1,116 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2018
    1. CredCo Indicator:Inference - Convincing Evidence

      Question:How convincing do you find the evidence given for the primary claim?

      Answer:Not at All Convincing

    2. A couple of years ago, one of the lead HPV vaccine developers for Merck’s Gardasil, Dr. Diane Harper, came clean and warned that Gardasil was not only ineffective and unnecessary, it was dangerous.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Experts are cited

      Highlight:

      A couple of years ago, one of the lead HPV vaccine developers for Merck’s Gardasil, Dr. Diane Harper, came clean and warned that Gardasil was not only ineffective and unnecessary, it was dangerous.

    3. Based on their study, Rail and study co-author Abby Lippman, a McGill University professor emeritus, published an op-ed article in Montreal’s Le Devoir newspaper questioning the safety and benefits of human papillomavirus vaccines.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Experts are cited

      Highlight:

      Based on their study, Rail and study co-author Abby Lippman, a McGill University professor emeritus, published an op-ed article in Montreal’s Le Devoir newspaper questioning the safety and benefits of human papillomavirus vaccines.

    4. Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:The correlation appears across multiple independent contexts

      Highlight:

      Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

    5. The Rail-Lippman four-year study involved 170 parents of teenage girls who were given the HPV shots, which usually are administered sequentially in a series of three.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Cause precedes effect

      Highlight:

      The Rail-Lippman four-year study involved 170 parents of teenage girls who were given the HPV shots, which usually are administered sequentially in a series of three.

    6. Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

      Question:What evidence is given for the primary claim? Select all that apply.

      Answer:Cause precedes effect

      Highlight:

      Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

    7. Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

      CredCo Indicator:Inference - Type of Claims

      Question:Is a general or singular causal claim made? Highlight the section(s) that supports your answer.

      Answer:General Causal Claim

      Highlight:

      Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

    8. CredCo Indicator:Tone - Exaggerated Claims

      Question:Does the author exaggerate any claims? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    9. Maybe her pension was threatened, or her family. Who knows?

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      Maybe her pension was threatened, or her family. Who knows?

    10. Offit is a mainstream media darling. Ignore Offit. He’s off it and has made millions with his vaccine patent. And ignore the presstitutes who feed off him.

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      Offit is a mainstream media darling. Ignore Offit. He’s off it and has made millions with his vaccine patent. And ignore the presstitutes who feed off him.

    11. That’s my thought for the average vaccine indoctrinated sheeple. But my thoughts get nastier with the manic frothing-at-the-mouth vaccine fanatics, and downright vicious with the vaccine industry and its celebrated spokesman Dr. Paul Offit.

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      That’s my thought for the average vaccine indoctrinated sheeple. But my thoughts get nastier with the manic frothing-at-the-mouth vaccine fanatics, and downright vicious with the vaccine industry and its celebrated spokesman Dr. Paul Offit.

    12. pro-vaccine hysteria criticism,

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      pro-vaccine hysteria criticism,

    13. Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      Somehow these “prestigious” medical officials have ignored the adverse reaction cases reported internationally among teenage girls, ranging from chronic fatigue to chronic seizures to partial and complete paralysis.

    14. Oh, of course statistics provided by pro-vaccine agencies and Big Pharma were included in the National Post article that “prove” HPV vaccine’s efficacy and safety.

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      Oh, of course statistics provided by pro-vaccine agencies and Big Pharma were included in the National Post article that “prove” HPV vaccine’s efficacy and safety.

    15. Of course they were roundly attacked through the Canadian mainstream media.

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      Of course they were roundly attacked through the Canadian mainstream media.

    16. The mainstream media piled on with remarks from the usual “prestigious” medical professionals who asserted HPV vaccinations safety and remarkable success at reducing ovarian cancer.

      CredCo Indicator:Tone - Emotionally Charged

      Question:Does the article have an emotionally charged tone? (i.e, outrage, snark, celebration, horror, etc.). If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      The mainstream media piled on with remarks from the usual “prestigious” medical professionals who asserted HPV vaccinations safety and remarkable success at reducing ovarian cancer.

    17. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Naturalistic

      Question:Does the author suggest that something is good because it is natural, or bad because it is not natural (the naturalistic fallacy)?

