790 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
      • for: enthnography - Jarawa, African-Asian tribe, Alexandre Dereims, human origins - Jawara, anthropology - Jarawa, Andaman archipelago

      • summary

        • An extraordinary film by filmmaker Alexandre Dereims about the isolated Jawara people, believed to be one of the first peoples to migrate out of Africa and who landed in an island off the coast of India. Their way of life has not changed for tens of thousands of years but unfortunately, is being quickly eroded by the influences of modernity.
        • This film documents the life of this ancient tribe, who until recently lived in complete isolation from modernity. Dereims illegally entered the territory to film the Jawara tribe and give them a voice in the context of the Indian governments continual exploitation of the tribe for tourism and their agenda to confiscate their land for modern development.
        • The film is a realtime record of how rapidly colonialism and the transformation of takes place. We hear the voices of the Jawara as they speak of the incremental exploitation and corruption of the modern world on their people. When we see this, we realize how little has changed since the 14th century when global colonialism began.
        • Instead of preserving the Jawara to have a living reminder of our ancient past and the wonder of human evolution, we myopically exploit them. What a sad commentary on humanity.
      • new trailmark: deeper reflections

        • this trailmark is used to capture deeper reflections not captured in the initial annotation
        • this often occurs for me there next day after a night's sleep.
        • I believe it happens because the intuitive gut feeling that initially attracted me to the story is not so easily accessible. It could be complex, entangled and difficult to articulate and/or subconscious
      • deeper reflections

        • our own process of cultural construction
          • the living Jawara are so valuable ethnographically and anthropologically because they are living, breathing examples of how culture constructs us -
        • adjacency between - Jawara people - Ronald Wright's computer analogy for modern humans
          • Cumulative Cultural Evolution (CCE)
            • Deep Humanity
          • adjacency statement
            • The comparison between the cultural differences between the Jawara people and we modernly enculturated humans is striking. Perhaps not as striking as feral children but still striking. It shows us how easily we ourselves could have such a different experience of life and Worldview if we were born into the Jawara tribe today.
            • As Ronald Wright noted, there is likely no difference between the human mental capacity of our 50,000 year old ancestors and ourselves
            • The significance of their existence is living proof of CCE, a profound Deep Humanity teaching about how we humans construct the meaningverse and symbolosphere so critical to intertwingled individual and collective experience of reality
            • The Jawara and other isolated ingenious progress should be treated with the greatest respect and esteem for being the living examples of our cultural evolution that teaches us the deepest lessons of what we are as humans and how culture profoundly shapes us
            • At a minimum, all the tourists the the Indian government have allowed to visit them, as well as the tourist operators should have mandatory Deep Humanity training before being allowed any contact with them in order to preserve their dignity
            • striping away all the amenities of modern life, we can see how happy they Jawara people are with so little
            • this is a lesson on recognising the wonder of simply being alive, an invaluable Deep. Humanity lesson
  2. Nov 2023
    1. the increasing number of tourists is starting to make them feel like exhibits in a zoo
      • for: human exploitation, treating humans like animals in a zoo

      • example - human exploitation - Jawara

        • These images parading the Jawara like curiosity items remind one of centuries earlier when European colonizers treated the people they enslaved as curiosity items - like animals in a zoo
        • Zoo's are themselves an icon that represents the distorted anthropogenic perspective and relationship of modern humans to the rest of the biome.
    2. there are armed poachers who shoot at us they steal they kill our pigs we think about it all the time 00:06:53 after the wild pigs it's deer their numbers have decreased dramatically since the poachers forced the jarrow to hunt for them wild game is being sold illegally on the 00:07:12 indian market
      • for: cultural destruction - Jawara - poachers, modernity - disruption of ecological cycle, example - ecosystem disruption

      • comment

      • example: ecosystem disruption
      • example: human cultural ecosystem in balance
      • the uncontrolled influence of the outside world always follows. Governments are too shortsighted to understand that this always happens and feel they can control the situation. They cannot. Greed breeds resourcefulness
        • In a matter of years, poachers have disrupted the Jawara's traditional diet, forcing them to overhunt deer and disrupt the entire ecological cycle that existed up until then.It's an example of how modernity ruthlessly and rapidly disrupts ecosystems. In this case, ecosystems where humans have integrated in a balanced way.
    1. How will people build professional callouses if the early work that may be viewed as mundane essentials are taken over by AI systems? Do we risk living in the age of the last masters, the age of the last experts?

      Professional callouses

      This is a paragraph too far. There are many unnecessary "callouses" that have been removed from work, and we are better for it. Should we go back to the "computers" of the 1950s and 1960s...women whose jobs were to make mathematical calculations?

      As technology advances, there are actions that are "pushed down the complexity stack" of what is assumed to exist and can be counted on.

      • for: microbiome, gut health, MET in Individuality - microbiome, complexity - human microbiome, fermentation - health
    1. there's a microbe in the mouth called fusobacterium nucleotide it over proliferates it's okay to have normally but it over proliferates when 01:28:39 you have bleeding gums gingivitis or periodontitis where it then enters the bloodstream this is called translocation and colonize the colon and the evidence is very good it is a principal cause of 01:28:52 colon cancer colon cancer starts in the mouth incredibly and doesn't get there by swallowing gets her through the bloodstream translocation
      • for:holistic medicine - example - oral microbiome and colon cancer, oral microbiome - colon cancer, bleeding gums - colon cancer, gingivitus - colon cancer, periodontitis - colon cancer, bloodstream translocation, complexity - example - human body - colon cancer - oral microbiome

      • comment

        • colon cancer starts in the mouth!
      • references

        • Oral-Intestinal Microbiota in Colorectal Cancer: Inflammation and Immunosuppression (2022)

          • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8824753/
          • Abstract
            • It is widely recognized that microbial disorders are involved in the pathogenesis of many malignant tumors.
            • The oral and intestinal tract are two of the overriding microbial habitats in the human body. Although they are anatomically and physiologically continuous, belonging to the openings at both ends of the digestive tract, the oral and intestinal microbiome do not cross talk with each other due to a variety of reasons, including
              • intestinal microbial colonization resistance and
              • chemical barriers in the upper digestive tract.
            • However, this balance can be upset in certain circumstances, such as
              • disruption of colonization resistance of gut microbes,
              • intestinal inflammation, and
              • disruption of the digestive tract chemical barrier.
            • Evidence is now accruing to suggest that the oral microbiome can colonize the gut, leading to dysregulation of the gut microbes.
            • Furthermore, the oral-gut microbes create an
              • intestinal inflammatory and
              • immunosuppressive microenvironment
            • conducive to
              • tumorigenesis and
              • progression of colorectal cancer (CRC).
            • Here, we review
              • the oral to intestinal microbial transmission and
              • the inflammatory and immunosuppressive microenvironment, induced by oral-gut axis microbes in the gut.
            • A superior comprehension of the contribution of the oral-intestinal microbes to CRC provides new insights into the prevention and treatment of CRC in the future.
        • Insights into oral microbiome and colorectal cancer – on the way of searching new perspectives (2023)

          • https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fcimb.2023.1159822/full
          • Abstract
            • Microbiome is a keystone polymicrobial community that coexist with human body in a beneficial relationship.
            • These microorganisms enable the human body to maintain homeostasis and take part in mechanisms of defense against infection and in the absorption of nutrients.
            • Even though microbiome is involved in physiologic processes that are beneficial to host health, it may also cause serious detrimental issues.
            • Additionally, it has been proven that bacteria can migrate to other human body compartments and colonize them even although significant structural differences with the area of origin exist.
            • Such migrations have been clearly observed when the causes of genesis and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) have been investigated.
            • It has been demonstrated that the oral microbiome is capable of penetrating into the large intestine and cause impairments leading to dysbiosis and stimulation of cancerogenic processes.
            • The main actors of such events seem to be oral pathogenic bacteria belonging to the red and orange complex (regarding classification of bacteria in the context of periodontal diseases), such as
              • Porphyromonas gingivalis and
              • Fusobacterium nucleatum respectively,
            • which are characterized by significant amount of cancerogenic virulence factors.
            • Further examination of oral microbiome and its impact on CRC may be crucial on early detection of this disease and would allow its use as a precise non-invasive biomarker.
    1. Die englische Regierung hat in der letzten Oktoberwoche 27 Lizenzen zur Öl- und Gasförderung in der Nordsee vergeben. George Monbiot konfrontiert diese Entscheidung mit aktuellen Erkenntnissen zum sechsten Massenaussterben und dem drohenden Zusammenbruch lebensunterstĂŒtzender Systeme des Planeten https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2023/oct/31/flickering-earth-systems-warning-act-now-rishi-sunak-north-sea

