389 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. was not willing to leave home at age 18 for an unfamiliar world.

      This was true for me to. In my situation, college was too expensive for me to go in without a clear goal of what I wanted to become. I didn't have a lot of guidance or work experience beforehand to make a calculated decision toward my professional goals. I once thought I wanted to work in film or creative writing, but once I dabbled with that before entering college and realizing how unstable of a lifestyle it entailed, I was able to make a decisive choice geared toward my strengths and values. College is just too risky to not be 100% on board with your career path. I would advising being familiar with your world before pursuing it.

    2. After all, the earnings gap between four-year college graduates and everyone else has soared in recent decades.

      This is a very interesting line that speaks to me on several levels. I've actually done a lot of research behind my current career path of becoming a Software Engineer and I'd have to agree with this line. People working in this field make on average $120,000 annually, and roughly 90% have a bachelors relating to SE. I personally used to work as an Aviation Maintenance Tech beforehand, which I didn't need a bachelors for and made $60,000 annually. In my opinion, the aviation job is significantly more difficult than SE. This just goes to show the importance of furthering education.

    3. Published Wednesday, the study tracked students from nearly every college in the country (including those who failed to graduate), measuring their earnings years after they left campus.

      The study measured the student's salaries. I find it interesting that they measure the college's efficiency based off of how much money the alumni from each school received. Can a school still be efficient at teaching without guaranteeing careers?

    4. More recently, these universities have seemed to struggle, with unprepared students, squeezed budgets and high dropout rates. To some New Yorkers, “City College” is now mostly a byword for nostalgia.

      I'm curious to know what the writer means when they state how universities struggle with "unprepared students". Does this mean that college acceptance rates are higher? Or does it mean that high schools are becoming worse at preparing students for college? Im going to keep this in mind as I read because I'm curious to know what the writer claims is causing this.

    5. City University of New York system propelled almost six times as many low-income students into the middle class and beyond as all eight Ivy League campuses, plus Duke, M.I.T., Stanford and Chicago, combined.

      This is interesting to me. I have grown up being told by teachers, parents, and students going to an Ivy League school will help you improve your class standing because they are prestigious schools, but when looking at the data, the City University of New York System propelled many many lower-income students into the middle-class six times more than Ivy League schools, and that is an eye opener. This just shows that going to an Ivy League school doesn't always guarantee you the upper hand.

    6. “There are a lot of people who would not go to college at all, and would not get an education at all, if they had to go through some selective criteria,” said Erik Pavia, a 2010 graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso, known as UTEP. “UTEP opens the doors to people from all walks of life.”

      I think this a problem that we can correct in this country. I feel as if people high up in education do not emphasize enough the importance of attending some form of college is. I also think a way to fix this problem is make college cheaper. A big reason why people do not attend college is because it is too great of an expense. With lowering the cost of college we will have more educated people in this country and it will benefit this world greatly.

    7. To take just one encouraging statistic: At City College, in Manhattan, 76 percent of students who enrolled in the late 1990s and came from families in the bottom fifth of the income distribution have ended up in the WB_wombat_top three-fifths of the distribution. These students entered college poor. They left on their way to the middle class and often the upper middle class.

      I think that city colleges are truly a great route for people who come from lower income families. Unfortunatley not everyone can afford to go to a 4 year university. I think people should push harder for young students to attend a city college if they can not afford to go to a 4 year school. The base knowledge that they will receive at a city college is way more than if they do not attend at all.

    8. “There is a real problem with the elite privates and flagship publics in not serving as many low-income students as they should,”

      I agree with this statement because many elite privates do not fulfill the needs of low-income students. They give them some money, but not enough for these students to afford it. This is the reason why low-income students decide to go to community college first and transfer. It is cheaper and close to home so they are still able to help bring in income for their family. Elite schools try to help out the upper middle class and the rich instead of helping the ones who truly need it.

    9. shows that many colleges indeed fail to serve their students well. Dropout rates are high, saddling students with debt but no degree. For-profit colleges perform the worst, and a significant number of public colleges also struggle. Even at the strong performers, too many students fall by the wayside. Improving higher education should be a national priority.

      I do believe that the reasons students drop out are because they feel as if they do not get the attention needed or the college does not serve them as they wish it did. My cousin for example, dropped out of community college because she did not have teachers who helped her learn the way she wanted. She said they would not focus on their students nor did they interact with them. Even though college is much different than high school I think it is still necessary for teachers to know a bit about their students. This is a very interesting topic because it is also very important that there government needs to focus heavily on education.

    10. They remain deeply impressive institutions that continue to push many Americans into the middle class and beyond — many more, in fact, than elite colleges that receive far more attention.

      I strongly agree with this quote because I do believe that attending universities is to help educate and raise a future economic level. Most families that are low income is because the parents do not have a job that pays above minimum wage. This is mostly due to the fact that they do not have an education further than a high school diploma, if that. I can strongly agree with that connection.

    11. “There are a lot of people who would not go to college at all, and would not get an education at all, if they had to go through some selective criteria,”

      What I got from this is that some people just prefer to work jobs and get money now. People like store managers for retail who have started families and are just living off of hourly rates. I have coworkers that chose not to go to college because they would rather work full time in retail rather than going to school to pursue a job that they dont they could even get.

    12. Those problems are real: The new study — by a team of economists led by Raj Chetty of Stanford — shows that many colleges indeed fail to serve their students well. Dropout rates are high, saddling students with debt but no degree. For-profit colleges perform the worst, and a significant number of public colleges also struggle. Even at the strong performers, too many students fall by the wayside. Improving higher education should be a national priority.

      It stands out to me how much colleges fail to serve their students especially considering how much money they pay for their education whether it is from financial aid or out of their own pockets. That is one thing I was scared of coming into college, whether I was going to do well or not because I honestly struggle with school. I was always told how ruthless college was going to be compared to high school. How much easier it is to fail a class in college compared to high school.