      Answer:No

    18. And unbound or free aluminum, the stuff used in almost all vaccines, is a neurological toxin.

      CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Appeal to Fear

      Question:Does the author exaggerate the dangers of a situation and use scare tactics to persuade (the appeal to fear fallacy)?

      Answer:Sort of

      Highlight:

      And unbound or free aluminum, the stuff used in almost all vaccines, is a neurological toxin.

    19. Maybe her pension was threatened, or her family. Who knows?

      CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Appeal to Fear

      Question:Does the author exaggerate the dangers of a situation and use scare tactics to persuade (the appeal to fear fallacy)?

      Answer:Sort of

      Highlight:

      Maybe her pension was threatened, or her family. Who knows?

    20. It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

      CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Appeal to Fear

      Question:Does the author exaggerate the dangers of a situation and use scare tactics to persuade (the appeal to fear fallacy)?

      Answer:Sort of

      Highlight:

      It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

    21. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Slippery Slope

      Question:Does the author say that one small change will lead to a major change (use a slippery slope argument)? Highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    22. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - False Dilemma

      Question:Does the author present a complicated choice as if it were binary (construct a false dilemma)? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    23. CredCo Indicator:Logical Fallacies - Straw Man

      Question:Does the author present the counterargument as a weaker, more foolish version of the real counterargument (use a Straw Man Argument)? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    24. CredCo Indicator:Confidence - Acknowledge Uncertainty

      Question:Do they acknowledge uncertainty or the possibility that things might be otherwise? If so, highlight the relevant section(s).

      Answer:No

    25. CredCo Indicator:Confidence - Extent Claims Justified

      Question:To what extent does their confidence in their claims seem justified?

      Answer:Not at all justified

    26. Oh, of course statistics provided by pro-vaccine agencies and Big Pharma were included in the National Post article that “prove” HPV vaccine’s efficacy and safety.

      Question:Are any experts, organizations, or studies cited that are separate from the central study quoted in the article? If so, highlight relevant section(s).

      Answer:4 or more

      Highlight:

      Oh, of course statistics provided by pro-vaccine agencies and Big Pharma were included in the National Post article that “prove” HPV vaccine’s efficacy and safety.

    27. A couple of years ago, one of the lead HPV vaccine developers for Merck’s Gardasil, Dr. Diane Harper, came clean and warned that Gardasil was not only ineffective and unnecessary, it was dangerous.

      Question:Are any experts, organizations, or studies cited that are separate from the central study quoted in the article? If so, highlight relevant section(s).

      Answer:4 or more

      Highlight:

      A couple of years ago, one of the lead HPV vaccine developers for Merck’s Gardasil, Dr. Diane Harper, came clean and warned that Gardasil was not only ineffective and unnecessary, it was dangerous.

    28. Harper mentioned the medically known fact that 98 percent of HPV warts among sexually active women heal on their own within a year or two.

      Question:Are any experts, organizations, or studies cited that are separate from the central study quoted in the article? If so, highlight relevant section(s).

      Answer:4 or more

      Highlight:

      Harper mentioned the medically known fact that 98 percent of HPV warts among sexually active women heal on their own within a year or two.

    29. [Image of a table titled “WARNING (HPV4 Gardasil & HPV 2 Cervarix): Adverse Reactions And Deaths As Reported To The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System]

      Question:Are any experts, organizations, or studies cited that are separate from the central study quoted in the article? If so, highlight relevant section(s).

      Answer:4 or more

      Highlight:

      [Image of a table titled “WARNING (HPV4 Gardasil & HPV 2 Cervarix): Adverse Reactions And Deaths As Reported To The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System]

    30. [Image of a table titled “WARNING (HPV4 Gardasil & HPV 2 Cervarix): Adverse Reactions And Deaths As Reported To The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System]

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 3

      Highlight:

      [Image of a table titled “WARNING (HPV4 Gardasil & HPV 2 Cervarix): Adverse Reactions And Deaths As Reported To The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System]

    31. Oh, of course statistics provided by pro-vaccine agencies and Big Pharma were included in the National Post article that “prove” HPV vaccine’s efficacy and safety.