    1. Jedes Zehntel Grad weiterer Temperaturerhöhung drĂ€ngt 140 Millionen Menschen - vor allem in Ă€rmeren Regionen - aus der sogenannten Klimatische, in der Menschen gut leben können. Forschende haben genau berechnet, wie viele Menschen bei verschiedenen Klimaszenarien in so heißen Gebieten leben wĂŒrden, dass sie mit hoher Wahrscheinlichkeit zur Emigration gezwungen werden. Bei dem derzeit wahrscheinlichen 2,7 Grad-Szenario fĂŒr 2100 wĂ€ren das bis 2030 ca 2 Milliarden Menschen, bei einem 1,5 Gra-Pfad 400 Millionen. Auch in den nicht ganz so heißen Gebieten wird die Zahl der Extremwetterereignisse weiter zunehmen. https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/may/22/global-heating-human-climate-niche

    1. George Monbiot zur Entscheidung Sunaks, die Öl- und Gasproduktion in der Nordsee zu maximieren. Er spricht vom pollution paradox: Die Firmen, die dem Planeten am meisten schaden, haben die triftigsten GrĂŒnde, in Politik und Desinformation zu investieren. Indiz fĂŒr Desinformation sei der RĂŒckgriff auf CCS. Die Konservativen erhalten große Spenden von der Fossilindustrie. Sunak hat verschuldet, dass der CO<sub>2</sub>-Preis in Uk nur noch halb so hoch ist wie in der EU. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2023/aug/01/rishi-sunak-north-sea-planet-climate-crisis-plutocrats

    1. From this self-critical and controlled reasoning which is applied objectively andmethodically to the world, it makes sure to construct an "objectivity" which transcends the
      • for: adjacency - objectivity - imputation of the other

      • adjacency between

        • objectivity
        • imputation of the other
      • adjacency statement
        • there is a subtle assumption behind objectivity, namely that at least one other consciousness exists which can experience something the phenomena in a sufficiently similar way.
        • this is not a trivial assumption. Consider Thomas Nagel's "What is it like to be a bat?" Another human subject is typically required when "objectivity" is invoked. Certainly a bat could not experience the same phenomena objectively!
        • This also begs the question: to what extent can another human experience the phenomena the same way? We are assuming that two human beings who agree on the objectivity of a fact know what it is like to be the other in some salient way.
  3. Oct 2023
    1. However, recentresearch shows that people do not always engage with explainability tools enough to help improvedecision making. The assumption that people will engage with recommendations and explanationshas proven to be unfounded

      .

    1. natural parental authority and the rights of mothers.

      this is interesting cos not only does he include the personal into the political which seems a bit contradictory, but also in his awful state of nature i would argue that women still occupy similar roles so what does this have to do with his perfect society?

    2. desires for the greater good.

      does this really fit with previous assertions of self-interest. what research did this guy do?

    3. moral system proposed by Hobbes

      moral system based upon human nature what now??

    4. reason and the pursuit of peace

      colonial perception of human nature based on reason and rationality.

    5. cooperation between people can only happen if it is in their self-interest
    6. ception of the world is influenced by physical stimuli and that there is no universal or objective experience of things.Our responses to the world are unique to us and influenced by how our bodies react to stimuli.Hobbes believed that all human actions are driven by our passions and desires.

      he does acknowledge the influence of other things on us so it is kind of convincing

    1. I 00:47:39 haven't heard any suggestion from anywhere in the world uh for a better order than the besmed liberal order which is based again on the very basic 00:47:52 understanding that all humans share the the same basic experiences and therefore we all share some common interests that the pain of as it's 00:48:05 biological that pain and and and despair and sadness they are the same in Israelis and Palestinians in Russians in ukrainians and this simple realization is the basis for the liberal Glo Global 00:48:18 Order
      • global liberal order, common human denominators, CHD, adjacency, adjancency - global liberal order - common human denominators - Deep Humanity, Yuval Noah Harari

      • adjacency

        • between
          • global liberal order
          • common human denominators (CHD)
          • Deep Humanity
      • adjacency statement
        • Yuval raised an interesting perspective I've never thought about with respect to the global liberal order
        • He points out that the essence of the global liberal order is that all humans share fundamental features
        • This aligns with Deep Humanity's Common Human Denominators (CHD)
        • The name 'global liberal order' has come to have a polarizing impact (liberals vs conservatives).
        • As pointed out in other places, liberal and conservative polarization is inherently partial truths and unreal abstractions.
          • Most human beings are both liberal AND conservative
        • Given the intractability of the problem, humanity is insufficient to deal with it
          • Nonlinear, alternative ways may have better success, including Deep Humanity, that looks at the Common Human Denominators as the foundational layer we all share as humans
    1. landing: content intended mostly for human consumption, such as an object description and links to primary information (e.g., an image file or a spreadsheet), to alternate versions and formats, and to related information; from “landing page”, this is intended to support a browsing experience of an abstract overall view of the object.

      Expectations

    1. Die Umweltexpertin und Klima-Aktivistin Hoang Thi Minh wurde in Vietnam wegen angebllicher Steuerhinterziehung zu drei Jahren Haft verurteilt. Mindestens vier Àhnliche Urteile sind bekannt. Unter dem Vorwurf der Steuehinterziehung wurde im September auch die prominente Umweltexpertin Ngo Thi To Nhien verhaftet. Zivilgesellschaftliches Engagement gegen die Klimakrise wird in Vietnam durchgehend kriminalisiert und verfolgt.https://taz.de/Klimaaktivistin-in-Vietnam-in-Haft/!5959470/

  4. Sep 2023
    1. in 2018 you know it was around four percent of papers were based on Foundation models in 2020 90 were and 00:27:13 that number has continued to shoot up into 2023 and at the same time in the non-human domain it's essentially been zero and actually it went up in 2022 because we've 00:27:25 published the first one and the goal here is hey if we can make these kinds of large-scale models for the rest of nature then we should expect a kind of broad scale 00:27:38 acceleration
      • for: accelerating foundation models in non-human communication, non-human communication - anthropogenic impacts, species extinction - AI communication tools, conservation - AI communication tools

      • comment

        • imagine the empathy we can realize to help slow down climate change and species extinction by communicating and listening to the feedback from other species about what they think of our species impacts on their world!
    2. can we build one of these kinds of shapes for animal communication
      • for: question, question - universal meaning shape for animal communication

      • comment

        • this would be an amazing project for TPF and BEing journeys. Could we actually talk to animals and plants to ask them about how we humans are treating them?
    1. In those countries where manpower is not available, or some process where human efforts are limited, Automation is justified. Howeverin the countries with huge potential of young manpower automation can be limited.

      So, Essentially, they're proposing we take populous countries and limit the automation and let it go wild, but wouldn't this mean that over time, there would be technology segregation or a widespread between the automated countries and the manual labor ones? This would potentially create a crisis. We can likely say that opening borders because of not having to be in the physical location could open up some other doors.

    1. n the autumn, as the meadows were not mown, the grass withered as it stood, falling this way and that,

      even though human society has been largely wiped out, there is a beautifulness in the way that the dystopian landscape is described.

    2. change began to be visible. It became green every- where in the first spring, after London ended, so that all the country looked alike.

      abundance post-human interference.

