these people have different lifestyles. They have very different dietary habits and different susceptibilities -- and we still find similar patterns," Setiawan said.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Experts are cited

      Highlight:

      "Given these very diverse populations, all these people have different lifestyles. They have very different dietary habits and different susceptibilities -- and we still find similar patterns," Setiawan said.

    6. One study surveyed more than 520,000 people in 10 European countries, making it the largest study to date on coffee and mortality, and found that drinking more coffee could significantly lower a person's risk of mortality. The second study was more novel, as it focused on nonwhite populations. After surveying over 185,000 African-Americans, Native Americans, Hawaiians, Japanese-Americans, Latinos and whites, the researchers found that coffee increases longevity across various races.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:An experimental study was conducted (natural experiments OK)

      Highlight:

      One study surveyed more than 520,000 people in 10 European countries, making it the largest study to date on coffee and mortality, and found that drinking more coffee could significantly lower a person's risk of mortality.

      The second study was more novel, as it focused on nonwhite populations. After surveying over 185,000 African-Americans, Native Americans, Hawaiians, Japanese-Americans, Latinos and whites, the researchers found that coffee increases longevity across various races.

    7. "Given these very diverse populations, all these people have different lifestyles. They have very different dietary habits and different susceptibilities -- and we still find similar patterns," Setiawan said.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:The correlation appears across multiple independent contexts

      Highlight:

      "Given these very diverse populations, all these people have different lifestyles. They have very different dietary habits and different susceptibilities -- and we still find similar patterns," Setiawan said.

    8. "The fact that we saw the same relationships in different countries is kind of the implication that its something about coffee rather than its something about the way that coffee is prepared or the way it's drunk," he said.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:The correlation appears across multiple independent contexts

      Highlight:

      "The fact that we saw the same relationships in different countries is kind of the implication that its something about coffee rather than its something about the way that coffee is prepared or the way it's drunk," he said.

    9. In the European study, people who were drinking coffee tended to have lower levels of inflammation, healthier lipid profiles and better glucose control compared with those who weren't.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Correlation

      Highlight:

      In the European study, people who were drinking coffee tended to have lower levels of inflammation, healthier lipid profiles and better glucose control compared with those who weren't.

    10. The study on European countries revealed an inverse association between coffee and liver disease, suicide in men, cancer in women, digestive diseases and circulatory diseases. Those who drank three or more cups a day had a lower risk for all-cause death than people who did not drink coffee.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Correlation

      Highlight:

      The study on European countries revealed an inverse association between coffee and liver disease, suicide in men, cancer in women, digestive diseases and circulatory diseases. Those who drank three or more cups a day had a lower risk for all-cause death than people who did not drink coffee.

    11. The new study shows that there is a stronger biological possibility for the relationship between coffee and longevity and found that mortality was inversely related to coffee consumption for heart disease, cancer, respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes and kidney disease.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Correlation

      Highlight:

      The new study shows that there is a stronger biological possibility for the relationship between coffee and longevity and found that mortality was inversely related to coffee consumption for heart disease, cancer, respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes and kidney disease.

    12. The new study shows that there is a stronger biological possibility for the relationship between coffee and longevity and found that mortality was inversely related to coffee consumption for heart disease, cancer, respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes and kidney disease.

      CredCo Indicator:Inference - Type of Claims

      Question:Is a general or singular causal claim made? Highlight the section(s) that supports your answer.

      Answer:General Causal Claim

      Highlight:

      The new study shows that there is a stronger biological possibility for the relationship between coffee and longevity and found that mortality was inversely related to coffee consumption for heart disease, cancer, respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes and kidney disease.

    13. The study on European countries revealed an inverse association between coffee and liver disease, suicide in men, cancer in women, digestive diseases and circulatory diseases. Those who drank three or more cups a day had a lower risk for all-cause death than people who did not drink coffee.

      CredCo Indicator:Inference - Type of Claims

      Question:Is a general or singular causal claim made? Highlight the section(s) that supports your answer.

