489 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2021
  2. Mar 2021
    1. We don’t ban cars, but we work hard to regulate them — and limit access to them — so as to reduce the death toll they cause

      con

    2. Cars kill about as many people as guns, and we don’t ban them!

      analogy

    3. In 2015, Gov. Greg Abbott of Texas tweeted that he was “embarrassed” that his state was ranked second (behind California) in requests to buy new guns, albeit still with one million requests.

      example

    4. One study by the Violence Policy Center found that in 2012 there were 259 justifiable homicides by a private citizen using a firearm.

      facts

    5. It is true that guns are occasionally used to stop violence

      opposing argument

    6. Look, we all agree on some kinds of curbs on guns. Nobody believes that people should be able to drive a tank down Main Street, or have an anti-aircraft gun in the backyard. I’ve been to parts of northern Yemen where one could actually buy a tank or an

      allusions

    7. I attended a N.R.A. gun safety class (which came with a one-year membership to the N.R.A., making me an N.R.A. alum who despises what that organization has become). These classes can be very useful, and audits found that more than 80 percent cover such matters as checking the gun to see if it’s loaded, keeping one’s finger off the trigger until ready to fire and being certain of the target.

      per test

    8. Yet more Americans have died from gun violence, including suicides, since 1970 (about 1.4 million) than in all the wars in American history going back to the Revolutionary War (about 1.3 million). And it’s not just gang-members: In a typical year, more pre-schoolers are shot dead in America (about 75) than police officers are.

      Stats

    9. This is the blunt, damning truth: The latest shooting was 100 percent predictable.

      Fact

    10. Some of you will protest, as President Trump and others have, that the immediate aftermath of a shooting is too soon to talk about guns, or that it is disrespectful to the dead to use such a tragedy to score political points.

      Opposing

    11. and so is our polarized political system and the power of the gun lobby. It’s unclear how effective some of my suggestions will be, and in any case this will be a long, uncertain, uphill process.

      Refute?

    12. Yes, making America safer will be hard: There are no perfect solutions. The Second Amendment

      Consession

    13. But automobiles are a reminder that we can chip away at a large problem through a public health approach: Just as auto safety improvements have left us far better off, it seems plausible to some gun policy experts that a sensible, politically feasible set of public health steps could over time reduce firearm deaths in America by one-third — or more than 10,000 lives saved each year.

      Analogy to auto

    14. So let’s not just shed tears for the dead, give somber speeches and lower flags. Let’s get started and save lives.

      Qualifier?

    15. he first step is to understand the scale of the challenge America faces: The U.S. has more than 300 million guns — roughly one for every citizen — and stands out as well for its gun death rates. At the other extreme, Japan has less than one gun per 100 people, and typically fewer than 10 gun deaths a year in the entire country.

      Analogy?

    16. America has been shaken by new mass shootings, in Georgia and Colorado, with at least 18 people killed. This essay originally ran in 2017, after a shooter killed 26 people in a Texas church, but the issue is still tragically relevant — and will remain so until America tightens its gun safety policies.

      Example

  3. Feb 2021
    1. Over the next several years, I spent hundreds of days in and out of hospitals. I developed what may be a lifelong, chronic daily headache disorder. Several years ago, I got a device called a peripheral nerve stimulator implanted near my brain, which made it possible for me to work and exercise again, but I am still in pain daily.I also lost my career and my dream of becoming a pilot, and the Air Force lost a competent and devoted officer candidat

      I think something that should definitely be talked about and discerned is how much experiences like rape can affect someone's life long time-not just emotionally,mentally and physically but the things that can be tarnished and destroyed within their lives as well. this woman's career was ruined and lost due to what had happened to her.

    2. My attacker was accused of raping at least two more women in just the four months after my attack, before he was ultimately incarcerated for another assault. And while the consequences of unreported, untreated rapes are not always as obvious as in my case, they are often devastating. How many women and men will stay silent as I did? How many will get ill as a result? How many will develop post-traumatic stress disorder?At the Veterans Affairs Center for Sexual Trauma Services at Bay Pines, Fla., I got to know a woman who had been raped when she was in the military during World War II. She kept her rape secret for decades, until the year before we met, when one of her doctors asked her if she had ever been raped. I was 21; she was in her 80s. Her post-traumatic stress disorder nearly destroyed her life.We have no way of knowing how many competent service members the military loses every year to sexual assault. Many then turn to Veterans Affairs for health care. My rape alone has already cost the federal government more than a million dollars. We can’t afford this. The military needs strong leaders who will loudly counter the normalization of sexual violence, who appreciate the contributions of service members of any gender and who recognize the costs of staying silent.

      my question to this would be why does it take so long for the perpetrator to be arrested, incriminated and charged for what they did? Does the victims stories seem so inconceivable and fraudulent that it could never have happened?!

    3. This one conversation among my classmates, my “brothers in arms,” helped me to fully understand why I had remained silent after my own rape. My classmates had made the implicit cultural belief explicit: Victims were to be blamed for their rapes, and if they lost their military careers for it, all the better.

      this line from the text or quote you can say is very imperative to my injustice because it talks about how victims are silenced after enduring a traumatic experience such as rape and are fearful and incompetent of vocalizing what has happened to them...because once again they are fearful of being silenced/ignored/ and condemned for not only telling their story but spreading awareness that could dismantle this ongoing cycle of oppression and injustice.

  4. Jan 2021
    1. None of this is meant to argue for some sort of relativism of values or that everyone is equally justified in the choices they make. The displays of racism, sexism and xenophobia that this presidential election has brought us — often in the form of stories that express values associated with macho individualism — are to be rejected wholesale.
    2. This is not to say that people who tell stories like this are necessarily wrong about their history
    3. stories about ourselves express values

      important

    4. whereas if we’re trying to justify a dubious act to someone who is judging us (or perhaps ourselves), we might tell a story that makes us out to be without other recourse in the situation

      we might change the details to elicit a certain response from the audience - strategic summary

    5. The audience for these stories, of course, affect the stories we tell.
    6. We tell stories that make us seem adventurous, or funny, or strong

      we tells stories to demonstrate something about us

    7. value
    8. Now, instead of just a story about me, we have a story about how I like to see myself, or perhaps how I like myself to be seen.

      the story tells you about the writer + observer

    9. Here’s a story:I was driving home from work and a car cut me off. The guy was driving really slowly, and I wound up following him for half a mile.

      begins with example to illustrate argument before he's even gotten to it

  5. Nov 2020
    1. To fund this, tax rates will have to be high. The government will not only have to subsidize most people’s lives and work; it will also have to compensate for the loss of individual tax revenue previously collected from employed individuals.