    1. Biology offers many examples of Selves which change on-the-fly—not just during evolutionary time scales, but during the lifetime of the agent. All animals were once a single fertilized egg cell, then became a collection of cells solving problems in anatomical space, and only later developed an emergent centralized Self focused around navigating 3D space of behaviors
      • for: analog, analog - human development
      • analog: human development
        • Buddhist teachings on illusory nature of the self often make use of the example of our use of the same name for a body that is ever changing - it started as a sperm/egg united, then an embryo, fetus, neonate, newborn, infant, child, adolescent, young adult, adult, finally elderly.
        • the early stages of human development are just as radical as caterpillar to butterfly.
        • As adult humans, we take memories for granted, but such meta-level features do not even exist in the earlier parts of our development, such as just after the sperm inseminates the egg and we are just a collection of rapidly dividing cells
        • In this case, it is indeed insightful to apply more universal ideas of life and intelligence, since we ourselves have been through many different types of intelligences in our own individual human development
    2. Another feature of this vision that aligns well with Buddhist ideas is the lack of a permanent, unique, unitary Self [68]. The picture given by the evolutionary cell-biological perspective is one where a cognitive agent is seen as a self-reinforcing process (the homeostatic loop), not a thing [69,70,71].
      • for: illusory self, non-self, lack of self, organism - as process, human INTERbeCOMing, bio-buddhism, biology - buddhism
    1. it's kind of a miracle that that a collection of individual cells with their own agendas and their own ability to pursue various goals in physiological space and and Gene expressions face and so on that there is a way to arrange 00:02:52 those things that give rise to this gives rise to this emergent new self that operates in a different problem space
      • for: quote, quote - Michael Levin, quote - human superorganism
      • quote
        • it's kind of a miracle that a collection of individual cells with their own agendas and their own ability to pursue various goals in physiological space and gene expressions, that there is a way to arrange those things that give rise to this emergent new self that operates in a different problem space
      • author: Michael Levin
      • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfrEDUv29r0&t=159s

      • comment

        • He also points out how contradictory many of the behaviors of the emergent, composite self is to the wellbeing of the individual parts.
        • We are all aware of the many destructive behaviors that the emergent, composite human superorganism can participate in such as:
        • drug addiction
        • violence
        • suicide
        • poor diet
        • lack of exercise
        • destructive emotional behavior
        • etc
    1. In terms of evolution, animals adapt to their ecological conditions, but as humans, we have been able to control our ecological conditions.
      • for: humans vs other animals, personal experience, personal experience - pets, control vs adaptation, human features, quote, quote - Ruth Gates, quote - humans vs animals, quote - control vs adaptation
      • quote
        • . In terms of evolution, animals adapt to their ecological conditions, but as humans, we have been able to control our ecological conditions.
      • author: Ruth Gates
      • source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJV0Kx7oGxU&t=496s
      • comment
        • personal experience
          • her remark made me think about how often I feel this difference with our pets. They adapt to whatever we do. We control our environment by building something. They just adapt to whatever we build.
            • Our pets never build anything, but simply adapt to what we build.
      • for: nonduality, non-duality, duality, dualism, hard problem of consciousness, explanatory gap, relativistic theory of consciousness, human INTERbeing, human INTERbeCOMing, Deep Humanity, DH
      • title: A Relativistic Theory of Consciousness
      • author: Nir Lahav, Zahariah A. Neemeh
      • date: May 12, 2022

      • abstract

        • In recent decades, the scientific study of consciousness has significantly increased our understanding of this elusive phenomenon.
        • Yet, despite critical development in our understanding of the functional side of consciousness, we still lack a fundamental theory regarding its phenomenal aspect.
        • There is an “explanatory gap” between
          • our scientific knowledge of functional consciousness and
          • its “subjective,” phenomenal aspects,
        • referred to as the “hard problem” of consciousness.
        • The phenomenal aspect of consciousness is the first-person answer to “what it’s like” question, and
          • it has thus far proved recalcitrant to direct scientific investigation.
        • Naturalistic dualists argue that it is composed of a primitive, private, non-reductive element of reality that is independent from the functional and physical aspects of consciousness.
        • Illusionists, on the other hand, argue that it is merely a cognitive illusion, and that all that exists are ultimately physical, non-phenomenal properties.
        • We contend that both the dualist and illusionist positions are flawed because they tacitly assume consciousness to be an absolute property that doesn’t depend on the observer.
        • We develop a conceptual and a mathematical argument for a relativistic theory of consciousness in which
          • a system either has or doesn’t have phenomenal consciousness with respect to some observer.
        • Phenomenal consciousness is neither private nor delusional, just relativistic.
          • In the frame of reference of the cognitive system, it will be observable (first-person perspective) and
          • in other frame of reference it will not (third-person perspective).
        • These two cognitive frames of reference are both correct,
          • just as in the case of
            • an observer that claims to be at rest
            • while another will claim that the observer has constant velocity.
        • Given that consciousness is a relativistic phenomenon, neither observer position can be privileged,
          • as they both describe the same underlying reality.
        • Based on relativistic phenomena in physics
          • we developed a mathematical formalization for consciousness which bridges the explanatory gap and dissolves the hard problem.
        • Given that the first-person cognitive frame of reference also offers legitimate observations on consciousness,
          • we conclude by arguing that philosophers can usefully contribute to the science of consciousness by collaborating with neuroscientists to explore the neural basis of phenomenal structures.
      • comment

        • This is a promising approach to solving the hard problem of consciosness
      • for: Donald Winnicott, human INTERbeing, human INTERbeCOMing, Deep Humanity, DH

      • title: For Donald Winnicott, the psyche is not inside us but between us

      • author: James Barnes date: May 18, 2020

      • comment: insight

        • adjacency
          • between
            • Donald Winnicott
            • Deep Humanity concept of human INTERbeCOMing
          • adjacency relationship
            • when James Barnes wrote that Winnicott's psychoanalysis is based on a unitary conception of self and other,
              • that resonated deeply with me
              • due to my own spiritual journey in
                • non-duality as well as
                • Deep Humanity conception of human INTERbeCOMing
      • source: early morning discussions
    1. ‘There is no such thing as a baby 
 if you set out to describe a baby, you will find you are describing a baby and someone.’
      • for: Donald Winnicott, quote, quote - Donald Winnicott, quote - human INTERbeing, human INTERbeing, human INTERbeCOMing, white - humans INTERbeCOMing, DH, Deep Humanity, altricial, mOTHER, non-duality

      • quote: Donald Winnicott

        • There is no such thing as a baby 
 if you set out to describe a baby, you will find you are describing a baby and someone.
      • comment

        • what Winnicott says here is the essence of:
          • the Deep Humanity concepts of
            • the individual / collective gestalt and
            • human INTERbeCOMing,
          • the Buddhist concepts of:
            • emptiness,
            • non-duality in the human realm,
            • Indra's net of jewels in the human realm and
            • Thich Nhat Hahn's INTERbeing
          • complexity
    2. , a fundamentally unitary conception of self and other.
      • for: human INTERbeCOMing, human INTERbeing, DH, Deep Humanity, Donald Winnicott
      • quote

        • He (Donald Winnicott) largely circumvented the subject-object dualism inherent in the Freudian model of mind (which both the Ego-psychologists and the Kleinians subscribed to) and
          • espoused, or at least regularly insinuated, a fundamentally unitary conception of self and other.
      • comment -The Deep Humanity definition of the individual / collective gestalt identifies the indivisible nature of the individual and collective.

        • It can also need called the ' self / other gestalt' and both are really another way to articulate non-duality in between members of the same species
        • a ' unitary conception of self and other' is yet another way to articulate this same thing
    3. Save Share Tweet EmailJames Barnesis a psychotherapist, lecturer and writer with a background in psychoanalysis and philosophy. He has a psychotherapy practice in Exeter, UK, and sees clients remotely.Edited by Christian JarrettSyndicate this idea Save Share Tweet EmailFor Donald Winnicott, your psyche isn’t just in your head – it emerges from your relationships with others and the world

      for: human INTERbeing, human INTERbeCOMing, DH, Deep Humanity

      • for: Michael Levine, developmental biology, human superorganism, multi-scale competency architecture, eukaryote multi-cellular superorganism - interlevel communication, interoception

      • definition: multi-scale competency architecture

        • a complex living organism is not simply nested structurally in terms of cells which comprise tissues, comprising organs, and bodies, and then ultimately societies. Each of these layers has certain problem-solving competencies.
      • comment

        • The HUMAN interBEcomING is a multi-level system.
        • It would be insightful to learn if there are ways our human consciousness level can communicate to each level, including the social level
      • future work
        • literature review of research on specific areas related to the level of human consciousness communicating with other levels of the superorganism
          • perhaps called "interlevel communication of multi-level superorganism
          • interoception signals?
    1. Recent work has revealed several new and significant aspects of the dynamics of theory change. First, statistical information, information about the probabilistic contingencies between events, plays a particularly important role in theory-formation both in science and in childhood. In the last fifteen years we’ve discovered the power of early statistical learning.

