3,063 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2019
    1. Second, the ability to read and use online information effectively to solve problems defines success in both life and work

      this relates back to my other post about how they can use these skills forever

    2. First, they focus directly on information use and learning, so these skills are central to education at all levels.

      this is a really good thing for students to learn at a young age because they will use it in many different ways for life

    3. At least five processing practices occur during online research and comprehension, each requiring additional new skills and strategies when they take place online: (1) reading to identify important questions, (2) reading to locate information, (3) reading to evaluate information criti-cally, (4) reading to synthesize information, and (5) reading and writing to communicate information.

      MAIN PART OF READING COMPREHENSION, these are 5 practices that are definitely used during online research and comprehension

    1. A higher level of activating interest is to have students propose their own ideas for products and activities.

      Voice & choice for the win!

    2. Student interest in a topic holds so much power. When a topic connects to what students like to do, engagement deepens as they willingly spend time thinking, dialoging, and creating ideas in meaningful ways.

      Make those real world connections to students and you'll have automatic buy in from them because they care

    1. remix capitalizes on skills and fluencies, from video editing to collaborative production processes, that have become increasingly essential for students in the modern world.

      Realistic of what our students need to be learning to be successful after school

    2. remix education empowers learners and students to express themselves thoughts through “recycled” culture and media, using preexisting objects—including music and video—as the building blocks for their own unique point of view.

      Exactly! Great way to sum this up

    3. remix is a part of a global creative exchange, aiding and mediated by technology. Second, the deliberate act of “cut/copy and paste”—which relies on core analytical and critical competencies, as creators and remix artists comprehend and synthesize cultural materials in order to synthesize their own works—becomes the paradigmatic and pedagogical framework for remix culture.

      Love the mention of global exchange. It is exactly what is driving our culture

    4. Even the American dream—”life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness”—as penned by Thomas Jefferson, is little more than a remix of John Locke’s assertion that government existed to protect citizens’ “life, liberty, and estate.”

      Had no idea, what a great example to give to demonstrate remixing

    5. remix culture and education lie at the very core of how to teach multimedia skills and critical thinking in the classroom.

      We need to remix our digital literacy and multimedia to better help our students

    1. Creation can be viewed simply as the act of producing, or causing to exist.  Construction is the building or assembling of an infrastructure.

      It's just "we got here" but how you get from here to there

    2. The origin of OCC was originally structured around the idea of content creation as defined by Sonia Livingstone in her theoretical definition of media literacy (2004). She identified that in order to “identify, in textual terms, how the Internet mediates the representation of knowledge, the framing of entertainment, and the conduct of communication”, our understanding of construction and creation needs to be broad enough to allow for change in the future. I believe that viewing the work as construction and more expansive that just creation allows for this eventuality.

      It's never really a finished product, but something you can go back to constantly edit and re-define

    1. ursuing deep learning requires moving beyond learning about – “what the facts are, where they came from, and who believes them” – to learning to be – which involves “design” in the sense of understanding how and when and why knowledge of various kinds is useful for and sufficient for achieving particular purposes and goals.

      combines so many teaching principles and theories in this one idea

    2. n the sense that each new mix becomes a meaning-making resource (affordance) for subsequent remixes, there is no “end” to remixing. Each remix in principle expands the possibilities for further remix.

      Never ending possibilities is interesting to think about. Makes me think of the "read it again" adventure novels from my childhood

    3. very single act of reading and choosing and criticizing and praising culture is in this sense remix, and it is through this general practice that cultures get made.

      Happens literally every day, especially via social media

    4. a very general level all of culture can be understood in terms of remix, where someone creates a cultural product by mixing meaningful elements together (e.g., ideas from different people with ideas of one’s own), and then someone else comes along and remixes this cultural artefact with others to create yet another artefact.

      Same thing we encourage our students to do. Take an idea and make it better

    1. Literacy needs much more than the traditional basics of reading and writing the national language; in the new economy workplace it is a set of supple, variable, communication strategies, ever-diverging according the cultures and social languages of technologies, functional groups, types of organisation and niche clienteles.

      Good reflection of a complex idea

    2. the inherent multimodality of contemporary forms of representation. As a consequence, the traditional emphasis on alphabetical literacy (letter sounds in words in sentences in texts in literatures) would need to be supplemented in a pedagogy of Multiliteracies by learning how to read and write multimodal texts which integrated the other modes with language

      The world does not communicate solely in one language. We need to not only recognize this, but also find new and different ways to communicate

    3. growing significance of two ‘multi’ dimensions of ‘literacies’ in the plural—the multilingual and the multimodal.

      Not just literacy, but multi faceted and ever changing

    1. focus is on the process of inquiry

      focuses on inquiry instead of the final product of research

    2. During Phase 3, students work both individually and in small groups at using strategies and skills from the previous phases to develop lines of inquiry around curricular topics. This type of project requires clear questions, multiple reliable sources, citations, and a final product that communicates that information to others.

      Phase 3 focuses on students independent thinking and collaborative thinking and builds on skills developed in previous phases. This phase requires that the students have defined questions, reliable resources, citations, and a final product that communicates their learning and research to others.

    3. Phase 2 is a collaborative phase during which both teachers and students conduct think-aloud demonstrations and minilessons. Teacher modeling in the beginning of the phase gives way to student modeling in the latter half. Students take responsibility for teaching their peers a variety of online reading comprehension strategies. Instruction also begins to move from search skills to critical evaluation and synthesis skills. (See a complete checklist of skills.)