      If financial capital will be drawn to the hands of the few, what is to prevent them from:

      1. Opposing re-ordering the system
      2. Evading the system (loopholes or running away - which is already what many do today already)

      The assumption seems to be that the powerful will need to realise that they have a social obligation – which is a mighty tenuous one.

    2. In all cases, people will be able to choose to work fewer hours than they do now.

      What is different from what Keynes predicated? The addition of productivity from the second half of the 20th century didn’t decrease working hours – they appear to have driven more value into the hands of shareholders instead of works (especially post 70s). stagnating incomes.

    3. The volunteer service jobs of today, in other words, may turn into the real jobs of the future.

      What reordering of the economy need to happen for such jobs to have economic value?

      Why don’t they have direct economic value today already?

  6. Oct 2020
    1. Defenders of the Electoral College argue that it was created to protect the interests of smaller states

      Which is true. Since the article talks about how only campaigning in certain areas is not fair to the country, abolishing the electoral college would make it worse. Candidates would only campaign in New York and California considering that is where almost a majority of the population lives.

    2. Republicans nearly suffered the same fate in 2004.

      If this is the case then it seems to affect both parties

    3. t’s

      So if half the population lives in nine states than how is that better for democracy if the election will be decided by those nine states? Of which probably have no clue the interest and way of life in the other states.

    4. In 2016, two-thirds of all public campaign events were held in just six states: Michigan, Ohio, Florida, Pennsylvania, Virginia and North Carolina; toss in six more and you’ve got 94 percent of all campaign events.

      That's just smart campaigning. Your not going to visit Idaho 9 times and Pennsylvania 9 times if you know you already have Idaho as a win. Work smarter, not harder

    5. Half the population now lives in just nine states.

      Exactly. So if half the population lives in 9 states, and those 9 states are all big states and decide the fate of our country, what about the other 41 states which are very different? In contrast with the electoral college, about 12 states are swing states and range from large states to small states. It ends up being more fair through the electoral college. Why should I want 9 states vote for the president who only helps their state issues when we can have a system where 12 states differing in size can even out the selfishness of each state voting for their corresponding president

    6. That’s wrong as a matter of history: The framers of the Constitution were concerned primarily with ensuring that the president wasn’t selected by uneducated commoners. The electors were meant to be a deliberative body of intelligent, well-informed men who would be immune to corruption.

      Although that counter-argument is true, that does not mean that a side effect was to protect the interests of the smaller states. Think about the Virginia plan and the New Jersey plan which were all about balancing the power. They truly believed in balancing power and the electoral college, although was made to keep uneducate people from voting, it also was made to balance the power

    1. A comparative sociological study of East and West Germans conducted after reunification in 1990 found that Eastern women had twice as many orgasms as Western women.

      Is this the only empirical evidence for the claim about women under Communism having better sex? That's pretty thin — esp. considering that the link to the study doesn't work.

    2. Why Women Had Better Sex Under Socialism

      'First of all, I did not come up with the headline nor did I choose the photo to accompany the piece. Both of those decisions were made by the New York Times editor' (https://scholar.harvard.edu/kristenghodsee/blog/sources-my-new-york-times-op-ed-why-women-had-better-sex-under-socialism).

    3. sometimes necessary social change — which soon comes to be seen as the natural order of things — needs an emancipation proclamation from above

      'Needs' is a bit strong — why not just say that sometimes even necessary social change can benefit from emancipation proclamations from above?

    4. Democracy

      Not: capitalism?

    5. Russia extended full suffrage to women in 1917

      Russia, not the Bolsheviks: see the editor's note at bottom!

    6. or have sex, for money.

      If the implication is that there was no prostitution behind the Iron Curtain, then I'd like to see a lot more documentation. And what about the kind of prostitution (fictionally) examined in The Lives of Others, where an ambitious actress sleeps with a high-ranking party functionary in order to bypass the obstacles posed by the state bureaucracy?

    7. including state-sponsored research on the mysteries of female sexuality

      Interesting, but this hardly demonstrates that Eastern European women had better sex.

    8. This generational divide between daughters and mothers who reached adulthood on either side of 1989 supports the idea that women had more fulfilling lives during the Communist era.

      Is that the only other bit of empirical evidence? Oy.

    1. dry humor

      Humor is an important way to engage an audience, personally I find it more entertaining if an article can make me chuckle

    2. pitch their own ideas and are assigned topics to explore.

      explains the process of how articles come to fruition

    3. “My own view is that, particularly now, we owe it to our readers to present a wide range of intellectually honest opinions.”

      Importatnt and necessary to give intelligent opinions that may differ from the readers

    4. considering points of view just outside their comfort zone.

      Makes readers think about opposing views

    5. We’ve retained the ambition to have a really wide range of voices there, to create an environment of collegial combat among different points of view dealing with consequential questions

      Wide range of view points

    6. “The objective is rather to afford greater opportunity for exploration of issues and presentation of new insights and new ideas by writers and thinkers who have no institutional connection with The Times and whose views will very frequently be completely divergent from our own.”

      Objective of the Op. Ed page

    7. “The purpose of the Op. Ed. page is neither to reinforce nor to counterbalance The Times’s own editorial position

      From the intro of the section

    8. It is the section’s unique mission both to be the voice of The Times, and to challenge it.

      The Option section is there to be the voice and challenge the Times

    9. Get people interested in important issues of the day, with the right balance of fact and thoughtful analysis.

      Reason for an op-ed

  7. Sep 2020
    1. Yet the idea that a meaningful life must be or appear remarkable is not only elitist but also misguided.

      Can anyone explain this in further detail??

    2. Tertius’s tragedy is that he never reconciles himself to his humdrum reality. Dorothea’s triumph is that she does.

      Smith is warning us that we should quickly recognize that we should want to find joy from small, everyday things.

    3. But the effect of her being on those around her was incalculably diffusive: for the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.”

      Example of what she is saying, which is that it is important to find happiness in small things and involving yourself in people around you.

    4. Today’s college students desperately want to change the world, but too many think that living a meaningful life requires doing something extraordinary and attention-grabbing like becoming an Instagram celebrity, starting a wildly successful company or ending a humanitarian crisis.

      Addresses her audience, and shows that she can be a knowledgeable figure.

    5. As students head to school this year, they should consider this: You don’t have to change the world or find your one true purpose to lead a meaningful life. A good life is a life of goodness — and that’s something anyone can aspire to, no matter their dreams or circumstances.

      I think this is both logos and pathos..college students are struggling to find meaning in their lives and their careers, so this is a statement of hope. Also, this is an appeal to logic because the entire article has articulated this point with research and examples throughout the piece.