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 2

      Highlight:

      Oh, of course statistics provided by pro-vaccine agencies and Big Pharma were included in the National Post article that “prove” HPV vaccine’s efficacy and safety.

    32. Rail and study co-author Abby Lippman, a McGill University professor emeritus,

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 1

      Highlight:

      Rail and study co-author Abby Lippman, a McGill University professor emeritus,

    33. published an op-ed article in Montreal’s Le Devoir newspaper questioning the safety and benefits of human papillomavirus vaccines.

      CredCo Indicator:Citation of Studies

      Question:Highlight each scientific study cited:

      Answer:Scientific Study 1

      Highlight:

      published an op-ed article in Montreal’s Le Devoir newspaper questioning the safety and benefits of human papillomavirus vaccines.

    34. one of the lead HPV vaccine developers for Merck’s Gardasil, Dr. Diane Harper,

      CredCo Indicator:Quotes from Outside Experts

      Question:Highlight each expert cited:

      Answer:Expert 2

      Highlight:

      one of the lead HPV vaccine developers for Merck’s Gardasil, Dr. Diane Harper,

    35. Rail and study co-author Abby Lippman,

      CredCo Indicator:Quotes from Outside Experts

      Question:Highlight each expert cited:

      Answer:Expert 1

      Highlight:

      Rail and study co-author Abby Lippman,

    36. Question:Which of the following types of sources are cited in the article? Check all that apply. If Other, please highlight.

      Answer:Studies

    37. Question:Which of the following types of sources are cited in the article? Check all that apply. If Other, please highlight.

      Answer:Experts

    38. Canadian Concordia University’s kinesiology professor Genevieve Rail was awarded a grant of $270,000 to study the effects of HPV vaccines on the public.

      CredCo Indicator:Single Study Article

      Question:Is this article primarily about a single scientific study?

      Answer:Yes

      Highlight:

      Canadian Concordia University’s kinesiology professor Genevieve Rail was awarded a grant of $270,000 to study the effects of HPV vaccines on the public.

    39. It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

      CredCo Indicator:Clickbait Title

      Question:What clickbait techniques does this headline employ (select all that apply)?

      Answer:Inducing fear (“Is Your Boyfriend Cheating on You?”)

      Highlight:

      It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

    40. It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

      CredCo Indicator:Clickbait Title

      Question:What clickbait techniques does this headline employ (select all that apply)?

      Answer:Hidden secret or trick (“Fitness Companies Hate Him...”, “Experts are Dying to Know Their Secret”)

      Highlight:

      It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

    41. It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

      CredCo Indicator:Clickbait Title

      Question:What clickbait techniques does this headline employ (select all that apply)?

      Answer:Provoking emotions, such as shock or surprise (“...Shocking Result”, “...Leave You in Tears”)

      Highlight:

      It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam

    42. CredCo Indicator:Clickbait Title

      Question:Is the headline clickbaity?

      Answer:Somewhat clickbaity

    43. CredCo Indicator:Title Representativeness

      Question:How is the title unrepresentative of the content of the article? (Select all that apply).

      Answer:Title carries little information about the body

    44. CredCo Indicator:Title Representativeness

      Question:How is the title unrepresentative of the content of the article? (Select all that apply).

      Answer:Title emphasizes different information than the body

    45. CredCo Indicator:Title Representativeness

      Question:Question: Does the title of the article accurately reflect the content of the article?

      Answer:Somewhat Unrepresentative

    46. Question:Rate your impression of the credibility of this article

      Answer:Somewhat low credibility

  2. Mar 2018
    1. Szeliski and Shum, 1997

      Creating full view panoramic image mosaics and environment maps, In Proceedings of SIGGRAPH'97, volume 31, pages 251-258 .

    Tags

    Annotators

  3. Dec 2017
    1. is chapter, we look at how to present your research effectively.

      maybe discuss this chapter in the beginning of the semester would be helpful for the lab

    1. Still at a starting point, we have neither ‘advanced’ nor remained unmoved.

      The cover of Ken Macrorie's textbook, The I-Search Paper, has a moebius strip on it, reflecting this sentiment nicely.<br>

      But the conceit of the moebius strip extends from the back cover as well

      So, you start reading this book on the back cover, nice twist, just like in a moebius strip. You work through the text by doing. Then when you are done, you get to the end and out the back of the book you go onto the back cover, to enter again. Escher would approve. That is what I see happening here. In the end this process serves the product, the text that is produced for anyone concerned.