      The data of the past is congruent with the current psychological trends that face the education system of today. Developmentalists have charted how children construct and revise intuitive theories. In turn, a variety of theories have developed because of the greater use of statistical information that supports probabilistic contingencies that help to better inform us of causal models and their distinctive cognitive functions. These studies investigate the physical, psychological, and social domains. In the case of intuitive psychology, or "theory of mind," developmentalism has traced a progression from an early understanding of emotion and action to an understanding of intentions and simple aspects of perception, to an understanding of knowledge vs. ignorance, and finally to a representational and then an interpretive theory of mind.

      The mechanisms by which life evolved—from chemical beginnings to cognizing human beings—are central to understanding the psychological basis of learning. We are the product of an evolutionary process and it is the mechanisms inherent in this process that offer the most probable explanations to how we think and learn.

      Bada, & Olusegun, S. (2015). Constructivism Learning Theory : A Paradigm for Teaching and Learning.

    1. Steve Bannon I mean to my to my delight 00:25:29 and horror read an entire section of my book team human aloud on war room pandemic and it was a section of the book that I looked at and I still there's nothing I can really change in it to defend it from being used in that 00:25:42 context
      • for:Douglas Rushkoff, Steve Bannon quoting Douglas Rushkoff, recontextualize, misquote, disquote
      • new portmanteau meaning: disquote
        • quoting another person but with a context opposite to the original author's
          • from disinformation
      • comment
        • thinking of what Douglas Rushkoff felt about Steven Bannon's use of his writing in a way that is opposite to what Rushkoff aspires to and advocates for,
          • we could not use the word "misquote" because it was verbatim
          • the portmanteau "disquote" can imply disinformation but it has a meaning that means a fake attribution of a quote, which is not quite right here
          • however, Bannon used Rushkoff's book chapter in a polar opposite context, to resonate with the pain of the masses, but lead to an end result that is diametrically opposite to the ultimate wellbeing of the hurt masses
          • this suggests a new meaning for the word "disquote", a quote used for quite divergent context
        • From a "Team Human" perspective, far right propaganda can be seen as using the content generated by the left in order to justify authoritarianism position that further consolidate power of the elites
        • The left critiques the many failings of neoliberalism and destructive capitalism by pointing out the social and ecological harm it causes and the same critiques can be coopted by the far right to rally the masses harmed by neoliberal policies.
        • The failing of the elite neoliberal class breaks up team human into perceived polarized team left and team far right (populist), where team populist is now mis-perceived to be the standard bearer of social justice.
        • The far right is stepping in to fill the gap of reacting to the enormous harm caused by neoliberal policies, but their solutions come with their own serious problems.
        • Team human, in the wide sense of the term must reclaim the territory for humanity
      • for: doppleganger, conflict resolution, deep humanity, common denominators, CHD, Douglas Rushkoff, Naomi Klein, Into the Mirror World, conspiracy theory, conspiracy theories, conspiracy culture, nonduality, self-other, human interbeing, polycrisis, othering, storytelling, myth-making, social media amplifier -summary
        • This conversation was insightful on so many dimensions salient to the polycrisis humanity is moving through.
        • It makes me think of the old cliches:
          • "The more things change, the more they remain the same"
          • "What's old is new" ' "History repeats"
        • the conversation explores Naomi's latest book (as of this podcast), Into the Mirror World, in which Naomi adopts a different style of writing to explicate, articulate and give voice to
          • implicit and tacit discomforting ideas and feelings she experienced during covid and earlier, and
          • became a focal point through a personal comparative analysis with another female author and thought leader, Naomi Wolf,
            • a feminist writer who ended up being rejected by mainstream media and turned to right wing media.
        • The conversation explores the process of:
          • othering,
          • coopting and
          • abandoning
        • of ideas important for personal and social wellbeing.
        • and speaks to the need to identify what is going on and to reclaim those ideas for the sake of humanity
        • In this context, the doppleganger is the people who are mirror-like imiages of ourselves, but on the other side of polarized issues.
        • Charismatic leaders who are bad actors often are good at identifying the suffering of the masses, and coopt the ideas of good actors to serve their own ends of self-enrichment.
        • There are real world conspiracies that have caused significant societal harm, and still do,
        • however, when there ithere are phenomena which we have no direct sense experience of, the mixture of
          • a sense of helplessness,
          • anger emerging from injustice
        • a charismatic leader proposing a concrete, possible but explanatory theory
        • is a powerful story whose mythology can be reified by many people believing it
        • Another cliche springs to mind
          • A lie told a hundred times becomes a truth
          • hence the amplifying role of social media
        • When we think about where this phenomena manifests, we find it everywhere:
    1. The life inside The human gut is an amazing piece of work. Often referred to as the "second brain," it is the only organ to boast its own independent nervous system, an intricate network of 100 million neurons embedded in the gut wall. So sophisticated is this neural network that the gut continues to function even when the primary neural conduit between it and the brain, the vagus nerve, is severed. (Citing the enteric nervous system's autonomy and apparent infallibility, comedian Stephen Colbert once christened the gut "the pope of your torso.")

      Human gut as second brain — Forte, this is the real “second brain”

  5. Aug 2023
    1. I've been wondering if we are too focused on systems and actions that we can do, rather than on ourselves as human beings and what we can be.
      • for: human DOing, Deep Humanity, DH, quote, quote - DH, quote - Deep Humanity, quote - human DOing
      • quote
        • I've been wondering if we are too focused on systems and actions
          • that we can do, rather than on ourselves as human beings and
          • what we can be.
      • comment
        • this is aligned to the Deep Humanity notion of the difference between:
          • human DOing vs
          • human BEing
    1. I should like to add that specialization, instead of makingthe Great Conversation irrelevant, makes it more pertinentthan ever. Specialization makes it harder to carry on anykind of conversation; but this calls for greater effort, not theabandonment of the attempt.

      The dramatic increase in economic specialization of humanity driven by the Industrial Revolution has many benefits to societies, but it also has detrimental effects when the core knowledge and shared base of the society is lost.

      Certainly individuals have a greater reliance on specialists for future outcomes (think about the specialization of areas like climate science which can have destructive outcomes on all of humanity or public health outcomes with respect to vaccines and specialized health care delivery), but they also need to have a common base of knowledge/culture and the ability to think critically for themselves to be able to effect necessary changes, particularly when the pace of those changes is more rapid than humans have generally been evolved to accept them.

    2. Adam Smith stated the case long ago: "A man withoutthe proper use of the intellectual faculties of a man, is, ifpossible, more contemptible than even a coward, and seemsto be mutilated and deformed in a still more essential part ofthe character of human nature."

      This seems apropos to the situation in which I view Donald J. Trump.