    6. One research study showed that adolescents who did household chores felt a stronger sense of purpose. Why? The researchers believe it’s because they’re contributing to something bigger: their family. Another study found that cheering up a friend was an activity that created meaning in a young adult’s life.

      This is an appeal to logos, research is exemplifying numbers and establishes authority. Using scientific logic helps the reader establish a sense of trust.

    7. Most young adults won’t achieve the idealistic goals they’ve set for themselves.

      I believe this sentence is the exigence of the piece, but the tone is not hurtful. It is a simple matter of fact explanation of life.

    8. Rather than succumb to the despair of thwarted dreams, she embraces her life as it is and contributes to those around her as she can.

      I love the imagery this sentence offers, I think this appeals to the idea that dreams can change and evolve, it's more about how you respond to your situations.

    9. But thanks to social media, purpose and meaning have become conflated with glamour: Extraordinary lives look like the norm on the internet.

      I sense the sarcasm in this statement and it pulls the reader back to realize that social media is hugely glamorized

    10. But thanks to social media, purpose and meaning have become conflated with glamour

      This statement essentially eclipses what social media has done to society. Social media has made society confuse purpose and meaning with glamour. Social media has created an unrealistic picture as to what society should be.

    11. As students head to school this year, they should consider this: You don’t have to change the world or find your one true purpose to lead a meaningful life.

      Although many feel as if they need to contribute to something very big, the author is explaining how in order to feel meaning and purpose, many can contribute to something simple that may hold a special meaning to them. Something that holds meaning to one person may not hold meaning to another. Even chores around the house can provide someone with the sense of meaning that they need to feel purpose and importance.

    12. One research study showed that adolescents who did household chores felt a stronger sense of purpose. Why? The researchers believe it’s because they’re contributing to something bigger: their family

      The author is using logos as he provides data to support the argument presented. The data explains how adolescents who did household chores felt a stronger sense of purpose solely because they feel a sense of responsibility in something other than themselves. By doing chores, many people feel the important sense of duty, which is very important.

    13. One research study showed that adolescents who did household chores felt a stronger sense of purpose. Why? The researchers believe it’s because they’re contributing to something bigger: their family. Another study found that cheering up a friend was an activity that created meaning in a young adult’s life.

      here, smith is using logos through providing statistical data to support her point! giving real numbers further solidifies her argument to an audience....it shows that instead of just theories and anecdotes, smith also has cold hard facts to support her argument

    14. It’s one of the most beautiful passages in literature, and it encapsulates what a meaningful life is about: connecting and contributing to something beyond the self, in whatever humble form that may take.

      i just think it's good to note that the author did a really good job making the connection between the message of the book and the message of the piece itself!

    15. Over the past five years, I’ve interviewed dozens of people across the country about what gives their lives meaning, and I’ve read through thousands of pages of psychology, philosophy and neuroscience research to understand what truly brings people satisfaction.

      i think that here, the author was trying to (and succeeded in) establishing ethos! smith shares her varied experience with talking with many people across the country about what truly gives their lives meaning. from this point on, knowing this knowledge, the audience trusts smith's perspective on the "meaning of life," trusting that she is using valid stories to support her viewpoint

    16. Rather than succumb to the despair of thwarted dreams, she embraces her life as it is and contributes to those around her as she can.

      Talking about Dorothea's life the author points out that she is happier doing what she loves then doing what others may deem better. And doing what you love and living in the moment you can begin to embrace life and live it to the fullest.

    17. But that doesn’t mean their lives will lack significance and worth. We all have a circle of people whose lives we can touch and improve — and we can find our meaning in that.

      This is an important statement for young adults to read and understand. You do not have to the be the most popular, or the most successful in life to have worth. In your bubble you can help support those around you and do the small things to find meaning in your life.

    18. But thanks to social media, purpose and meaning have become conflated with glamour: Extraordinary lives look like the norm on the internet.

      I agree with this statement. Social media has glamorized people's lives to the point where people think that it is normal. What people need to understand is you don't need to have a fabulous life to have meaning.

    19. A good life is a life of goodness — and that’s something anyone can aspire to, no matter their dreams or circumstances.

      I really like the whole message of this article. I think it is a topic that isn't spoken about enough and needs to be because many people think they are failures because they haven't changed the world even if it is an unachievable goal.

    20. But that doesn’t mean their lives will lack significance and worth. We all have a circle of people whose lives we can touch and improve — and we can find our meaning in that.

      I think this statement is so important because young adults are put under a lot of pressure to impress and be better than those around them. You don't have to affect the whole entire world in order to have a meaningful life.

    21. The most meaningful lives, I’ve learned, are often not the extraordinary ones. They’re the ordinary ones lived with dignity.

      I agree with this statement 100 precent because doing what makes you happy is more important than any social media following. Most of the time influencers use photo shop and tell fake stories in order to make their lives seem perfect even if they are miserable.

    22. But thanks to social media, purpose and meaning have become conflated with glamour: Extraordinary lives look like the norm on the internet.

      This is one of the reasons I believe social media is so harmful to ones mental health and self esteem. It really is a topic that is not spoken about enough.

    23. Rather than succumb to the despair of thwarted dreams, she embraces her life as it is and contributes to those around her as she can.

      The author shared Dorothea's story which is a personal story. Esfahani wants us to think that it is perfectly fine and good to make an impact on those around us. This is an example of PATHOS.

    24. But that doesn’t mean their lives will lack significance and worth. We all have a circle of people whose lives we can touch and improve — and we can find our meaning in that.

      I totally agree with this statement. It is so easy to get carried away when we start comparing ourselves with others. I believe that we do not have to make an impact on everyone; having an impact on just the people around us is great.

    25. As students head to school this year, they should consider this: You don’t have to change the world or find your one true purpose to lead a meaningful life.

      Many students/teenagers feel the need to do something BIG to feel important and good about themselves. The author seems to be targeting students and teenagers who struggle with this.

    1. We sleep under the stars rather than in a tent; if it rains we pull out a tarp to keep dry. Dawn wakes us up, we roll up our sleeping bags and plastic ground sheet, wolf down trail mix or granola bars and start down the path. We fill our water bottles at passing streams, stop for rest and meals wherever we fancy, chat as we walk, and when dusk comes we look for a flat spot, kick aside any rocks and branches and unroll our ground sheet and sleeping bags again.

      In nature, all are one

  8. Jul 2020
    1. Each suspect wielded his own knife.

      So powerful. This basically means that everyone may or may not have had the same reason for "white flight", but they all did it and wielded the knife of cutting off the tax base of urban areas.

    2. If border residents also fled the city as black migrants arrived, even though black enclaves were miles away, these departures signaled a concern about broader city finances rather than a dislike of immediate black neighbors.

      Proving that white flight is more of a financial thing.