      Answer:General Causal Claim

      Highlight:

      The study on European countries revealed an inverse association between coffee and liver disease, suicide in men, cancer in women, digestive diseases and circulatory diseases. Those who drank three or more cups a day had a lower risk for all-cause death than people who did not drink coffee.

    14. CredCo Indicator:Tone - Exaggerated Claims

      Question:Does the author exaggerate any claims? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    15. CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    16. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Naturalistic

      Question:Does the author suggest that something is good because it is natural, or bad because it is not natural (the naturalistic fallacy)?

      Answer:No

    17. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Appeal to Fear

      Question:Does the author exaggerate the dangers of a situation and use scare tactics to persuade (the appeal to fear fallacy)?

      Answer:No

    18. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Slippery Slope

      Question:Does the author say that one small change will lead to a major change (use a slippery slope argument)? Highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    19. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - False Dilemma

      Question:Does the author present a complicated choice as if it were binary (construct a false dilemma)? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    20. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Straw Man

      Question:Does the author present the counterargument as a weaker, more foolish version of the real counterargument (use a Straw Man Argument)? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    21. However, Dr. Alberto Ascherio, professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said people should be wary of this finding. "Even if it was in some way true, it doesn't make sense to me, because by smoking, you increase your mortality several-fold. Then, if you reduce it by 10% drinking coffee, give me a break," said Ascherio, who was not involved in the study.

      CredCo Indicator:Confidence - Acknowledge Uncertainty

      Question:Do they acknowledge uncertainty or the possibility that things might be otherwise? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      However, Dr. Alberto Ascherio, professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said people should be wary of this finding.

      "Even if it was in some way true, it doesn't make sense to me, because by smoking, you increase your mortality several-fold. Then, if you reduce it by 10% drinking coffee, give me a break," said Ascherio, who was not involved in the study.

    22. People who avoid coffee, particularly in places like the US and Europe where drinking the beverage is very common, may do so because they have health problems. Their higher mortality rate could be a result of them being less healthy to begin with.

      CredCo Indicator:Confidence - Acknowledge Uncertainty

      Question:Do they acknowledge uncertainty or the possibility that things might be otherwise? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      People who avoid coffee, particularly in places like the US and Europe where drinking the beverage is very common, may do so because they have health problems. Their higher mortality rate could be a result of them being less healthy to begin with.

    23. CredCo Indicator:Confidence - Extent Claims Justified

      Question:To what extent does their confidence in their claims seem justified?

      Answer:Mostly justified

    24. Studies have shown that certain compounds have neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties that can help reduce risk for illnesses like Parkinson's disease.

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 3

      Highlight:

      Studies have shown that certain compounds have neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties that can help reduce risk for illnesses like Parkinson's disease.

    25. The second study was more novel, as it focused on nonwhite populations. After surveying over 185,000 African-Americans, Native Americans, Hawaiians, Japanese-Americans, Latinos and whites, the researchers found that coffee increases longevity across various races.

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 2

      Highlight:

      The second study was more novel, as it focused on nonwhite populations. After surveying over 185,000 African-Americans, Native Americans, Hawaiians, Japanese-Americans, Latinos and whites, the researchers found that coffee increases longevity across various races.

    26. One study surveyed more than 520,000 people in 10 European countries, making it the largest study to date on coffee and mortality, and found that drinking more coffee could significantly lower a person's risk of mortality.

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 1

      Highlight:

      One study surveyed more than 520,000 people in 10 European countries, making it the largest study to date on coffee and mortality, and found that drinking more coffee could significantly lower a person's risk of mortality.

    27. Dr. Alberto Ascherio, professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health,

      CredCo Indicator:Quotes from Outside Experts

      Question:Highlight each expert cited:

      Answer:Expert 3

      Highlight:

      Dr. Alberto Ascherio, professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health,

    28. Marc Gunter, reader in cancer epidemiology and prevention at Imperial College's School of Public Health in the UK, who co-authored the European study.

