2,588 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2018
    1. Elements of Connected Learning

      There are 3 elements of connected learning- combining a young person's interests, relationships, and opportunities, together they allow for connected learning.

    2. an age of abundant access to information and social connection that embraces the diverse backgrounds and interests

      As technology continues to advance, we have virtually unrestricted access to not only information but contact with one another. Technology is incredible in the sense that it connects people from all over the world, different religions, different socioeconomic backgrounds, etc.

    3. social connection that embraces the diverse backgrounds

      Connections with society through in person experiences/online ones are so important.

    4. ased on her experiences writing online, Abigail decides she wants to become a professional writer. S

      I love this example. It is cool to see how connections online can make you successful/build your experiences snd opportunities.

    5. Learners need to feel a sense of belonging and be able to make meaningful contributions to a community in order to experience connected learning

      It makes it hard for someone to learn at their full potential if they are not comfortable in the learning situation, or if they feel like they are not contributing or making a difference in what they are trying to learn about.

    6. . A growing body of research indicates that interest helps us pay attention, make connections, persist and engage in deeper learning.

      If you're interested in something your're going to put more effort into it. I find myself in school now trying so much harder and caring so much more about what I learn now that it has something to do with what I want to do for my career. I had interest in basketball, and practiced every single day and played for all my school teams from when I was 5 years old to I was 18. I wouldn't have put 100% effort and played that long if I wasn't interested in the game. My example of basketball relates to teaching school because I think if I could make my class interesting to where the kids were 100% involved and locked in like I was with basketball and with my classes now, then I think they would learn the material better and be more involved by participating, paying attention, and engaging in class activities.

    7. Learners need support from peers and mentors to persist through setbacks and challenges

      Sometimes as a student, or teacher, you will have struggles and not all information that you learn or teach will come easy. During this time, it is important to look to peers and mentors for support and help.

    8. The research is clear: Learning is irresistible and life-changing when it connects personal interests to meaningful relationships and real-world opportunity.

      This is so true. As a teacher I have to come up with ideas that will keep my students interested and make learning fun with whatever material it is.

    9. Learners need support from peers and mentors to persist through setbacks and challenges

      It is hard to do life on your own, you need people who you know are there for you and have your back through anything.

    10. Click [here] to learn more about connected learning in teaching practice.

      Here is where they talk about how teaching practices you can use for connected learning.

    11. earners need to feel a sense of belonging and be able to make meaningful contributions to a community in order to experience connected learning.

      learners need to feel a sense of belonging and feel like they are able to make meaningful contributions to the community.

    12. Through collaborative production, friendly competition, civic action, and joint research, youth and adults make things, have fun, learn, and make a difference together.

      I like the part of "make things, have fun, learn, and make a difference together". Some children may not be able to achieve connected learning without the guidance of an adult. It is important for teachers, parents and mentors to help students learn about communities they can become engaged in based on their interests.

    13. Youth who participated at YOUmedia saw clear results. Feeling emotionally and physically safe and a sense of belonging Becoming more involved in the chosen interests they brought to YOUmedia Improving in at least one digital media skill Improving academic skills: better communication with adults and improved writing ability Understanding more about opportunities available to them after high school

      this is so important. I think that often children in low income areas like inner-city Chicago don't feel that they have a place to be free and express themselves. Creating things like YOUmedia is important to at-risk kids.

    14. The Digital Youth Network provided in- and out-of-school connected learning experiences to low-income students in Chicago.

      I want to read more about this study.

    15. A survey of 30,000 college graduates found that a strong connection to a faculty member doubled the positive life outcomes of graduates.

      I think it is really important to connect with professors and teachers in order for you to succeed in the class.

    16. Learning is motivating when it grows out of personal interest. A growing body of research indicates that interest helps us pay attention, make connections, persist and engage in deeper learning. For example, when reading about games they enjoy playing, teenage boys read at a much higher level than their reading level in school.

      It is so interesting that when students are given the opportunity to chose what they want to read or learn about, that they preform at a higher level. One of my favorite projects in high school was for my problem and stats class. It had to do with frequency and statistics. We got to conduct research on something that we had interest in. I love golf, so I chose to do my project on the correlation of birdies made at the Masters to finishing position. I had so much fun doing it, even though I hated math.

    17. The research is clear: Learning is irresistible and life-changing when it connects personal interests to meaningful relationships and real-world opportunity.

      I really like the idea of connected learning. Linking children's interests to what they are learning is a great tool. I feel like if you give children freedom to explore what they want but somehow prompt them into achieving what you, as the teacher want, the learning process will be great and exciting.

    18. Through collaborative production, friendly competition, civic action, and joint research, youth and adults make things, have fun, learn, and make a difference together.

      This section mentions that through shared practices students can make a difference. I think this is an extremely motivating factor in learning. If students just complete work and turn it in for a grade, the meaning becomes the value of a grade. If they see a difference being made they know they can actually contribute and will be more motivated in the future as well.

    19. Learning is motivating when it grows out of personal interest. A growing body of research indicates that interest helps us pay attention, make connections, persist and engage in deeper learning. For example, when reading about games they enjoy playing, teenage boys read at a much higher level than their reading level in school.

      This is so powerful as a future teacher learning the importance and how to incorporate students' interests into the classroom. When interest is sparked this motivation is created and as this model states it can create somewhat of a chain reaction that can open the doors to so many relationships and opportunities in the future. I think I can incorporate interest into my PBL unit plan and hopefully motivate the students to engage in the learning and collaborate with peers.

    1. SAMR is a model of tech integration designed by Dr. Ruben R. Puentedura, Ph.D. that is simple, easy to gauge, and offers all educators something to strive for.

      And that "something to strive for" is being able to take technology implementation in your classroom to that "next level"

    2. I am very happy about Apple’s consistent use of the SAMR model as a framework for technology implementation because the clear and consistent message serves as a reminder to teachers about the expectation for each of us to achieve what we cannot achieve without new technology.

      I find it very interesting (yet not surprising) that Apple uses the SAMR framework. They are, after all, one of the world's leading innovators in technology implementation, especially in modern classrooms (with iPads especially!) I also found the author's definition of SAMR framework as "a reminder to teachers about the expectation for each of us to achieve what we cannot achieve without new technology" fascinating. As technology becomes more and more advanced and integrated in our classrooms, teachers play a vital role in knowing and learning how to incorporate the technology into lesson plans.

    3. Teachers in the substitution and augmentation phase can use technology to accomplish traditional tasks,  but the real learning gains result from engaging students in learning experiences that could not be accomplished without technology.