    1. Extreme bad behaviour from governments and private companies – GAFAs [Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon] and the like in China – will create a social and civic innovation to compensate and/or to contribute to an innovation jump. I hope for development of human cooperative brain networks.
      • for: quote, quote - Janet Salmons, quote - human cooperative brain networks, indyweb - support
      • quote
        • Extreme bad behaviour from governments and private companies – GAFAs [Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon] and the like in China – will create a social and civic innovation to compensate and/or to contribute to an innovation jump. I hope for development of human cooperative brain networks.
      • author: Caroline Figueres
        • strategic consultant
    1. Technological change is an accelerant and acts on the social ills like pouring gasoline on a fire
      • for: quote, quote - Stowe Boyd, quote - progress trap, quote - unintended consequences, unintended consequences, progress trap, cultural evolution, technology - futures, futures - technology, progress trap
      • quote:
        • Technological change is an accelerant and acts on the social ills like pouring gasoline on a fire
      • author: Sowe Boyd
        • consulting futurist on technological evolution and the future of work
      • paraphrase
        • In an uncontrolled hyper-capitalist society,
          • the explosion in technologies over the past 30 years has only
            • widened inequality,
            • concentrated wealth and
            • led to greater social division.
          • And it is speeding up with the rise of artificial intelligence,
            • which like globalization has destabilized Western industrial economies while admittedly pulling hundreds of millions elsewhere out of poverty.
        • And the boiling exhaust of this set of forces is pushing the planet into a climate catastrophe. -The world is as unready for hundreds of millions of climate refugees as it was for the plague.
        • However, some variant of social media will likely form the context for the rise of a global movement to stop the madness
          • which I call the Human Spring
        • which will be more like
          • Occupy or
          • the Yellow Vests
        • than traditional politics.
        • I anticipate a grassroots movement
          • characterized by
            • general strikes,
            • political action,
            • protest and
            • widespread disruption of the economy
          • that will confront the economic and political system of the West.
        • Lead by the young, ultimately this will lead to large-scale political reforms, such as
          • universal health care,
          • direct democracy,
          • a new set of rights for individuals and
          • a large set of checks on the power of
            • corporations and
            • political parties.
        • For example,
          • eliminating corporate contributions to political campaigns,
          • countering monopolies and
          • effectively accounting for economic externalities, like carbon.
    1. One hundred trillion cells, one and 14 zeros, that's the approximate number of microorganisms in your body, ten times greater than the number of your own cells. Your microbial baggage occupies almost 2% of your body weight, that's about one and a half kilograms, approximately the weight of your liver. Or your brain.
      • for: stats, stats - microbiome, human microbiome, stats - human microbiome
      • stats
      • paraphrase
        • One hundred trillion cells is the approximate number of microorganisms in your body,
        • that's ten times greater than the number of your own cells.
        • The micrbiome is about 2% of our body weight
        • That's about one and a half kilograms
    2. About ten years ago, a massive breakthrough happened in genomic research technology. A method appeared which is called NGS, next generation sequencing, and this method significantly cuts time and costs of any genomic research. For example, have you ever heard about the Human Genome Project? It was quite a popular topic for science fiction some time ago. 00:03:10 This project launched in 1990 with the goal to decrypt all genomic information in a human organism. At that time, with the technology of the time, it took ten years and three billion dollars to reach the goals of this project. With NGS, all of that can be done in just one day at the cost of 15,000 dollars.
      • for: progress trap, cumulative cultural evolution, gene-culture co-evolution, speed of cultural evolution, human genome project
      • paraphrase
        • the human genome project took 10 years and cost 3 billion dollars
        • with NGS technology, 10 years later, the same job takes 1 day and costs $15,000 dollars
      • for: human life expectancy, life expectancy, life expectancy myth, life expectancy at birth, life expectancy - ancestors
      • title: The life expectancy myth, and why many ancient humans lived long healthy lives
      • comment
      • new insight
        • life expectancy at birth skews our understanding of how the health and longevity of adults. -There is a false claim and belief that due to modern technologies, modern humans have lived far longer than our ancestors in the distant past.
        • In fact, child mortality rates play a major role in calculating life expectancy and this is what differs modernity from our ancestors.
        • Our distant ancestors did live to their 70s and 80s
    1. It is not uncommon to hear talk about how lucky we are to live in this age of scientific and medical advancement where antibiotics and vaccinations keep us living longer, while our poor ancient ancestors were lucky to live past the age of 35. Well this is not quite true. At best, it oversimplifies a complex issue, and at worst it is a blatant misrepresentation of statistics. Did ancient humans really just drop dead as they were entering their prime, or did some live long enough to see a wrinkle on their face?
      • for: life expectancy, human life expectancy, life expectancy - myth, life expectancy - ancestors
      • paraphrase
        • It is not uncommon to hear talk about how lucky we are to live in this age of scientific and medical advancement
          • where antibiotics and vaccinations keep us living longer, while our poor ancient ancestors were lucky to live past the age of 35.
        • This is not quite true:
          • at best, it oversimplifies a complex issue, and
          • at worst it is a blatant misrepresentation of statistics.
      • key question
        • What happened?
          • Did ancient humans really just drop dead as they were entering their prime, or
          • Did some live long enough to see a wrinkle on their face?
    2. What is commonly known as ‘average life expectancy’ is technically ‘life expectancy at birth’.  In other words, it is the average number of years that a newborn baby can expect to live in a given society at a given time.  But life expectancy at birth is an unhelpful statistic if the goal is to compare the health and longevity of adults.  That is because a major determinant of life expectancy at birth is the child mortality rate which, in our ancient past, was extremely high, and this skews the life expectancy rate dramatically downward.
      • for: life expectancy, human life expectancy, life expectancy - myth, life expectancy at birth, life expectancy - ancestors
      • paraphrase
      • definition
        • What is commonly known as ‘average life expectancy’ is technically ‘life expectancy at birth’.
        • In other words, it is the average number of years that a newborn baby can expect to live in a given society at a given time.
        • But life expectancy at birth is an unhelpful statistic if the goal is to compare the health and longevity of adults.
        • That is because a major determinant of life expectancy at birth is the child mortality rate
          • which, in our ancient past, was extremely high, and this skews the life expectancy rate dramatically downward.
    1. professor John on Beatty will always say 00:14:07 I am because we are since we are therefore I am so my being is not just my being alone and being the richest in the world and 00:14:19 owning everybody my property has no meaning my wealth has no meaning if it's not of service to the community so if you come to my Village and many other villages in the African continent and someone says is a wealthy person but 00:14:33 is not bringing his wealth to Advanced education Advanced roads and infrastructure train people support agriculture people don't care he's not respected but once you bring your wealth and no matter how poor you are that you 00:14:47 are contributing to the society you are considered great so these are the values we think we can start discussing in the International Community
      • for: individual / collective entanglement, ubuntu M2W, human interbeing, quote, quote - John Mbiti, quote - human interbeing
      • paraphrase
        • professor John Mbiti will always say "I am because we are since we are therefore I am:
      • so my being is not just my being alone and being the richest in the world and owning everybody
        • my property has no meaning my wealth has no meaning
          • if it's not of service to the community
        • so if you come to my Village and many other villages in the African continent and someone says is a wealthy person but is not bringing his wealth to
          • Advanced education
          • Advanced roads and infrastructure
          • train people
          • support agriculture
        • people don't care he's not respected
        • but once you bring your wealth and no matter how poor you are that you are contributing to the society
        • you are considered great so these are the values we think we can start discussing in the International Community
    1. you can imagine that that if that's happening today and climate change hasn't really even hit yet and biodiversity loss really hasn't even hit badly yet or at least this hasn't hit widespread 00:35:45 badly
      • for: future climate impacts, futures, climate impacts, preparedness, climate change - human migration, climate refuge, climate departure, Camilo Mora
      • comment

        • There will be massive human migration
        • Europe is already unable to cope with the migration of a million climate refugees from Syria
        • The US is polarized due to mass migration of a few people escaping climate crisis and violence in central and South America
        • Developed countries will be overwhelmed with climate refugees number in the millions or tens of millions
        • In addition to human migration, the migration of species seeking cooler temperatures will fundamentally reshape our economies
        • climate departure is the date when local climate goes outside normal historical bounds and locally adapted species do not recognize it anymore and will be forced to migrate to survive
        • climate departure is a huge issue that is going to happen, regardless of which decarbonoization path we take. This means all species on the globe will be undergoing dramatic environmental shifts, making mass extinction more likely.
      • reference

    1. there's 00:08:43 nothing there that could be secured and here's the important point I think we experienced that we experience it as a sense of lack 00:08:58 that is to say the sense that something is wrong with me something is missing something isn't quite right I'm not good enough and the reality is I think all of us to 00:09:14 some degree have some sense of that some sense of lack even though we might ignore it or cover it up there's there's some sense of that but because it's mostly sort of unconscious in the sense that we don't 00:09:29 really know where it comes from
      • for: sense of lack, sense of self, sense of self and sense of lack, human condition, poverty mentality, alienation, separation, emptiness, emptiness of emptiness, W2W, inequality
      • key insight
        • sense of self is equivalent to
          • sense of lack
          • duality
          • disconnection
          • alienation
          • separation
          • solidification - the opposite of emptiness
      • comment
        • this sense of lack that is intrinsically associated with the sense of self is perhaps the deepest root of our unhappiness
        • this is a key insight for sharing for both those who have too much (the 1%) as well as those who are so materially impoverished and deprived that they are forced to adopt survivalist strategies to stay alive, and if successful, take on a hard edge to survivalism, over-appreciating materialism
        • the same mistake is committed on both end of the disparity spectrum, both groups are still under the illusion that that sense of lack can be filled
      • for: gene culture coevolution, carrying capacity, unsustainability, overshoot, cultural evolution, progress trap