    3. too segregated by race for many urban whites to encounter black neighbors.

      That's a shame in and of itself.

    4. Did whites leave cities for racial reasons or for economic ones?

      I believe both.

    5. “triumph of racist social engineering,”

      I would like to quote this in my research paper.

    6. Ta-Nehisi Coates

      What an icon! He is a symbol of true black excellence.

    7. From 1940 to 1970, four million blacks settled in industrial cities in the North and West. As they moved in, the fraction of white metropolitan households living in the typical Northern or Western central city fell from two-thirds to one-third.

      A prime example of white flight in America. Whether the main cause was racism, "religiousness", or economic reasons, is unknown. But I believe that it was a mixture of them all.

    8. Was Donald Trump’s surprise victory due to his voters’ racism or their economic anxiety? The right answer might be that it was both.

      Agreed.

    1. a wide range of intellectually honest opinions

      "Intellectually honest" = back your claims with credible research!

    2. The goal is to supply readers with a steady stream of big ideas and provocative arguments, and to entertain them

      The "entertainment" part of our op-eds depends on tone and voice. Remember, you can write conversationally in an op-ed, but still need to keep it professional. Engage readers.

    3. collegial combat

      You may find a classmate writing about the same current event you are--and expressing a completely different opinion!

    4. greater opportunity for exploration of issues and presentation of new insights and new ideas

      Keyword: NEW. That's you!

    5. challenge it

      As you learn about your current event, you will likely read through many news publications, some of which are strictly fact based, and others which are op-eds themselves. You are coming to the table with your own viewpoint, and you are prepared to defend it.

    6. Get people interested in important issues of the day, with the right balance of fact and thoughtful analysis.

      This is exactly what we are going for: engaging in a persuasive discussion of current events, where our analyses are supported with credible research.

  9. Feb 2020
    1. It would remind us that we belong to nature, that we are dependent on it and that further alienation from it will be at our own peril.

      So Less Exploitation of natural Resources?

    2. plenty and equality

      unlimited resources?

  10. Sep 2019
    1. City University of New York system propelled almost six times as many low-income students into the middle class and beyond as all eight Ivy League campuses, plus Duke, M.I.T., Stanford and Chicago, combined.

      This is interesting to me. I have grown up being told by teachers, parents, and students going to an Ivy League school will help you improve your class standing because they are prestigious schools, but when looking at the data, the City University of New York System propelled many many lower-income students into the middle-class six times more than Ivy League schools, and that is an eye opener. This just shows that going to an Ivy League school doesn't always guarantee you the upper hand.

    2. The question is how to enable more working-class students to do so. “It’s really the way democracy regenerates itself,” said Ted Mitchell

      We should do more research on the people that came from lower-income families. See what helped them want more for their selves & family. See how we can get others to want and do the same.

    3. as frequently happens with low-income students — was not willing to leave home at age 18 for an unfamiliar world. “I just didn’t feel like I was ready to go out to college on my own,” he said. “So I decided to stay home and save money.”

      This was something i heard from a lot of peers in high school. Most did stay home and said it would be cheaper, its what my parents wanted me to do. Instead i did what i wanted, i wanted to get out of my home town and see greater things. I am glad i did even though i struggle like everyone else due to the cost of college, I see how much better everything can be. My parents always told me to do better for myself and i am, but i do it for them as well. So, i guess my point was that if you want it bad enough if you work for it, you can do it. No matter where you start out.

    4. At City College, in Manhattan, 76 percent of students who enrolled in the late 1990s and came from families in the bottom fifth of the income distribution have ended up in the WB_wombat_top three-fifths of the distribution. These students entered college poor. They left on their way to the middle class and often the upper middle class.

      Community college is really a great route and is often looked down upon as its not a 4 year school. Yet going to a community college means not only saving money but still getting a good education. I think some students may feel discouraged to go to school if they know they can't go to a 4 year and then rather just not go to school.

    5. They remain deeply impressive institutions that continue to push many Americans into the middle class and beyond — many more, in fact, than elite colleges that receive far more attention.

      I think that this shows how big name schools get a lot of attention yet many not big name schools are doing amazing things for their students and have a high rate yet since they have not been recognized as a big name school it doesn't receive full recognition.

    6. was not willing to leave home at age 18 for an unfamiliar world.

      This was true for me to. In my situation, college was too expensive for me to go in without a clear goal of what I wanted to become. I didn't have a lot of guidance or work experience beforehand to make a calculated decision toward my professional goals. I once thought I wanted to work in film or creative writing, but once I dabbled with that before entering college and realizing how unstable of a lifestyle it entailed, I was able to make a decisive choice geared toward my strengths and values. College is just too risky to not be 100% on board with your career path. I would advising being familiar with your world before pursuing it.

    7. After all, the earnings gap between four-year college graduates and everyone else has soared in recent decades.

      This is a very interesting line that speaks to me on several levels. I've actually done a lot of research behind my current career path of becoming a Software Engineer and I'd have to agree with this line. People working in this field make on average $120,000 annually, and roughly 90% have a bachelors relating to SE. I personally used to work as an Aviation Maintenance Tech beforehand, which I didn't need a bachelors for and made $60,000 annually. In my opinion, the aviation job is significantly more difficult than SE. This just goes to show the importance of furthering education.

    8. Published Wednesday, the study tracked students from nearly every college in the country (including those who failed to graduate), measuring their earnings years after they left campus.

      The study measured the student's salaries. I find it interesting that they measure the college's efficiency based off of how much money the alumni from each school received. Can a school still be efficient at teaching without guaranteeing careers?

    9. More recently, these universities have seemed to struggle, with unprepared students, squeezed budgets and high dropout rates. To some New Yorkers, “City College” is now mostly a byword for nostalgia.

      I'm curious to know what the writer means when they state how universities struggle with "unprepared students". Does this mean that college acceptance rates are higher? Or does it mean that high schools are becoming worse at preparing students for college? Im going to keep this in mind as I read because I'm curious to know what the writer claims is causing this.

    10. “There are a lot of people who would not go to college at all, and would not get an education at all, if they had to go through some selective criteria,” said Erik Pavia, a 2010 graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso, known as UTEP. “UTEP opens the doors to people from all walks of life.”

      I think this a problem that we can correct in this country. I feel as if people high up in education do not emphasize enough the importance of attending some form of college is. I also think a way to fix this problem is make college cheaper. A big reason why people do not attend college is because it is too great of an expense. With lowering the cost of college we will have more educated people in this country and it will benefit this world greatly.

    11. To take just one encouraging statistic: At City College, in Manhattan, 76 percent of students who enrolled in the late 1990s and came from families in the bottom fifth of the income distribution have ended up in the WB_wombat_top three-fifths of the distribution. These students entered college poor. They left on their way to the middle class and often the upper middle class.