      Technology is usually seen as a distraction and not a tool to help engage students in learning experiences.

    4. The SAMR model  is a useful tool for helping teachers think about their own tech use as they begin to make small shifts in the design and implementation of  technology driven learning experiences to achieve the next level.
    5. The key to successful technology integration is the efficient use of digital tools tools that are appropriate for the task.

      The only flip side to this is what if the school doesnt have funding for the digital tools?

    6. At the Modification and Redefinition level, the task changes and extends the walls of the classroom.

      I personally believe that extending learning outside of a classroom is very important

    7. engaging students in learning experiences that could not be accomplished without technology

      This is the new way of the world

    8. The SAMR model  is a useful tool for helping teachers think about their own tech use

      This is interesting! It requires personal reflection before teaching a subject

    9. Researchers have determined that technology integration typically moves through specific levels. The higher the level of an activity the greater the educational benefit.

      I like this idea. I think it is interesting that the higher levels are described as "greater educational benefits" as opposed to more challenging or harder.

    1. connected learning offers a way of connecting the often-fragmented spheres of home, school, and peer-based learning, leveraging the affordances of digital and networked media.

      Connected learning is a way to connect home, school, peer-based learning, and individual interests.

    2. connected learning posits that the most meaningful and resilient forms of learning happen when a learner has a personal interest or passion that they are pursuing in a context of cultural affinity, social support, and shared purpose.

      What is connected learning as a learning theory?

    1. In math classes, students are grouped intentionally to provide a mix of skill levels, which helps them to be more sensitive to group members’ needs.

      I love this idea and firmly believe in it! While grouping students by skill level is beneficial in some cases like group assessment in reading, it can also be a dark cloud over some students heads. By grouping mix skills levels together, everyone can have a different role and can contribute differently. In these situations some students may learn more, while other students may teach or lead, but they will all come out with a deeper understanding of the material than they had before going in.

    2. Letting Students Teach One Another

      I believe this type of learning/teaching is extremely important for all classrooms. Students can sometimes learn much better from their peers than they can from the teacher, especially when given the chance to have student lead teaching after the teacher has taught the material. This allows students who do understand the material to help those who do not in different ways that they might understand better.

    3. focus on the mathematical process

      Focusing on the process, not the product which would be a right answer. This brings critical, deeper thinking into the discussion which will allow the students to have a better grasp on the knowledge.

    4. Harkness table (a large wooden table capable of seating the entire class),

      A more cost effective way would be sitting the class in a circle so everyone can be seen by all students and the teacher.

    5. encourage classroom collaboration by assigning students to groups to review their homework, do daily class worksheets, participate in moderated discussions, and complete hands-on projects. Often, teachers give students group tests, which, like the class worksheets, are designed to be harder than the individual assignments.

      Ways to bring collaborative learning into the classroom with minor disruptions to traditional learning

    6. Other things to consider are the need to create an effective classroom geography, focus on the process, build accountability, let students teach one another, and encourage students to be in tune with one another.

      Important things to consider when creating a collaborative learning environment

    7. n math and English, teachers cede the floor to students so they can teach one another

      Honestly, I feel like peer to peer teaching is the best way to learn, only if the peer knows the information. Because, they are able to explain, and sometimes connect it to everyday life and its easier to understand.

    8. focus on the mathematical process and not just the “right answer.” In English, the discussions are open-ended, allowing for multiple right answers.

      I like focusing on the process of solving it rather than focusing on the right answer. It helps the students become motivated to learn math and reading, because they are able to express themselves.

    9. The collaborative-learning style incorporated into the fabric of the school helps students to be resilient by aiding them with identifying their resources (peers) and testing their theories to see if they are on the right track all while developing habits of mind that form the foundation of scholarship.

      it allows students to do their own work then compare with their peers and see if they are on the right track or need assistance to get on the right track. While doing this they also develop social skills and are interacting with fellow classmates all while using collaborative learning.

    10. Letting Students Teach One Another

      Just the title of this particular section intrigued me. Lots of ideas can be thought of when there are multiple minds in the mix. Students are typically more in tune with one another than students and teachers are so it is good to have students teach one another.

    11. The moderator can look at the discussion tracker’s notes and see which students he should invite to chime in.

      This gives the students a sense of responsibility and it gives the ones who aren't outspoken a chance to say what is on their mind.

    12. Because the group work is intentionally more difficult, this process keeps individual students accountable for full participation in group

      I think is a good strategy to help keep kids on track, especially the ones that tend to slack off during group based projects/ activities.

    13. Focusing on the Process, Not Right Answers In math, four times a year, each student is given a set of values or codes to substitute in the equations so that even though the students are working together, they have to focus on the mathematical process and not just the “right answer.” In English, the discussions are open-ended, allowing for multiple right answers.

      I think this is key to getting students motivated to learn. When right answers are emphasized memorization is seen as the key to success and a bad grade or wrong answer allows the individual to view themselves as a failure. It is a very frustrating and backwards mindset that a lot of education enforces. When kids know they are not necessarily looking for the right answer they can relax, which ultimately reduces stress and I think can allow them to be more motivated and creative.

    1. Collaborative Reasoning, the teacher poses a question likely to incite different points of view, and students provide reasons to support their positions. Collaborative reasoning aims to "encourage students to use reasoned discourse as a means for choosing among alternative perspectives on an issue" while drawing on personal experiences, background knowledge, and text for interpretive support

      Another way to hold student lead discussions

    2. discussion-based teaching, including the Harkness Method, in which the role of the teacher in facilitating discussion is to serve "mostly as an observer," and act as little as possible.

      Way to hold student lead discussion

    3. discussion-based practices improve comprehension of the text and critical-thinking skills for students across ethnic backgrounds and socioeconomic contexts

      When students are allowed to talk out their thoughts to peers, they think more critically about the material. When they are forced to only think to themselves, then do an individual examination on their thoughts - it can become very narrow minded because they have no one else to bounce their ideas off of. We all do better when we can talk through something.

    4. More than 1200 studies comparing cooperative, competitive, and individualistic efforts have found that cooperative learning methods improve students' time on tasks and intrinsic motivation to learn, as well as students' interpersonal relationships and expectations for success

      Cooperative learning is better for students retention of information and their motivation to learn in the classroom.

    5. When compared to more traditional methods where students passively receive information from a teacher, cooperative, problem-based learning has been shown to improve student engagement and retention of classroom material

      Students are thinking and engaging with the material on a deeper level when they work together in a collaborative setting. They can talk out the problems, get feedback from each other, and build on each others ideas to get the answers.