      CredCo Indicator:Quotes from Outside Experts

      Question:Highlight each expert cited:

      Answer:Expert 2

      Highlight:

      Marc Gunter, reader in cancer epidemiology and prevention at Imperial College's School of Public Health in the UK, who co-authored the European study.

    29. Veronica Wendy Setiawan, associate professor of preventative medicine at USC's Keck School of Medicine, who led the study on nonwhite populations.

      CredCo Indicator:Quotes from Outside Experts

      Question:Highlight each expert cited:

      Answer:Expert 1

      Highlight:

      Veronica Wendy Setiawan, associate professor of preventative medicine at USC's Keck School of Medicine, who led the study on nonwhite populations.

    30. Question:Which of the following types of sources are cited in the article? Check all that apply. If Other, please highlight.

      Answer:Studies

    31. Question:Which of the following types of sources are cited in the article? Check all that apply. If Other, please highlight.

      Answer:Experts

    32. CredCo Indicator:Single Study Article

      Question:Is this article primarily about a single scientific study?

      Answer:No

    33. CredCo Indicator:Clickbait Title

      Question:Is the headline clickbaity?

      Answer:Not at all clickbaity

    34. CredCo Indicator:Title Representativeness

      Question:Question: Does the title of the article accurately reflect the content of the article?

      Answer:Completely Representative

    35. Question:Rate your impression of the credibility of this article

      Answer:Somewhat high credibility

    1. CredCo Indicator:Inference - Convincing Evidence

      Question:How convincing do you find the evidence given for the primary claim?

      Answer:Not at All Convincing

    2. A couple of years ago, one of the lead HPV vaccine developers for Merck’s Gardasil, Dr. Diane Harper, came clean and warned that Gardasil was not only ineffective and unnecessary, it was dangerous.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Experts are cited

      Highlight:

      A couple of years ago, one of the lead HPV vaccine developers for Merck’s Gardasil, Dr. Diane Harper, came clean and warned that Gardasil was not only ineffective and unnecessary, it was dangerous.

    3. Based on their study, Rail and study co-author Abby Lippman, a McGill University professor emeritus, published an op-ed article in Montreal’s Le Devoir newspaper questioning the safety and benefits of human papillomavirus vaccines.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Experts are cited

      Highlight:

      Based on their study, Rail and study co-author Abby Lippman, a McGill University professor emeritus, published an op-ed article in Montreal’s Le Devoir newspaper questioning the safety and benefits of human papillomavirus vaccines.

    4. Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:The correlation appears across multiple independent contexts

      Highlight:

      Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

    5. The Rail-Lippman four-year study involved 170 parents of teenage girls who were given the HPV shots, which usually are administered sequentially in a series of three.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Cause precedes effect

      Highlight:

      The Rail-Lippman four-year study involved 170 parents of teenage girls who were given the HPV shots, which usually are administered sequentially in a series of three.

    6. Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Cause precedes effect

      Highlight:

      Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

    7. Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

      CredCo Indicator:Inference - Type of Claims

      Question:Is a general or singular causal claim made? Highlight the section(s) that supports your answer.

      Answer:General Causal Claim

      Highlight:

      Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

    8. CredCo Indicator:Tone - Exaggerated Claims

      Question:Does the author exaggerate any claims? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    9. Maybe her pension was threatened, or her family. Who knows?

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      Maybe her pension was threatened, or her family. Who knows?

    10. Offit is a mainstream media darling. Ignore Offit. He’s off it and has made millions with his vaccine patent. And ignore the presstitutes who feed off him.

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      Offit is a mainstream media darling. Ignore Offit. He’s off it and has made millions with his vaccine patent. And ignore the presstitutes who feed off him.

    11. That’s my thought for the average vaccine indoctrinated sheeple. But my thoughts get nastier with the manic frothing-at-the-mouth vaccine fanatics, and downright vicious with the vaccine industry and its celebrated spokesman Dr. Paul Offit.