      • Title: The genetic and cultural evolution of unsustainability

      • Author: Brian F. Snyder

      • Abstract

      • Summary
      • Paraphrase
        • Anthropogenic changes are accelerating and threaten the future of life on earth.
        • While the proximate mechanisms of these anthropogenic changes are well studied
          • climate change,
          • biodiversity loss,
          • population growth
        • the evolutionary causality of these anthropogenic changes have been largely ignored.
        • Anthroecological theory (AET) proposes that the ultimate cause of anthropogenic environmental change is
          • multi-level selection for niche construction and ecosystem engineering.
        • Here, we integrate this theory with
          • Lotka’s Maximum Power Principle
        • and propose a model linking
          • energy extraction from the environment with
          • genetic, technological and cultural evolution
        • to increase human ecosystem carrying capacity.
        • Carrying capacity is partially determined by energetic factors such as
          • the net energy a population can acquire from its environment and
          • the efficiency of conversion from energy input to offspring output.
        • These factors are under Darwinian genetic selection
        • in all species,
        • but in humans, they are also determined by
          • technology and
          • culture.
        • If there is genetic or non-genetic heritable variation in
          • the ability of an individual or social group
        • to increase its carrying capacity,
        • then we hypothesize that - selection or cultural evolution will act - to increase carrying capacity.
        • Furthermore, if this evolution of carrying capacity occurs - faster than the biotic components of the ecological system can respond via their own evolution,
          • then we hypothesize that unsustainable ecological changes will result.
  6. Jul 2023
    1. The consequences of our current choices bear not juston us. They bear on the continued evolutionary unfoldingof life in the universe. This marks the scale of our currentresponsibility
      • for: human impacts, MET, major evolutionary transition, progress trap, human responsibility to life, CCE, cumulative cultural evolution, playing God
      • comment
        • Very true, in fact our species is in the unprecedented position that
        • human activity, and specifically our cumulative cultural evolution (CCE) now determines the biological / genetic evolutionary future not only of our own species, but of all life on earth.
        • In other words, of evolution itself! -This is an awkward position as we have nowhere near the wisdom to play God and determine the future direction of evolution!
      • References
      • for: ecological civilization, degrowth, futures, deep ecology, emptiness, polycrisis, human exceptionalism, planned descent
      • source
      • Description

        • Nate hosts this discussion on what constitutes an ecological civilization with guests
          • William Rees
          • Rex Weyler
          • Nora Bateson
      • Reflections Overall,

        • an insightful discussion on the polycrisis and
        • reflections on what is in store for civilization.
      • There is consensus that
        • what we are experiencing has been decades in the making and
        • the solutions-oriented approach to solving problems has only treated the symptoms and indeed has made things worse.
      • There is a strong undercurrent of the emptiness in nature
      • Rex

        • emphasized the folly of human exceptionalism that has been socially normalized and which
        • continues to create the major separation that fuels the polycrisis.
        • Not recognizing that we are nature, not recognizing our animal nature
        • we look upon nature with an attitude of controlling nature, rather than flowing with her.
        • advocated Taoism as a more consistent way to frame nature rather than the reductionist, control methodology that separates us from nature.
      • Nora's perspective is the folly of abstraction that generates fixed preconceptions of aspects of nature that we then reify.

        • The fixed preconceptions are solidified but they are an oversimplified version of reality,
        • and that oversimplification leads to actualizing the cliche"a little knowledge is dangerous" into civilization
        • in other words, the continuous manufacture of progress traps.
      • William sees our impending crash as not only inevitable, but natural.

        • In this, he concurs with Rex's perspective.
        • Human beings are simply another species and like them,
          • we are susceptible to population explosions when negative feedbacks are removed,
          • which can lead to nature self-correcting with mass dieoff when resources are overconsumed.
    1. accepting our animal  nature, and end this human exceptionalism,   which blinds us to our animal nature, just  for starters. If we have a meeting about   climate or biodiversity, in our minds we need  to invite all other creatures to those meetings.   And I'm not just trying to be foolish or silly  here. I'm serious, I'm dead serious about it. We   01:24:09 need to be sitting at the table with the elephants  and the jaguars and the wolves and the algae and   the apple trees and the bees and allowing  those voices somehow into our conversation.
      • for: symbiocene, human exceptionalism
      • question
        • how do we invite them in? if they cannot represent themselves, how do we represent them?
          • does anyone know what' it's like to be a bat?
      • remind ourselves of our animal nature
        • mortality salience counters human exceptionalism
    2. No fairness, again, is a human construct.   01:10:41 And I mentioned before, evolution doesn't  care. If a species is going extinct,   evolution doesn't freak out and go, oh, we  got to keep that species. It just happens.   There's no thinking being back there going, well,  should we let them go or not? And let's face it,   01:11:12 when we eat the blackberries off the vine, that's  their babies. Is that fair that we eat the babies   of the blackberries?
      • for: nature has no values, human values, purpose, purposelessness,
      • key insight
        • evolution doesn't care
        • humans care, humans construct value and want to save ourselves. Evolution doesn't care if entire species live or die.
      • comment
        • I've thought the same thing. It differentiates human beings from nature
        • Another way to say this is that humans have purpose, nature does not
    3. If you think of a plague of locusts or   a plague of mice or frogs or whatever, every  species, when it is situated in an environment   00:39:06 which for whatever set of juxtapositional  reasons is favorable to the expansion of   that species, it will explode and expand. And humans are no different. With fossil fuel,   we acquired the ability to exploit the planet  and provide all the other resources needed to   grow the human enterprise to realize  for the first time in human history,   our full exponential growth potential.
      • for:nonexceptional human
      • If you think of a plague of locusts or a plague of mice or frogs or whatever,
        • every species, when it is situated in an environment<br /> which for whatever set of juxtapositional reasons is favorable to the expansion of that species,
          • it will explode and expand.
        • And humans are no different.
        • With fossil fuel, we acquired the ability to exploit the planet and provide all the other resources needed to grow the human enterprise
          • to realize for the first time in human history, our full exponential growth potential.
          • up until about the industrial revolution, we were held in check by negative feedback.
          • The positive feedback tendencies of the species shared by all other species was held back by resource shortages, disease, war, and all of that stuff.
          • Well, fossil fuel temporarily relieved us of that, and we exploded just as a plague of locusts explodes during a favorable environment.
          • But then what that explosion does is deplete the resources and it crashes.
          • So I think we're on a one-off population boom/bust cycle, which is completely natural.
          • It just, it's never happened to humans before on a global scale
          • it has many times before on a local scale. But this time it's a global thing.
          • It's natural, it's going to happen, get used to it.
          • And Rex is right. Don't panic. Start taking care of what you can in your immediate environments.
    4. I think this is also part of  our sense of who we are as humans, as ourselves,   and the idea of the self, the individual, and  even the humans as this individual species,   these divisions are arbitrary.
      • for: emptiness, human interbeing, human interbecoming
      • example
        • BEing journey
          • I think this is also part of our sense of who we are as humans, as ourselves,
          • and the idea of the self, the individual, and even the humans as this individual species,
          • these divisions are arbitrary.
          • I don't stop at my skin.
          • I'm breathing air.
          • I'm drinking the water.
          • I'm eating food.
          • I'm eating an apple.
          • When I eat an apple, when do the molecules of the apple become me? -When I'm chewing it in my mouth?
            • when it's in my stomach?
            • when my system has broken down the nutrients?
            • when is that point that nitrogen molecule becomes me versus the apple?
          • I would propose that apple is me when it's growing on the tree.
          • I think of the blossoms of the tree and the bees.
            • The blossoms of the tree,
            • the tree can't reproduce without the bees.
            • So is the bee part of the tree?
            • The bee is part of the reproductive system of the tree.
            • So the bee is part of the tree,
            • the tree is part of the bee.
            • The bee needs the tree.
            • The tree needs the bee.
          • This is just one simple relationship,
            • but it's not simple at all because
              • the bee needs a lot of other things,
              • and the tree needs a lot of other things.
              • And the mycelium and the soil.
          • We talk about a tree and the soil and the atmosphere and the bee as if they're all separate things.
          • And that's convenient because our language has nouns that mean certain things.
          • So we want to talk about trees.
          • It's nice to have a word for tree,
            • but we get it in our head that the tree is separate from the soil,
            • which is separate from the atmosphere,
            • which is separate from the bee.
          • And I'm saying no, those divisions are indeed somewhat arbitrary,
          • but we use them for convenience.
          • But the soil's not the soil without the relationship with the tree
            • and the tree's not the tree without the relationship with the soil and the atmosphere.
            • And the atmosphere is not the atmosphere without the relationshi to the tree, to the bee, to me and the soil.
          • So to me that's the essence of ecology.
          • And that we have to expand this sense of self,
            • individual self as well as
            • the species of humans.
        • And this isolated self, I think is a socially reinforced construct, - but we get sucked into it.
          • And we talk about relationships in ecology and we talk about the value of all living things,
          • but in our actions we come back to the individual self.
    5. we talk about human rights and we want to  protect our human rights. We have to expand   that sense of human rights to the rest of the  world and understood. We don't have the right to   00:21:48 destroy that diversity which is critical and which  has inherent value.
      • for: human rights, nonhuman rights
    1. I would say it's text when interpreted as text/plain it's human readable. Otherwise it's binary. That is, binary = for machines only.
    2. I couldn't find a definition of text except that text means absence of binary data. This is weak - so I would follow your definition - A text file is a file which can be read by a human.
    1. Abstract
      • The Buddha taught that everything is
        • connected and
        • constantly changing.
      • These fundamental observations of the world are shared by
        • ecology and
        • evolution.
      • We are living in a time of unprecedented rates of extinction.
      • Science provides us with the information that we need to address this extinction crisis.
      • However, the problems underlying extinction generally do not result from a lack of scientific understanding,
        • but they rather result from an unwillingness to take the needed action.
      • I present mindfulness and meditative aspects of Zen practice that provide the deeper “knowing,” or awareness that we need to inspire action on these problems.