    6. College Prep math teacher Betsy Thomas gives her students a group test prior to the individual test for each unit during the year.

      I love this idea. This shows that she isn't reaching for her students to fail or do bad if they did not understand the material the first time around. By giving the group test before the individual test, she is allowing her students a second chance to learn or review the material and help each other! It gives them a greater chance as success on the individual test.

    1. You need a culture that values every student's strengths and a school community that believes everyone can learn from each other.

      Taking away the stigma that only the "smart" kids can contribute in class.

    2. "We're really learning that you don't necessarily have to be right. You just have to believe in your conclusions and find ways to prove them."

      This brings in the idea of critical thinking. If students are thinking critically about what they are studying or working on then it is better if they find an answer or idea that may not be traditionally right but if they can justify it and make someone else understand it then they are still learning!

    3. In English classes, students are encouraged to share and to listen to each other's individual interpretations of the text, underscoring the notion that there can be multiple right answers.

      I love this idea of learning in English class. It is very important to allow students to feed off each others ideas and interpretations so they know now everyone has to think the same in order to be going in the same direction.

    4. In math, for instance, the teachers prompt the students to ask each other their questions before asking the teacher, so that students learn to rely on their own collective wisdom.

      While I know most students hate this type of rule in a classroom, it is extremely beneficial for those who will give it a chance.

    5. What you see and hear are the age-old power and impact of collaborative learning, where three boys, sharing strings and chalk, are bent over the blacktop surveying triangles, as the father of geometry, Euclid, might have directed them to do more than 2,000 years ago.

      It is interesting that instead of focusing on the money aspect of the school (and since they pay $34,000 a year in tuition I am sure they have a very nice campus and very nice amenities) they focus on how they are allowed to learn and be taught. Collaborative learning means a lot within schools and I hope one day more schools realize this because it is a very easy and cost efficient thing to bring into all school environments.

    6. Tuition is about $34,000 per student and roughly 25 percent of students receive financial aid or scholarships. None have special needs or require English-language-learner services; 100 percent are admitted to college, most to top-tier universities.

      While these college prep schools are wonderful for students, this seems to be a very noninclusive school environment. Just a thought.

    7. Today, her students will become land surveyors, using rope and chalk to draw geometric shapes on the courtyard's blacktop.

      It is amazing that she is taking her students outside to be active agents in their learning instead of teaching at them in a classroom where they sit and practice problems. Active engagement like this will allow her students to remember so much more and understand the material on a deeper level.

    1. 7) When mobile technology is readily available and performing correctly in the classroom, students are able to access the most up-to-date information quicker and easier than ever before.

      As teachers, we should want students to be inquisitive and independent when learning. Technology allows students to be able to find the information that they need independently.

    2. 8) The traditional passive learning model is broken. With technology in the classroom the teacher becomes the encourager, adviser, and coach.

      As future educators we need to learn how to adapt to this new model of a technology integrated classroom.

    3. 3) It gives students the opportunity to enhance the interaction with their classmates and instructors by encouraging collaboration.

      Not only does it give them that opportunity but it gives them the chance to interact with other people digitally on a global scale.

    4. 1) If used correctly, mobile devices and the applications they support, will help prepare students for their future careers.

      Nearly all employers need their employees to be technologically advance.

    1. three key components of teacher knowledge: understanding of content, understanding of teaching, and understanding of technology.
    2. a complex interaction among three bodies of knowledge: Content, pedagogy, and technology. The interaction of these bodies of knowledge, both theoretically and in practice, produces the types of flexible knowledge needed to successfully integrate technology use into teaching.
    3. The development of TPACK by teachers is critical to effective teaching with technology.

      TPACK or technology, pedagogy, and content knowledge

    4. Moreover, this knowledge is unlikely to be used unless teachers can conceive of technology uses that are consistent with their existing pedagogical beliefs (Ertmer, 2005).

      This can be challenging when teachers become set in their ways and refuse to venture out of their set pedagogical beliefs on teaching. This can also be seen when looking at collaboration and student contributions in the classroom. Some teachers get stuck in their existing pedagogical belift that they are the one sole educator in the classroom, and the students bring very little to the table. Both of these instances are very negative for a modern classroom teacher.

    5. Teachers often have inadequate (or inappropriate) experience with using digital technologies for teaching and learning.

      This is very true, many teachers have classrooms full of students who know 10x the technological information that they themselves know. This can slow down the use of technology in the classroom. Though it can had a good verse situation of the educator/student dynamic in the classroom, where the students can help the teacher learn someone new or further their knowledge.

    6. particular technologies have their own propensities, potentials, affordances, and constraints that make them more suitable for certain tasks than others

      One needs to think about what kind of technology they are using, especially in the classroom, and if it the appropriate type to use for the situation. If the wrong type of technology was used for a certain activity or project, it could possibly lead to unnecessary frustration and unneeded struggle on the student, as well as the teacher.

    7. Thus, effective teaching depends on flexible access to rich, well-organized and integrated knowledge from different domains (Glaser, 1984; Putnam & Borko, 2000; Shulman, 1986, 1987), including knowledge of student thinking and learning, knowledge of subject matter, and increasingly, knowledge of technology.

      Teaching requires flexible access to knowledge of all areas in the discipline because they may have to quickly redirect or change their plan based on student understanding or comprehension. Students may not respond well to how a lesson was planned or taught, therefore teachers need to change their plan so the students are best catered to.

    8. Pedagogical Knowledge

      Deep knowledge about a subject

    9. Email does not afford synchronous communication in the way that a phone call, a face-to-face conversation, or instant messaging does. Nor does email afford the conveyance of subtleties of tone, intent, or mood possible with face-to-face communication

      In a similar way texting does not allow people to convey tone, so there are often misinterpretations

    10. are not even considered to be technologies

      Students don't always realize what kind of technology they have because it is almost second nature

    11. specificity (a pencil is for writing, while a microscope is for viewing small objects); stability (pencils, pendulums, and chalkboards have not changed a great deal over time); and transparency of function (the inner workings of the pencil or the pendulum are simple and directly related to their function) (Simon, 1969)

      Specificity, Stability, and Transparency of Function

    12. effective teaching depends on flexible access to rich, well-organized and integrated knowledge from different domains

      Teachers must always be flexible and able to adapt to any situation that may arise in the classroom

    1. But now technology is advancing at such a rate that traditional ways of teaching and learning are not pushing students and teachers to their full potential.

      True

    2. For my classmates and me, computers were just tools to get things done

      Growing up it was the same for me!

