1,743 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2021
  2. Aug 2021
  3. Jul 2021
  4. May 2021
    1. “Some of what is happening now will make these white supremacists realize why their grandparents wore hoods,” Ms. Wilson said. “At least then there was shame.”

      This is really something that is opens my eyes to in shock because people really kelp what they were hiding a secret to not get hate by others. This is a important topic that i never put my eye on.

    2. Now the online hunt to reveal extremists has raised concerns about unintended consequences, or even collateral damage. A few individuals have been misidentified in recent weeks, including a professor from Arkansas who was wrongly accused of participating in the neo-Nazi march. And some worry that the stigma of being outed as a political extremist can only reinforce that behavior in people who could still be talked out of it.

      this is a crazy topic to me because this can be harmful to many people and there life. As well the internet can be filled with many things that people post.

    3. You’re a Nazi and you’re fired, it’s your fault,” she sang. “You were spotted in a mob, now you lost your freaking job. You’re a Nazi and you’re fired, it’s your fault.”

      This is a great example of many things comparing to the nazi because the nazi were bad people so my question is what are they trying to say/ and why is this important/

  5. Apr 2021
    1. “To work alone: I am convinced this is what I should do, to discover what I really want,” she decided.

      Not always true; sometimes mixing what you know with what others teach you can help better your comparisons and discover what you truly want. It is like if you only had KitKats in your life and someone comes up and asks if you like KitKats better than a Hershey bar; of course you are going to say KitKats are great, but how do you truly know they are better to you than a Hershey bar if you never tried one? (A weird and seemingly unrelated metaphor, yes, but it does show what I mean in the value of comparison).

    2. Though mostly oblivious to the political upheaval in Germany at the time

      Part 2 of two-part annotation. Firstly, I'd like to agree with the other commentators on the questioning of her being oblivious to the upheaval in Germany (although it could be compared to now how there are plenty of people who have no idea what is going on in Venezuela). But relating both annotations in my two-parter, I would like to go against the authors words of a picture perfect world that she painted of Ruth. It reminded me of when the immigrants in the 1800-1900s came to America thinking the streets were paved in gold but were surely mistaken. I am sure many others who would be in her position didn't receive the same fate, especially with what was occurring in Germany at the time.

    3. “In Europe one can work!”

      Part 1 of two-part annotation.

    4. “Fear of having nothing to say musically, fear of not being able to say it, fear, fear, a whole web of it.”

      I can definitely relate to this, albeit not musically...more or less in general. The fear and anxiety of everything all together, where you wonder if anyone really hears you, especially if you say or tell no one anything. This isn't limited to just creating music, it can be anything you're passionate about, such as writing. You're scared of being unable to do something you love or maybe because of someone judging you, but that fear can be overcome.

    5. Seeger struggled with his own attempts at composition and, though notionally supportive of her work, placed Crawford in charge of domestic duties

      Is it possible that during Crawford’s time as a housewife, her compositions were published under Seeger’s name?

    6. She became indispensable to his work, helping draft his counterpoint treatise and enacting its musical principles in her new scores by “dissonating” melodies into disjunct figures and refracting rhythms in willfully independent lines.

      After becoming “indispensable” to him, would Seeger have admitted that women can write symphonies?

    7. Though her mother wrote hoping that Crawford might become “a real lady musician, with nice manners and poise and self-confidence and pretty clothes,”

      Does this mean that her mother did not support her?

    8. she became a wife, a mother, a leftist and a folk revivalist.

      Did her family not support her musical career and aspirations? Or was she overwhelmed with responsibilities and ultimately just unable to compose as much as she would have liked?

    9. “Fear of having nothing to say musically, fear of not being able to say it, fear, fear, a whole web of it.”

      Was her fear part of the reason she avoided Schoenberg?

  6. Mar 2021
    1. We don’t ban cars, but we work hard to regulate them — and limit access to them — so as to reduce the death toll they cause

      con

    2. Cars kill about as many people as guns, and we don’t ban them!

      analogy

    3. In 2015, Gov. Greg Abbott of Texas tweeted that he was “embarrassed” that his state was ranked second (behind California) in requests to buy new guns, albeit still with one million requests.

      example

    4. One study by the Violence Policy Center found that in 2012 there were 259 justifiable homicides by a private citizen using a firearm.

      facts

    5. It is true that guns are occasionally used to stop violence

      opposing argument

    6. Look, we all agree on some kinds of curbs on guns. Nobody believes that people should be able to drive a tank down Main Street, or have an anti-aircraft gun in the backyard. I’ve been to parts of northern Yemen where one could actually buy a tank or an

      allusions

    7. I attended a N.R.A. gun safety class (which came with a one-year membership to the N.R.A., making me an N.R.A. alum who despises what that organization has become). These classes can be very useful, and audits found that more than 80 percent cover such matters as checking the gun to see if it’s loaded, keeping one’s finger off the trigger until ready to fire and being certain of the target.

      per test

    8. Yet more Americans have died from gun violence, including suicides, since 1970 (about 1.4 million) than in all the wars in American history going back to the Revolutionary War (about 1.3 million). And it’s not just gang-members: In a typical year, more pre-schoolers are shot dead in America (about 75) than police officers are.

      Stats

    9. This is the blunt, damning truth: The latest shooting was 100 percent predictable.

      Fact

    10. Some of you will protest, as President Trump and others have, that the immediate aftermath of a shooting is too soon to talk about guns, or that it is disrespectful to the dead to use such a tragedy to score political points.

      Opposing

    11. and so is our polarized political system and the power of the gun lobby. It’s unclear how effective some of my suggestions will be, and in any case this will be a long, uncertain, uphill process.

      Refute?

    12. Yes, making America safer will be hard: There are no perfect solutions. The Second Amendment

      Consession

    13. But automobiles are a reminder that we can chip away at a large problem through a public health approach: Just as auto safety improvements have left us far better off, it seems plausible to some gun policy experts that a sensible, politically feasible set of public health steps could over time reduce firearm deaths in America by one-third — or more than 10,000 lives saved each year.