      Phase 2: Essentially students and teachers initially have a thinking brainstorm session about the topic/theme. Teacher is the model in the start of this phase and then lets the student take the reigns. Students have responsibility for teaching their peers online reading comprehension strategies. Also moves into critical evaluation and synthesis skills.

    4. We then demonstrated how to use basic Boolean search terms.

      boolean search terms

    5. Phase 1 centers on computer basics, word processing skills, Web searching, navigation basics, and e-mail.

      phase 1; basics and introduction to internet skills, searching, etc.

    6. The gradual release of responsibility to students is central to both approaches

      reminds me of scaffolding; students are released into doing more and more of their own thinking one step at a time

    7. Internet reciprocal teaching, involves problem-based tasks in which readers create their own text. This provides students a path for navigating the Cs of change.

      definition of Internet Reciprocal Teaching

    8. By creating a curriculum that allows for problem-based inquiry learning, high-level discussion, and collaboration

      building skills to prepare students for digital world.

    9. In addition, the rise of the Internet means that teachers must shift how they teach reading and writing

      important to consider; the world is no longer simply paper and pen or type-writers. The literacy tools we have now are virtuously endless.

    10. Internet Reciprocal Teaching Promotes the Five Cs

      5 C's of Internet Reciprocal Thinking: Creativity, Communication, Collaboration, Critical Thinking, Comprehension

    11. Reciprocal teaching revolves around four global comprehension strategies: predicting, questioning, clarifying, and summarizing. The teacher explains these strategies to small groups using a shared text, first modeling their use, and then asking students to lead the groups.

      This reminds me gradual release

    12. We then demonstrated how to use basic Boolean search terms.

      Vital when searching for information

    13. Learners need classrooms that build critical thinking, communication, and creativity skills in collaborative environments that encourage global citizenship.

      This can easily be fostered at the beginning of the year if the teacher helps build it

    14. During Phase 3, students work both individually and in small groups at using strategies and skills from the previous phases to develop lines of inquiry around curricular topics. This type of project requires clear questions, multiple reliable sources, citations, and a final product that communicates that information to others.

      Independent practice - time to show what you know!

    15. Phase 2 is a collaborative phase during which both teachers and students conduct think-aloud demonstrations and minilessons.

      The guided part of MTM

    16. Phase 1 centers on computer basics, word processing skills, Web searching, navigation basics, and e-mail.

      Starting from ground zero - how to do the basics

    17. Students today must be prepared to navigate the new "Cs of change" that the 21st century has brought us. These Cs include such skills as creativity, communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and comprehension.

      New way of teaching our students

    18. No one gave students a map for Internet inquiry. Students needed a sextant, a tool for navigation, to guide them.

      Just like students have been taught out how to navigate their textbooks, they have to be taught how to navigate the Internet

    1. by your student learning objectives, as well as your own technological, pedagogical, and content area knowledge (TPACK) and objectives

      combination of TPACK and SLO for the IIP.

    2. “credibility” and “relevance”…but they do understand words like “truthful” and “useful.”

      important distinction; students can understand these simpler vocab words that essentially mean the same thing.

    3. five phases:
      1. students collaborative with instructor to pick area of interest and work on a DQ to guide their research.
      2. students engage in OCI as the do research and use digital tools to make discoveries 3.Students use critical thinking to evaluate online info by analyzing credibility of their info. 4.Students synthesize what they learned/researched by combining info in multiple, multimodal sources.
      3. Students engage in online content construction by putting their research into their own words and choosing the best digital tool/text before sharing their answers.
    4. ell with Project Based Learning (PBL) initiativ

      IIP lines up with PBL

    5. nterest driven,

      I think this is crucial. This intrinsically motivates students to be curious and conduct proper research.

    6. The Internet Inquiry Project is an online research project that helps students develop the important digital knowledge and skills needed as they build their web literacies.

      IIQ helps students develop and craft web literacy by cultivating web knowledge and skills.

    7. This process involves the following five phases:

      While I teach science and not English, I can't help but think of all the English standards this process hits. Just like we want students to collaborate, we should be collaborating with our co-workers and creating more cross-curricular lessons

    8. Internet Inquiry Projects are student interest driven, and are more authentic as a learning activity than traditional WebQuests. Internet Inquiry Projects also align well with Project Based Learning (PBL) initiatives.

      This is a cool idea. WebQuests have been used for awhile and I like the idea of having it more student driven

    1. free to use and access, and to re-purpose.

      open learning is influential in areas of design, practice, pedagogy, and theory in education. Open Education Resources at the K-12 level are fundamental to OL.

    2. Open learning

      defined as "set of practices, resources, and scholarship that are open to the public and that are accessible, free to use and access, and re-purpose"

    3. Open learning is becoming a critical focus for K-12 technology-supported programs, both those strictly online as well as blended classroom practices extending into online environments.

      Randall story--shows that there needs to be digital literacy not just at a educator's level, but on an admin level as well

    4. We uploaded a pre-publication draft of the column to allow for review, remix, and commentary

      I liked this article. Good teachers borrow ideas and great teachers edit them. I find so many wonderful ideas online from blogs, pinterest, teachers pay teachers, etc. that I have used and edited to fit my classroom.

    1. Not teaching digital literacy along with language or other literacy instruction does our students a disservice. Nowadays, applying for a job or even filling in an online form to reserve a picnic table at a local park requires digital literacy skills.