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      That’s my thought for the average vaccine indoctrinated sheeple. But my thoughts get nastier with the manic frothing-at-the-mouth vaccine fanatics, and downright vicious with the vaccine industry and its celebrated spokesman Dr. Paul Offit.

    12. pro-vaccine hysteria criticism,

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      pro-vaccine hysteria criticism,

    13. Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

    14. Oh, of course statistics provided by pro-vaccine agencies and Big Pharma were included in the National Post article that “prove” HPV vaccine’s efficacy and safety.

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      Oh, of course statistics provided by pro-vaccine agencies and Big Pharma were included in the National Post article that “prove” HPV vaccine’s efficacy and safety.

    15. Of course they were roundly attacked through the Canadian mainstream media.

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      Of course they were roundly attacked through the Canadian mainstream media.

    16. The mainstream media piled on with remarks from the usual “prestigious” medical professionals who asserted HPV vaccinations safety and remarkable success at reducing ovarian cancer.

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      The mainstream media piled on with remarks from the usual “prestigious” medical professionals who asserted HPV vaccinations safety and remarkable success at reducing ovarian cancer.

    17. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Naturalistic

      Question:Does the author suggest that something is good because it is natural, or bad because it is not natural (the naturalistic fallacy)?

      Answer:No

    18. And unbound or free aluminum, the stuff used in almost all vaccines, is a neurological toxin.

      CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Appeal to Fear

      Question:Does the author exaggerate the dangers of a situation and use scare tactics to persuade (the appeal to fear fallacy)?

      Answer:Sort of

      Highlight:

      And unbound or free aluminum, the stuff used in almost all vaccines, is a neurological toxin.

    19. Maybe her pension was threatened, or her family. Who knows?

      CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Appeal to Fear

      Question:Does the author exaggerate the dangers of a situation and use scare tactics to persuade (the appeal to fear fallacy)?

      Answer:Sort of

      Highlight:

      Maybe her pension was threatened, or her family. Who knows?

    20. It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

      CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Appeal to Fear

      Question:Does the author exaggerate the dangers of a situation and use scare tactics to persuade (the appeal to fear fallacy)?

      Answer:Sort of

      Highlight:

      It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

    21. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Slippery Slope

      Question:Does the author say that one small change will lead to a major change (use a slippery slope argument)? Highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    22. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - False Dilemma

      Question:Does the author present a complicated choice as if it were binary (construct a false dilemma)? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    23. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Straw Man

      Question:Does the author present the counterargument as a weaker, more foolish version of the real counterargument (use a Straw Man Argument)? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    24. CredCo Indicator:Confidence - Acknowledge Uncertainty

      Question:Do they acknowledge uncertainty or the possibility that things might be otherwise? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    25. CredCo Indicator:Confidence - Extent Claims Justified

      Question:To what extent does their confidence in their claims seem justified?

      Answer:Not at all justified

    26. Oh, of course statistics provided by pro-vaccine agencies and Big Pharma were included in the National Post article that “prove” HPV vaccine’s efficacy and safety.

      Question:Are any experts, organizations, or studies cited that are separate from the central study quoted in the article? If so, highlight relevant section(s).

      Answer:4 or more

      Highlight:

      Oh, of course statistics provided by pro-vaccine agencies and Big Pharma were included in the National Post article that “prove” HPV vaccine’s efficacy and safety.

    27. A couple of years ago, one of the lead HPV vaccine developers for Merck’s Gardasil, Dr. Diane Harper, came clean and warned that Gardasil was not only ineffective and unnecessary, it was dangerous.

      Question:Are any experts, organizations, or studies cited that are separate from the central study quoted in the article? If so, highlight relevant section(s).

      Answer:4 or more

      Highlight:

      A couple of years ago, one of the lead HPV vaccine developers for Merck’s Gardasil, Dr. Diane Harper, came clean and warned that Gardasil was not only ineffective and unnecessary, it was dangerous.

    28. Harper mentioned the medically known fact that 98 percent of HPV warts among sexually active women heal on their own within a year or two.