      Analogy to auto

    14. So let’s not just shed tears for the dead, give somber speeches and lower flags. Let’s get started and save lives.

      Qualifier?

    15. he first step is to understand the scale of the challenge America faces: The U.S. has more than 300 million guns — roughly one for every citizen — and stands out as well for its gun death rates. At the other extreme, Japan has less than one gun per 100 people, and typically fewer than 10 gun deaths a year in the entire country.

      Analogy?

    16. America has been shaken by new mass shootings, in Georgia and Colorado, with at least 18 people killed. This essay originally ran in 2017, after a shooter killed 26 people in a Texas church, but the issue is still tragically relevant — and will remain so until America tightens its gun safety policies.

      Example

    1. Will I ever write really simple music?” she wondered in a letter to Seeger

      Did she desire this, or did she feel like it was something she was supposed to do, especially considering the musical expectations of women at the time?

    2. Dio the Composer virtually did not exist in my growing up.”

      What was behind this? The stresses of life or the control exhibited in marriage over women?

    3. Seeger struggled with his own attempts at composition and, though notionally supportive of her work, placed Crawford in charge of domestic duties

      Could he have hindered his own creativity by limiting his wife’s?

    4. a kind of discordant version of Barber’s Adagio for Strings.

      Why must female artists and musicians always be compared to their male contemporaries? Why can’t they be described simply as they are?

    5. written for unusual pairings of instruments like oboe and cello

      Do we think these unusual pairings were made intentionally or instead were chosen because she enjoyed the sound of the instruments together?

    6. helping draft his counterpoint treatise and enacting its musical principles in her new scores by “dissonating” melodies into disjunct figures and refracting rhythms in willfully independent lines.

      So in some ways, she was also a teacher to him?

    7. radically discordant and uniquely American.

      Why would something radically discordant and dissonant be defined as uniquely American? How does dissonance in music translate to Americanism and patriotism... or the lack thereof?

    8. Crawford found her compositional voice just as modernism was emerging

      Do we think this is said to imply that she was one of the founders of American modernism or was inspired by modernism?

    9. As a woman of that generation,

      Why the differentiation between woman and man?

    10. Crawford’s piece within a broader traversal of the American string quartet, connecting her work to later giants like Elliott Carter and contemporary composer

      Interesting that she is considered an influence even though she has not been a major influence in the standard classical canon of music... do we think that she is not as acknowledged because of her heavy use of dissonance or because of her sex?

    11. postwar avant-garde.

      What did the events and repercussions of WWI do to create an avant-garde musical movement and how did the political and economic instability of the time change composers priorities? How did the Roaring 20s and the depression affect this as well?

    12. fear, fear, a whole web of it.”

      How do we feel that fear inspires artists? Even though it can hinder creativity, do we also believe it can help it?

    13. avoided studying with the master of 12-tone composition.

      Is this because she was afraid of getting influenced by others and wanted to define her own voice or because she had some disdain for Schoenberg? Could she possibly have avoided him out of ego?

    14. Though mostly oblivious to the political upheaval in Germany at the time

      How is it possible that she was so unaware of the upheaval in Germany. I feel like it was something no one was able to ignore.

    1. iolent crime would drop this year by 0.6 percent and that the overall crime rate would fall by 1.8 percent

      I don't think this is true, Because crimes are increasing

    2. Current data suggests, however, that violence may be tailing off in 2017, at least moderately.

      In 2017 crimes have lowered a bitt.

    3. In Chicago and elsewhere, murder victims, as well as those arrested on murder charges, were disproportionately young, African-American and male,

      Why people of color. Is it because they have less patience?

    4. police shootings that prompted rioting or other civil disturbances are Chicago, Baltimore, Charlotte, St. Louis and Milwaukee.

      Police shootings and rioting occur in Chicago etc.

    5. distrust between heavily policed communities and local police. It’s not a coincidence that cities that have crime increases have also had problems between communities and the police.”

      Problems between the police and communities.

    6. particular area will be free to continue committing crimes with little fear of arrest.

      So people that commit crimes don't really fear being arrested. Is it because police officers don't so their jobs?

    7. The shootings, many of which have been captured on video over the last three years, have been widely disseminated via the news media and on the internet.

      the Media shows all the crimes.

    8. handguns, poverty and social isolation, warring gangs involved in the drug trade, and police officers who are questioning fewer people and making fewer arrests for fear of being criticized by superiors and civil rights groups.

      So that may be causes that crimes are increasing.

    9. There are pockets of increased violence across the country that demand an increased response from all levels of government,”

      The government should do something to stop crimes. More protection?

    10. directed prosecutors to more aggressively charge those arrested, while blaming illegal immigration for much of the rise in violence.

      Do they think that immigrants are causing crimes to increase?

    11. hat the nation is in the grip of a crime wave that requires more arrests and harsher penalties, including for nonviolent crimes like drug possession.

      Harsher penalties. And more arrests.

    12. “What you worry about is that the trend is broken, and the numbers are going to go back up. A 20 percent increase in homicides over the past two years is not trivial. We’ve got what looks like a serious problem here.”

      A serious problem and people should do something to stop rises in homicides.

    13. 1980s and 1990s, last year was the first time violent crime increased in consecutive years since 2005 and 2006,

      A totally rise of crimes compared to the 1980 and 1990.

    14. A total of 17,250 people were murdered in 2016

      A lot of murders. Is it because of the Covid lockdown.

    15. Violent crime, including homicides, rose for the second consecutive year in 2016, driven by increases in a few urban centers

      Homicides and crimes increase. Why is that happening?

  7. Feb 2021
    1. Computational thinking is not new. Seymour Papert, a pioneer in artificial intelligence and an M.I.T. professor, used the term in 1980 to envision how children could use computers to learn.