      We must also not assume that others are teaching out students digital literacy. It is everyone's responsibility.

    1. INTRODUCTION: WHAT IS UbD™ FRAMEWORK?

      This is a great resource for teachers who need a reminder of Understanding by Design (UbD)

    2. The UbD framework promotes not only acquisition, but also the student’s ability to know why the knowl-edge and skills are important, and how to apply or transfer them in meaningful, professional, and socially important ways

      This is how I believe genuine learning is done. Not only being able to tell someone what you know, but being able to incorporate important things into real life scenarios. I believe that it is more important with what one can do with their knowledge rather than being able to simply claim they have said knowledge, it is important to be useful and applicable to the world.

    3. . Teachers are coaches of understanding, not mere purveyors of content knowl-edge, skill, or activity. They focus on ensuring that learning happens, not just teaching

      One must understand what they are teaching to others before they can help another group of people to understand what they understand. Anyone can teach something, but that material is then useless if they cannot effectively understand it themselves to help others understand it as well.

    4. The UbD framework helps focus curriculum and teaching on the develop-ment and deepening of student understanding and transfer of learning (i.e., the ability to effectively use content knowledge and skill).

      I find this important because rather than memorization and repetition of material, it is meant to be delivered in a way that students can really understand and use it later in life.

    5. • Can explain concepts, principles, and processes by putting it their own words, teaching it to others, justifying their answers, and showing their reasoning

      One way students can express mastery of an assignment.

    6. FIGURE 1—SAMPLE TRANSFER GOALS

      Title of Table of Transfer Goals

    7. Learning priorities are established by long-term performance goals—what it is we want students, in the end, to be able to do with what they have learned.

      I think this is really important because school has become a place where teachers test and then move on (teach the test). But life is not a "test" and the information that is being taught should be information that can be applied in life or be a building block with that goal.

    8. The point of school is not to simply excel in each class, but to be able to use one’s learning in other settings.

      In most cases there is a difference between getting A's on a test and then truly mastering the material. To show mastery you must be able to apply the knowledge outside of a school setting and not just be able to "spit the facts on a test".

    9. Effective curriculum is planned backward from long-term, desired results through a three-stage design process (Desired Results, Evidence, and Learning Plan). This process helps avoid the common problems of treating the textbook as the curriculum rather than a resource, and activity-oriented teaching in which no clear priorities and purposes are apparent.

      Love this! I think this is brilliant because as a teacher you need to know the learning objectives first to then plan the lesson plan around the overall goal for the students.

    10. Six facets of under-standing—the capacity to explain, interpret, apply, shift perspective, empa-thize, and self-assess—can serve as indicators of understanding.

      Ways students can reveal their learning.

    1. We also need to recognize the risks of blogging/tweeting, which include opening avenues for abuse. We should not be throwing students into the public domain to discuss sensitive topics without having conversations with them on what they might face and which of these risks they are willing to take, how they would handle it, and how they might support each other. Then we should give them a private option if they so choose.

      This is very important to keep in mind when working with children

    2. For example, teaching digital skills would include showing students how to download images from the Internet and insert them into PowerPoint slides or webpages. Digital literacy would focus on helping students choose appropriate images, recognize copyright licensing, and cite or get permissions, in addition to reminding students to use alternative text for images to support those with visual disabilities.

      This is a great example of digital skills vs digital literacy.

    3. When we encourage students to use technology, do we remind them of the risks of placing their information online and give them choices of how much personal information to reveal?

      "Stranger danger " is a serious risk. Children and teens can often not think ahead that far in advance to understand the repercussions sharing an address or other personal information can cause.

    1. The TPACK framework builds on Shulman’s (1987, 1986) descriptions of PCK to describe how teachers’ understanding of educational technologies and PCK interact with one another to produce effective teaching with technology. Other authors have discussed similar ideas, though often using different labeling schemes. The conception of TPACK described here has developed over time and through a series of publications, with the most complete descriptions of the framework found in Mishra and Koehler (2006) and Koehler and Mishra (2008).

      TPACK

    2. Knowledge of content is of critical importance for teachers.

      Being up to date on content is crucial. I also think being able to adapt and differentiate is just as important.

    3. this knowledge is unlikely to be used unless teachers can conceive of technology uses that are consistent with their existing pedagogical beliefs

      Very true! I would make teachers use something that they are not completely enthusiastic about. They should be taught the same way as students. They will not be effective technology users if they don't love it, or don't agree with it. "Have to ..." as we know, doesn't get us very far! But if technology is offered as something that is exciting, helpful, easy to use, makes teaching more fun ... sure! I'd be all for it!!!

    4. Teachers often have inadequate (or inappropriate) experience with using digital technologies for teaching and learning.

      ... and not only that but technology works only 50% of the time even if the teacher and the students know how to use it. There's always a lot of time spent with fixing the tools, applications and connection which makes me feel like the positive impact of technology is almost equals out by the negative part of the lost time that could have been spent with valuable, face-to-face, "old fashion" teaching which is good information and personal connection inside the classroom. Technology can be super frustrating and that takes away a lot of the value that it otherwise carries. But this can improve, of course, and hopefully will.

    5. This chart really helped me to understand the impact of TPACK and how each aspect of knowledge can work together to create a greater purpose.

    6. Rather, particular technologies have their own propensities, potentials, affordances, and constraints that make them more suitable for certain tasks than others

      There are so many types of technology and internet resources that are beneficial to students and teachers, alike.