  4. Sep 2017
    1. the discipline aims to identify the key actors within networks, where influence is concentrated in these networks, and how that influence is disseminated.

      SNA also gives you the ability to see beyond your social horizon. It is easy to know our friends friends but it is very hard to know our friends friends friends. Much less our friends friends friends friends. But do they influence us in some way? How many steps out does influence remain? Is there a way to measure this in your small paper?

    1. ask people to list those in their social circles who have intervened in abusive situations, people they have talked to about bystander intervention, or people whose opinion on intervening is important to them.

      What would be the links between these people? If you asked someone to list their friends, you will get lists which produce a star network. There needs to be a second round of questions involving friends of friends. Getting network data requires asking interrelated people.

    2. ystander behaviors can tell us there is a difference, but not much more.

      How would you analyze this via SNA? What networks would shape bystander intervention? Networks at the party? Personal or friendship networks? Networks on campus? Could you think about doing something on this for your small paper?

    1. a phone calls and mail. Now, it might mean instantaneous connection via apps

      Is there a way to compare what these networks look like? Could you compare the friendship network of a grandparent, parent and child? And compare the ways in which they maintain those networks? I would also include a strength of ties. I could see the grandparent having stronger ties but fewer. The child having more but weaker. Just thinking of ideas for your small paper.

    1. party and we don’t know anyone there, that humans have a desire to talk to each other

      Is this an idea for your small paper? How have others mapped and measured what interactions take place at social gatherings? Could you reproduce this for your small paper?

  5. Apr 2017
    1. He assured the company that it was a fact, handed down from his ancestor, the historian, that the Kaatskill mountains had always been haunted by strange beings. That it was affirmed that the great Hendrick Hudson, the first discoverer of the river and country, kept a kind of vigil there every twenty years, with his crew of the Half-moon; being permitted in this way to revisit the scenes of his enterprise, and keep a guardian eye upon the river and the great city called by his name. That his father had once seen them in their old Dutch dresses playing at ninepins in the hollow of the mountain; and that he himself had heard, one summer afternoon, the sound of their balls, like distant peals of thunder.

      This solidifies the fact that these ghosts are “real” (at least in the world of the narrative) since they have been noted by other people then just Rip, and have similar stories of interactions/observations between the Dutch ghosts and members of the town.

    2. He doubted his own identity, and whether he was himself or another man.

      This moment provides an example of an existentialist dilemma in the form of dissociative dread toward his understanding of self. Rip’s confusion is so strong that it causes him to doubt the nature of his own being.

    3. stared at him with such a fixed statue-like gaze, and such strange uncouth, lack-lustre countenances, that his heart turned within him, and his knees smote together.

      This is a moment defining real fear towards his current predicament.

    4. On nearer approach, he was still more surprised at the singularity of the stranger’s appearance. He was a short, square-built old fellow, with thick bushy hair, and a grizzled beard. His dress was of the antique Dutch fashion—a cloth jerkin strapped round the waist—several pairs of breeches, the outer one of ample volume, decorated with rows of buttons down the sides, and bunches at the knees. He bore on his shoulders a stout keg, that seemed full of liquor, and made signs for Rip to approach and assist him with the load. Though rather shy and distrustful of this new acquaintance, Rip complied with his usual alacrity;

      These Dutch ghosts are part of the history of the area but are also tangible forces that drive the plot. Rip can physically interact with these ghosts as if they were normal people, the only thing that proves odd is that they do not speak. Regardless, they are ghosts that are more like echoes of a time past that can be encountered, rather than being antagonistic like the ambiguous forces that Poe presents in his works.