    1. Organizing visual aesthetics and user experiences by using mockups, wireframes or pencil sketches/maps of digital content to be built.

      This statement reminds me of how important it is to pick a theme for our website, and making it organized. I think visuals are very important because they can keep the learner/reader interested.

    2. Knowing how to read, write, and participate in the digital world has become the 4th basic foundational skill next to the three Rs—reading, writing, and arithmetic—in a rapidly evolving, networked world

      This is a challenging one for me being in special education and trying to focus on kids with asd (autism spectrum disorder). I know it is still important to integrate this into sped classrooms as well, but with the spectrum being so wide, there are certain areas that need to be focused on other then use of the web. Although I do think there could be great programs we could use via the web to integrate reading, writing skills into the way we teach autistic children

    3. we need to provide people with open access to the skills and know-how needed to use the web to improve their lives, careers, and organizations.

      Having different skills and at least some knowledge of the web and technology is needed in most workplaces.

    4. Synthesize

      This paragraph helped me in writing my own synthesis on Understanding by Design Framework. Instead of simply summarizing the information I learned, I started to think about how I would apply UbD Framework in my own K-3 classroom- how it would engage my students, how my students could get the very most out of my lesson plans when I began planning with learning goals in mind. I also integrated multiple modes in the form of a related YouTube video and included a chart that I found extremely useful in an article I read.

    5. They enable individuals to become teachers, advocates, and community leaders to leverage and advance the web as an open and public resource.

      Its important to be aware that the web is a key source and tool for many opportunities and its crucial to have people be able to spread that knowledge.

    6. Having these skills on the web expands access and opportunity for more people to learn anytime, anywhere, at any pace.

      The internet becoming such a prominent part of our everyday lives opens many doors for a number of things but especially education.

    7. we need to provide people with open access to the skills and know-how needed to use the web to improve their lives, careers, and organizations.

      Being informed on how to use the internet properly will be beneficial in the long run due to the web being so crucial in todays world.

    1. Connected learning is realized when a young person is able to pursue a personal interest or passion with the support of friends and caring adults, and is in turn able to link this learning and interest to academic achievement, career success or civic engagement.

      When there is something that is interesting to that student, they would become more focused into the lesson. Simply because its something they hold interest in and they enjoy talking about it.

    2. social support to overcome

      Great to get feedback from people!

    3. young person is able to pursue a personal interest or passion with the support of friends and caring adults, and is in turn able to link this learning and interest to academic achievement, career success or civic engagement.

      Love this! I can connect to this because a lot of my "art" friends have personal pages to sell and spread their artwork.

    4. It advocates for broadened access to learning that is socially embedded, interest-driven, and oriented toward educational, economic, or political opportunity. Connected learning is realized when a young person is able to pursue a personal interest or passion with the support of friends and caring adults, and is in turn able to link this learning and interest to academic achievement, career success or civic engagement.

      I think the concept of connected learning has a great understanding of getting kids motivated to learn and education should be linked to their interests and environment because that adds so much meaning to learning.

    5. Connected learning is realized when a young person is able to pursue a personal interest or passion with the support of friends and caring adults, and is in turn able to link this learning and interest to academic achievement, career success or civic engagement.

      This is a perfect definition of connected learning!

    1. We also offer an approach to learning, design and program building that can expand the opportunities afforded by a changing media environment while minimizing the risks.

      The idea of connected learning in this sense can be directly and smoothly tied to the Web Literacy Map and using the internet safely and effectively in the classroom. Since technology is in the interest of many students I think incorporating media is very beneficial to the goal of connected learning.

    2. ffective learning is lifelong and integrated into the real world of work, civic engagement, and social participation.

      Effective learning is lifelong and helps learners be able to function in society.

    3. She finds it to be a community of support-ive friends who have high writing standards and creativity.

      This community holds her to a high standard of writing.

    4. Digital and net-worked media offer new ways of expanding the reach and accessibility of connected learning so it is not just privileged youth who have these opportunities.

      It is important that other children, not just privileged youth to get the opportunity to experience connected learning. I want to learn about how to make this possible.

    5. she jumped at the chance to connect with others who shared her interest.

      I love how enthusiastic she gets about connecting with other people that share her interest.

    1. Much of what educators and researchers know about effective literacy instruction comes from the special education field. When professionals understand why the learning process breaks down, they can better understand learning for everybody,

      You can learn so much from special education classrooms. You can see learning processes break down in different kids and try to figure out if theres a theme between them that could lead you to maybe adjusting how your teaching the lesson plan etc.

    2. With the right instruction, most special education students can increase their literacy. The question remains, though, whether schools have the resources and knowledge to provide those tools.

      so true. They need good instruction and good teachers ho are willing to go the full way to helping these kids achieve their goals.

    3. As school districts across Idaho try to reach the literacy goals they crafted earlier this year, one group is often left out of the conversation: special education students who likely won’t read at grade level by the end of spring semester, if ever.

      When planning curriculum or lesson plans, especially now with special ed kids sometimes being in the regular classrooms, you have to try to find a way to make goals for the sped kids as well. Its so important for you to include them and make them feel like they can be successful, they just want to hear positive

    1. Teachers are coaches of understanding, not mere purveyors of content knowl-edge, skill, or activity. They focus on ensuring that learning happens, not just teaching (and assuming that what was taught was learned); they always aim and check for successful meaning making and transfer by the learner.

      This is so important to me because I want to be a coach in athletics too. You cant just assume that what you taught that day to the kids is learned immediately . You have to reiterate the information and make sure that they are actually taking in the information you are giving them. You can do this by finding out different ways to teach the information to them. practicing the information also is so important.

    2. Understanding is revealed when students autonomously make sense of and transfer their learning through authentic performance. Six facets of under-standing—the capacity to explain, interpret, apply, shift perspective, empa-thize, and self-assess—can serve as indicators of understanding.

      This is so important because I want my students to be able to take things they learn inside my classroom and use them outside the classrom. If they had to explain the information to someone outside of my classroom I would love for them to be able to do so with the information they obtained during the class

    3. The UbD framework helps focus curriculum and teaching on the develop-ment and deepening of student understanding and transfer of learning (i.e., the ability to effectively use content knowledge and skill).

      So important to plan/think ahead and ask yourself questions or whether or not this will be useful and educational for the students.

    4. performance tasks and other evidence.

      I appreciate that the UbD Framework acknowledges that assessment does not just have to be performance based (quizzes, standardized tests, etc.) Understanding can be demonstrated in several other ways including: being able to explain concepts in their own words, interpreting data and text, applying what they have learned in different contexts, demonstrating perspective by being able to see other points of view, empathizing with others, and having self-knowledge by displaying metacognitive awareness.