    13. Being in the middle class is not enough, people can barely make ends meet. People in the middle class do not even consider themselves being apart of the middle class.

    14. This article glamorizes putting people into the middle class when that is the group that struggles with income inequality.

    15. many colleges indeed fail to serve their students well. Dropout rates are high, saddling students with debt but no degree.

      This sentence is really interesting to me. Colleges exist to give you a higher education help give you a degree, when in reality, the tuition rate is getting high and people in lower income families can't keep up with paying so students drop out with debt. All you do is pay the tuition, do all work and pass your classes and then you earn you degree. You don't really learn anything. I remember talking with a friend and he said that he has spent 3 years in college not really learning anything and considered dropping out, but he can't because he is already deep in debt and leaving would just make it worse because he can't pay it off.

    16. The share of lower-income students at many public colleges has fallen somewhat over the last 15 years.

      It is so hard for anyone to go to college if they are low income, whether they have family who attended college or not, whether they receive financial aid or not. There are so many factors that play into it, but a main one being money. Money makes the world go round, and thats the sad reality. Low income families cannot afford to send their children to college because they can barely even afford to pay rent most of the time, they live day by day a lot of the time, a college savings account is almost unheard of for low income families. And college is at an all time high, it is ridiculously expensive even for PUBLIC schools, most US families cannot afford it, and the government does not fund public universities enough. Which only then leads for lower income families to continue the cycle of no education and poverty, and continue the middle/upper classes on top. The cycle repeats.

    17. Most Baruch graduates, he added, are making more money than their parents as soon as they start their first post-college job.

      This to is very impressive, but I would also understand why those in the lower class would be more successful than those who were already coming into ivy schools from middle/upper classes. Those who are in the lower class have already endured so much emotionally, physically and mentally to let alone be going to college, then to get into an Ivy League, whether it be on scholarship or taking out massive amounts of loans to even attend both are crucial. Attending on scholarship, they must remain at the top of the top on their A game, or they won't be able to afford school, and if they took out loans, obviously the massive amount of loans will have to be paid off, and worth it somehow. Therefore those of lower income families will obviously work 100X harder in college because it was already100x harder for them to even be there, and they want to break the cycle of poverty, they want to "make it."

    18. There is a real problem with the elite privates and flagship publics in not serving as many low-income students as they should,”

      there are many problems with elite schools not serving as may low income students as they should is a statement i agree with low income is directly associated with minority because the vast majority of lower income people as compared to weathlier people are minority. many minority students arent even exposed to ivy league because the idea itself seems out of reach resources arent even provided in lower income neighborhoods that home many low income families.

    19. Dropout rates are high, saddling students with debt but no degree.

      This reminds me of a college counselor I had once. She explained to us that she did not finish getting a degree at the original college she had chosen due to the amount of debt she was in. Instead she had to finish getting her degree at a community college. Sadly she is in debt until this day.

    20. These students entered college poor. They left on their way to the middle class and often the upper middle class.

      This was interesting because one could interpret it as the lower class being more motivated and taking education more seriously than the upper class.Which could slightly explain the changes in the graph between the statistics of children and adults.

    21. Most Baruch graduates, he added, are making more money than their parents as soon as they start their first post-college job.

      I find it interesting that the texts says most people make more money then their parents did when inflation and job discription wasnt taken into consideration when talking about the lower/ middle class I am skeptical about this article because i feel it didnt take it account first generation students or students of color because there are alot of other things that come into factor.

    22. Because the elite colleges aren’t fulfilling that responsibility, working-class colleges have become vastly larger engines of social mobility.

      i feel like this is such an intuitive statement. the only places where having a degree from an elite school would matter is in fields like science or law, where theres high standards and lots of competition. in many other fields, just having a degree is enough, they dont care where its from unless it really matters for the job. and for a student trying to get money, most of the time you dont get a job in your major's field right away.

    23. The unemployment rate for college graduates today is a mere 2.5 percent.

      i feel like thats a little bit of a misleading statement. yes, not a lot of college graduates are unemployed, but that doesn't mean they are working jobs that can give them a living wage along with money to pay off student debt

    24. Baruch graduates, he added, are making more money than their parents as soon as they start their first post-college job.

      thats so crazy to me. in the long run it makes sense, but the FIRST job after college already earning them more seems unbelievable. could be partially due to higher wages and inflation, but thats probably only a small part of it.

    25. There is a real problem with the elite privates and flagship publics in not serving as many low-income students as they should,”

      The pricetag of a college degree is a extremely frustrating topic for me, and was one of the many reasons I veered away from the college path entirely. The fact is, after considering inflation, even just a few generations ago, our elders were able to attend college for pennies comparatively to wheat we pay now. To me, it can feel like "for what?" because of incompetent staffing, the price of housing, etc.

    26. was not willing to leave home at age 18 for an unfamiliar world. “I just didn’t feel like I was ready to go out to college on my own,” he said. “So I decided to stay home and save money.”

      This is very similar to my own experience, to a degree. Senior year of high school, I was accepted to many of schools that I had applied to, but I didn't feel the passion to attend, have the money, or have the drive to throw myself directly from living with family into a giant school. I think this was a reasonable decision, because I feared burning out after the first year and dropping out after accumulating a year's worth of student debt. Instead, I took a gap year (albeit away from home) to save money and just take some time off. I know that attending college is the important next step to grow and to achieve my success, but the year away gave me the courage to do so.

    27. It hurts to see students not attend colleges they've worked hard to get into because they have low income. This is what I mean by students not having the same opportunities as others due to their socio-economic status. Despite all this, they can still succeed. Not everyone can or wants to go to a university right out of high school. Community college is beneficial because you can save money and be more prepared for moving away.