      计算机思维并不是一个很新的概念。人工智能领域的前沿学者、MIT教授Seymour Papert,早在1980年,就已经使用这个术语来展望孩子们如何在未来使用电脑来学习。计算机思维主要包括识别模式和顺序、创造算法、设计用于发现以及修正错误的测试,把一般浓缩为精确,把精确拓展到一般。

    2. Learning to Think Like a Computer
    1. Over the next several years, I spent hundreds of days in and out of hospitals. I developed what may be a lifelong, chronic daily headache disorder. Several years ago, I got a device called a peripheral nerve stimulator implanted near my brain, which made it possible for me to work and exercise again, but I am still in pain daily.I also lost my career and my dream of becoming a pilot, and the Air Force lost a competent and devoted officer candidat

      I think something that should definitely be talked about and discerned is how much experiences like rape can affect someone's life long time-not just emotionally,mentally and physically but the things that can be tarnished and destroyed within their lives as well. this woman's career was ruined and lost due to what had happened to her.

    2. My attacker was accused of raping at least two more women in just the four months after my attack, before he was ultimately incarcerated for another assault. And while the consequences of unreported, untreated rapes are not always as obvious as in my case, they are often devastating. How many women and men will stay silent as I did? How many will get ill as a result? How many will develop post-traumatic stress disorder?At the Veterans Affairs Center for Sexual Trauma Services at Bay Pines, Fla., I got to know a woman who had been raped when she was in the military during World War II. She kept her rape secret for decades, until the year before we met, when one of her doctors asked her if she had ever been raped. I was 21; she was in her 80s. Her post-traumatic stress disorder nearly destroyed her life.We have no way of knowing how many competent service members the military loses every year to sexual assault. Many then turn to Veterans Affairs for health care. My rape alone has already cost the federal government more than a million dollars. We can’t afford this. The military needs strong leaders who will loudly counter the normalization of sexual violence, who appreciate the contributions of service members of any gender and who recognize the costs of staying silent.

      my question to this would be why does it take so long for the perpetrator to be arrested, incriminated and charged for what they did? Does the victims stories seem so inconceivable and fraudulent that it could never have happened?!

    3. This one conversation among my classmates, my “brothers in arms,” helped me to fully understand why I had remained silent after my own rape. My classmates had made the implicit cultural belief explicit: Victims were to be blamed for their rapes, and if they lost their military careers for it, all the better.

      this line from the text or quote you can say is very imperative to my injustice because it talks about how victims are silenced after enduring a traumatic experience such as rape and are fearful and incompetent of vocalizing what has happened to them...because once again they are fearful of being silenced/ignored/ and condemned for not only telling their story but spreading awareness that could dismantle this ongoing cycle of oppression and injustice.

    1. He believes that to preserve an open society we really do need, as Trump has said, to “drain the swamp.” Getting big money out of politics would enable us, for example, to combat the rigidities and high prices of monopolies through strong antitrust enforcement, and to remove the exorbitant privileges that allow big banks to make profits at the expense of the rest of society.

      I could use this quote because it describes a plan to have when solving wealth inequality

    2. The banks that created the calamity got bailed out and no top executive went to jail, but millions of people lost their jobs, savings and homes.

      Do banks and executives have some sort of immunity to the consequences of crimes when they had a major role to play?

    3. This is because inequality erodes two foundation stones of modern society — openness to new ideas and opportunities, and a conviction that all citizens are morally equal.

      This level of wealth inequality within the country can cause a massive decay in individuals need for moral responsibility.

    1. But he also wasn’t good at verbalizing what he thought he knew: that going to school suddenly felt impossible, that people were undoubtedly judging him, that nothing he did felt good enough

      Why does he do that?

    2. he was taking three Advanced Placement classes, running on his school’s cross-country team and traveling to Model United Nations conferences.

      Maybe this is 1 reason why teens have anxiety

    1. I look for a couple of threads. One is the combination of ego and humility. Let’s be honest, a lot of C.E.O.s are ego-driven people. But they also have to be humble in some very precise ways around ideas and decisions, and being able to change their mind. That’s an idiosyncratic combination.Another thread is intellectual curiosity. They ask a lot of “why” questions, and they’re comfortable with the ambiguous nature of things that are unknown.The last one is that you want somebody who’s ultra-resilient, because there are just so many trials and tribulations to building a business. One day it can feel like you’re on the top of the world, and the next day it’s all crumbling down. Can you compartmentalize it, put it in context and enjoy it?

      在接受纽约时报采访时,他解释过自己会把钱投给怎样的创业者。

      “首先他要够谦逊,能听得进不同意见;第二他的求知欲必须旺盛,会问许多‘为什么’。最后,他得是一个有着超强韧性的人,因为创业要经历许多磨难,前一天你还在世界之巅,第二天一切的一切却都崩溃了,你能享受这样的生活吗?”

  8. Jan 2021
    1. process-oriented era.

      self-disciplined and settles well into established systems and structures. focuses on the journey as well as the destination. always complies with the rules

    1. None of this is meant to argue for some sort of relativism of values or that everyone is equally justified in the choices they make. The displays of racism, sexism and xenophobia that this presidential election has brought us — often in the form of stories that express values associated with macho individualism — are to be rejected wholesale.
    2. This is not to say that people who tell stories like this are necessarily wrong about their history
    3. stories about ourselves express values

      important

    4. whereas if we’re trying to justify a dubious act to someone who is judging us (or perhaps ourselves), we might tell a story that makes us out to be without other recourse in the situation

      we might change the details to elicit a certain response from the audience - strategic summary

    5. The audience for these stories, of course, affect the stories we tell.
    6. We tell stories that make us seem adventurous, or funny, or strong

      we tells stories to demonstrate something about us

    7. value
    8. Now, instead of just a story about me, we have a story about how I like to see myself, or perhaps how I like myself to be seen.