      I think that city colleges are truly a great route for people who come from lower income families. Unfortunatley not everyone can afford to go to a 4 year university. I think people should push harder for young students to attend a city college if they can not afford to go to a 4 year school. The base knowledge that they will receive at a city college is way more than if they do not attend at all.

    12. “There is a real problem with the elite privates and flagship publics in not serving as many low-income students as they should,”

      I agree with this statement because many elite privates do not fulfill the needs of low-income students. They give them some money, but not enough for these students to afford it. This is the reason why low-income students decide to go to community college first and transfer. It is cheaper and close to home so they are still able to help bring in income for their family. Elite schools try to help out the upper middle class and the rich instead of helping the ones who truly need it.

    13. shows that many colleges indeed fail to serve their students well. Dropout rates are high, saddling students with debt but no degree. For-profit colleges perform the worst, and a significant number of public colleges also struggle. Even at the strong performers, too many students fall by the wayside. Improving higher education should be a national priority.

      I do believe that the reasons students drop out are because they feel as if they do not get the attention needed or the college does not serve them as they wish it did. My cousin for example, dropped out of community college because she did not have teachers who helped her learn the way she wanted. She said they would not focus on their students nor did they interact with them. Even though college is much different than high school I think it is still necessary for teachers to know a bit about their students. This is a very interesting topic because it is also very important that there government needs to focus heavily on education.

    14. They remain deeply impressive institutions that continue to push many Americans into the middle class and beyond — many more, in fact, than elite colleges that receive far more attention.

      I strongly agree with this quote because I do believe that attending universities is to help educate and raise a future economic level. Most families that are low income is because the parents do not have a job that pays above minimum wage. This is mostly due to the fact that they do not have an education further than a high school diploma, if that. I can strongly agree with that connection.

    15. “There are a lot of people who would not go to college at all, and would not get an education at all, if they had to go through some selective criteria,”

      What I got from this is that some people just prefer to work jobs and get money now. People like store managers for retail who have started families and are just living off of hourly rates. I have coworkers that chose not to go to college because they would rather work full time in retail rather than going to school to pursue a job that they dont they could even get.

    16. Those problems are real: The new study — by a team of economists led by Raj Chetty of Stanford — shows that many colleges indeed fail to serve their students well. Dropout rates are high, saddling students with debt but no degree. For-profit colleges perform the worst, and a significant number of public colleges also struggle. Even at the strong performers, too many students fall by the wayside. Improving higher education should be a national priority.

      It stands out to me how much colleges fail to serve their students especially considering how much money they pay for their education whether it is from financial aid or out of their own pockets. That is one thing I was scared of coming into college, whether I was going to do well or not because I honestly struggle with school. I was always told how ruthless college was going to be compared to high school. How much easier it is to fail a class in college compared to high school.

    17. Being in the middle class is not enough, people can barely make ends meet. People in the middle class do not even consider themselves being apart of the middle class.

    18. This article glamorizes putting people into the middle class when that is the group that struggles with income inequality.

    19. many colleges indeed fail to serve their students well. Dropout rates are high, saddling students with debt but no degree.

      This sentence is really interesting to me. Colleges exist to give you a higher education help give you a degree, when in reality, the tuition rate is getting high and people in lower income families can't keep up with paying so students drop out with debt. All you do is pay the tuition, do all work and pass your classes and then you earn you degree. You don't really learn anything. I remember talking with a friend and he said that he has spent 3 years in college not really learning anything and considered dropping out, but he can't because he is already deep in debt and leaving would just make it worse because he can't pay it off.

    20. The share of lower-income students at many public colleges has fallen somewhat over the last 15 years.

      It is so hard for anyone to go to college if they are low income, whether they have family who attended college or not, whether they receive financial aid or not. There are so many factors that play into it, but a main one being money. Money makes the world go round, and thats the sad reality. Low income families cannot afford to send their children to college because they can barely even afford to pay rent most of the time, they live day by day a lot of the time, a college savings account is almost unheard of for low income families. And college is at an all time high, it is ridiculously expensive even for PUBLIC schools, most US families cannot afford it, and the government does not fund public universities enough. Which only then leads for lower income families to continue the cycle of no education and poverty, and continue the middle/upper classes on top. The cycle repeats.

    21. Most Baruch graduates, he added, are making more money than their parents as soon as they start their first post-college job.

      This to is very impressive, but I would also understand why those in the lower class would be more successful than those who were already coming into ivy schools from middle/upper classes. Those who are in the lower class have already endured so much emotionally, physically and mentally to let alone be going to college, then to get into an Ivy League, whether it be on scholarship or taking out massive amounts of loans to even attend both are crucial. Attending on scholarship, they must remain at the top of the top on their A game, or they won't be able to afford school, and if they took out loans, obviously the massive amount of loans will have to be paid off, and worth it somehow. Therefore those of lower income families will obviously work 100X harder in college because it was already100x harder for them to even be there, and they want to break the cycle of poverty, they want to "make it."

    22. There is a real problem with the elite privates and flagship publics in not serving as many low-income students as they should,”

      there are many problems with elite schools not serving as may low income students as they should is a statement i agree with low income is directly associated with minority because the vast majority of lower income people as compared to weathlier people are minority. many minority students arent even exposed to ivy league because the idea itself seems out of reach resources arent even provided in lower income neighborhoods that home many low income families.

    23. Dropout rates are high, saddling students with debt but no degree.

      This reminds me of a college counselor I had once. She explained to us that she did not finish getting a degree at the original college she had chosen due to the amount of debt she was in. Instead she had to finish getting her degree at a community college. Sadly she is in debt until this day.

    24. These students entered college poor. They left on their way to the middle class and often the upper middle class.

      This was interesting because one could interpret it as the lower class being more motivated and taking education more seriously than the upper class.Which could slightly explain the changes in the graph between the statistics of children and adults.

    25. Most Baruch graduates, he added, are making more money than their parents as soon as they start their first post-college job.

      I find it interesting that the texts says most people make more money then their parents did when inflation and job discription wasnt taken into consideration when talking about the lower/ middle class I am skeptical about this article because i feel it didnt take it account first generation students or students of color because there are alot of other things that come into factor.

    26. Because the elite colleges aren’t fulfilling that responsibility, working-class colleges have become vastly larger engines of social mobility.

      i feel like this is such an intuitive statement. the only places where having a degree from an elite school would matter is in fields like science or law, where theres high standards and lots of competition. in many other fields, just having a degree is enough, they dont care where its from unless it really matters for the job. and for a student trying to get money, most of the time you dont get a job in your major's field right away.