    28. I strongly feel that "Improving higher education should be a national priority" as well. Education is essential and the basis for the foundation we build in our society. I believe this needs to start from elementary school and continue throughout all years of education. This isn't happening because all students aren't treated fairly. They do not have the same opportunities, resources, and support that other students have. I think the solution starts with improving this issue here.

    29. Graduates are also happier and healthier

      This quote stood out to me because this is the mindset I'm trying using to push myself. I actually didn't want to go to college in the first place because I already burnt my self out in high school and I thought I wasn't going to get accepted to any colleges because of my grades. My mom was the one who pushed me to continue my education and she let me live my life out here in SF. I want to live happy and healthy so that's why I'm working towards my degree.

    30. debt but no degree

      This quote stood out to me because this is one of many concerns I have while attending college. I questioned myself asking, what if I don't do well in college? Attending college costs a lot of money including the materials needed for each class, dorming or the rent. In the end, the experience varies between people but a majority are still paying off their debt.

    31. Lower-income students who attend elite colleges fare even better on average than low-income students elsewhere

      I think it's important to note that there is no evidence listed for this. This sentence really stood to to me because it is a claim that might not be factual but is making readers believe that only going to an elite college will make you more successful. This reminds me of high school because many counselors and educators often told students that the school you attend does not matter as much as what you make out of the school you attend. I do not think the author realized the confusion it would cause adding this line.

    32. On these more typical campuses, students often work while they’re going to college. Some are military veterans, others learned English as a second language and others are in their mid-20s or 30s.

      This stands out to me because it is listing different groups of specific people to show how they are excelling. I believe they added this to show that these are groups people might not think of often in college but are groups that are excelling. This was interesting to me because I am a first generation student so I am usually placed into a group of people as well. It also reminds me of high school and grouping different type of people who get college education.

  2. Sep 2019
    1. It’s true in red states as well as in many blue and purple states

      I think this quote is very significant because it shows that the issues with higher education are not political. They are universal problems that effect everyone. I think it is interesting that it is addressed.

    2. Other research that has tried to tease out the actual effects of higher education finds them to be large. And they’re not limited to money

      This statement reaffirms the importance of college and higher education by describing the lasting effects it gives. This contributes to the article's thesis of there needing to be an improvement of access to higher education. I find this quote to be interesting because I would imagine graduates to be less happy but it's good to know.

    3. Graduates are also happier and healthier. No wonder that virtually all affluent children go to college, and nearly all graduate.

      From the way I see it, wealthy kids, of course, are happier and healthier than low-income kids. I mean, the number of challenges they face is not even close to what students from low-income and underrepresented backgrounds face. Wealthy students are automatically put into the top of this college hierarchy that exists in our education system, while all other students have to climb their way to the top.

    4. He did well enough in high school to attend many colleges but — as frequently happens with low-income students — was not willing to leave home at age 18 for an unfamiliar world.

      Students coming from low-income families face more challenges when it comes to getting an education. Financials is one of the most critical aspects for disadvantaged students in deciding whether or not they are going to be attending college. Another aspect that also plays a big role for students who are not only low-income but also first-gen is getting the emotional and informational support they need. Students who are the first ones in their family to attend college might often feel they are alone in their college journey. I think that can lead students to feel depressed, and eventually drop out or not attend college at all.

    5. “The state does not recognize — and it’s not just in Texas — the importance that the investment in public education has for the economy and so many other things.

      I liked this quote because it makes sense to me. If more money is put into public education, then many people of lower-income would probably be more likely to attend college and graduate as well. Then, they could find jobs and start boosting the economy. I think that more jobs helps the economy at least. More money given to public education probably means more financial aid to students too which would boost there chances of success after college, since they have less student debt.

    6. No wonder that virtually all affluent children go to college, and nearly all graduate.

      I believe what this is saying is that kids with wealthier families will go to more expensive colleges who have the means to provide a better college experience for the students. This would then result in the students being more likely to graduate. This claim is sad to me because it means that lower-income students who don't go to a more expensive school have a disadvantage. Earlier in the reading John Friedman even noted that students from more modest backgrounds are less likely to be on elite college campuses. All students supposedly have an equal opportunity to go to college and graduate with a degree. But in this case the opportunity between high and lower income students would not be equal if lower income students are less likely to graduate.

    7. Because the elite colleges aren’t fulfilling that responsibility, working-class colleges have become vastly larger engines of social mobility.

      This is an interesting claim to me because if it is in fact true, then why would people ever promote going to more elite schools over working-class ones. I feel like an idea is instilled in many kids minds that it is better to try to go to a more elite school because they will probably fare better after college, but if working-class colleges can do help you the same or even better, should going to a more reputable school even matter? Also, is it worth spending more money on college in this case too. it reminds me of how my mom would try to steer me away from going to city college in high school because she thought that going to a university would be better for me. But would she have thought differently if she saw this claim?

  3. May 2019
    1. The reason is clear. State funding for higher education has plummeted. It’s down 18 percent per student, adjusted for inflation, since 2008, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. The financial crisis pinched state budgets, and facing a pinch, some states decided education wasn’t a WB_wombat_top priority.

      State funding for college has fallen, and tuition has risen. Students either accumulate a lifetime of debt or simply cannot go to college.

    2. Those college graduates have to come from somewhere, of course, and most of them are coming from campuses that look a lot less like Harvard or the University of Michigan than like City College or the University of Texas at El Paso.

      This is another very interesting concept. A lot of the colleges stated above are the bottom of the barrel colleges that everyone disses, yet there is a lot of upwards mobility for those that achieve their success there.

    3. More recently, these universities have seemed to struggle, with unprepared students, squeezed budgets and high dropout rates. To some New Yorkers, “City College” is now mostly a byword for nostalgia.

      It seems that in a modern society, the working classs is becoming more reluctant to go to college for the weak payoff of hard work and would rather go straight into working, as it saves time and accumulates money faster.