    5. As he was about to descend, he heard a voice from a distance hallooing: “Rip Van Winkle! Rip Van Winkle!” He looked around, but could see nothing but a crow winging its solitary flight across the mountain. He thought his fancy must have deceived him, and turned again to descend, when he heard the same cry ring through the still evening air, “Rip Van Winkle! Rip Van Winkle!”—at the same time Wolf bristled up his back, and giving a low growl, skulked to his master’s side, looking fearfully down into the glen. Rip now felt a vague apprehension stealing over him; he looked anxiously in the same direction, and perceived a strange figure slowly toiling up the rocks, and bending under the weight of something he carried on his back. He was surprised to see any human being in this lonely and unfrequented place, but supposing it to be some one of the neighborhood in need of his assistance, he hastened down to yield it.

      This build up provides a sense of apprehension, with Wolf detecting some sort of danger and the odd way that Rip’s name was being called through echo. This does not stop him from proceeding onward to make his chance meeting with the company of Dutch ghosts. 

    6. “Oh! that flagon! that wicked flagon!”

      A loose connection to Poe within the realm of alcahol playing a part in altered mind states.

    7. His mind now misgave him; he began to doubt whether both he and the world around him were not bewitched.

      The assumption that one has come under a spell or some other form of witchcraft would be a real fear for people of the time. Many believed the early superstitions, and while they acted as explanations for things they could not explain, they acted as warnings and preventive measures for certain behavior. Stories of ghosts and witches could be used to keep people away from dangerous territories, or provide lessons about needing to be more attentive to the possible dangers found outside of the safety of civilization. Irvings other works (like Legend of Sleepy Hallow) highlight the impact that fear can has on the mind.

    8. The moment Wolf entered the house, his crest fell, his tail drooped to the ground, or curled between his legs, he sneaked about with a gallows air, casting many a sidelong glance at Dame Van Winkle, and at the least flourish of a broomstick or ladle, he would fly to the door with yelping precipitation.

      This is a light bit of foreshadowing, noting that the dog has a sense for danger. It comes up again when Rip is about to encounter the Dutch ghosts.

    9. The great error in Rip’s composition was an insuperable aversion to all kinds of profitable labor. It could not be for want of assiduity or perseverance

      Rip as a character is surprisingly similar to Irving in his mannerisms. Though it is not as widely known, Irving had a similar aversion to labor due to a massive amount of anxiety brought on by the failure of his brother’s businesses after the Revolution. The fear of the state of the new nation was noticeable in how drastically the economy was shifting, which was one of the deciding factors that pushed Irving into writing and publishing. It was a way to secure some financial stability and support for his family’s livelihood while also avoiding ventures that could, at any moment due to the young nation’s “growing pains”, could fail and lead to ruin (Kopec).

    10. ghosts, witches, and Indians.

      Most of the early American folklore has been lost to time, since many of these stories were told mainly by word of mouth alone. Irving was one of the first to solidify local folklore in his works, practically starting the genre of “campfire narratives” in literature. His short piece of horror fiction, Legend of Sleepy Hallow, is what pioneered the American Gothic form of literature, which would be later built upon by writers like Poe.

    11. RIP VAN WINKLE.

      The annotations below are focused on the themes and language of American gothic horror and the connection to another text located here.

      Associated Sources in MLA Style:

      Badenhausen, Richard. "Fear and Trembling in Literature of the Fantastic: Edgar Allan Poe's 'The Black Cat'." Studies in Short Fiction, vol. 29, no. 4, 1992, pp. 487-498. EBSCOhost.

      Bann, Jennifer. "Ghostly Hands and Ghostly Agency: The Changing Figure of the Nineteenth-Century Specter." Victorian Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Social, Political, and Cultural Studies, vol. 51, no. 4, 2009, pp. 663-686. EBSCOhost.

      Kopec, Andrew. "Irving, Ruin, and Risk." Early American Literature, vol. 48, no. 3, Nov. 2013, pp. 709-735. EBSCOhost.

      Norton, Mary Berth. "Witchcraft in the Anglo-American Colonies." OAH Magazine of History, vol. 17, no. 4, July 2003, pp. 5-9. EBSCOhost.

    1. It was now the representation of an object that I shudder to name—and for this, above all, I loathed, and dreaded, and would have rid myself of the monster had I dared—it was now, I say, the image of a hideous—of a ghastly thing—of the GALLOWS!—oh, mournful and terrible engine of Horror and of Crime—of Agony and of Death!