      the story tells you about the writer + observer

    9. Here’s a story:I was driving home from work and a car cut me off. The guy was driving really slowly, and I wound up following him for half a mile.

      begins with example to illustrate argument before he's even gotten to it

  9. Nov 2020
    1. To do that, the president would need the cooperation of state, county and city officials.

      I think that the power dynamics here are pretty interesting. For one, sanctuary initially had problematic power dynamics with churches; now the power dynamic in the United States contains three players: church, state, and federal government

    2. Unavoidably, the clergy made itself a foe of the government, which argued that no one was above the law and that the sanctuary movement was, at heart, inspired more by politics than by theological imperatives. Movement members were put on trial. In one celebrated 1980s case, eight of them, including Mr. Fife, were convicted of felony conspiracy and other charges. None ended up going to jail, however.Editors’ PicksSome Movies Actually Understand Poverty in AmericaJunk Food Was Our Love LanguageI Don’t Want to Be the Office GrandmaAdvertisementContinue reading the main story

      This was natural due to the illegal nature of the clergymen's activities - the fact they were convicted, but didn't serve any time confirms the moral significance of their actions in many ways.

    3. With the front door to the United States effectively shut, Central Americans turned to a back entrance.

      I think that this is a great way to put it. Illegal immigration is a result of declining accessibility to asylum status...I wonder what a comparative study would show about illegal immigration rates for countries that either have more lenient laws or more efficient processing for asylum seekers

    4. typically were labeled “economic migrants,” not political refugees.

      Labels matter!! Highlights how labels play into politics and emotions.

    5. And so it played down widespread human rights outrages by those regimes and affiliated death squads. When Salvadorans and Guatemalans tried to enter the United States, claiming a fear of persecution in their homelands, they typically were labeled “economic migrants,” not political refugees.

      This is an important example of politics usurping morality due to fear and public perception. The economies may have been bad - but that wasn't even close to the "worst" of it.

    6. Those refugees found President Ronald Reagan’s White House no more eager to open its arms than the Trump administration is now to embrace Syrians seeking shelter from carnage back home

      New normalization of turning our back against refugees. This highlights a blindness of the U.S.'s military involvement in the same countries of whom they later reject refugees from.

    7. sanctuary movement of the 1980s, which put church and state in conflict with each other over the fate of Central Americans fleeing civil wars and pleading for asylum in the United States.

      Insight into the dynamic between the church and state --> Clash between morality and politics

    8. threatening to withhold federal money from localities that refuse to cooperate with immigration officials.

      Looming threat --> Coerces localities to respond in a specific way due to national pressure. Further shows that the President can impact the enforcement/implementation of asylum.

    9. In biblical times, shelter was offered even to those who might have qualified as “bad hombres” in the eyes of President Trump.

      Originally, sanctuary was non-discriminatory. Stark contrast from its selectivity today.

    10. Those refugees found President Ronald Reagan’s White House no more eager to open its arms than the Trump administration is now to embrace Syrians seeking shelter from carnage back home.

      important to keep in mind when looking across various administrations

    11. In biblical times, shelter was offered even to those who might have qualified as “bad hombres” in the eyes of President Trump. Killers, for example.

      interesting connection to the cyclical nature of asylum and how different leaders and governing bodies overtime have either restricted or broadened the institution

    12. Few were granted asylum — less than 3 percent in 1984. By comparison, Poles fleeing Communism were 10 times as likely that year to find asylum here. Anti-ayatollah Iranians were 20 times as likely.

      I found it interesting that people fleeing communism in the 80s weren't classified as economic migrants, but people from Latin American fleeing violence were.

    1. Online vigilantism has been around since the early days of the internet. So has “doxxing” — originally a slang term among hackers for obtaining and posting private documents about an individual, usually a rival or enemy. To hackers, who prized their anonymity, it was considered a cruel attack.

      This statement was interesting to me as although I knew what the word doxxing was I never knew what the word actually meant.

    2. For Ms. Coleman, the real mainstream moment for online vigilantism was in 2015, when an image of a dentist standing over a lion he had shot swiftly spread on social media. The lion was Cecil, a well-known conservation icon. Animal lovers seethed. The actress Mia Farrow even posted the dentist’s home address on Twitter.

      People will post some personal things as an act of vigilantism against someone who may post something they oppose like hunting animals. #weblit #LS121FA

    3. But the two young men pictured were not the bombers. At one point, Reddit sleuths even set their sights on a student from Brown University, about 60 miles away in Providence, R.I., who was missing. He had nothing to do with the bombing; he had committed suicide

      Examples of how dangerous it is when certain photos circulate around the internet quickly and how that can make certain people appear to be something they may not be associated with. #weblit #LS121FA

    4. In short, once someone is labeled a Nazi on the internet, that person stays a Nazi on the internet.

      this is a really good point on anonymity of the internet. Someone may be very racist, but they live in the bay area and that could really close doors to say something like that, but on the internet they can always find a new identity to create and talk about their racist beliefs. You aren't really changing their ways.

    5. “You’re a Nazi and you’re fired, it’s your fault,” she sang. “You were spotted in a mob, now you lost your freaking job. You’re a Nazi and you’re fired, it’s your fault.”

      Yo this song slaps for real. Nazi's are a great example of a group so wholly dispised in America. Demonized to the point that it's difficult to recognize it in real life. You know it's the point of "Would you kill Hitler?" Which is a logical fallacy and the world has gotten more complicated in terms of doxxing with the rise of the internet.

    6. “It’s important to dox Nazis,” said Andrea Grimes, 33, of Alameda, Calif. She held a sign that read: “White people pick one: Be the problem. Be the solution.” She said she had “outed” white supremacists to their parents, which she said often worked well to stop bad behavior online.

      I think this is very important, because it can be a learning experience for those exposed, and count as a warning for those around them. #LS121FA #weblit

    7. So has “doxxing” — originally a slang term among hackers for obtaining and posting private documents about an individual, usually a rival or enemy. To hackers, who prized their anonymity, it was considered a cruel attack.