    4. The

      The graph above is extremely hard to read and i'm pretty sure they purposely make it hard to read

    5. push many Americans into the middle class and beyond

      Not really student loans are a giant anchor around the neck for people who can't pay out of pocket, and its only really the american colleges that do this basically the world over has either free college or colleges that cost 1/4 as much and still teach the same material

  4. Mar 2019
    1. As all historians know, forgetting is as essential to public understandings of history as remembering.

      On Forgetting.

  5. Feb 2019
    1. Students certainly don’t need to strive obsessively for perfection, but I should have prioritized grades, not guys.

      students should balance social and academic life

    2. Drinking and smoking eased my social anxiety and seemed like fun. Until I couldn’t stop. Getting clean — smoke-toke-alcohol-free — led to a huge upswing in my life.

      Never knew it would be hard like she explained to stop.

    3. Yet as a teacher, I see that the students who come weekly, sit in front, and ask and answer questions get higher grades and frankly, preferential treatment

      students who do sit in the front and are engaged to the topic that is being taught will learn better and have higher grades.

    4. f a class was boring or it snowed, I’d skip.

      Relatable, last semester I would skip lectures because I knew I could get notes from my peers.

    5. as a freshman I think majority of us can relate to this. We're too worried about what others think.

    1. He was 18. He came to school and was invited to a party his first weekend, and he didn’t know anybody. So he started to drink. He drank way too much and ended up lying on a bench in his residential hall, feeling very sick. Nobody stopped and said, ‘How are you doing? Are you O.K.?’ And he felt so isolated. When he came in to speak with me the next day, the thing that struck him — what he said — was, ‘There I was, alone, with all these people around.’ ”

      This makes me sad. I have seen it, people drink way too much. They're unstoppable.

    2. he technology that keeps them connected to parents and high school friends only reminds them of their physical separation from just about everyone they know best.

      Yes, being away from home was hard.

    1. In my own life I made bad choices that went far beyond spray paint. I flunked out of college and at various points narrowly dodged jail time. When I think back to those mistakes, I’m horrified and chastened. I feel fortunate to have survived, to have had the privilege to make amends.

      Nobody is perfect everyone makes mistakes. We live and we learn, my laughs now can make us cry later.

    2. Because in 1985, a college student could get a little self-righteous, make a bad decision, face consequences and then go home, having learned a “valuable lesson.”

      Times have changed. Get in trouble with the law and that can now affect your future education.

    1. Social scientists have found that this misperception causes black children to be “pushed out, overpoliced and underprotected,” according to a report by the legal scholar Kimberlé W. Crenshaw.

      Evidence part of BEAM concept that shows why black children are perceived to be more mature and how this happens.

    2. The minstrel version of Topsy, a character in “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” turned into the pickaninny.

      The cover of Uncle Tom's cabin depicts Topsy as crazy looking (messy hair, weird pose, yelling) even though she is just a child

    3. In one study, people overestimated their ages by 4.5 years. This contributes to a false perception that black boys are less childlike than white boys.

      The author used a statistic in this line to make a point that black kids are commonly viewed as older, which takes away their innocence. Later in the article it is expounded upon.

    4. But only white kids were allowed to be innocent. The more that popular writers, playwrights, actors and visual artists created images of innocent white children, the more they depicted children of color, especially black children, as unconstrained imps. Over time, this resulted in them being defined as nonchildren.

      the initial label of innocence put on children actually was the catalyst for viewing black children as the opposite. It's included primarily because history of what went wrong in our past is a great motivator for moving forward.

    5. tears.

      If this article were to be published as a book instead, it would be different because it would most likely include many more examples to give us the same sense that the author is trying to give us in this article

    6. The association between childhood and innocence did not always exist. Before the Enlightenment, children in the West were widely regarded as immodest beings who needed to be taught to restrain themselves. “The devil has been with them already,” the Puritan minister

      This section sets out to talk about the ties between childhood and innocence. Originally, children were actually viewed much closer to devil spawn, and needed to be cleansed and taught innocence, or whatever the equivalent was at the time. However, with Sentimentalists, they worked on the perception of childhood innocence being the only real difference between children and adults. However, this only applied to white children.

    7. Topsy was at heart an innocent child who misbehaved because she had been traumatized, “hardened,” by slavery’s violence.

      This line creates a dark tone that illustrates the story both to give the readers a serious sense of what is going on as well as to describe "Uncle Tom's Cabin."

    8. ore adultlike

      I think that the author added this paragraph in order to show how people of all races see black children as less innocent and provides examples of how and why

    9. George Zimmerman admitted at his 2012 bail hearing that he misjudged Trayvon Martin’s age when he killed him. “I thought he was a little bit younger than I am,” he said, meaning just under 28. But Trayvon was only 17.

      The main idea is that black children are viewed as older, less innocent, and more adultlike by people of all races. It's included because not only does it elaborate on the main information in this piece, it gives hard evidence for the idea that they're viewed as older - one who was killed was perceived as a decade older than he was. This connects primarily because it establishes the problem for which the article sets out to solve.

    10. the more they depicted children of color, especially black children, as unconstrained imps.

      Racism has roots in our culture and was spread onto people through the use of propaganda portraying black children as wild and uncontrollable compared to the innocent white children they would portray.

    1. These forces should also help reduce local air pollution in countries like China and India, which is why their leaders are getting behind these technologies in a big way. Government incentives have turned China into the biggest market for electric vehicles. And an Indian government minister says his country wants all cars sold there by 2030 to be electric. France says it wants to end sales of new diesel and gasoline cars by 2040, while Norway’s goal is 2025.

      In other parts of the world air pollution is already becoming a serious problem and it could be one here in the U.S. some day.

    2. The potential environmental benefits of electric vehicles are huge. The transportation sector accounts for 14 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions and 27 percent of emissions in the United States. Moreover, countries have found it much more difficult to reduce planet-warming gases from transportation than from power plants

      The benefits will help slow down global warming and this is really important considering that it is a major issue.