    5. think purposefully

      The UbD Framework is centered around beginning with the "end in mind"- to start planning after considering questions such as "What do I want my students to achieve in this lesson?" By starting with learning goals in mind, lessons will be much more concise and developmentally appropriate.

    1. Unfortunately, many focus on skills rather than literacies. Digital skills focus on what and how. Digital literacy focuses on why, when, who, and for whom.

      this would always happen. quickly learn something but not actually look into the different components of what we learned. then would move on to the next assignment.

  2. Sep 2018
    1. Although Wikipedia is not a scholarly source, it is usually a good enough first stop to learn about something. However, students need to know how it is updated.

      It seems as though some peoples's arguments and "facts" come from Wikipedia and they don't seem to understand how Wikipedia works. Everyone needs to be educated on how it can provide opinion based information and not the true facts.

    2. nd what posting a photo today might mean for their future employment opportunities?

      Especially high schoolers! I know at least for me, when I posted a picture or comments about something I did not take in to consideration how that could effect me getting a job in the future. Once something is put on the internet, it's there forever.

    3. When we encourage students to use technology, do we remind them of the risks of placing their information online and give them choices of how much personal information to reveal?

      This needs to be brought up to any child who indulges in social media especially at a young age. Social media is becoming very popular and middle school aged children and younger are now using it more and more.

    4. For example, teaching digital skills would include showing students how to download images from the Internet and insert them into PowerPoint slides or webpages. Digital literacy would focus on helping students choose appropriate images, recognize copyright licensing, and cite or get permissions, in addition to reminding students to use alternative text for images to support those with visual disabilities.

      So what I got from this is that digital literacy is taking it to the next level and educating whoever why you can do this and what the appropriate way is.

    5. When we encourage students to use technology, do we remind them of the risks of placing their information online and give them choices of how much personal information to reveal?

      This is how so many students (and adults) get into sticky situations in the digital world. We are thrust into a technology based world, encouraged to put our information online to 'be with the times', and then never asked to think deeper about what it all really means.

    6. Digital skills would focus on which tool to use (e.g., Twitter) and how to use it (e.g., how to tweet, retweet, use TweetDeck), while digital literacy would include in-depth questions: When would you use Twitter instead of a more private forum? Why would you use it for advocacy? Who puts themselves at risk when they do so?

      This encourages students to go beyond the "how" of the situation and go into the "why". By asking in-depth questions, critical thinking skills are brought into a digital space.

    7. Digital literacy would focus on helping students choose appropriate images, recognize copyright licensing, and cite or get permissions, in addition to reminding students to use alternative text for images to support those with visual disabilities.

      I do not remember this topic ever being covered in school. We were shown the digital skills but never given any further explanation that encompassed digital literacy. This is very important to teach because these are things students will need to know outside of school. It will also enhance their digital work so it can be used beyond a classroom setting.

    8. Digital skills focus on what and how. Digital literacy focuses on why, when, who, and for whom.

      I did not know there was a difference between digital skills and digital literacy. I can see how it is important to differentiate between the two when teaching them.

    9. We should not be throwing students into the public domain to discuss sensitive topics without having conversations with them on what they might face and which of these risks they are willing to take, how they would handle it, and how they might support each other.

      So true. It is so important to highlight the negative aspects of the internet and let students be aware of this before hand. Most of my activities in elementary, middle, and high school were set on private within my classes.

    10. It is important for students to recognize that although technology gives us a lot of power, it also restricts us in many ways, a

      This is always my concern. Technology is a great tool but only if used correctly and it is our job as future educators to know this.

    11. For example, teaching digital skills would include showing students how to download images from the Internet and insert them into PowerPoint slides or webpages. Digital literacy would focus on helping students choose appropriate images, recognize copyright licensing, and cite or get permissions, in addition to reminding students to use alternative text for images to support those with visual disabilities

      I like how there was an example provided for these two terms. I think examples are important in the classroom and these terms.

    12. It is important for students to recognize that although technology gives us a lot of power, it also restricts us in many ways, and we need to question how the affordances of technology modify our communication and our behavior.

      yes! technology can be such a great tool but at the same time it can be dangerous. We must be careful in the way that we use it and teach our children to use it.

    13. I avoid putting my students in high-risk situations, but this does not mean avoiding teaching digital literacy. It means discussing with them why they would post a real photo of themselves as avatars

      this is a scary topic. it is interesting to me though because I rarely think about my audience before I post something of myself online.

    14. I allow them the choice of which platform to use for the support they need, but I make sure they ask questions. When is it best to do a Google search versus ask a question on Twitter? Why would students tweet to a particular hashtag or person versus another? When they tweet to people from another country in another time zone, what kind of context do they need to consider? What should they add, remove, or modify in order to communicate better?

      one of my professors freshman year used twitter as a tool in our classroom. we did not have a choice of how to use it, however; but i think a choice is important

    15. eight elements of digital literacies, I have just mentioned the civic, critical, creative, and communicative. The other four are cultural, cognitive, constructive, and confidence

      I have never thought about connecting these elements to technology. very interesting

    16. or example, teaching digital skills would include showing students how to download images from the Internet and insert them into PowerPoint slides or webpages. Digital literacy would focus on helping students choose appropriate images, recognize copyright licensing, and cite or get permissions, in addition to reminding students to use alternative text for images to support those with visual disabilities

      I never learned about copyright and what images I could properly use. I just learned how to use them.

    17. Unfortunately, many focus on skills rather than literacies. Digital skills focus on what and how. Digital literacy focuses on why, when, who, and for whom.

      Yes! in school, I felt like it was not about the literacy but more about just completing a task and moving on.

    18. Digital literacies are not solely about technical proficiency but about the issues, norms, and habits of mind surrounding technologies used for a particular purpose.

      this is important to think about when teaching about the digital world because there is more to teach about than just the technology

    19. Digital literacy is not about the skills of using technologies, but how we use our judgment to maintain awareness of what we are reading and writing, why we are doing it, and whom we are addressing.

      It is important for students to be aware of their surroundings and to not judge other people's ideas and posts on the internet because they wouldn't want the same thing to happen to them

    20. We should not be throwing students into the public domain to discuss sensitive topics without having conversations with them on what they might face and which of these risks they are willing to take, how they would handle it, and how they might support each other. Then we should give them a private option if they so choose.