      I didnt know the definition of doxxing so this is interesting. #LS121FA #weblit

    1. To fund this, tax rates will have to be high. The government will not only have to subsidize most people’s lives and work; it will also have to compensate for the loss of individual tax revenue previously collected from employed individuals.

      If financial capital will be drawn to the hands of the few, what is to prevent them from:

      1. Opposing re-ordering the system
      2. Evading the system (loopholes or running away - which is already what many do today already)

      The assumption seems to be that the powerful will need to realise that they have a social obligation – which is a mighty tenuous one.

    2. In all cases, people will be able to choose to work fewer hours than they do now.

      What is different from what Keynes predicated? The addition of productivity from the second half of the 20th century didn’t decrease working hours – they appear to have driven more value into the hands of shareholders instead of works (especially post 70s). stagnating incomes.

    3. The volunteer service jobs of today, in other words, may turn into the real jobs of the future.

      What reordering of the economy need to happen for such jobs to have economic value?

      Why don’t they have direct economic value today already?

  10. Oct 2020
    1. Defenders of the Electoral College argue that it was created to protect the interests of smaller states

      Which is true. Since the article talks about how only campaigning in certain areas is not fair to the country, abolishing the electoral college would make it worse. Candidates would only campaign in New York and California considering that is where almost a majority of the population lives.

    2. Republicans nearly suffered the same fate in 2004.

      If this is the case then it seems to affect both parties

    3. t’s

      So if half the population lives in nine states than how is that better for democracy if the election will be decided by those nine states? Of which probably have no clue the interest and way of life in the other states.

    4. In 2016, two-thirds of all public campaign events were held in just six states: Michigan, Ohio, Florida, Pennsylvania, Virginia and North Carolina; toss in six more and you’ve got 94 percent of all campaign events.

      That's just smart campaigning. Your not going to visit Idaho 9 times and Pennsylvania 9 times if you know you already have Idaho as a win. Work smarter, not harder

    5. Half the population now lives in just nine states.

      Exactly. So if half the population lives in 9 states, and those 9 states are all big states and decide the fate of our country, what about the other 41 states which are very different? In contrast with the electoral college, about 12 states are swing states and range from large states to small states. It ends up being more fair through the electoral college. Why should I want 9 states vote for the president who only helps their state issues when we can have a system where 12 states differing in size can even out the selfishness of each state voting for their corresponding president

    6. That’s wrong as a matter of history: The framers of the Constitution were concerned primarily with ensuring that the president wasn’t selected by uneducated commoners. The electors were meant to be a deliberative body of intelligent, well-informed men who would be immune to corruption.

      Although that counter-argument is true, that does not mean that a side effect was to protect the interests of the smaller states. Think about the Virginia plan and the New Jersey plan which were all about balancing the power. They truly believed in balancing power and the electoral college, although was made to keep uneducate people from voting, it also was made to balance the power

    1. A comparative sociological study of East and West Germans conducted after reunification in 1990 found that Eastern women had twice as many orgasms as Western women.

      Is this the only empirical evidence for the claim about women under Communism having better sex? That's pretty thin — esp. considering that the link to the study doesn't work.

    2. Why Women Had Better Sex Under Socialism

      'First of all, I did not come up with the headline nor did I choose the photo to accompany the piece. Both of those decisions were made by the New York Times editor' (https://scholar.harvard.edu/kristenghodsee/blog/sources-my-new-york-times-op-ed-why-women-had-better-sex-under-socialism).

    3. sometimes necessary social change — which soon comes to be seen as the natural order of things — needs an emancipation proclamation from above

      'Needs' is a bit strong — why not just say that sometimes even necessary social change can benefit from emancipation proclamations from above?

    4. Democracy

      Not: capitalism?

    5. Russia extended full suffrage to women in 1917

      Russia, not the Bolsheviks: see the editor's note at bottom!

    6. or have sex, for money.

      If the implication is that there was no prostitution behind the Iron Curtain, then I'd like to see a lot more documentation. And what about the kind of prostitution (fictionally) examined in The Lives of Others, where an ambitious actress sleeps with a high-ranking party functionary in order to bypass the obstacles posed by the state bureaucracy?

    7. including state-sponsored research on the mysteries of female sexuality

      Interesting, but this hardly demonstrates that Eastern European women had better sex.

    8. This generational divide between daughters and mothers who reached adulthood on either side of 1989 supports the idea that women had more fulfilling lives during the Communist era.

      Is that the only other bit of empirical evidence? Oy.

    1. dry humor

      Humor is an important way to engage an audience, personally I find it more entertaining if an article can make me chuckle

    2. pitch their own ideas and are assigned topics to explore.

      explains the process of how articles come to fruition

    3. “My own view is that, particularly now, we owe it to our readers to present a wide range of intellectually honest opinions.”

      Importatnt and necessary to give intelligent opinions that may differ from the readers

    4. considering points of view just outside their comfort zone.

      Makes readers think about opposing views

    5. We’ve retained the ambition to have a really wide range of voices there, to create an environment of collegial combat among different points of view dealing with consequential questions

      Wide range of view points

    6. “The objective is rather to afford greater opportunity for exploration of issues and presentation of new insights and new ideas by writers and thinkers who have no institutional connection with The Times and whose views will very frequently be completely divergent from our own.”

      Objective of the Op. Ed page

    7. “The purpose of the Op. Ed. page is neither to reinforce nor to counterbalance The Times’s own editorial position

      From the intro of the section

    8. It is the section’s unique mission both to be the voice of The Times, and to challenge it.

      The Option section is there to be the voice and challenge the Times

    9. Get people interested in important issues of the day, with the right balance of fact and thoughtful analysis.

      Reason for an op-ed

    1. But Tony McAleer, a former white supremacist leader who now runs Life After Hate, a rehabilitation program for neo-Nazis, called doxxing a “ passive aggressive violence.” He said publicizing the names and workplaces of neo-Nazis may offer some level of solace to people outraged by them, but it makes his job more difficult.