    7. As a matter of practical significance, however, most of the technologies under consideration in current literature are newer and digital and have some inherent properties that make applying them in straightforward ways difficult.

      Although times are changing and the age of technology is upon us educators, we should use technology to our advantage instead of being worried and overwhelmed.

    8. the TPACK framework offers several possibilities for promoting research in teacher education, teacher professional development, and teachers’ use of technology.

      This framework encourages educators to remain students themselves

    9. teaching is a complicated practice that requires an interweaving of many kinds of specialized knowledge.

      Content knowledge is on the beginning we have to find new and exciting ways to make learning meaningful for our students along with findng ways to connect across disciplines.

    10. By better describing the types of knowledge teachers need (in the form of content, pedagogy, technology, contexts and their interactions), educators are in a better position to understand the variance in levels of technology integration occurring.

      Teachers need to know what their current level of understanding is for each so they know what their strengths and weaknesses are and how to work on each

    11. Teaching with technology is a difficult thing to do well. The TPACK framework suggests that content, pedagogy, technology, and teaching/learning contexts have roles to play individually and together. Teaching successfully with technology requires continually creating, maintaining, and re-establishing a dynamic equilibrium among all components. It is worth noting that a range of factors influences how this equilibrium is reached.

      Good reminder that all teachers need to continually revamp and re-think how they are reaching their students

    12. By simultaneously integrating knowledge of technology, pedagogy and content, expert teachers bring TPACK into play any time they teach. Each situation presented to teachers is a unique combination of these three factors, and accordingly, there is no single technological solution that applies for every teacher, every course, or every view of teaching. Rather, solutions lie in the ability of a teacher to flexibly navigate the spaces defined by the three elements of content, pedagogy, and technology and the complex interactions among these elements in specific contexts.

      Good summary of how TPACK can be used effectively

    13. An understanding of the affordances of technology and how they can be leveraged differently according to changes in context and purposes is an important part of understanding TPK.

      Technology can be used for different purposes than it might originally be intended.

    14. ny definition of technology knowledge is in danger of becoming outdated by the time this text has been published.

      TK = technology knowledge. Constantly changing so no "true" definition

    15. teacher interprets the subject matter, finds multiple ways to represent it, and adapts and tailors the instructional materials to alternative conceptions and students’ prior knowledge.

      Process of how PCK works: teacher interprets info, figures out how to best deliver it to students, & includes students prior knowledge

    16. Pedagogical knowledge (PK) is teachers’ deep knowledge about the processes and practices or methods of teaching and learning.

      PK = the process of teaching (different methods, practices, etc.)

    17. Content knowledge (CK) is teachers’ knowledge about the subject matter to be learned or taught.

      CK = teacher content knowledge about a specific subject

    18. three knowledge bases (content, pedagogy, and technology) form the core of the technology, pedagogy, and content knowledge (TPACK) framework.

      TPACK framework design

    19. Teachers often have inadequate (or inappropriate) experience with using digital technologies for teaching and learning. Many teachers earned degrees at a time when educational technology was at a very different stage of development than it is today. It is, thus, not surprising that they do not consider themselves sufficiently prepared to use technology in the classroom and often do not appreciate its value or relevance to teaching and learning.

      I think the majority of teachers will unprepared (technology wise) from their college experience and therefore don't use it in their classroom often

    20. Digital technologies—such as computers, handheld devices, and software applications—by contrast, are protean (usable in many different ways; Papert, 1980); unstable (rapidly changing); and opaque (the inner workings are hidden from users;

      Digital technology is ever changing and more complex than the technology seen in the past

    1. As an agenda for research, connected learning is about examining learning that cuts across the contexts of home, school, and peer culture, looking at the links and disjunctures between them.  As a learning theory, connected learning posits that the most meaningful and resilient forms of learning happen when a learner has a personal interest or passion that they are pursuing in a context of cultural affinity, social support, and shared purpose.

      Agenda (for research), learning theory (based on personal interest and passion) and model for design (connecting the spheres of home, school and peers).

    2. This interdisciplinary research network is dedicated to understanding the opportunities and risks for learning afforded by today's changing media ecology, as well as building new learning environments that support effective learning and educational equity.  Our work focuses on a model of connected learning -- learning that is socially connected, interest-driven, and oriented towards educational opportunity. 

      Very important for teachers, students, and adults in all fields to communicate and grow online.

    3. connected learning -- learning that is socially connected, interest-driven, and oriented towards educational opportunity. 

      definition of what connected learning is

    1. Encouraging students to reach out to one another to solve problems not only builds collaboration skills but leads to deeper learning and understanding.

      Being able to reach out to peers for help is important. Collaboration with other educators will help you become successful

    2. Encouraging students to reach out to one another to solve problems not only builds collaboration skills but leads to deeper learning and understanding.

      Students will learn how to work together to solve problems, as well as work on important social skills within the classroom.

    3. In this conversation, we're going to have-- I'm going to have you guys write down the questions, and then talk to each other about the conversation, about the book, and I'm going to sort of step back and take notes. And I'll do a little bit of guiding, but you guys are going to talk to each other. And there's three particular roles that students will fill. One is the scribe role, where one student is taking notes on the conversation, so that all the other students can be fully engaged in the conversation that's happening. Another role is a little map where one student is monitoring who's speaking when and they draw these sort of diagrams so that there's a visual map of how the conversation is going. The other thing I just want to point out since I'm showing these to you is, would you say this is a good conversation? Yes.