      • comment

        • emptiness is interdependency and change
        • in Deep Humanity praxis, it is equivalent to
          • human INTERbeing and
          • human INTERbeCOMing
  7. bafybeihzua2lldmlutkxlie7jfppxheow6my62x2qmywif2wukoswo5hqi.ipfs.w3s.link bafybeihzua2lldmlutkxlie7jfppxheow6my62x2qmywif2wukoswo5hqi.ipfs.w3s.link
    1. forms might be asso-ciated with structures
      • comment
        • A Deep Humanity analog to the word "structure" is the word "pattern"
        • Hence we have the equivalency:
          • platonic form = structure = pattern
        • and the author's prior statement that
          • These mental and subsequently materialized ideas then
          • have the potential to
            • influence the physical world and to
              • feedback into the mental world to produce additional structure and
              • physical material
        • is equivalent to Indyweb / Deep Humanity statement that
          • individual and collective learning are deeply entangled
          • cumulative cultural evolution is mediated through this entanglement
          • that is best represented by the idea of dependent origination
          • individuals articulate ideas and externally present them to other consciousnesses
          • a multi-meaningverse exists whenever social learning occurs and
            • multiple perspectives, multiple meaningverses converge
          • each individual perspective surfaces their own adjacencies of ideas drawn from their own salience landscape
            • which in turn emerge from their own respective unique lebenswelt
        • We might also say that to the degree that internal patterns of the symbolosphere correlate with external patterns of the physiosphere, then
        • that is the degree to which the universal pattern manifests in both nature nature and in human nature
        • since humans (human nature) are an expression of nature (nature nature), we should not expect otherwise
    1. Researchers from Moscow State University and the Human Brain Institute in St. Petersburg told the Dalai Lama in May that they have examined 104 monks who are simulating meditation states thought to resemble thukdam.
      • comment
        • look for any research on this from the Russian scientists at the Human Brain Institute in St. Petersberg
    1. A.G.I.-ism distracts from finding better ways to augment intelligence.
      • There are people who are designing systems to prioritize augmenting human intelligence and use machines to assist us
      • For instance, it was the vision of Doug Engelbart
  8. Jun 2023
    1. PARIS — Europe’s top human rights court condemned the French government on Wednesday over its refusal to bring home the families of two Islamic State fighters, a landmark ruling that may push France and other European countries to speed up the repatriation of nationals held for years in squalid detention camps in northeastern Syria.

      Could such EU wide actions or decision result in fostering seed of anger among individual EU nations, eventually prompting them to leave EU? Is there no power among individual nations to make their own decisions when it comes to national security?

    1. Collaborating with another human is better than working with generative AI in part because conversation allows us to establish common ground, build shared semantics and engage in repair strategies when something is ambiguous.

      Collaborating with humans beats collaborating with AI because we can sync up our mental models, clarify ambiguity, and iterate.

      Current AI tools are limited in the methods they make available to perform these tasks.

    1. the positive ones is we become good parents we spoke about this last time we we met uh and and it's the only outcome it's the only way I believe we can 01:14:34 create a better future
      • comment
        • the best possible outcome for AI
        • is that we human better
        • othering is significantly reduced
        • the sacred is rediscovered
  9. May 2023
    1. the beauty of perceptual immaturity in altricial species is that it makes learning easier by reducing the complexity of the world
      • the beauty of perceptual immaturity in altricial species is that
      • it makes learning easier by reducing the complexity of the world,” the researchers wrote.
      • Parents are key to altricial learning, Goldstein said,
        • forming a two-way system of feedback.
      • Far from being passive recipients, he said,
        • infants of many species can change the behavior of their parents
        • in ways that actively shape their own developments.
    1. I am skeptical of this idea that we can escape our human nature I think that's a 00:38:01 that's that's a hubris that that that's the sort of hubris which and you know the ancient Greeks had
      • Comment
        • Mary Harrington believes it is hubris to believe we can escape our human nature.
        • I believe that cultural evolution is complex
          • We learn and change behavior over the course of even one life time
    2. I think we 00:30:23 do need to get better at humaning
      • Comment
        • Elise does agree with Mary in that we need to "human better"
    3. when people do die it is almost like I think a colleague of mine under Sandberg 00:31:27 says that when somebody died the library Burns because all of that wisdom that they're carrying around in their minds that it took decades and decades to build up inside of them gets extinguished
      • comment
        • I think many of us have had this thought!
          • that when we die, vast amounts of wisdom is extinguished along with that person
          • As our digital tools become more sophisticated, however,
        • we are uploading our libraries to the digital collective intelligence network
          • the internet may well evolve to become the epitome and master repository of human cumulative cultural evolution.
          • even AI could not exist if it did not mine a training set of billions of human and their shared ideas
          • Perhaps it is the internet which is the vehicle for collective hybridized human-cyborg immortality?
          • If knowledge is preserved this way, then this flavor of immortality is only meaningful for our species
    1. His ideas for creating the “Pure Land inthe Human Realm” extend to several kinds of activity: from seeking rebirth ina Buddhist paradise such as Uttarakuru to purifying the present world throughreform activities; from improving peoples’ lives by fostering technologicalinnovation to establishing a utopian mountaintop Buddhist community inwhich esoteric rituals for the welfare of the nation would have an importantplace

      Activities leading to a Pure Land in the Human Realm.

    1. almost all beginners to RDF go through a sort of "identity crisis" phase, where they confuse people with their names, and documents with their titles. For example, it is common to see statements such as:- <http://example.org/> dc:creator "Bob" . However, Bob is just a literal string, so how can a literal string write a document?

      This could be trivially solved by extending the syntax to include some notation that has the semantics of a well-defined reference but the ergonomics of a quoted string. So if the notation used the sigil ~ (for example), then ~"Bob" could denote an implicitly defined entity that is, through some type-/class-specific mechanism associated with the string "Bob".