    3. $100 per kilowatt-hour,

      If they can bring the price margins of the electric batteries the prices will be matched with regular cars. and they are only 25$ away from it.

    4. The skeptics, however, have consistently been overly pessimistic about this technology.

      They have always under estimated what can be accomplished with electric cars.

    5. wishful

      Allow there people are still skeptical this idea is closer than we believe. With the advnacements in technology

    6. emission

      other countries are already on the path of pushing out emission laws that try to help push electric cars and get rid of gas cars.

    7. models

      all auto makers are putting big efforts to create cars in the electric segment that will be just as appealing as any other regular car.

    8. cheaper

      These cars are now going to be priced at a range that is competitive with the rest of diesel and gasoline.

    9. mainstream

      Every year with advancements in technology we have finally hit that point where electric cars are on the verge of becoming the mainstream car in the next few years.

    10. gas-guzzling

      There has to be a change made with the way the climate is having drastic changes that we have not seen before.

    1. These students entered college poor. They left on their way to the middle class and often the upper middle class.

      city colleges are pushing people to where they want to go

    2. To some New Yorkers, “City College” is now mostly a byword for nostalgia.

      college is an elitist system

    3. Improving higher education should be a national priority.

      Students who go to private schools traditionally do better then kids who go to public schools. The kids from the public schools are the ones dropping out. why do you have to pay to get better higher education

    4. Improving higher education should be a national priority.

      I feel like this idea should be stressed, especially with the high tuition fees in today's world

    5. ity University of New York system propelled almost six times as many low-income students into the middle class and beyond as all eight Ivy League campuses, plus Duke, M.I.T., Stanford and Chicago, combined.

      Private university aren't helping low income students as compared to a public university who is helping students change economic classes.

    6. These students entered college poor. They left on their way to the middle class and often the upper middle class.

      A college degree helps you changed which economic class you fall in.

    7. The heyday of the colleges that serve America’s working class can often feel very long ago. It harks back to the mid-20th century, when City College of New York cost only a few hundred dollars a year and was known as the “Harvard of the proletariat.”

      Colleges are no longer serving the working class, college cost so much. Why? When years ago is cost only a few hundred compared to thousands.

    8. itself

      It wouldnt let me highlight the whole thing.

      Working students need to have access to college and work and still be able to pay for it all, on what they make. That should be a possibility if enough effort put in.

    9. More recently, these universities have seemed to struggle, with unprepared students, squeezed budgets and high dropout rates.

      I can’t say i’m surprised by this because now a days colleges are so expensive many people do not have enough money to attend college or even a junior college. Also people do are able to attend college may realize that it is more expensive than they thought which explains the drop out rate.

    10. proletariat.

      pro·le·tar·i·at Dictionary result for proletariat /ˌprōləˈterēət/Submit noun workers or working-class people, regarded collectively (often used with reference to Marxism). "the growth of the industrial proletariat" synonyms: the workers, working-class people, wage-earners, the laboring classes, the common people, the ordinary people, the lower classes, the masses, the commonalty, the rank and file, the third estate, the plebeians; More the lowest class of citizens in ancient Rome.

    11. hese more typical campuses, students often work while they’re going to college. Some are military veterans, others learned English as a second language and others are in their mid-20s or 30s.

      Students are stretched thin, and needs will typically rule the decision to drop out or stay in school.

    12. Dropout rates are high, saddling students with debt but no degree

      dropping out means debt and no degree

    13. There are a lot of people who would not go to college at all, and would not get an education at all

      College are not for everyone and there are other ways to succeed or get a job without a college degree

    14. making more money than their parents as soon as they start their first post-college job

      Most parents don't make much for a living or even have a stable job..

    15. these universities have seemed to struggle, with unprepared students, squeezed budgets and high dropout rates

      Colleges are different from high school, plus some people cannot afford to attend college which causes high dropout rates

    16. The reason is clear. State funding for higher education has plummeted. It’s down 18 percent per student, adjusted for inflation, since 2008, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. The financial crisis pinched state budgets, and facing a pinch, some states decided education wasn’t a WB_wombat_top priority.“It’s really been a nightmare,” said Diana Natalicio, UTEP’s president and herself a first-generation college graduate. “The state does not recognize — and it’s not just in Texas — the importance that the investment in public education has for the economy and so many other things. Education was for me, and for many of the rest of us, the great opportunity creator.”

      What a surprise to think that money is going down for funds to states for college.

    17. Pavia grew up in Canutillo, a poor neighborhood in El Paso, the son of a construction worker and house cleaner. He did well enough in high school to attend many colleges but — as frequently happens with low-income students — was not willing to leave home at age 18 for an unfamiliar world. “I just didn’t feel like I was ready to go out to college on my own,” he said. “So I decided to stay home and save money.”

      Does Texas not offer Financial aids to students?

    18. After all, the earnings gap between four-year college graduates and everyone else has soared in recent decades. The unemployment rate for college graduates today is a mere 2.5 percent.

      This article from 2017 may not be too accurate.

    19. They remain deeply impressive institutions that continue to push many Americans into the middle class and beyond — many more, in fact, than elite colleges that receive far more attention.

      Will I really be able to beat a Stanford student when applying for a job ?

    20. Out West, California built an entire university system that was both accessible and excellent

      Csu or UC ?

    21. “There is a real problem with the elite privates and flagship publics in not serving as many low-income students as they should,”

      I agree with this as the cost of college has not made it easy or possible for those who come from low-income families to succeed in obtaining a college education or degree.

    22. these universities have seemed to struggle, with unprepared students, squeezed budgets and high dropout rates.