    27. The unemployment rate for college graduates today is a mere 2.5 percent.

      i feel like thats a little bit of a misleading statement. yes, not a lot of college graduates are unemployed, but that doesn't mean they are working jobs that can give them a living wage along with money to pay off student debt

    28. Baruch graduates, he added, are making more money than their parents as soon as they start their first post-college job.

      thats so crazy to me. in the long run it makes sense, but the FIRST job after college already earning them more seems unbelievable. could be partially due to higher wages and inflation, but thats probably only a small part of it.

    29. There is a real problem with the elite privates and flagship publics in not serving as many low-income students as they should,”

      The pricetag of a college degree is a extremely frustrating topic for me, and was one of the many reasons I veered away from the college path entirely. The fact is, after considering inflation, even just a few generations ago, our elders were able to attend college for pennies comparatively to wheat we pay now. To me, it can feel like "for what?" because of incompetent staffing, the price of housing, etc.

    30. was not willing to leave home at age 18 for an unfamiliar world. “I just didn’t feel like I was ready to go out to college on my own,” he said. “So I decided to stay home and save money.”

      This is very similar to my own experience, to a degree. Senior year of high school, I was accepted to many of schools that I had applied to, but I didn't feel the passion to attend, have the money, or have the drive to throw myself directly from living with family into a giant school. I think this was a reasonable decision, because I feared burning out after the first year and dropping out after accumulating a year's worth of student debt. Instead, I took a gap year (albeit away from home) to save money and just take some time off. I know that attending college is the important next step to grow and to achieve my success, but the year away gave me the courage to do so.

    31. It hurts to see students not attend colleges they've worked hard to get into because they have low income. This is what I mean by students not having the same opportunities as others due to their socio-economic status. Despite all this, they can still succeed. Not everyone can or wants to go to a university right out of high school. Community college is beneficial because you can save money and be more prepared for moving away.

    32. I strongly feel that "Improving higher education should be a national priority" as well. Education is essential and the basis for the foundation we build in our society. I believe this needs to start from elementary school and continue throughout all years of education. This isn't happening because all students aren't treated fairly. They do not have the same opportunities, resources, and support that other students have. I think the solution starts with improving this issue here.

    33. Graduates are also happier and healthier

      This quote stood out to me because this is the mindset I'm trying using to push myself. I actually didn't want to go to college in the first place because I already burnt my self out in high school and I thought I wasn't going to get accepted to any colleges because of my grades. My mom was the one who pushed me to continue my education and she let me live my life out here in SF. I want to live happy and healthy so that's why I'm working towards my degree.

    34. debt but no degree

      This quote stood out to me because this is one of many concerns I have while attending college. I questioned myself asking, what if I don't do well in college? Attending college costs a lot of money including the materials needed for each class, dorming or the rent. In the end, the experience varies between people but a majority are still paying off their debt.

    35. Lower-income students who attend elite colleges fare even better on average than low-income students elsewhere

      I think it's important to note that there is no evidence listed for this. This sentence really stood to to me because it is a claim that might not be factual but is making readers believe that only going to an elite college will make you more successful. This reminds me of high school because many counselors and educators often told students that the school you attend does not matter as much as what you make out of the school you attend. I do not think the author realized the confusion it would cause adding this line.

    36. On these more typical campuses, students often work while they’re going to college. Some are military veterans, others learned English as a second language and others are in their mid-20s or 30s.

      This stands out to me because it is listing different groups of specific people to show how they are excelling. I believe they added this to show that these are groups people might not think of often in college but are groups that are excelling. This was interesting to me because I am a first generation student so I am usually placed into a group of people as well. It also reminds me of high school and grouping different type of people who get college education.

    37. It’s true in red states as well as in many blue and purple states

      I think this quote is very significant because it shows that the issues with higher education are not political. They are universal problems that effect everyone. I think it is interesting that it is addressed.

    38. Other research that has tried to tease out the actual effects of higher education finds them to be large. And they’re not limited to money

      This statement reaffirms the importance of college and higher education by describing the lasting effects it gives. This contributes to the article's thesis of there needing to be an improvement of access to higher education. I find this quote to be interesting because I would imagine graduates to be less happy but it's good to know.

    39. Graduates are also happier and healthier. No wonder that virtually all affluent children go to college, and nearly all graduate.

      From the way I see it, wealthy kids, of course, are happier and healthier than low-income kids. I mean, the number of challenges they face is not even close to what students from low-income and underrepresented backgrounds face. Wealthy students are automatically put into the top of this college hierarchy that exists in our education system, while all other students have to climb their way to the top.

    40. He did well enough in high school to attend many colleges but — as frequently happens with low-income students — was not willing to leave home at age 18 for an unfamiliar world.

      Students coming from low-income families face more challenges when it comes to getting an education. Financials is one of the most critical aspects for disadvantaged students in deciding whether or not they are going to be attending college. Another aspect that also plays a big role for students who are not only low-income but also first-gen is getting the emotional and informational support they need. Students who are the first ones in their family to attend college might often feel they are alone in their college journey. I think that can lead students to feel depressed, and eventually drop out or not attend college at all.

    41. “The state does not recognize — and it’s not just in Texas — the importance that the investment in public education has for the economy and so many other things.

      I liked this quote because it makes sense to me. If more money is put into public education, then many people of lower-income would probably be more likely to attend college and graduate as well. Then, they could find jobs and start boosting the economy. I think that more jobs helps the economy at least. More money given to public education probably means more financial aid to students too which would boost there chances of success after college, since they have less student debt.

    42. No wonder that virtually all affluent children go to college, and nearly all graduate.

      I believe what this is saying is that kids with wealthier families will go to more expensive colleges who have the means to provide a better college experience for the students. This would then result in the students being more likely to graduate. This claim is sad to me because it means that lower-income students who don't go to a more expensive school have a disadvantage. Earlier in the reading John Friedman even noted that students from more modest backgrounds are less likely to be on elite college campuses. All students supposedly have an equal opportunity to go to college and graduate with a degree. But in this case the opportunity between high and lower income students would not be equal if lower income students are less likely to graduate.

    43. Because the elite colleges aren’t fulfilling that responsibility, working-class colleges have become vastly larger engines of social mobility.

      This is an interesting claim to me because if it is in fact true, then why would people ever promote going to more elite schools over working-class ones. I feel like an idea is instilled in many kids minds that it is better to try to go to a more elite school because they will probably fare better after college, but if working-class colleges can do help you the same or even better, should going to a more reputable school even matter? Also, is it worth spending more money on college in this case too. it reminds me of how my mom would try to steer me away from going to city college in high school because she thought that going to a university would be better for me. But would she have thought differently if she saw this claim?