      Here is a distinct fear of the gallows, something the narrator has told us he is condemned to for his crime at the beginning of his tale. The fear outlined in this sentence represents the narrator’s true fear, the fear of facing what he has done. The gallows are an object for delivering punishment through the death of the criminal. The narrator constantly faced fear, guilt, and anger but fails to address their effects throughout the story. He instead chooses to run away from these emotions by burying them in alcohol or just remove them from his life with violence. This is the only moment that causes the narrator to seize up and deliver short hyphenated statements, which to a reader would sound quick and manic. This fear is an existential fear of closure and finality, now that the narrator has own death it shows through the text a moment of vulnerability (Badenhausen 492-493).

    2. But may God shield and deliver me from the fangs of the Arch-Fiend! No sooner had the reverberation of my blows sunk into silence, than I was answered by a voice from within the tomb!—by a cry, at first muffled and broken, like the sobbing of a child, and then quickly swelling into one long, loud, and continuous scream, utterly anomalous and inhuman—a howl—a wailing shriek, half of horror and half of triumph, such as might have arisen only out of hell, conjointly from the throats of the dammed in their agony and of the demons that exult in the damnation.

      Here the replacement cat (and possible paranormal force) acts upon the plot by revealing the narrators misdeeds. Like Irving’s Dutch ghosts, this mysterious cat is integral to the story for without their influence the main characters would be unaffected. Again, this cat provides another confusing instance of possible paranormal power by somehow ending up inside the wall. The narrator hated the creature so much, how could he have missed it as he bricked up his wife’s corpse? It either had managed to avoid detection to hide itself within the wall, or had some greater power that allowed it to appear there as it had in the tavern. 

    3. I withdrew my arm from her grasp and buried the axe in her brain. She fell dead upon the spot, without a groan.

      This is the point of no return, where the narrator goes from mere killer of beast to full villain with manslaughter. He is unmoved by killing the thing that prevented him from taking out his anger again, she had interrupted his control and for that she died.

    4. Pluto had not a white hair upon any portion of his body; but this cat had a large, although indefinite splotch of white, covering nearly the whole region of the breast. Upon my touching him, he immediately arose, purred loudly, rubbed against my hand, and appeared delighted with my notice. This, then, was the very creature of which I was in search. I at once offered to purchase it of the landlord; but this person made no claim to it—knew nothing of it—had never seen it before.

      Just like the mark on the wall, this is another stange occuance that could be related to the paranormal. This cat appears out of nowhere and specifically targets the narrator. It could be seen as an antagonistic force, a manifestation meant to spell the narrator’s downfall. Again, Pluto’s name is referenced, calling back to the idea of death and relating it to this new cat. Its lack of an eye is an intentional narrative decision by Poe, but in the world inside the text is strangely coincidental to be near identical to Pluto, almost unsettling so. What is interesting about this cat is that the white tuft of fur it sports “develops” the image of the stockade. Either an outside force is at work on the cat’s fur, or the cat itself is a doppelganger (a supernatural creature that morphs its own body to match another’s appearance) of sorts.

    5. I approached and saw, as if graven in bas relief upon the white surface, the figure of a gigantic cat. The impression was given with an accuracy truly marvellous. There was a rope about the animal’s neck.

      This odd occurrence might be attributed to something paranormal. As the narrator later explains, it is physically possible for flesh remains to leave burn impressions on surfaces. However, the corpse of the cat would have to have been resting against the wall for that impression to develop, and the chances of that happening to produce such a haunting representation is highly improbable. Perhaps there was some sort of other force at work and it made possible the author’s explanation or something else entirely. Whatever the case, it remains unknown, but a reader can confirm that within the world of the narrative because it is a tangible remnant viewed by multiple people and not just the narrator.

    6. One night as I sat, half stupified, in a den of more than infamy

      The narrator never seeks to remedy his situation, only to run from it or drink it away.

    7. I experienced a sentiment half of horror, half of remorse, for the crime of which I had been guilty

      These are the common themes Poe tends to play on throughout his body of work, which are tied to very personal and emotional moments. A healthy human mind is capable of a vast array of different feelings, each meant to inform thought via bodily sensations and responses. If the narrator can comprehend the emotions, but does not associate them to his crime, is it an effect of alcohol? Could it be something darker, something stemming from a broken mind? 