      Many universities have high drop out rates which can't necessarily be fixed as each individual has their own reasons on as to why they leave

    23. Education was for me, and for many of the rest of us, the great opportunity creator.

      there should be more investment into public education for it liberates many and gives them purpose to move forward and have their dream(s) become reality

    24. City University of New York system propelled almost six times as many low-income students into the middle class and beyond as all eight Ivy League campuses, plus Duke, M.I.T., Stanford and Chicago, combined.

      elite colleges not taking their responsibility seriously and help the students who attend the school

    25. On several dozen of campuses, remarkably, fewer students hail from the entire bottom half of the income distribution than from the WB_wombat_top 1 percent.

      this shows that those in the bottom are welcomed and are ready to pursue college and succeed

    26. UTEP to teach an intensive two-week class on business and law. Pavia’s story is the classic story of the American dream.

      UTEP helps students of all social standards

    27. “There are a lot of people who would not go to college at all, and would not get an education at all, if they had to go through some selective criteria,

      don't want to be judged or think that they won't be able to succeed

    28. success stories are real, too, and they’re fairly common

      why are they so similar

    29. Dropout rates are high, saddling students with debt but no degree. For-profit colleges perform the worst, and a significant number of public colleges also struggle.

      why do profit colleges perform worst than those of non profit?

    30. Baruch graduates, he added, are making more money than their parents as soon as they start their first post-college job.

      this is interesting, would it have to do with the demand of certain majors along with increase in salary or not

    31. These students entered college poor. They left on their way to the middle class and often the upper middle class.

      both graduates and dropouts were able to climb the economic ladder

    32. many of them are performing much better than their new stereotype suggests.

      they're helping students finish their education even with the obstacles the school(s) themselves are facing

    33. unprepared students, squeezed budgets and high dropout rates.

      did they do nothing to try and better their education as well as helping them?

    34. West, California built an entire university system that was both accessible and excellent.

      affordable and equal higher education opportunities

    35. performing much better than their new stereotype suggests.

      .how so?

    36. More recently, these universities have seemed to struggle, with unprepared students, squeezed budgets and high dropout rates. To some New Yorkers, “City College” is now mostly a byword for nostalgia.

      .high drop out rates .

  6. Jan 2019
    1. healthy relationship with all technology,

      main idea summarized

    2. We do not face a simple choice of digital or analog. That is the false logic of the binary code that computers are programmed with, which ignores the complexity of life in the real world.

      key idea- author knows we cannot live without the technology we already have

    3. but learning happens best when we build upon the relationships between students, teachers and their peers.

      social interaction is extremely important

    4. but has outperformed digital learning experiments

      i agree that some things- such as a teacher in a classroom rather than online cannot be replaced

    5. encouraging human interaction

      not artificial like that of social media

    6. feeling of belonging.

      main idea about analog giving a sense of home

    7. real places where we live.

      can be debated that communities found online are very real to many people

    8. the walled garden of analog saves both time and inspires creativity.

      main idea of the article- for analog devices

    9. powerful efficiency in that simplicity

      minimalism is becoming increasingly popular in all aspects of life

    10. unparalleled with anything delivered through a screen

      this is true- but there are things that the analog devices cannot due that are essential to everyday life

    11. But younger consumers who never owned a turntable and have few memories of life before the internet drive most of the current interest in analog

      this is ironic since the trend was started by social media

    12. Vinyl records have witnessed a decade-long boom in popularity (more than 200,000 newly pressed records are sold each week in the United States)

      interesting that this became a trend among teens

    13. Nearly half of millennials worry about the negative effects of social media on their mental and physical health, according to the American Psychiatric Association.

      can cause major self esteem issues as well as can be a public health issue- lack of exercise

    14. Facebook and Twitter are eroding our democratic institutions

      huge issue in today's news

    15. it was revolutionary at the time it came out

  7. Nov 2018
    1. get the better of the major objection to your argument by raising and answering it in advance

      We've talked about the importance of anticipating objections when writing all three of our previous assignments. WP2-B is no exception. Addressing likely objections helps you rhetorically, as it shows you're paying attention to what others say, not just to what you happen to think.

    2. An op-ed contributor is a specialist who seeks only to inform them

      I would prefer the word "persuade" to "inform." When informing readers, one doesn't necessarily have to make an argument. But op-eds are all about argument. So, aim to do more than inform. Persuade your readers to accept your argument.

  8. Oct 2018
    1. whatever messages people with money want to push at us

      How does this play into equity? Does this provide an unfair advantage for certain groups? Should we be obligated to support or should this be an impetus for people to support underrepresented groups against those with hateful opinions?

    2. This means those using pseudonyms to protect their identities while posting about human rights violations in repressive regimes and are flagged by members of those regimes may face consequences for breaking the rule, while others go unnoticed.

      This is also an issue on YouTube, where many LGBTQ+ videos were flagged as inappropriate. Is this an industry-wide issue that will continue to hold, or are companies simply dismissive of these issues at hand?

    3. It’s a combination that leaves it without effective competition.

      Is this concerning? Does this effectively make it a pseudo-monopoly (I'm not an economist, so I can't say what is actually defined as such) or does it act as a company that simply outcompetes its competition?

    4. Rather, as this latest incident should remind us, we are Facebook’s product.

      Although this article is in the Opinions section, the article also does have a large journalistic aspect in reporting just how Facebook's ad system works. It's somewhat shorter than I expected, but makes its point quickly and recaps it right here.

    1. Out of curiosity, the other day I searched “cellphones” on Google.

      Similarly, this is under NYT's "Sunday Review," indicating that it's not a purely journalistic article and along with the first-person view, contains a very vivid opinion. That being said, the reader can choose to trust or not trust the author.

    2. But, really, how can you tell?

      This sentence is an exemplification of the writing style that caters to a general audience rather than a more niche audience. The author is talking to the public at large, not to other Silicon Valley people--it's a warning siren rather than simply just a critical response.

    3. Growth becomes the overriding motivation — something treasured for its own sake, not for anything it brings to the world.