      Question:Are any experts, organizations, or studies cited that are separate from the central study quoted in the article? If so, highlight relevant section(s).

      Answer:4 or more

      Highlight:

      Harper mentioned the medically known fact that 98 percent of HPV warts among sexually active women heal on their own within a year or two.

    29. [Image of a table titled “WARNING (HPV4 Gardasil & HPV 2 Cervarix): Adverse Reactions And Deaths As Reported To The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System]

      Question:Are any experts, organizations, or studies cited that are separate from the central study quoted in the article? If so, highlight relevant section(s).

      Answer:4 or more

      Highlight:

      [Image of a table titled “WARNING (HPV4 Gardasil & HPV 2 Cervarix): Adverse Reactions And Deaths As Reported To The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System]

    30. [Image of a table titled “WARNING (HPV4 Gardasil & HPV 2 Cervarix): Adverse Reactions And Deaths As Reported To The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System]

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 3

      Highlight:

      [Image of a table titled “WARNING (HPV4 Gardasil & HPV 2 Cervarix): Adverse Reactions And Deaths As Reported To The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System]

    31. Oh, of course statistics provided by pro-vaccine agencies and Big Pharma were included in the National Post article that “prove” HPV vaccine’s efficacy and safety.

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 2

      Highlight:

      Oh, of course statistics provided by pro-vaccine agencies and Big Pharma were included in the National Post article that “prove” HPV vaccine’s efficacy and safety.

    32. Rail and study co-author Abby Lippman, a McGill University professor emeritus,

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 1

      Highlight:

      Rail and study co-author Abby Lippman, a McGill University professor emeritus,

    33. published an op-ed article in Montreal’s Le Devoir newspaper questioning the safety and benefits of human papillomavirus vaccines.

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 1

      Highlight:

      published an op-ed article in Montreal’s Le Devoir newspaper questioning the safety and benefits of human papillomavirus vaccines.

    34. one of the lead HPV vaccine developers for Merck’s Gardasil, Dr. Diane Harper,

      CredCo Indicator:Quotes from Outside Experts

      Question:Highlight each expert cited:

      Answer:Expert 2

      Highlight:

      one of the lead HPV vaccine developers for Merck’s Gardasil, Dr. Diane Harper,

    35. Rail and study co-author Abby Lippman,

      CredCo Indicator:Quotes from Outside Experts

      Question:Highlight each expert cited:

      Answer:Expert 1

      Highlight:

      Rail and study co-author Abby Lippman,

    36. Question:Which of the following types of sources are cited in the article? Check all that apply. If Other, please highlight.

      Answer:Studies

    37. Question:Which of the following types of sources are cited in the article? Check all that apply. If Other, please highlight.

      Answer:Experts

    38. Canadian Concordia University’s kinesiology professor Genevieve Rail was awarded a grant of $270,000 to study the effects of HPV vaccines on the public.

      CredCo Indicator:Single Study Article

      Question:Is this article primarily about a single scientific study?

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      Canadian Concordia University’s kinesiology professor Genevieve Rail was awarded a grant of $270,000 to study the effects of HPV vaccines on the public.

    39. It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

      CredCo Indicator:Clickbait Title

      Question:What clickbait techniques does this headline employ (select all that apply)?

      Answer:Inducing fear (“Is Your Boyfriend Cheating on You?”)

      Highlight:

      It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

    40. It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

      CredCo Indicator:Clickbait Title

      Question:What clickbait techniques does this headline employ (select all that apply)?

      Answer:Hidden secret or trick (“Fitness Companies Hate Him...”, “Experts are Dying to Know Their Secret”)

      Highlight:

      It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

    41. It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

      CredCo Indicator:Clickbait Title

      Question:What clickbait techniques does this headline employ (select all that apply)?

      Answer:Provoking emotions, such as shock or surprise (“...Shocking Result”, “...Leave You in Tears”)

      Highlight:

      It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

    42. CredCo Indicator:Clickbait Title

      Question:Is the headline clickbaity?