      This is an important idea to teach in the classroom and to allow students to understand the risks of posting sensitive items on the internet. And it is important to also allow them to know that they can put their posts on private

    21. I allow them the choice of which platform to use for the support they need, but I make sure they ask questions.

      Allowing students to have their own ideas and to be creative allows them to be independent and not forced to do an activity one way but can do it in many different ways.

    22. Teaching digital literacy does not mean teaching digital skills in a vacuum, but doing so in an authentic context that makes sense to students. It means teaching progressively rather than sequentially, which helps learners understand better and more clearly over time.

      Being able to teach new ideas and concepts to students in an authentic way helps them to better grasp the new concept and to understand it in a more complex way.

    23. eight elements of digital literacies, I have just mentioned the civic, critical, creative, and communicative. The other four are cultural, cognitive, constructive, and confidence.

      These eight qualities are important to have and to teach in the classroom, but I had no idea that it related to using technology. It is interesting to see that.

    24. It was a way of both encouraging one another to remain critical and supporting one another through adversity in creative ways.

      I think that is very important to teach in the classroom, students need to be able to encourage each other and the work they are doing.

    25. teaching digital skills would include showing students how to download images from the Internet and insert them into PowerPoint slides or webpages. Digital literacy would focus on helping students choose appropriate images, recognize copyright licensing, and cite or get permissions, in addition to reminding students to use alternative text for images to support those with visual disabilities.

      This helps me better understand how to teach my future students how to use technology appropriately.

    1. Simply stated, students are often not provided with opportunities in school to practice the web literacies necessary to read, write, and participate on the web.

      With technology becoming more popular in the classroom and every day life, there needs to be a course students can take to help them get understand the basics.

    2. imply stated, students are often not provided with opportunities in school to practice the web literacies necessary to read, write, and participate on the web.

      With the web building so rapidly, when students do not have the opportunity at an early age to annotate or critically think about what they are reading or watching. Critical thinking is used when students are older but when the web is rapidly changing, it is hard to keep up.

    3. Simply stated, students are often not provided with opportunities in school to practice the web literacies necessary to read, write, and participate on the web.

      This is very true. As stated in another article, students are often taught about digital skills but not digital literacy. And when they not being taught about it, they probably are not being allowed to participate in critical ways.

    4. students are often not provided with opportunities in school to practice the web literacies necessary to read, write, and

      I agree. I was introduced technology growing up but compared to some of my peers I am behind. I think it is highly important to teach children about the internet/how to use it.

    5. This technology facilitates access to an unlimited amount of online information in a participatory learning space.

      So true. Technology is such a big part of today's society and it is important that we as future teachers know how to use it.

    6. Simply stated, students are often not provided with opportunities in school to practice the web literacies necessary to read, write, and participate on the web.

      I agree. when I was in school it was almost frowned upon to use the internet and social media within the school. I think it is important, however, that we educate our students on how to properly use the web and technology because it is our generation.

    7. he World Wide Web has become this generation’s defining technology for literacy. This technology facilitates access to an unlimited amount of online information in a participatory learning space.

      The web is such a big part of our current generation. It amazes me how much information is at the tip of our fingers

    1. three-stage design process (Desired Results, Evidence, and Learning Plan)

      Begin with the end in mind. Know the goals or expectations you want your students to accomplish.

    2. think purposefully about curricular plan-ning.

      Thinking about the purpose of your curriculum and the goals or objectives you want your students to accomplish is key.

    3. The perfor-mance tasks ask students to apply their learning to a new and authentic situation as means of assessing their understand-ing and ability to transfer their learning.

      This seems like a more authentic way of assessing students knowledge.

    4. Understanding is revealed when students autonomously make sense of and transfer their learning through authentic performance. Six facets of under-standing—the capacity to explain, interpret, apply, shift perspective, empa-thize, and self-assess—can serve as indicators of understanding

      Important critical thinking skills that can be transferred outside of the classroom

    5. Teaching for understanding

      Students need to be able to understand what they are learning and to be able to apply it. They cannot simple just be taught the information, ask no questions, and then move on. Students need to have a deep understanding about the topics taught in class so that they can build more learning off of previous knowledge. They can't do this if they are just simply being taught information that they have to regurgitate on a test.

    6. Can explain concepts, principles, and processes by putting it their own words, teaching it to others, justifying their answers, and showing their reasoning.

      This is important for students to be able to do so that both the student and the teacher knows that the student understood what was being taught in the classroom.

    7. The perfor-mance tasks ask students to apply their learning to a new and authentic situation as means of assessing their understand-ing and ability to transfer their learning.

      The students should be able to use what they learned in what subject area and apply it to another.

    8. An important point in the UbD framework is to recognize that factual knowledge and skills are not taught for their own sake, but as a means to larger ends. Acquisition of content is a means, in the service of meaning making and transfer.

      The students should be able to use what they learned in the classroom across many different areas, such as in the real world or at home, not just in the classroom.

    9. This process helps avoid the common problems of treating the textbook as the curriculum rather than a resource, and activity-oriented teaching in which no clear priorities and purposes are apparent.

      I believe that this is definitely something that should be avoided, using the textbook to plan curriculum.

    10. Furthermore, the format of the test causes many educators to erroneously believe that the state test or provincial exam only assesses low-level knowledge and skill. This, too, is false. Indeed, the data from released national tests show conclusively that the students have the most difficulty with those items that require understanding and transfer, not recall or recognition.

      like I stated before, not memorization but understanding!

    11. The UbD framework promotes not only acquisition, but also the student’s ability to know why the knowl-edge and skills are important, and how to apply or transfer them in meaningful, professional, and socially important ways

      it should be more than just "knowing" the material! students should be able to understand and perform the material.

    12. In Stage 3 of backward design, teachers plan the most appropriate lessons and learning activities to address the three different types of goals identified in Stage 1: transfer, meaning making, and acquisition (T, M, and A).

      after knowing the goal and how it will be assessed, lastly the teacher must come up with lessons on how she will teach the students

    13. • Can explain concepts, principles, and processes by putting it their own words, teaching it to others, justifying their answers, and showing their reasoning.• Can interpret by making sense of data, text, and experience through images, analogies, stories, and models.• Can apply by effectively using and adapting what they know in new and complex contexts.• Demonstrate perspective by seeing the big picture and recognizing differ-ent points of view.• Display empathy by perceiving sensitively and walking in someone else’s shoes.• Have self-knowledge by showing meta-cognitive awareness, using productive habits of mind, and reflect-ing on the meaning of the learning and experience

      these are great examples of how students understand the lesson. we should be assessing our students in more than one way in order to make sure they understand fully.