      This article chooses to break up the text (although not in full) -- with quotes instead of photos. Rather, it relies on the flashing image at the top to carry the reader through.

    4. Silicon Valley Is Not Your Friend

      The sensory overload of the title and the drawing behind it is somewhat overwhelming but ultimately seems to serve a greater purpose of appealing to engrained perceptions of neon colors as alarming and flashing screens as worrisome and triggering.

  9. Sep 2018
    1. and getting polio and having to wait in line at the bank to check your account balance.

      Subtle (and sarcastic) way of transitioning to his main point of his next paragraph

    2. We don’t deny that new technologies come with some perils.

      Argument 3: People wan't to go back to the past days, and that's why they don't want people playing video games too much (because they didn't exist to this popularity at that time)

    3. The risk here, of course, is that by treating the immoderate playing of video games as an addiction, we are pathologizing relatively normal behavior.

      Ethos: Making people who play video games a lot feel like they are not "regular" people.

    4. More damning

      Pathos: Anger

    5. A large-scale study of internet-based games

      Argument 2: Specific studies on this topic support his argument

    6. Let’s start with the neuroscientific analogy:

      Argument 1: "Video games are like drugs", He rebuts this by saying that they don't hit the same areas of the brain as drugs do.

    7. This is all terribly misguided. Playing video games is not addictive in any meaningful sense. It is normal behavior that, while perhaps in many cases a waste of time, is not damaging or disruptive of lives in the way drug or alcohol use can be.

      Thesis and clear side of the argument: "This is all terribly misguided"

    8. Evidence for addiction to video games is virtually nonexistent.

      Clincher

    9. American Journal of Psychiatry

      Logos

    10. By contrast, using a drug like methamphetamine can cause a level of dopamine release 10 times that or more.

      Logos

    11. Playing a video game or watching an amusing video on the internet causes roughly about as much dopamine to be released in your brain as eating a slice of pizza.

      Logos

    12. This is true but not illuminating.

      Recognition of opposition

    13. World Health Organization

      Logos

    14. the neuroscientist Andrew Doan

      Logos

    15. The American Psychiatric Association

      Logos

    16. It’s certainly common to hear parents complain that their children are “addicted” to video games. Some researchers even claim that these games are comparable to illegal drugs in terms of their influence on the brain — that they are “digital heroin”

      Statement of topic and issue

    17. the neuroscientist Peter C. Whybrow

      Logos

    18. Is video game addiction a real thing?

      Hook

    1. But a student who designs and sells greeting cards and mentions on her Facebook page that she is a softball player risks losing her athletic eligibility. That is shameful. Bylaw 12.5.1.3 has got to go.

      They need to fix this law, it is unfair and unjust.

    2. It means that the author’s book biography cannot state that he participates in a college-level sport. It means that, in publicizing the book to students or alumni, the college cannot mention that the author is a student athlete.

      Thats unfair to the student athlete.

    3. But N.C.A.A. bylaw 12.5.1.3, otherwise denoted as “Modeling and Other Nonathletically Related Promotional Activities,” specifies that, in promoting the book, no reference can be made to the individual’s “involvement in intercollegiate athletics.”

      The point before now makes sense.

    4. Our school is fortunate to have as a student a young man (whose name I can’t mention) who has published a book (whose title I can’t cite). The book has nothing whatsoever to do with athletics, but among his many activities at the college, he participates in an intercollegiate sport (which, of course, shall remain unspecified).

      How come yet came mention his name?

    5. let’s begin by reforming the association’s bylaw that prevents college athletes from promoting any personal creative endeavor if they even mention that they participate in a sport.

      Why haven't they done it yet?

    6. Its root cause is that universities with powerhouse sports teams like U.C.L.A., Ohio State and Texas receive nearly $20 million a year from brands like Adidas or Nike, while the athletes wearing the Adidas or Nike apparel are expected to compete purely for the love of the game.

      Why don't athletes get a athletes.

    7. It’s about the lengths to which the N.C.A.A. goes to control every dollar and branding opportunity associated with college athletics.

      Why is that?

    1. nt us to get back our desire for broad consensus and to reject strategies that seek to impose one group’s ideas over another’s. I want collaboration and strategic agreements on nationwide issues.

      inspiring people to think the same way he does

    2. I want to see a return to efficiency — and to sanity. I want our proud, pragmatic Catalan spirit back.

      end goal

    3. new elections for the Catalan Parliament.

      new politicians are needed

    4. the matter of independence has divided Catalans, distanced us from the European Union and frightened away banks and businesses. A resolution is necessary.

      why it is a problem

    5. independence movement in Catalonia is still acting irresponsibly by threatening a unilateral declaration of independence

      threatening pulling away all together

    6. federal financing system should function as an alliance between the Catalonia tax office and the federal tax administration.

      the governments should work together

    7. Second, the Catalan government should have exclusive jurisdiction over issues like language, education and culture. The Spanish state should guarantee that it will defend and encourage the use of all of Spain’s languages.

      Works kind of like the federal and state government: the Spanish state works on big picture and Catalan government takes care of "smaller" deals

    8. Catalonia is a nation that exists within Spain must be recognized

      Catalonia is a nation inside nation but decides its own sovereignty. The author believes that the constitution should recognize that.

    9. This new agreement, which should culminate in federal constitutional reform, must address several objectives.

      talking about a theoretical reform

    10. the support of a much broader majority

      the goal is to have the vast majority's wishes come true

    11. The Socialist Party of Catalonia, which I lead, has a plan to move forward. We refuse to choose between paralysis and secessionism. We do not want to see a minority — or even a slim majority — of Catalans impose their views on the rest of the population on this issue

      the author is biased to the socialist party of catalonia because they lead the movement

    12. the matter of independence has divided Catalans

      this issue is dividing Catalonia

    13. A minority cannot be allowed to impose its opinion upon the rest of Catalonia.

      not enough people voted on the issue for the vote to reflect the full opinion of Catalonia

    14. Some of it belongs to the pro-independence faction in Catalonia’s regional parliament, which chose to disregard the law and schedule an independence referendum for Oct. 1. But the central government in Madrid deserves much of the blame for the crisis, too. Incapable of negotiating with Catalans, it delegated the matter to the judicial branch, which issued an order forbidding the referendum, an order that ultimately led to the police’s use of excessive force against voters.