      This is a good point to highlight! I like how this teacher allows the class to discuss the topic at hand amongst themselves. This teacher is there to guide the students if they need help staying on track. This is good for students to practice group discussions led by themselves!

    1. Connected learning is realized when a young person is able to pursue a personal interest or passion with the support of friends and caring adults, and is in turn able to link this learning and interest to academic achievement, career success or civic engagement.

      I have always believed that students who are interested in a topic, like really interested, will excel.

    2. I think that connected learning can be really easy to navigate. There are so many avenues that a teacher could create to keep the students connected. One student had talked about chat rooms about subjects and the idea sounds great!

    3. “connected learning.” It advocates for broadened access to learning that is socially embedded, interest-driven, and oriented toward educational, economic, or political opportunity. Connected learning is realized when a young person is able to pursue a personal interest or passion with the support of friends and caring adults, and is in turn able to link this learning and interest to academic achievement, career success or civic engagement.

      This can be done in the classroom utilizing online strategies. Teachers could create chat rooms for students on a certain subject or even ask students to create social media sites for historic figures.

    4. Connected learning is realized when a young person is able to pursue a personal interest or passion with the support of friends and caring adults, and is in turn able to link this learning and interest to academic achievement, career success or civic engagement.

      Students should always and continually be pushed to pursue things they are interested in or passionate about so that they can strive for a career in a field that they can truly make a difference with or be fully involved in.

    5. support of friends and caring adults, and is in turn able to link this learning and interest to academic achievement, career success or civic engagement.

      I really like how in this definition of connected learning includes the support of others because making sure you have a good support system around you goes along way in what people want to accomplish

    6. Connected learning is realized when a young person is able to pursue a personal interest or passion with the support of friends and caring adults, and is in turn able to link this learning and interest to academic achievement, career success or civic engagement.

      Encourage students to pursue their interests and turn it into a career they can thrive in

    1.  Dr. Puentedura has included Questions and Transitions Ladders  with the SAMR model to help teachers make transitions to each level.

      Dr. Puentedura's Questions and Transitions Ladders can be extremely useful as a reference. Very practical and helps to connect with our Educational Standards. I will save this document (link) for myself!

    2.  Technology provides us all with the ability to develop our own toolkit of flexible resources for use when needed.

      I love the phrase "toolkit." It is essential for a teacher to have his/her own toolkit to help benefit their students and enhance their lesson plans.

    3. The key to successful technology integration is the efficient use of digital tools tools that are appropriate for the task.

      I believe that technological use in teaching should be chosen as it is appropriate for specific tasks or courses, and not integrated for the sole fact of using it.

    4. The SAMR model truly covers the entire spectrum of tech integration. Every lesson, activity and designer has an entry point and those at the highest levels can be continually challenged to redefine learning.

      I look forward to seeing the progression that the SAMR model can have in the future as technology develops further.

    5.  Technology provides us all with the ability to develop our own toolkit of flexible resources for use when needed.

      Make tech work for you!

    6. Researchers have determined that technology integration typically moves through specific levels.

      Tech integration is a gradual process that occurs in stages

    7. What is the new task? Will any portion of the original task be retained? How is the new task uniquely made possible by the new technology? How does it contribute to my design?

      important redefinition questions to ask, transfer to final level

    8. bout the expectation for each of us to achieve what we cannot achieve without new technology.

      I think SAMR is so important as tech is constantly changing. It is a great model to help teachers stay current and efficient in their teaching and tech integration

    9. How is the original task being modified? Does this modification fundamentally depend upon the new technology? How does this modification contribute to my design?

      modification important questions, focused on transfer from level to level

    10. Have I added an improvement to the task process that could not be accomplished with the older technology at a fundamental level? How does this feature contribute to my design?

      important SAMR augmentation questions

    11. What will I gain by replacing the older technology with the new technology?

      important question to consider for substitution

    12. eachers in the substitution and augmentation phase can use technology to accomplish traditional tasks,  but the real learning gains result from engaging students in learning experiences that could not be accomplished without technology. At the Modification and Redefinition level, the task changes and extends the walls of the classroom.

      tech is used in the Sub and Aug levels to accomplish basic tasks, and in the Mod and Redef levels, technology is used to extended the lesson beyond the classroom

    13. AMR is a model of tech integration designed by Dr. Ruben R. Puentedura, Ph.D. that is simple, easy to gauge, and offers all educators something to strive for.

      SAMR S- substitution A-Augmentation M-modification R- redefinition

    14. Apple’s use of the SAMR model as a framework for tech integration presents a consistent, clear and powerful message that is spreading!

      maybe when models like SAMR are used on broader scales, like Apple, it helps spread awareness and makes the model more mainstream

    1. Stage 1 Fluency Example: The Menu Project

      This is something I have done in my classroom. I must say the food unit is one of the engaging units because it is the most relevant things to human. We need food to survive.

    1. TPACK Lesson

      This is a great TPACK lesson for Spanish. I have done a lesson sort of like this with back-to-school flyers but I love how she takes it one step further and integrates twitter as well.

    1. conventional forms of teaching and learning are not useful to prepare students for our dynamic and constantly shifting 21st century society

      This is a bold statement but we should also be aware of that with our choices as teachers, we are shaping the society of the 21st century as well. Also, not everything "old" is necessarily useless and bad, so we need to distinguish between "modern" and "valuable" as well as "old" and "worthless". I think one of the most important value that we need to teach to our students and to ourselves, too, is flexibility.