    14. The perfor-mance tasks ask students to apply their learning to a new and authentic situation as means of assessing their understand-ing and ability to transfer their learning.

      Problem solving? This is beneficial to students because it allows for them to have a better understanding of their learning when they are having to perform what they learned.

    15. An important point in the UbD framework is to recognize that factual knowledge and skills are not taught for their own sake, but as a means to larger ends.

      personally, I learn a lot more efficiently when I am told why I am learning something and how it will help me and make me a better student. If a teacher does not stress why a student is learning something, the student might feel as if the content is useless.

    16. This first stage in the design process calls for clarity about priorities.

      I feel like so many people struggle with priorities, really when there are 1000 other things going on. This approach forces students to focus on their priorities up front.

    17. In the first stage of backward design, we consider our goals, examine established content standards (national, state, prov-ince, and district), and review curriculum expectations.

      I think this is efficient because I work better with a common goal in mind.

    1. Determine what types of assessments and measures would clarify (or serve as evidence of) when and whether students can perform the desired outcome.

      It is always important to think about who you are teaching when it comes to lesson planning. It has to be age appropriate or the learning outcomes won't be achieved.

    2. The designer then identifies what types of evidence are sufficient proof of the desired end result. The designer works “backwards” from that end goal and intentionally plans and develops supporting instruction and learning experiences around the desired outcomes and evidence[1].

      With the end in mind it is easier to avoid using the textbook to teach or to use other people's ideas to teach. It is also beneficial to start with the end goal because then you won't lose sight of what the whole unit plan or lesson plan is supposed to be about. You also won't start without knowing what the whole idea behind the unit plan is.

    1. Teachers become most effective when they seek feedback from students and their peers and use that feedback to adjust approaches to design and teaching.

      It is so beneficial to ask students what they thought about the assignments given in class so that if they liked it you can model later activities after this one. Or if they didn't like it, you know not to use it in future classrooms or they can give feedback on how to better improve the assignment; ways that the students would like to do the activity because then it is ideal about what the children enjoy.

    2. Effective curriculum development reflects a three-stage design process called "backward design" that delays the planning of classroom activities until goals have been clarified and assessments designed. This process helps to avoid the twin problems of "textbook coverage" and "activity-oriented" teaching, in which no clear priorities and purposes are apparent.

      It is important to not teach by the textbook because there are so many other creative and engaging ways to learn information that is in the textbook. Students will just read the textbook, memorize what they need to, and then forget all the information later. Students need the engaging activities in the classroom to help them remember what they are learning so that they can apply it later on in their education.

    3. Students reveal their understanding most effectively when they are provided with complex, authentic opportunities to explain, interpret, apply, shift perspective, empathize, and self-assess. When applied to complex tasks, these "six facets" provide a conceptual lens through which teachers can better assess student understanding.

      Students need to be able to be challenged in an appropriate way in order to be able to understand what they are learning and to develop that knowledge.

    4. A primary goal of education should be the development and deepening of student understanding.

      This is a very important aspect to include in the classroom as they will be using this same knowledge they learn in a elementary class in high school.

    1. Less than 20% of students constructed “Mastery” responses, or responses that questioned the source of the post or the source of the photo. On the other hand, nearly 40% of students argued that the post provided strong evidence because it presented pictorial evidence about conditions near the power plant.

      This is shocking. We need to teach children how to look at things they find online critically. The fact that 40 percent of students argued it was strong enough evidence to show the conditions near the power plant is concerning. These students thought that just because there was picture evidence that it was true.

    2. Our sites for field-testing included under-resourced, inner-city schools in Los Angeles and well-resourced schools in suburbs outside of Minneapolis. Our college assessments, which focused on open web searches, were administered online at six different universities that ranged from Stanford, an institution that rejects 94% of its applicants, to large state universities that admit the majority of students who apply. In what follows, we provide an overview of what we lear

      The differences in the places they tested is a good thing. They tested inner-city schools that are under-resourced, schools in the suburbs that were well resourced and different colleges from Stanford to large state institutions. This shows that many students from completely different backgrounds have the problem of evaluating validity.

    3. only nine percent of high school students in an Advanced Placement history course were able to see through MinimumWage.com’s language to determine that it was a front group for a D.C. lobbyist, or as Salon’s headline put it, “Industry PR

      I remember having to do this in my AP history course when preparing for the AP exam. Some kids in my class didn't seem to understand why the article or charts would be biased.

    4. would hope that middle school students could distinguish an ad from a news story. By high school, we would hope that students reading about gun laws would notice that a chart came from a gun owners’ political action committee. And, in 2016, we would hope college students, who spend hours each day online, would look beyond a .org URL and ask who’s behind a site that presents only one side of a contentious issue.

      Students today often lack this ability which is concerning. I remember having to do work in class that would give us pictures of charts that were published by support groups or action committees and were then asked how the chart might be biased.

    5. Between January 2015 and June 2016, we administered 56 tasks to students across 12 states. In total, we collected and analyzed 7,804 student responses. Our sites for field-testing included under-resourced, inner-city schools in Los Angeles and well-resourced schools in suburbs outside of Minneapolis. Our college assessments, which focused on open web searches, were administered online at six different universities that ranged from Stanford, an institution that rejects 94% of its applicants, to large state universities that admit the majority of students who apply.

      This is important to note because they not only analyzed students in high school but college as well.

    1. Creativity

      This is a big thing for me since I want to be an art teacher and since I want to incorporate technology into my class. I want to teach students how to share/document artwork online even with younger students we could make it private within the class. This would be great so they could comment on each others work.

    2. Being audience and culturally aware, resolving conflict appropriately, using technology tools effectively, and taking responsibility for personal and group productivity.

      Very important to respect different cultures and understand everyone is online.

    3. Extending thinking beyond the individual learner to integrate social networks and tools in problem-solving.

      Important to connect with others/share ideas esp. as a teacher.

    4. Understanding basic principles, purpose, and applications of coding and programming languages.

      I do not have any experience in this. I was not aware of its importance.

    5. Writing on the web enables one to build and create

      our websites!

    6. Comparing and evaluating information from a number of sources online to test credibility and relevance. 21C Skill: Problem-solving

      Need to focus on this because technology/sources can be helpful, but if the correct information is not provided then this is where it gets messy.

    7. Detecting information in a website using the internal search engine.

      I just learned how to do this. I think it is important to being these steps in the classroom more.

    8. locate people, resources, and information. They then know how to judge the credibility of these sources.1

      This is true and important. When I was in school I was taught how to find credible sources and this is important to know as a future teacher.