    8. spirit of PERVERSENESS

      This is not a "physical" sprit like those in Irving's works. In this case, "spirit" embodies the “feeling” or the “quality of” what it is referencing. The spirit of perverseness would be something of a compulsion, something internal that forces negative action and/or thought.

    9. Pluto

      This is a bit of plain faced foreshadowing. Pluto is the Roman equivalent of Hades, the god of death and overseer for the underworld. The name calls upon the imagery of darkness and death, which no doubt plays into the narrative throughout.

    10. In speaking of his intelligence, my wife, who at heart was not a little tinctured with superstition, made frequent allusion to the ancient popular notion, which regarded all black cats as witches in disguise.

      The concept of the witch played a large role in the development of colonial America, and the superstitions surrounding witchcraft are usually connected to larger outside forces that were difficult to explain or comprehend. Disease, injury, misfortune, and other tragic events that would occur were often blamed on fellow townsfolk that had preexisting issues or disagreements with others (Norton 5-6). Due to the empiricist model of thought, perception defined reality, so all that was required to prove someone was capable of witchcraft was to “experience” the effects. If someone said they saw a person turn into a cat, it was taken as proper testimony to the event.

      It is interesting that the wife holds this belief, yet the narrator downplays it. Perhaps that is a veiled critique of these old superstitions.

    11. But my disease grew upon me—for what disease is like Alcohol!

      Poe was a known alcholic, so it is interesting how he comments on it a being a "disease" with this narrator character. Perhaps there is more self-inserted introspection involved then his usual themes of guilt, sadness, and loss noteable in his other works.

    12. THE BLACK CAT.

      The annotations below are focused on the themes and language of American gothic horror and the connection to another text located here.

      Associated Sources in MLA Style:

      Badenhausen, Richard. "Fear and Trembling in Literature of the Fantastic: Edgar Allan Poe's 'The Black Cat'." Studies in Short Fiction, vol. 29, no. 4, 1992, pp. 487-498. EBSCOhost.

      Bann, Jennifer. "Ghostly Hands and Ghostly Agency: The Changing Figure of the Nineteenth-Century Specter." Victorian Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Social, Political, and Cultural Studies, vol. 51, no. 4, 2009, pp. 663-686. EBSCOhost.

      Kopec, Andrew. "Irving, Ruin, and Risk." Early American Literature, vol. 48, no. 3, Nov. 2013, pp. 709-735. EBSCOhost.

      Norton, Mary Berth. "Witchcraft in the Anglo-American Colonies." OAH Magazine of History, vol. 17, no. 4, July 2003, pp. 5-9. EBSCOhost.

    1. arg maxvw;vcP(w;c)2Dlog11+evcvw

      maximise the log probability.

    2. p(D= 1jw;c)the probability that(w;c)came from the data, and byp(D= 0jw;c) =1p(D= 1jw;c)the probability that(w;c)didnot.

      probability of word,context present in text or not.

    3. Loosely speaking, we seek parameter values (thatis, vector representations for both words and con-texts) such that the dot productvwvcassociatedwith “good” word-context pairs is maximized.
    4. In the skip-gram model, each wordw2Wisassociated with a vectorvw2Rdand similarlyeach contextc2Cis represented as a vectorvc2Rd, whereWis the words vocabulary,Cis the contexts vocabulary, anddis the embed-ding dimensionality.

      Factors involved in the Skip gram model

  6. Mar 2017
    1. 2.4 基本版面の設計

      ここで記述されている設計方法は、紙に印刷される書籍には当てはまるが、紙に印刷される他のもの(雑誌など)にあてはまるかどうかは私には分からない。ページ区切りがなされる電子文書にはあてはまらないことがある。たとえば、ユーザが本文フォントの大きさを変更できる電子書籍にはあてはまらない。

      しかし、基本版面という考え方、とくに文字サイズ、行長、行数、行間、そのものは、ページ割付けされる文書(つまり冊子本のように見える文書)一般に有効ではないかと思う。巻子本のように見える文書についても、文字サイズ、行長、行間は、有効であろう。

  7. Feb 2017
    1. We suggested that employee perceptions of voice vary between the different levels of an organisation and proposed that trade union membership will be more likely to enhance individual employee perceptions of voice at the wider organisational level.
    1. Try to get a Ralph Gibson neg expose tri-x at E.I. 200 and overdevelop the neg if I remember correctly something along the lines of 11mins in Rodinal 1:25 20°C

      Normal Tri-X at ISO 200 in Rodinal takes 7 minutes according to the massive dev chart, 11 minutes is an increase in 57%.