    1. YOUmedia

      Sounds like a great learning opportunity for Chicago teens where they can experiment with technology and find their interest while connecting with each other not only in the digital space but in real life, face-to-face as well.

    2. For example, when reading about games they enjoy playing, teenage boys read at a much higher level than their reading level in school.

      Good to know that there's research behind it!

    3. interest helps us pay attention,

      We've always known that but does it mean that we should only teach kids what they're interested in?

    4. The research is clear: Learning is irresistible and life-changing when it connects personal interests to meaningful relationships and real-world opportunity.

      And if learning can be irresistible and life-changing, then that can change the meaning of "school" for our students!

    5. Meet Abigail: A Connected Learner

      It is amazing to see how the "virtual world" is becoming more and more real! It affects real people's real life, and does in a positive way.

    6. The Digital Youth Network

      This looks like an amazing opportunity for economically disadvantaged children.

    7. Feeling emotionally and physically safe and a sense of belonging

      A beautiful alternative to gangs. Providing an emotionally safe place and a sense of belonging are the absolute most important things for young people! From that base, they can fly and everything becomes possible.

    8. Click [here] to learn more about connected learning in teaching practice.

      You have to dig a little but there are good resources here that can be helpful to teachers looking to add value to their classroom

    9. or example, when reading about games they enjoy playing, teenage boys read at a much higher level than their reading level in school.

      I have never really thought about this. I have never thought about my students reading at a higher level in certain topics. This is powerful insight.

    10. Learning is irresistible and life-changing when it connects personal interests to meaningful relationships and real-world opportunity.

      This is as important as building relationships with out students. The two go hand in hand. If the content is not relevant students will not see a reason to learn it.

    11. Feeling emotionally and physically safe and a sense of belongingBecoming more involved in the chosen interests they brought to YOUmediaImproving in at least one digital media skillImproving academic skills: better communication with adults and improved writing abilityUnderstanding more about opportunities available to them after high school

      Results of Connected Learning

    12. Connected learning does not rely on a single technology or technique. Rather, it is fostered over time through a combination of supports for developing interests, relationships, skills, and a sense of purpose.

      What Connected Learning Is.

    13. Understanding more about opportunities available to them after high school

      This is really valuable. I feel like a lot of students are unaware and afraid of what is after graduation.

    14. Librarians and mentors organize showcases, support the production of various projects and broker connections to other opportunities in their interest area.

      This is really great to see how professionals are taking into consideration to what these students want to learn and allowing them to take the power into their own hands.

    15. 30,000 college graduates found that a strong connection to a faculty member doubled the positive life outcomes of graduates.

      As a future teacher this makes me value my future studnets connections more.

    16. For example, when reading about games they enjoy playing, teenage boys read at a much higher level than their reading level in school.

      This is really interesting!

    17. Learning is irresistible and life-changing when it connects personal interests to meaningful relationships and real-world opportunity.

      I can personally relate to this. When in school, I never wanted to learn it or put time into it if I could not see a real world benefit or application.

    18. Based on her experiences writing online, Abigail decides she wants to become a professional writer

      I think that this is an example of how technology can inspire a career and passion.

    19. Learning is motivating when it grows out of personal interest.

      This is critical for all students in all subject areas. A great way for students to get involved and stay motivated in school is to encourage their interests.

    20. Connected learning combines personal interests, supportive relationships, and opportunities. It is learning in an age of abundant access to information and social connection that embraces the diverse backgrounds and interests of all young people.

      Connected learning helps students to build relationships over common interests and needs. This is a fantastic opportunity for students to build relationships online.

    21. Success beyond the classroom requires tangible connections to real-world career and civic opportunities.

      These real world experiences will and can motivate our students in ways you could never imagine.

    22. Learners need support from peers and mentors to persist through setbacks and challenges. A survey of 30,000 college graduates found that a strong connection to a faculty member doubled the positive life outcomes of graduates.

      Again, the importance of Student Teacher Relationships. Our students need to feel like they can depend and trust us. We also need to be that support system because we can never truly know what kind of support system they may have at home.

    23. Learning is motivating when it grows out of personal interest. A growing body of research indicates that interest helps us pay attention, make connections, persist and engage in deeper learning. For example, when reading about games they enjoy playing, teenage boys read at a much higher level than their reading level in school.

      This is why Teacher Student Relationships are so important. We need to learn all we can about our students so that we can relate lessons we are teaching to them so that can connect and learn as much as possible.

    24. Learners need support from peers and mentors to persist through setbacks and challenges.

      to show others what you are doing and getting feedback can go along way for students for having that extra support is always amazing

    25. Learning is irresistible and life-changing when it connects personal interests to meaningful relationships and real-world opportunity.

      Being able to connect to others and interact with other online can have a positive effect. In the example above a girl was able to gain her confidence and know what she wanted to do and go for it

    26. Groups that foster connected learning have shared culture and values, are welcoming to newcomers, and encourage sharing, feedback and learning among all participants.

      Kids need to feel safe and welcomed. Find the commonality and build from there

    27. Organizations and adults must meet youth where they are in order to foster connected learning.

      Meet the needs of the kids - show an interest where they show interest to build a relationship

    28. college graduates found that a strong connection to a faculty member doubled the positive life outcomes of graduates.

      One of the biggest things we talk about in my school - building relationships. You need a connection with every student in order for them to be successful

    29. interest helps us pay attention, make connections, persist and engage in deeper learning.