      I think that it's a conflicting kind of interest. If you dox white supremacist and make them afraid to voice their opinions, wouldn't that protect the people they are targeting? I don't think that every white supremacist can be rehabilitated, even though we should try to do so. There are two conflicting needs: the need to keep those who would do violence to vulnerable members of our communities accountable and the need to rehabilitate those who hold harmful viewpoints. I think that is essential to balance the two of them before doxxing anyone.

    2. The ethics — and even the definition — of doxxing is murky. It is the dissemination of often publicly available information. And, some at the protest asked, are you really doxxing a person if he or she is marching on a public street, face revealed and apparently proud? It is not as though they are hiding their identities.

      I think that just because information is available online, that doesnt mean you have the right to use it to target someone. On one hand, sometimes that information can be to protect people. If you find out that someone you know online is planning to shoot up a school, doxxing that person to protect those they may harm at the school should be permissible. On the other hand, doxxing someone you don't know could lead to misidentification and negative consequences for the person who has been misidentified.

    3. “For us, it slows things down. We try to integrate people back to humanity,” Mr. McAleer said. “If isolation and shame is the driver for people joining these types of groups, doxxing certainly isn’t the answer.”

      So not only is doxxing questionable legally, there's also reason to assume that it doesn't even work.

      weblit #LS121FA

    4. “People went berserk,” Ms. Coleman said. “That, to me, was this interesting turning point where it showed the general public would be willing to jump into the fray.”

      Should this really be something society accepts? What if people get it wrong, and they dox the wrong person? What if there's more to the story that people aren't aware about? Who get's held responsible if a person's information gets doxxed?

      weblit #LS121FA

    5. “For us, it slows things down. We try to integrate people back to humanity,” Mr. McAleer said. “If isolation and shame is the driver for people joining these types of groups, doxxing certainly isn’t the answer.”

      The idea shouldn't be to push these people farther into these groups or the outskirts of society. It should be about righting wrongs and reintegration into society.

    6. The ethics — and even the definition — of doxxing is murky. It is the dissemination of often publicly available information. And, some at the protest asked, are you really doxxing a person if he or she is marching on a public street, face revealed and apparently proud? It is not as though they are hiding their identities.

      Even though they might reveal their face in public I feel employers, family members might overlook these type of events. It's in the best interest we're all aware of who is participating in hateful movements.

    7. “For a long time it was only a certain quarter of people on the internet who would be willing to do this,” Ms. Coleman said. “It was very much hinged on certain geek cultures, but there was an extraordinary quality to the Charlottesville protest. It was such a strong public display I think it just opened the gates.”

      It sounds like it has gotten more common place and natural to do this to people and when it becomes more normal to do things like this, many more people want to join and be a part of what is happening because it seems like a natural thing to do.

    8. professor from Arkansas who was wrongly accused of participating in the neo-Nazi march. And some worry that the stigma of being outed as a political extremist can only reinforce that behavior in people who could still be talked out of it.

      This sounds like a very harmful way for people to be wrongly accused. When it happens on the internet, it never really goes away.

    9. “For us, it slows things down. We try to integrate people back to humanity,” Mr. McAleer said. “If isolation and shame is the driver for people joining these types of groups, doxxing certainly isn’t the answer.”

      I personally agree with Mr. McAleer’s opinion on doxxing Nazis. I don't think doxxing Nazis actually makes them change their ways, instead, it isolates them from society and only makes their terrible opinion about the world stronger for themselves.

    10. Online vigilantism has been around since the early days of the internet. So has “doxxing” — originally a slang term among hackers for obtaining and posting private documents about an individual, usually a rival or enemy. To hackers, who prized their anonymity, it was considered a cruel attack.

      That's some very useful information. I've always wanted to know how the word Doxxing came to be and this article answered that question for me.

    1. Podcast listening can be harder to crack. There are so many shows! How do you find the ones you’ll like? And once you’ve found a show, where do you start: with the most recent episode? At the beginning? Some specific gem of an episode buried deep in the back catalog?

      Perhaps start with making the RSS feeds easily discoverable?! I just spent 20 minutes doing some reasonably serious web gymnastics to extract the RSS feed for Caliphate (https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/podcasts/caliphate-isis-rukmini-callimachi.html) out of the iTunes feed using a JSON request tactic. Why can't the podcast's main page have or advertise the raw RSS feed?!

    1. hink salad bowl, rather than melting pot

      metaphor revised

    2. It should be clear by now that assimilation is primarily about power.

      paragraph 10 and 10 on worksheet

    3. Debates about assimilation are different from debates about undocumented immigration,

      paragraph 9 and 9 on worksheet

    4. One reason

      paragraph 7 and 7a. on worksheet

    5. One of this country’s most cherished myths is the idea that, no matter where you come from, if you work hard, you can be successful. But these ideals have always been combined with a deep suspicion of newcomers.
      1. on worksheet
    6. Whichever

      paragraph 3

    7. a process metaphorically described as a melting pot.

      2b. on worksheet

    8. For some, assimilation is based on pragmatic considerations, like achieving some fluency in the dominant language, some educational or economic success, some familiarity with the country’s history and culture

      2c on worksheet

      1st possibility

    9. What

      2

  11. Sep 2020
    1. “The whitest job in arts and culture? Curator,” the study said. “The jobs with fewest white workers: maintenance and security.”

      non-POC tend to have higher level jobs in museums most POC worker in the lower level jobs such as maintenance and security

    2. some elite Manhattan museums and arts groups employ overwhelmingly white staffs

      -example of class inequality -hiring white workers doesn't promote diversity -decreases opportunities available in museums for other races

    1. Yet the idea that a meaningful life must be or appear remarkable is not only elitist but also misguided.

      Can anyone explain this in further detail??