    1. The negative I used was developed in Rodinal 1+25 for 16 minutes at 20*C and has still provided fairly soft tone gradation despite extended development.

      As mentioned further down:

      She simply set her spotmeter to the recommended ISO rating and placed the black ball of wool in the basket onto zone 3. Additional exposure was then given for the bellows extension factor. The recommended development time for Rodinal diluted 1+25 was 8 minutes, so that time was doubled

      Seems to be that exposing FP4+ at box speed and then doubling the development time can lead to adequate negatives for salt printing.

  8. Jul 2016
    1. Unsupervised Learning of 3D Structure from Images Authors: Danilo Jimenez Rezende, S. M. Ali Eslami, Shakir Mohamed, Peter Battaglia, Max Jaderberg, Nicolas Heess (Submitted on 3 Jul 2016) Abstract: A key goal of computer vision is to recover the underlying 3D structure from 2D observations of the world. In this paper we learn strong deep generative models of 3D structures, and recover these structures from 3D and 2D images via probabilistic inference. We demonstrate high-quality samples and report log-likelihoods on several datasets, including ShapeNet [2], and establish the first benchmarks in the literature. We also show how these models and their inference networks can be trained end-to-end from 2D images. This demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of learning to infer 3D representations of the world in a purely unsupervised manner.

      The 3D representation of a 2D image is ambiguous and multi-modal. We achieve such reasoning by learning a generative model of 3D structures, and recover this structure from 2D images via probabilistic inference.

    1. When building a unified vision system or gradually adding new capabilities to a system, the usual assumption is that training data for all tasks is always available. However, as the number of tasks grows, storing and retraining on such data becomes infeasible. A new problem arises where we add new capabilities to a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), but the training data for its existing capabilities are unavailable. We propose our Learning without Forgetting method, which uses only new task data to train the network while preserving the original capabilities. Our method performs favorably compared to commonly used feature extraction and fine-tuning adaption techniques and performs similarly to multitask learning that uses original task data we assume unavailable. A more surprising observation is that Learning without Forgetting may be able to replace fine-tuning as standard practice for improved new task performance.

      Learning w/o Forgetting: distilled transfer learning

  9. Jun 2016
    1. Dynamic Filter Networks

      "... filters are generated dynamically conditioned on an input" Nice video frame prediction experiments.

    1. Atl=xtifl= 0MAXPOOL(RELU(CONV(Etl1)))l >0(1)^Atl=RELU(CONV(Rtl))(2)Etl= [RELU(Atl^Atl);RELU(^AtlAtl)](3)Rtl=CONVLSTM(Et1l;Rt1l;Rtl+1)(4)

      Very unique network structure. Prediction results look promising.

  10. Dec 2015
    1. from plantations. If that were to increase to 75 percent, the logged area of natural forests could drop in half.” Meanwhile the consumption of all wood has leveled off---for fuel, buildings, and, finally, paper. We are at peak timber.
  11. Jul 2015
    1. with the admission that “a few readers were flooding the site with inappropriate mat e rial.”

      for more on this, see Whitney Phillips, This is Why We Can't Have Nice Things http://www.amazon.com/This-Cant-Have-Nice-Things/dp/0262028948

      Here's a great essay on sexism and trolling: http://kernelmag.dailydot.com/issue-sections/staff-editorials/12898/trolling-stem-tech-sexism/ You can read more from Whitney here: http://billions-and-billions.com/about/

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. http://ssrn.com/abstract=2588493

      Grimmelmann, James. "The Virtues of Moderation." April 1, 2015. SSRN http://ssrn.com/abstract=2588493 keywords: moderation, online communities, semicommons, peer production, Wikipedia, MetaFilter, Reddit 17 Yale J.L. & Tech. 42 (2015) U of Maryland Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2015-8

  12. Nov 2014