      You pay attention to things that naturally interest you and therefore take learning to a higher level

    30. Based on her experiences writing online, Abigail decides she wants to become a professional writer.

      Used real world experiences and connected them to her personal life to help her grow via digital literacy

    31. organizations and caring adults can form partnerships, broker connections across settings, and share on openly networked platforms and portfolios.

      This is where networking, both in person and online, could come into play.

    32. earners need to feel a sense of belonging and be able to make meaningful contributions to a community in order to experience connected learning. Groups that foster connected learning have shared

      I don't think real positive change or learning can occur unless a student feels safe, welcomed, and like they belong. See Maslow's hierarchy of needs.

    33. hrough collaborative production, friendly competition, civic action, and joint research, youth and adults make things, have fun, learn, and make a difference together.

      shared interests and collaboration are instrumental for connected learning; reminds me of the phrase "great minds think alike"

    34. They do this by being sponsors of what youth are genuinely interested in — recognizing diverse interests and providing mentorship, space, and other resources.

      sponsorship/adult support in connected learning = important to learning success and an important resource

    35. Learning is irresistible and life-changing when it connects personal interests to meaningful relationships and real-world opportunity.

      absolutely true. passion+learning+education= change in the world for good

    36. embraces the diverse backgrounds and interests of all young people.

      importance of diversity in connected learning will heighten cultural awareness

    37. They surpassed their more wealthier peers, growing up in Silicon Valley, in 21st-century competencies and digital media engagement.

      this company was able to give these lower income students the same opportunities that the wealthier students had.

    1. Find Native Speakers

      This is a great idea to engage students. I have thought about it before but I have not yet put it into practice. I did pen pal letters one year but snail mail was too slow. I am going to try an incorporate this idea even more.

    1. RSA ANIMATE: Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us

      Creativity Inc. by Ed Catamull the founder of PIXAR really ties in with this video. In some departments PIXAR's employees get 2 days a month to do whatever they want with company resources. This really motivating because intrinsic motivation is going to drive them to go further.

    1. What our collaborative learning style empowers and enables is a student's resilience

      This ties in with growth mindset

    1. Will Richardson

      As teachers we need to start stepping aside and let our students grow and develop in ways that interest them so they can learn and excel with intrinsic motivation.

    2. Will Richardson highlights importance of learning and engagement based on pure passion of learning; without "waiting for a curriculum". Today's schools need to be re-envisioned in a way that fosters collaboration and real world/ problem-solving skills, and that steers away from test prep and replaces that with life-prep.

    1. A filter bubble is the intellectual isolation that can occur when websites make use of algorithms to selectively assume the information a user would want to see, and then give information to the user according to this assumption.

      Defining filter bubble

    1. Survey! Question! Read! Recite! Review!

      Makes me think about the process we use to teach students about their textbooks. We now need to do the same with the Internet

    1. Achieve3000® provides the only patented, cloud-based solutions that deliver daily differentiated instruction for nonfiction reading and writing that are precisely tailored to each student’s Lexile® reading level.

      I used this website with my students last year and saw a dramatic increase in their reading comprehension.

    1. What is OER

      Love this video, quick and easy explanation!

    2. Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching, learning and research materials in any medium that reside in the public domain or have been released under an open license that permits no-cost access, use, adaptation and redistribution by others.

      Excellent for educators to get and share ideas

    1. The Mismeasure of Boys: Reading and Online Videogames

      This study found that boys read at a higher level if they are reading about video games when compared to the level they do in school.

    1. The great educator John Dewey wrote that interest operates by a process of “catch” and “hold”—first the individual’s interest must be captured, and then it must be maintained. The approach required to catch a person's interest is different from the one that’s necessary to hold a person’s interest: catching is all about seizing the attention and stimulating the imagination.

      John Dewey Quote on How to Promote Interest

    1. Interest is a psychological state of engagement, experienced in the moment, and also a predisposition to engage repeatedly with particular ideas, events, or objects over time.

      Students develop an interest in subjects when their teachers take the time to understand what motivates them.

    1. for caring adults, teachers, parents, learners and their peers to share interests and contribute to a common purpose. The potential of cross-generational learning and connection unfolds when centered on common goals.

      important to have a caring, experienced community to rely on and learn from

    2. Powered with possibilities made available by today’s social media, this peer culture can produce learning that’s engaging and powerful.

      this is what makes connected learning modern

    3. Interests foster the drive to gain knowledge and expertise

      connection to collaborative problem solving and the videos watched on OAKS

    4. For more than a century, educators have strived to customize education to the learner. Connected Learning leverages the advances of the digital age to make that dream a reality — connecting academics to interests, learners to inspiring peers and mentors, and educational goals to the higher order skills the new economy rewards.

      good summary quote

    1. ohn Seely Brown on Motivating Learners (Big Thinkers Series) 41,780 views41K views •

      Notes: -important for kids to embrace change

      • curiosity -using gaming as an example (embracing change, leveling up, etc.) -competition and collaboration and analyzation to improve (surfing example) -kids who are "turned on" by their passion drives learning -joining a community of common interests
    1. our educational system may be doing more to perpetuate and even to increase inequality than to expand economic opportunity

      Striving towards personal interests and desires should not be pushed to the side in order to achieve a separately desired goal that is not so of the individual.

    2. Clarissa made great strides in her writing, engaging with it in ways that felt more authentic, and more motivat-ing than her writing classes at school.

      She advanced quicker because of the support she received from a community that shared her same interests.

    3. she jumped at the chance to connect with others who shared her interest

      It is so important to find others who share similar interests when you develop a passion for something.