    2. Tertius’s tragedy is that he never reconciles himself to his humdrum reality. Dorothea’s triumph is that she does.

      Smith is warning us that we should quickly recognize that we should want to find joy from small, everyday things.

    3. But the effect of her being on those around her was incalculably diffusive: for the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.”

      Example of what she is saying, which is that it is important to find happiness in small things and involving yourself in people around you.

    4. Today’s college students desperately want to change the world, but too many think that living a meaningful life requires doing something extraordinary and attention-grabbing like becoming an Instagram celebrity, starting a wildly successful company or ending a humanitarian crisis.

      Addresses her audience, and shows that she can be a knowledgeable figure.

    5. As students head to school this year, they should consider this: You don’t have to change the world or find your one true purpose to lead a meaningful life. A good life is a life of goodness — and that’s something anyone can aspire to, no matter their dreams or circumstances.

      I think this is both logos and pathos..college students are struggling to find meaning in their lives and their careers, so this is a statement of hope. Also, this is an appeal to logic because the entire article has articulated this point with research and examples throughout the piece.

    6. One research study showed that adolescents who did household chores felt a stronger sense of purpose. Why? The researchers believe it’s because they’re contributing to something bigger: their family. Another study found that cheering up a friend was an activity that created meaning in a young adult’s life.

      This is an appeal to logos, research is exemplifying numbers and establishes authority. Using scientific logic helps the reader establish a sense of trust.

    7. Most young adults won’t achieve the idealistic goals they’ve set for themselves.

      I believe this sentence is the exigence of the piece, but the tone is not hurtful. It is a simple matter of fact explanation of life.

    8. Rather than succumb to the despair of thwarted dreams, she embraces her life as it is and contributes to those around her as she can.

      I love the imagery this sentence offers, I think this appeals to the idea that dreams can change and evolve, it's more about how you respond to your situations.

    9. But thanks to social media, purpose and meaning have become conflated with glamour: Extraordinary lives look like the norm on the internet.

      I sense the sarcasm in this statement and it pulls the reader back to realize that social media is hugely glamorized

    10. But thanks to social media, purpose and meaning have become conflated with glamour

      This statement essentially eclipses what social media has done to society. Social media has made society confuse purpose and meaning with glamour. Social media has created an unrealistic picture as to what society should be.

    11. As students head to school this year, they should consider this: You don’t have to change the world or find your one true purpose to lead a meaningful life.

      Although many feel as if they need to contribute to something very big, the author is explaining how in order to feel meaning and purpose, many can contribute to something simple that may hold a special meaning to them. Something that holds meaning to one person may not hold meaning to another. Even chores around the house can provide someone with the sense of meaning that they need to feel purpose and importance.

    12. One research study showed that adolescents who did household chores felt a stronger sense of purpose. Why? The researchers believe it’s because they’re contributing to something bigger: their family

      The author is using logos as he provides data to support the argument presented. The data explains how adolescents who did household chores felt a stronger sense of purpose solely because they feel a sense of responsibility in something other than themselves. By doing chores, many people feel the important sense of duty, which is very important.

    13. One research study showed that adolescents who did household chores felt a stronger sense of purpose. Why? The researchers believe it’s because they’re contributing to something bigger: their family. Another study found that cheering up a friend was an activity that created meaning in a young adult’s life.

      here, smith is using logos through providing statistical data to support her point! giving real numbers further solidifies her argument to an audience....it shows that instead of just theories and anecdotes, smith also has cold hard facts to support her argument

    14. It’s one of the most beautiful passages in literature, and it encapsulates what a meaningful life is about: connecting and contributing to something beyond the self, in whatever humble form that may take.

      i just think it's good to note that the author did a really good job making the connection between the message of the book and the message of the piece itself!

    15. Over the past five years, I’ve interviewed dozens of people across the country about what gives their lives meaning, and I’ve read through thousands of pages of psychology, philosophy and neuroscience research to understand what truly brings people satisfaction.

      i think that here, the author was trying to (and succeeded in) establishing ethos! smith shares her varied experience with talking with many people across the country about what truly gives their lives meaning. from this point on, knowing this knowledge, the audience trusts smith's perspective on the "meaning of life," trusting that she is using valid stories to support her viewpoint

    16. Rather than succumb to the despair of thwarted dreams, she embraces her life as it is and contributes to those around her as she can.

      Talking about Dorothea's life the author points out that she is happier doing what she loves then doing what others may deem better. And doing what you love and living in the moment you can begin to embrace life and live it to the fullest.

    17. But that doesn’t mean their lives will lack significance and worth. We all have a circle of people whose lives we can touch and improve — and we can find our meaning in that.

      This is an important statement for young adults to read and understand. You do not have to the be the most popular, or the most successful in life to have worth. In your bubble you can help support those around you and do the small things to find meaning in your life.

    18. But thanks to social media, purpose and meaning have become conflated with glamour: Extraordinary lives look like the norm on the internet.

      I agree with this statement. Social media has glamorized people's lives to the point where people think that it is normal. What people need to understand is you don't need to have a fabulous life to have meaning.

    19. A good life is a life of goodness — and that’s something anyone can aspire to, no matter their dreams or circumstances.

      I really like the whole message of this article. I think it is a topic that isn't spoken about enough and needs to be because many people think they are failures because they haven't changed the world even if it is an unachievable goal.

    20. But that doesn’t mean their lives will lack significance and worth. We all have a circle of people whose lives we can touch and improve — and we can find our meaning in that.

      I think this statement is so important because young adults are put under a lot of pressure to impress and be better than those around them. You don't have to affect the whole entire world in order to have a meaningful life.

    21. The most meaningful lives, I’ve learned, are often not the extraordinary ones. They’re the ordinary ones lived with dignity.

      I agree with this statement 100 precent because doing what makes you happy is more important than any social media following. Most of the time influencers use photo shop and tell fake stories in order to make their lives seem perfect even if they are miserable.