  11. May 2019
    1. The reason is clear. State funding for higher education has plummeted. It’s down 18 percent per student, adjusted for inflation, since 2008, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. The financial crisis pinched state budgets, and facing a pinch, some states decided education wasn’t a WB_wombat_top priority.

      State funding for college has fallen, and tuition has risen. Students either accumulate a lifetime of debt or simply cannot go to college.

    2. Those college graduates have to come from somewhere, of course, and most of them are coming from campuses that look a lot less like Harvard or the University of Michigan than like City College or the University of Texas at El Paso.

      This is another very interesting concept. A lot of the colleges stated above are the bottom of the barrel colleges that everyone disses, yet there is a lot of upwards mobility for those that achieve their success there.

    3. More recently, these universities have seemed to struggle, with unprepared students, squeezed budgets and high dropout rates. To some New Yorkers, “City College” is now mostly a byword for nostalgia.

      It seems that in a modern society, the working classs is becoming more reluctant to go to college for the weak payoff of hard work and would rather go straight into working, as it saves time and accumulates money faster.

    4. The

      The graph above is extremely hard to read and i'm pretty sure they purposely make it hard to read

    5. push many Americans into the middle class and beyond

      Not really student loans are a giant anchor around the neck for people who can't pay out of pocket, and its only really the american colleges that do this basically the world over has either free college or colleges that cost 1/4 as much and still teach the same material

  12. Mar 2019
    1. As all historians know, forgetting is as essential to public understandings of history as remembering.

      On Forgetting.

  13. Feb 2019
    1. Students certainly don’t need to strive obsessively for perfection, but I should have prioritized grades, not guys.

      students should balance social and academic life

    2. Drinking and smoking eased my social anxiety and seemed like fun. Until I couldn’t stop. Getting clean — smoke-toke-alcohol-free — led to a huge upswing in my life.

      Never knew it would be hard like she explained to stop.

    3. Yet as a teacher, I see that the students who come weekly, sit in front, and ask and answer questions get higher grades and frankly, preferential treatment

      students who do sit in the front and are engaged to the topic that is being taught will learn better and have higher grades.

    4. f a class was boring or it snowed, I’d skip.

      Relatable, last semester I would skip lectures because I knew I could get notes from my peers.

    5. as a freshman I think majority of us can relate to this. We're too worried about what others think.

    1. He was 18. He came to school and was invited to a party his first weekend, and he didn’t know anybody. So he started to drink. He drank way too much and ended up lying on a bench in his residential hall, feeling very sick. Nobody stopped and said, ‘How are you doing? Are you O.K.?’ And he felt so isolated. When he came in to speak with me the next day, the thing that struck him — what he said — was, ‘There I was, alone, with all these people around.’ ”

      This makes me sad. I have seen it, people drink way too much. They're unstoppable.

    2. he technology that keeps them connected to parents and high school friends only reminds them of their physical separation from just about everyone they know best.

      Yes, being away from home was hard.

    1. In my own life I made bad choices that went far beyond spray paint. I flunked out of college and at various points narrowly dodged jail time. When I think back to those mistakes, I’m horrified and chastened. I feel fortunate to have survived, to have had the privilege to make amends.

      Nobody is perfect everyone makes mistakes. We live and we learn, my laughs now can make us cry later.

    2. Because in 1985, a college student could get a little self-righteous, make a bad decision, face consequences and then go home, having learned a “valuable lesson.”

      Times have changed. Get in trouble with the law and that can now affect your future education.

    1. Social scientists have found that this misperception causes black children to be “pushed out, overpoliced and underprotected,” according to a report by the legal scholar Kimberlé W. Crenshaw.

      Evidence part of BEAM concept that shows why black children are perceived to be more mature and how this happens.

    2. The minstrel version of Topsy, a character in “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” turned into the pickaninny.

      The cover of Uncle Tom's cabin depicts Topsy as crazy looking (messy hair, weird pose, yelling) even though she is just a child

    3. In one study, people overestimated their ages by 4.5 years. This contributes to a false perception that black boys are less childlike than white boys.

      The author used a statistic in this line to make a point that black kids are commonly viewed as older, which takes away their innocence. Later in the article it is expounded upon.

    4. But only white kids were allowed to be innocent. The more that popular writers, playwrights, actors and visual artists created images of innocent white children, the more they depicted children of color, especially black children, as unconstrained imps. Over time, this resulted in them being defined as nonchildren.

      the initial label of innocence put on children actually was the catalyst for viewing black children as the opposite. It's included primarily because history of what went wrong in our past is a great motivator for moving forward.

    5. tears.

      If this article were to be published as a book instead, it would be different because it would most likely include many more examples to give us the same sense that the author is trying to give us in this article

    6. The association between childhood and innocence did not always exist. Before the Enlightenment, children in the West were widely regarded as immodest beings who needed to be taught to restrain themselves. “The devil has been with them already,” the Puritan minister

      This section sets out to talk about the ties between childhood and innocence. Originally, children were actually viewed much closer to devil spawn, and needed to be cleansed and taught innocence, or whatever the equivalent was at the time. However, with Sentimentalists, they worked on the perception of childhood innocence being the only real difference between children and adults. However, this only applied to white children.

    7. Topsy was at heart an innocent child who misbehaved because she had been traumatized, “hardened,” by slavery’s violence.

      This line creates a dark tone that illustrates the story both to give the readers a serious sense of what is going on as well as to describe "Uncle Tom's Cabin."

    8. ore adultlike

      I think that the author added this paragraph in order to show how people of all races see black children as less innocent and provides examples of how and why

    9. George Zimmerman admitted at his 2012 bail hearing that he misjudged Trayvon Martin’s age when he killed him. “I thought he was a little bit younger than I am,” he said, meaning just under 28. But Trayvon was only 17.

      The main idea is that black children are viewed as older, less innocent, and more adultlike by people of all races. It's included because not only does it elaborate on the main information in this piece, it gives hard evidence for the idea that they're viewed as older - one who was killed was perceived as a decade older than he was. This connects primarily because it establishes the problem for which the article sets out to solve.

    10. the more they depicted children of color, especially black children, as unconstrained imps.

      Racism has roots in our culture and was spread onto people through the use of propaganda portraying black children as wild and uncontrollable compared to the innocent white children they would portray.

    1. These forces should also help reduce local air pollution in countries like China and India, which is why their leaders are getting behind these technologies in a big way. Government incentives have turned China into the biggest market for electric vehicles. And an Indian government minister says his country wants all cars sold there by 2030 to be electric. France says it wants to end sales of new diesel and gasoline cars by 2040, while Norway’s goal is 2025.