      At a standstill because neither party is doing the "right thing"

    15. The relationship between Catalonia and the rest of Spain has become a serious institutional crisis

      The main focus of the article

    16. it must be resolved as soon as possible

      call to action

  10. Feb 2018
    1. The number of Portuguese dying from overdoses plunged more than 85 percent before rising a bit in the aftermath of the European economic crisis of recent years. Even so, Portugal’s drug mortality rate is the lowest in Western Europe — one-tenth the rate of Britain or Denmark — and about one-fiftieth the latest number for the U.S.
    2. 25,000 Portuguese use heroin, down from 100,000 when the policy began.

      Since it was decriminalized the number of users dropped drastically

    3. After more than 15 years, it’s clear which approach worked better. The United States drug policy failed spectacularly, with about as many Americans dying last year of overdoses — around 64,000 — as were killed in the Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq Wars combined. Photo

      Why wont we make a change towards portugals way of tackling drugs. We had more people die from drugs then from any person in the vietnam, afghanistan, abd iraq wars COMBINED!!!!!

    4. drug addiction has been treated more as a medical challenge than as a criminal justice issue.

      it is a much better approach to tackle the problem then to incarcerate people in prison for these petty drug crimes.

    5. gently encourages them to try to quit and gives them clean hypodermics to prevent the spread of AIDS.

      it is a change to try and get them to stop without really pushing it on them

    1. “These are animals,” President Trump said of MS-13 members. Most often, rather, they are like my student: young people, not unlike child soldiers, who enter a violent life

      Calling these gang members "animals" is not at all accurate because these people often don't have a choice and gangs is their only escape out of their struggles.

    2. . Being in school felt impossible to him because he felt unable to succeed at it. He had an upcoming court case and no lawyer; that, he knew, would cost money he didn’t have.

      Poor kids that cannot succeed in school often lead horrible lives and are even at risk of becoming homeless.

    3. thousands of dollars of high-interest debt and little or no English skills. And they face an administration that insists that they are gangsters bringing bloodshed and gang warfare to American cities.

      How do the immigrants arrive to the United States if they are clearly in debt?

    4. 13. For two years he lived alone in her house, selling water bottles on the street on behalf of a neighboring family. Sometimes they invited him over for dinner; other times they didn’t.

      How are these kids able to survive if they are by themselves and can not afford food?

  11. Jan 2018
    1. What these findings show is that pride, gratitude and compassion, whether we consciously realize it or not, reduce the human mind’s tendency to discount the value of the future.

      pride, gratitude, compassion are emotions that leads us to value the future more, rather than using the instruments of logic and willpower. it's an interesting claim. but it's necessarily the case that one has to eliminate the other. you can still use logic and willpower to make those decisions about the future, about the marshmellow, but the reason why is rooted in other people. and it's this social connection that is a really good motivator for people. having an emotional connection to something is more likely to illicit a powerful reaction than just pure logic and willpower. so maybe it's when thinking about the future logic < emotional. well it's two different things. in terms of deciding to discount the future. i would say that logic does allow us to value the future more. but to follow through? i guess pride and compassion helps to increase perseverance as well.

  12. Dec 2017
    1. “Faith requires the possibility of rejection, or it is not faith.”

      Actually, science requires the possibility of rejection, or it is not science.

    1. but a federal judge ruled this summer that the state is not required to inform people with convictions who couldn’t vote under the old law that they may now register to vote.

      wtf???

    2. The law bars people with felonies of “moral turpitude” from voting. For decades such crimes were ill defined, but once included things like miscegenation

      wow

    1. I can only imagine how it has reopened the wounds of the women who came forward with their stories about him, and did not receive enough attention. This country is currently trying to reconcile itself to years of power abuse and sexual misconduct. Its leader is wantonly poking the bear.

      Poking the bear?

  13. Nov 2017
    1. No doubt most of you do some or all of these things

      Most, but not all. Some 30 million Americans are without high-speed home internet access, a problem Chairman Pai has made worse by recent efforts to dismantle the FCC's Lifeline program, which offers affordable broadband access options to low-income households.

    2. Ajit Pai

      Ajit Pai is Federal Communications Commission Chairman, appointed by President Donald Trump in early 2017. He previously served as a commissioner to the federal agency, and before that as general counsel to Verizon.

    1. The courage this country has shown

      Can anyone explain me how exactly has Spain being oppressing Catalonia all these years? I just don't get it.

    2. has caused an outcry and our response to it has become a priority.

      Their response so far has been to do nothing, oh, and fly to Brussels to "tell the world" and "ask Europe to react"; which it did, saying it's Spanish internal affair, a country they consider a democracy.

    3. It is essential to weave solid alliances with all the social and economic actors that want to build a national state truly at the service of its citizens

      Which is what they've been doing for the past seven years.

    4. convert the country into just one more province of a divided Spain that does not tolerate national plurality

      Just for two months, after the elections you'll get it back. Spain does not tolerate national plurality; that's why there are four official languages (the common one you know as "Spanish", and three more coofficial in their own regions, Catalan among them). But yeah, we hate national plurality...

    5. our police force at its service

      Same here: it's not "their" police force; it's the Catalan's police force. Those who rule Catalonia have to command the police force, yes.

    6. control the media

      Control the Catalan public television, since it's part of the Catalan government whose function they are exerting until the elections in two months.