    22. But thanks to social media, purpose and meaning have become conflated with glamour: Extraordinary lives look like the norm on the internet.

      This is one of the reasons I believe social media is so harmful to ones mental health and self esteem. It really is a topic that is not spoken about enough.

    23. Rather than succumb to the despair of thwarted dreams, she embraces her life as it is and contributes to those around her as she can.

      The author shared Dorothea's story which is a personal story. Esfahani wants us to think that it is perfectly fine and good to make an impact on those around us. This is an example of PATHOS.

    24. But that doesn’t mean their lives will lack significance and worth. We all have a circle of people whose lives we can touch and improve — and we can find our meaning in that.

      I totally agree with this statement. It is so easy to get carried away when we start comparing ourselves with others. I believe that we do not have to make an impact on everyone; having an impact on just the people around us is great.

    25. As students head to school this year, they should consider this: You don’t have to change the world or find your one true purpose to lead a meaningful life.

      Many students/teenagers feel the need to do something BIG to feel important and good about themselves. The author seems to be targeting students and teenagers who struggle with this.

    1. 2017 has already become the biggest box office year ever for horror.

      Collected $733 million in tickets in 2017.

    1. A 15-year-old was fatally stabbed and a 16-year-old was critically wounded in their Bronx high school on Wednesday morning in what the police say was apparently the culmination of weeks of

      hello everyone

    2. hello from Professor Johnson

      1. )\(Insert LaTeX\)
    3. the elementar

      Yes

    4. 5-year-old was fa

      hello

    5. Hello

    6. cowering

      hkjhjkhjkhjk

    1. The Ottomans held more territory in 16th-century Europe than either England or the Netherlands. More Christians lived in the Ottoman Empire than in any other European state. The city with the largest Jewish population in the 16th-century world was Ottoman Salonica. Christian Europe’s major military and political concern was the Ottomans. As Norwich helps to show, the Ottoman Empire was a European state, and we should finally bury the notion that the Ottomans were somehow set apart from Europe.

      The Ottoman Empire was a European state

      A radical proposal!

    1. As usual, Ms. Baker is asking us to ponder just how we communicate, or fail to.

      This sentence reminded me of a discussion we had in class last week where it was mentioned that most of the time, people don't listen to one another. Instead, we spend our time coming up with a response to their comment instead of giving them our full and undivided attention. This concept is seen in "The Antipodes" where most people tell stories however, there isn't much feedback about the story. An example would be Dave's story about his father shooting himself in the face. After telling this dark and twisted experience all that was said was "I'm sorry." When Dave followed up asking for no pity, they simply moved on to the next topic. While there isn't much to say about his story I feel if the characters actually cared about their coworker, they would have had more to say than "I'm sorry." There are several other examples as well as the lack of communication/listening towards Adam, a person of color, and Eleanor, a female. The In group seems to only tune into the stories they want to listen to.

    1. We sleep under the stars rather than in a tent; if it rains we pull out a tarp to keep dry. Dawn wakes us up, we roll up our sleeping bags and plastic ground sheet, wolf down trail mix or granola bars and start down the path. We fill our water bottles at passing streams, stop for rest and meals wherever we fancy, chat as we walk, and when dusk comes we look for a flat spot, kick aside any rocks and branches and unroll our ground sheet and sleeping bags again.

      In nature, all are one

  12. Aug 2020
    1. “The Antipodes” is also deeply funny, but it’s naturally funny, and if it’s a satire, it’s an organic one. This playwright doesn’t need to exaggerate to elicit what’s absurd in the human condition.

      When I first read this play I thought it was so humorous and intriguing that I had no idea what was going on. Sure, there was an office, a boss, some workers, but thats all of the concrete direct clues you get from Annie Baker. The rest you have to figure out for yourself. Even though in a sense the play is very simple when you lay it out in clear terms; It's about people who are working together who are trying to tell and create stories, you still have no idea what you're reading until you go back and analyze what just happened! The way Baker creates such an engaging and complicated play whilst keeping this facade that it is something easy to read is incredible. Relating back to this quote from the article, Baker doesn't need to facilitate extreme dramatics or exaggerated props for the story to be completely mind blowing, that all just comes from what is already there in daily human life that she has taken and shown us.

    1. At a start-up competition in 2014 in San Francisco, Lisa Curtis, an entrepreneur, pitched her food start-up, Kuli Kuli, and was told her idea had won the most plaudits from the audience, opening the door to possible investment. As she stepped off the stage, an investor named Jose De Dios, said, “Of course you won. You’re a total babe.”Ms. Curtis later posted on Facebook about the exchange and got a call from a different investor. He said “that if I didn’t take down the post, no one in Silicon Valley would give me money again,” she said. Ms. Curtis deleted the post.

      .... that's how the american capital of IT works. Same way as the american capital of Cinema.

  13. Jul 2020
    1. Each suspect wielded his own knife.

      So powerful. This basically means that everyone may or may not have had the same reason for "white flight", but they all did it and wielded the knife of cutting off the tax base of urban areas.

    2. If border residents also fled the city as black migrants arrived, even though black enclaves were miles away, these departures signaled a concern about broader city finances rather than a dislike of immediate black neighbors.

      Proving that white flight is more of a financial thing.

    3. too segregated by race for many urban whites to encounter black neighbors.

      That's a shame in and of itself.

    4. Did whites leave cities for racial reasons or for economic ones?

      I believe both.

    5. “triumph of racist social engineering,”

      I would like to quote this in my research paper.

    6. Ta-Nehisi Coates

      What an icon! He is a symbol of true black excellence.

    7. From 1940 to 1970, four million blacks settled in industrial cities in the North and West. As they moved in, the fraction of white metropolitan households living in the typical Northern or Western central city fell from two-thirds to one-third.

      A prime example of white flight in America. Whether the main cause was racism, "religiousness", or economic reasons, is unknown. But I believe that it was a mixture of them all.