      In other parts of the world air pollution is already becoming a serious problem and it could be one here in the U.S. some day.

    2. The potential environmental benefits of electric vehicles are huge. The transportation sector accounts for 14 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions and 27 percent of emissions in the United States. Moreover, countries have found it much more difficult to reduce planet-warming gases from transportation than from power plants

      The benefits will help slow down global warming and this is really important considering that it is a major issue.

    3. $100 per kilowatt-hour,

      If they can bring the price margins of the electric batteries the prices will be matched with regular cars. and they are only 25$ away from it.

    4. The skeptics, however, have consistently been overly pessimistic about this technology.

      They have always under estimated what can be accomplished with electric cars.

    5. wishful

      Allow there people are still skeptical this idea is closer than we believe. With the advnacements in technology

    6. emission

      other countries are already on the path of pushing out emission laws that try to help push electric cars and get rid of gas cars.

    7. models

      all auto makers are putting big efforts to create cars in the electric segment that will be just as appealing as any other regular car.

    8. cheaper

      These cars are now going to be priced at a range that is competitive with the rest of diesel and gasoline.

    9. mainstream

      Every year with advancements in technology we have finally hit that point where electric cars are on the verge of becoming the mainstream car in the next few years.

    10. gas-guzzling

      There has to be a change made with the way the climate is having drastic changes that we have not seen before.

    1. These students entered college poor. They left on their way to the middle class and often the upper middle class.

      city colleges are pushing people to where they want to go

    2. To some New Yorkers, “City College” is now mostly a byword for nostalgia.

      college is an elitist system

    3. Improving higher education should be a national priority.

      Students who go to private schools traditionally do better then kids who go to public schools. The kids from the public schools are the ones dropping out. why do you have to pay to get better higher education

    4. Improving higher education should be a national priority.

      I feel like this idea should be stressed, especially with the high tuition fees in today's world

    5. ity University of New York system propelled almost six times as many low-income students into the middle class and beyond as all eight Ivy League campuses, plus Duke, M.I.T., Stanford and Chicago, combined.

      Private university aren't helping low income students as compared to a public university who is helping students change economic classes.

    6. These students entered college poor. They left on their way to the middle class and often the upper middle class.

      A college degree helps you changed which economic class you fall in.

    7. The heyday of the colleges that serve America’s working class can often feel very long ago. It harks back to the mid-20th century, when City College of New York cost only a few hundred dollars a year and was known as the “Harvard of the proletariat.”

      Colleges are no longer serving the working class, college cost so much. Why? When years ago is cost only a few hundred compared to thousands.

    8. itself

      It wouldnt let me highlight the whole thing.

      Working students need to have access to college and work and still be able to pay for it all, on what they make. That should be a possibility if enough effort put in.

    9. More recently, these universities have seemed to struggle, with unprepared students, squeezed budgets and high dropout rates.

      I can’t say i’m surprised by this because now a days colleges are so expensive many people do not have enough money to attend college or even a junior college. Also people do are able to attend college may realize that it is more expensive than they thought which explains the drop out rate.

    10. proletariat.

      pro·le·tar·i·at Dictionary result for proletariat /ˌprōləˈterēət/Submit noun workers or working-class people, regarded collectively (often used with reference to Marxism). "the growth of the industrial proletariat" synonyms: the workers, working-class people, wage-earners, the laboring classes, the common people, the ordinary people, the lower classes, the masses, the commonalty, the rank and file, the third estate, the plebeians; More the lowest class of citizens in ancient Rome.

    11. hese more typical campuses, students often work while they’re going to college. Some are military veterans, others learned English as a second language and others are in their mid-20s or 30s.

      Students are stretched thin, and needs will typically rule the decision to drop out or stay in school.

    12. Dropout rates are high, saddling students with debt but no degree

      dropping out means debt and no degree

    13. There are a lot of people who would not go to college at all, and would not get an education at all

      College are not for everyone and there are other ways to succeed or get a job without a college degree

    14. making more money than their parents as soon as they start their first post-college job

      Most parents don't make much for a living or even have a stable job..

    15. these universities have seemed to struggle, with unprepared students, squeezed budgets and high dropout rates

      Colleges are different from high school, plus some people cannot afford to attend college which causes high dropout rates

    16. The reason is clear. State funding for higher education has plummeted. It’s down 18 percent per student, adjusted for inflation, since 2008, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. The financial crisis pinched state budgets, and facing a pinch, some states decided education wasn’t a WB_wombat_top priority.“It’s really been a nightmare,” said Diana Natalicio, UTEP’s president and herself a first-generation college graduate. “The state does not recognize — and it’s not just in Texas — the importance that the investment in public education has for the economy and so many other things. Education was for me, and for many of the rest of us, the great opportunity creator.”

      What a surprise to think that money is going down for funds to states for college.

    17. Pavia grew up in Canutillo, a poor neighborhood in El Paso, the son of a construction worker and house cleaner. He did well enough in high school to attend many colleges but — as frequently happens with low-income students — was not willing to leave home at age 18 for an unfamiliar world. “I just didn’t feel like I was ready to go out to college on my own,” he said. “So I decided to stay home and save money.”

      Does Texas not offer Financial aids to students?

    18. After all, the earnings gap between four-year college graduates and everyone else has soared in recent decades. The unemployment rate for college graduates today is a mere 2.5 percent.

      This article from 2017 may not be too accurate.

    19. They remain deeply impressive institutions that continue to push many Americans into the middle class and beyond — many more, in fact, than elite colleges that receive far more attention.

      Will I really be able to beat a Stanford student when applying for a job ?

    20. Out West, California built an entire university system that was both accessible and excellent

      Csu or UC ?

    21. “There is a real problem with the elite privates and flagship publics in not serving as many low-income students as they should,”

      I agree with this as the cost of college has not made it easy or possible for those who come from low-income families to succeed in obtaining a college education or degree.

    22. these universities have seemed to struggle, with unprepared students, squeezed budgets and high dropout rates.

      Many universities have high drop out rates which can't necessarily be fixed as each individual has their own reasons on as to why they leave

    23. Education was for me, and for many of the rest of us, the great opportunity creator.

      there should be more investment into public education for it liberates many and gives them purpose to move forward and have their dream(s) become reality

    24. City University of New York system propelled almost six times as many low-income students into the middle class and beyond as all eight Ivy League campuses, plus Duke, M.I.T., Stanford and Chicago, combined.

      elite colleges not taking their responsibility seriously and help the students who attend the school

    25. On several dozen of campuses, remarkably, fewer students hail from the entire bottom half of the income distribution than from the WB_wombat_top 1 percent.

      this shows that those in the bottom are welcomed and are ready to pursue college and succeed