      Answer:Somewhat clickbaity

    43. CredCo Indicator:Title Representativeness

      Question:How is the title unrepresentative of the content of the article? (Select all that apply).

      Answer:Title carries little information about the body

    44. CredCo Indicator:Title Representativeness

      Question:How is the title unrepresentative of the content of the article? (Select all that apply).

      Answer:Title emphasizes different information than the body

    45. CredCo Indicator:Title Representativeness

      Question:Question: Does the title of the article accurately reflect the content of the article?

      Answer:Somewhat Unrepresentative

    46. Question:Rate your impression of the credibility of this article

      Answer:Somewhat low credibility

  2. Apr 2018
    1. This page

      This page is the main page through which the other pages are accessed, and to which they redirect when finished. Some pages have directions to the PubMed Commons pages that in 2013 began facilitating the annotation of articles in the bioscience literature. Sadly, this was stopped in 2018, but comments can be retrieved through the Hypothesis site as detailed on my Laboratory Page.

  3. Mar 2018
    1. Points of interest:

      • Uses regular expressions -- fancy pattern matching -- to scan the text of annotations

      • This one just looks for ?, the idea being a teacher is looking for students asking questions

      • Could also look for dates, currency, links, images, videos, lots of things

    1. Points of interest

      • A highlight is an annotation with no text or tags.

      • This query has to perform some gymnastics to find the set of annotations that meet those two conditions

      • Gymnastics also required for the percentages

      • This pattern work for other things like: annotations vs pagenotes, public vs private, etc.

    1. Aspects of interest:

      • Uses distinct to get the set of unique users from all users who annotated a given doc
    1. Aspects of interest

      • Looks at the registered_date for users

      • Filters by domain wildcards

      • Then extrapolates to all signups, according to a 56/44 ratio established elsewhere

    1. Aspects of interest:

      • Joins annotations table and document_uri table

      • Looks for doi-related metadata

    1. Aspects of interest:

      • Finds distinct urls annotated by any CF annotator

      • Finds the average of the dates on the annotation for each url, so those sets of annotations can be arranged on a timeline

    1. Aspects of interest

      • Accesses the user_group table

      • Quotes the "group" field to distinguish it from the group keyword

      • Applies the lower string function to make matching more robust

      • Joins the user_group and group tables in order to show user counts per group

    1. Aspects of interest

      • Shows how to count different things in the same query

      • Shows how to use distinct to deduplicate

    1. Aspects of interest:

      • Uses form-based variables to parameterize the query. (

      • Formats results as a bar chart

    1. Aspects of interest:

      • Truncate date to day

      • Filter on a specified recent span of days

      • Use a complex expression to match a specified set of users

    1. Aspects of interest:

      • Uses WITH ("WITH provides a way to write auxiliary statements for use in a larger query. These statements can be thought of as defining temporary tables that exist just for one query")

      • Uses wildcard to match tlds: .edu, .ac.uk

      • Uses regular expression to match subdomains of email addresses (e.g. cornell. nyu)

      • uses array indexing to slice the regexp match

      • use || operator to join strings

      -

  4. Feb 2018
    1. Teaching, Learning, and IT Issues: Points of Intersection

      Intersections between EDUCAUSE's 2018 top 10 IT and teaching and learning issues.

    2. The IT and the T&L visions are thus fairly congruent: integrating disparate applications so that they offer our communities a consolidated environment and more customizable functionality. These are invigorating and also daunting challenges.

      Drawing connections between decentralizing services in the ERP > enterprise architecture and LMS > NGDLE.

    3. with more data comes more responsibility

      on the responsibility generated by aggregating learner data

    4. EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) Key Issues in Teaching and Learning surveys

      Visit the 2018 ELI Key Issues in Teaching and Learning with Hypothesis annotation enabled.

    5. EDUCAUSE Top 10 IT Issues

      Visit the 2018 EDUCAUSE Top 10 IT Issues with Hypothesis annotation enabled.

  5. Jan 2018