    9. What we concluded is that people needed the map to be more approachable, accessible, and applicable f

      I agree. I think if it is more available and easier to use then more people will approve.

    10. foundational

      I think it is crazy that technology is included in this, but it is very true. It is important to be able to work technology and incorporate it in the classroom because it is so prominent in today's society.

    11. Developing and presenting effective messages, and contributing to groups through appropriate interactions and active listening.

      It is important to be able to communicate to the people around you because that is always going to be present in a classroom setting or in a real-world setting.

    12. Generating, connecting, synthesizing, transforming, and refining ideas.

      Being creative while doing any type of assignments is important for students.

    13. Being audience and culturally aware, resolving conflict appropriately, using technology tools effectively, and taking responsibility for personal and group productivity.

      This is very important for students to learn at a young age. They need to know how to work collaboratively in a group setting because it is something that will occur often throughout their education and into their future careers.

    14. college and career readiness, and workforce development.

      I think this is important for students to start preparing for at a young age because it will help them in the long run when they do start applying to colleges and jobs.

    15. Managing and maintaining the privacy and security of your digital identity through behaviors and digital tool settings.

      I think that this is very important to incorporate into the classroom because students, especially at young ages, need to have their privacy on the internet.

    16. Writing on the web enables one to build and create content to make meaning.

      I want my students to be able to create things on the web, but I don't know what is developmentally appropriate for a kindergartner.

    17. Comparing and evaluating information from a number of sources online to test credibility and relevance.

      This is very important to do and to teach in the classroom because not all sites are valuable and credible.

    18. Understanding the basic structure of the web

      How are young students in a kindergarten classroom supposed to understand the basic structure of the internet?

    19. Using questions and keywords to find the information you need.

      This is very important for students to grasp because if they are typing whole sentences into the search box they aren't going to get the exact information they are looking for

    20. Good online readers know the tools and strategies that can be used to search for and locate people, resources, and information. They then know how to judge the credibility of these sources.

      This is important for my students to know, but how exactly do I teach this in the classroom?

    21. Approachable and accessible to diverse audiences and their needs. The map needs to be written in a language that is easy to understand, and relevant—why do web literacy skills matter to them. Applicable to interest and/or expertise. The map needs to connect to curriculum, credentials, professional development, and other resources to teach people the skills they need to engage online and offline.

      I feel as a future educator that I need to understand how to appropriately and effectively use technology in order to be able to teach my students how to use technology appropriately and effectively. I need to be a model for my students in many ways and how to use technology is now one of those ways.

    22. They can evaluate web content, and identify what is useful and trustworthy.

      How is a young student in kindergarten supposed to be able to know what is trustworthy on the internet?

    23. critical thinking, collaboration, problem solving, creativity, communication), these digital-age skills help us live and work in today’s world.

      I want my students to have all of these skills and qualities in my classroom and if I can provide that through the use of technology then I will try to incorporate it as much as I can.

    24. Knowing how to read, write, and participate in the digital world has become the 4th basic foundational skill next to the three Rs—reading, writing, and arithmetic

      This still baffles me as a student, but as a future educator I understand that technology is a growing and developing idea and will always be around. therefore, I need to find beneficial ways to incorporate it into my classroom curriculum.

    25. Knowing how to read, write, and participate in the digital world has

      Definition of web or digital literacy.

    26. he web literacy skills and competencies identified under reading on the web are as follows.

      All of the following are things that people could be tested on. As I previously mentioned, I wonder if our children will eventually be tested on this kind of web literacy. The guidelines below are a pretty good rubric for testing (not that I believe in testing in the first place but it is the way of the world these days)

    27. skills to move from being a consumer to a maker on the web.

      Yes!! I think that the web would be a better place if it was treated more as a learning tool as opposed to a means of entertainment.

    28. What we concluded is that people needed the map to be more approachable, accessible, and applicable for learning and teaching web literacy skills.

      I strongly agree with this!

    1. Therefore, it can be stated that teachers often focus more on teaching rather than learning. This perspective can lead to the misconception that learning is the activity when, in fact, learning is derived from a careful consideration of the meaning of the activity.

      I agree. the teachers, atleast when i was in school, tended to focus more on teaching and passing the test rather than learning and understaning

    1. This statement to me is very powerful because the web is an amazing platform for collaboration that can lead to amazing products, discussions, creativity, and so much more. If literacy of the web is missing from people's knowledge they are less likely to attempt to or don not have the means to share and explore on the web and that is a missed opportunity. This paragraph states that learning and teaching digital literacy skills, "allows more and diverse people to shape the Web." Just think how much more power that gives to society and especially our students.

    1. Studentsmust be taught to read both sources from a critical perspective.

      This is important. Children need to be able to understand the differences between real and fake things.

    2. 17Their writing is much more open to the public and can have more far-reaching consequences.The young people are creating new modes of expression that are poorly understood by adults,and as a result they receive little to no guidance or supervision.

      I think this is important. Many adults do not understand these new modes of expression and it leads children to be very vulnerable on the web.

    1. We need a leadership alliance between education and technology developers

      So true!!! Teachers cannot figure it all out on their own!!

    2. But if web literacy, including web programming, was adopted by every school as a fourth basic literacy, kids would not only learn how to code, they would learn about interactivity, collaboration, the melding of the artistic and the scientific, creativity, and precision.

      Alot of schools in charleston are shifting towards this. Problem is that not all schools can afford that.

    3. Learning the basics of intellectual property is part of web literacy.

      Something that should be taught in schools.

    4. Making web literacy the fourth literacy begins with the premise that not only are humans capable of learning together–we’re doing it, contributing to peer learning online, every day of our lives. That is a major educational paradigm shift, the great gift we’ve been given by those who built the web on open architecture.

      Interesting perspective. Most people view us as still trying how to use the internet instead of already learning from it.

    5. would build the largest encyclopedia the world has ever known, because we love to share what we know with others, and we’re even willing to spend endless hours creating our own community standards, editing, and making it right.

      Although we did build a large encyclopedia, it is not completely accurate

    6. No one would have believed that peers could contribute knowledge and advice, helping one another to learn through YouTube videos, Wikipedia, or other sites.

      No one wouldve guessed this but it is now what the internet is for!

    7. the conceptual DNA that helps you to understand and negotiate the world you live in.

      The truth of the matter is that this is the world we live in with technology. We have the choice to get with the technology program or get confused.

    8. You don’t just learn “about” reading: you learn to read. You don’t just learn “about” arithmetic: you learn to count and calculate. You don’t just learn “about” the web: you learn to make your own website.

      Best way I've heard this idea put into words so far!