    4. onnected learning is realized when a young person is able to pursue a personal interest or passion with the support of friends and caring adults, and is in turn able to link this learning and interest to academic achievement, career success or civic engagement

      I find it so important for people to be encouraged from a young age to find their skills and interests so they can be further pursued throughout their lives.

    1. Every English class starts with a moment of quiet after which students are asked to share their energy and stress levels.

      important: I think this idea could help some students realize they are not alone in their feelings and that there are a diversity of feelings and mindsets (that change on the daily) in the classroom.

    2. In English, juniors are grouped with seniors, which helps the younger students learn how the process works by watching and learning from the older students

      there is plenty of research backing the idea that students can benefit academically and personally from learning from older/ more experienced peers

    3. on the mathematical process and not just the “right answer.”

      so crucial to actually understanding the math, and not just focusing on "being done" or "getting the right answer". Much more sustainable approach to teaching math.

    4. group tests, which, like the class worksheets, are designed to be harder than the individual assignment

      group tests need to be based on critical thinking in order to achieve the collaborative aspect of learning

    5. effective classroom geography, focus on the process, build accountability, let students teach one another, and encourage students to be in tune with one another.

      teacher taking a step back; reminds me of Deweyian philosophy

    6. resilient by aiding them with identifying their resources (peers) and testing their theories to see if they are on the right track all while developing habits of mind that form the foundation of scholarship.

      using peers to solve problems rather than directly consulting teacher for answer

    1. students could utilize technology to network with students several states away to see how regional differences impact how others think about the Constitution.

      Use an online pen-pal system to elicit responses from others and compare and contrast regional ways of thinking about a particular topic

    2. a group of students might collaborate in a cloud-based workspace to propose a modern definition of equal protection under the law and solicit feedback on their proposals from classmates.

      Students use technology to alter and improve upon the original, like re-wording the 14th amendment

    3. Returning to the Constitution example, a student might augment a presentation on, say, the 14th Amendment with a video clip of how equal protection under the law was enforced during school desegregation.

      Adding one little piece of technology to an idea, like a video clip

    4. At this stage, technology is directly substituted for a more traditional one. It is a simple, bare-bones, direct replacement. For example, if you are teaching a government lesson on the Constitution, you might use an electronic or web-based version of the document instead of a hard copy. Students might also answer questions about the Constitution using a Microsoft Word instead of filling out a worksheet.

      Example of substitution is trading a paper copy for an electronic one

    5. . Think of the difference between seasoning an old family recipe (Enhancement) and creating an entirely new, original dish (Transformation).

      Difference between SA and MR

    1. Now let’s weave all this technological, pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) together and enhance the activities of our original lesson plan. The ideas below are examples of activities that can be added to the original list. Remember, the goal is to be purposeful in applying each form of knowledge.

      How to take a lesson (they use cell anatomy) and use it with TPACK

    2. recognized how your content could be presented in more interactive and engaging digital mediums—e.g., video, class discussion, game, etc.—and you knew how to make that happen via your LMS, then you just leveled up to Technical Content Knowledge (TCK).

      How to take your teaching to the next level

    3. the point of TPACK is to understand how to use technology to teach concepts in a way that enhances student learning experiences.

      Point is to enhance student learning via technology

    4. the intersections of each are critical because they represent deeper levels of understanding.

      TPACK is intertwined

    1. When a group investigates a new topic, it can be very fun, and the group will take ownership of the topic and the presentation.

      Make kids be the teacher for collaborative learning

    2. The content or reading assignment is a metaphor for a "puzzle" that students break into smaller pieces to learn.

      Jigsaw Activity in a nutshell for collaborative learning

    1. Group size: It’s a simple fix, but the size of the groups can help establish the right dynamics. Generally, smaller groups are better because students can’t get away with hiding while the work is completed by others.

      groups need to be the appropriate size so that students are not over or under worked

    2. Making Sure Everyone Participates “How many times have we put students in groups only to watch them interact with their laptops instead of each other? Or complain about a lazy teammate?”

      this is important that everyone participates so that there is not one person doing all of the work. also it mentions that everyone has experienced a slack group member. I definitely have had group members who did not do their work and it tampers with the overall groups success.

    1. Making sense of different terminology and conventions used within online communities. Participating in both synchronous (communicating in real time) and asynchronous (time lag in communication exchanges) discussions. Discovering information and resources by asking people within social networks.

      This is important because not only is it critical to have the knowledge on how to communicate appropriately in real time it is also important to have online etiquette when communicating with time lagged or via tweets or posts. I believe this first, has to be taught in real time, in person.

    2. we need to provide people with open access to the skills and know-how needed to use the web to improve their lives, careers, and organizations.

      This is important because it is critical to not only know how to use the internet but how to utilize the internet as a tool to better ones life.

    3. reach and meet the growing number of diverse audiences using the web.

      The internet is growing/expanding to meet people who previously did not have access. These individuals have varying/diverse perspectives which is valuable to aid in our growth as a society.

    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d8F1SnWaIfE

      Teaching for understanding/transfer of information.

    2. https://foundation.mozilla.org/en/opportunity/web-literacy/ Mozilla feels that people should have access to the internet and know how to utilize it for its information and potential in order to find what they're looking for.

    3. https://www.slideshare.net/jdumaresq/understanding-by-design-the-basics

      UbD is an exceptional way for students to learn about material by doing. Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe focus on "starting with the end in mind."