    1. configuring xterm

      Ugh. This is the real problem, I'd wager. Nobody wants to derp around configuring the Xresources to make xterm behave acceptably—i.e. just to reach parity with Gnome Terminal—if they can literally just open up Gnome Terminal and use that.

      I say this as a Vim user. (Who doesn't do any of the suping/ricing that is commonly associated with Vim.)

      It is worth considering an interesting idea, though: what if someone wrote a separate xterm configuration utility? Suppose it started out where the default would be to produce the settings that would most closely match the vanilla Gnome Terminal (or some other contemporary desktop default) experience, but show you the exact same set of knobs that xterm's modern counter part gives you (by way of its settings dialog) to tweak this behavior? And then beyond that you could fiddle with the "advanced" settings to exercise the full breadth of the sort of control that xterm gives you? Think Firefox preferences/settings/options vs. dropping down to about:config for your odd idiosyncrasy.

      Since this is just an Xresources file, it would be straightforward to build this sort of frontend as an in-browser utility... (or a triple script, even).

  10. Apr 2023
    1. 13:14 - [Aby] Telegram and telephone destroy the cosmos.13:18 Mythical and symbolic thinking13:20 strives to form spiritual bonds13:22 between humanity and the surrounding world,13:25 shaping distance into the space13:27 required for devotion and reflection,13:31 the distance undone13:32 by the instantaneous electrical connection.

      Telegram and telephone destroy the cosmos. Mythical and symbolic thinking strives to form spiritual bonds between humanity and the surrounding world, shaping distance into the space required for devotion and reflection, the distance undone by the instantaneous electrical connection. —Aby Warburg, [00:13:14] quoted in Aby Warburg: Metamorphosis and Memory (Original quote??)

    1. the overarching paradigm that underlies the global system, however useful it might have been, is not only obsolete, but actively pushing us toward self-annihilation. This paradigm reduces human existence to competition between disconnected, materially-defined units whose primary imperative is individual material self-maximisation and accumulation. Yet it is precisely this way of being that is eroding our mental health and destroying planetary life-support systems. Our inherently relational nature, the fact that our well-being is tied up with our connections to others – that we are fundamentally interconnected – is obfuscated.Moving through the global phase-shift, then, requires us to completely reorient ourselves into a new way of being in the world, rooted in new ways of understanding our relationship with the world that actually connect with reality.

      In Other Words The human INTERbeing - our relational nature - our Dunbar number past - is denied by modernity

  11. Mar 2023
    1. It has been suggested that - the human species may be undergoing an evolutionary transition in individuality (ETI).

      there is disagreement about - how to apply the ETI framework to our species - and whether culture is implicated - as either cause or consequence.

      Long-term gene–culture coevolution (GCC) i- s - also poorly understood.

      argued that - culture steers human evolution,

      Others proposed - genes hold culture on a leash.

      After review of the literature and evidence on long-term GCC in humans - emerge a set of common themes. - First, culture appears to hold greater adaptive potential than genetic inheritance - and is probably driving human evolution. - The evolutionary impact of culture occurs - mainly through culturally organized groups, - which have come to dominate human affairs in recent millennia. - Second, the role of culture appears to be growing, - increasingly bypassing genetic evolution and weakening genetic adaptive potential. -Taken together, these findings suggest that human long-term GCC is characterized by - an evolutionary transition in inheritance - from genes to culture - which entails a transition in individuality (from genetic individual to cultural group). Research on GCC should focus on the possibility of - an ongoing transition in the human inheritance system.

    2. patterns thought to be characteristic of an ETI, including the scale of our cooperation with non-kin, the prominence of human language and our complex, full-time division of labour.

      Summary

      Human Patterns of ETI - non-kin scale of cooperation - prominence of human language - complex and full-time division of labor

    1. As a consequence of sociocultural niche construction, humans have become a global force of nature – for better and for worse. It is only by embracing these sociocultural realities that we might shape better futures for both humans and non-human species alike.

      // In Other Words

      • we must undo the myopic cultural evolution that has already taken place with a more collectively conscious form of cultural evolution //
    1. Gene–culture coevolution and the nature of human sociality
      • Title: Gene–culture coevolution and the nature of human sociality
      • Author: Herbert Gintis

      //Abstract - Summary - Human characteristics are the product of gene–culture coevolution, - which is an evolutionary dynamic involving the interaction of genes and culture - over long time periods. - Gene–culture coevolution is a special case of niche construction. - Gene–culture coevolution is responsible for: - human other-regarding preferences, - a taste for fairness, - the capacity to empathize and - salience of morality and character virtues.

      • Title: Human niche construction in interdisciplinary focus
      • Author:
        • Jeremy Kendal
        • Jamshid J. Tehrani
        • John Oding-Smee
      • Abstract
        • summary
        • Niche construction is an endogenous causal process in evolution,
      • reciprocal to the causal process of natural selection.
        • It works by adding ecological inheritance,
        • comprising the inheritance of natural selection pressures previously modified by niche construction,
        • to genetic inheritance in evolution.
        • Human niche construction modifies selection pressures in environments in ways that affect both human evolution, and the evolution of other species.
        • Human ecological inheritance is exceptionally potent
        • because it includes the social transmission and inheritance
        • of cultural knowledge, and material culture.
        • Human genetic inheritance
        • in combination with human cultural inheritance
        • thus provides a basis for gene–culture coevolution,
        • and multivariate dynamics in cultural evolution.
        • Niche construction theory potentially integrates the biological and social aspects of the human sciences.
        • We elaborate on these processes,
        • and provide brief introductions to each of the papers published in this theme issue.
    1. The central question of the Anthropocene, why did behaviorally modern humans gain the unprecedented capacity to change an entire planet, cannot be answered by genetic changes in human behavior. To explain why human societies scaled up to become a global force capable of changing the Earth and why there are so many different forms of human societies and ecologies shaped by them, explanations must be sought beyond the theories of biology, chemistry or physics. Here I introduce a new evolutionary theory, sociocultural niche construction, aimed at explaining the origins of human capacity to transform the Earth 3. As will be seen, this theory also explains why behaviorally modern human societies came to transform ecology in so many different ways over the past 50,000 years as they expanded across the Earth.

      //Summary* - The central question of the Anthropocene: - why did behaviorally modern humans gain the unprecedented capacity to change an entire planet? - cannot be answered by genetic changes in human behavior. - To explain why human societies scaled up to become a global force capable of changing the Earth and why there are so many different forms of human societies and ecologies shaped by them, - explanations must be sought beyond the theories of - biology, - chemistry or - physics. - Here I introduce a new evolutionary theory, sociocultural niche construction, - aimed at explaining the origins of human capacity to transform the Earth . - As will be seen, this theory also explains why - behaviorally modern human societies came to - transform ecology in so many different ways over the past 50,000 years as they expanded across the Earth. //

    1. Abstract
      • Abstract
      • summary
        • The exhibition of increasingly intensive and complex niche construction behaviors through time
        • is a key feature of human evolution,
        • culminating in the advanced capacity for ecosystem engineering exhibited by Homo sapiens.
        • A crucial outcome of such behaviors has been the dramatic reshaping of the global biosphere,
          • a transformation whose early origins are increasingly apparent
          • from cumulative archaeological and paleoecological datasets.
        • Such data suggest that, by the Late Pleistocene,
        • humans had begun to engage in activities
        • that have led to alterations in the distributions of a vast array of species
        • across most, if not all, taxonomic groups.
        • Changes to biodiversity have included
          • extinctions,
          • extirpations, and
          • shifts in species
            • composition,
            • diversity, and
            • community structure.
        • We outline key examples of these changes,
        • highlighting findings from the study of new datasets, like
          • ancient DNA (aDNA),
          • stable isotopes, and
          • microfossils, as well as
          • the application of new statistical and computational methods to datasets that have accumulated significantly in recent decades.
        • We focus on four major phases that witnessed broad anthropogenic alterations to biodiversity:
          • the Late Pleistocene global human expansion,
          • the Neolithic spread of agriculture,
          • the era of island colonization, and
          • the emergence of early urbanized societies and commercial networks.
        • Archaeological evidence documents millennia of anthropogenic transformations
        • that have created novel ecosystems around the world.
        • This record has implications for:
          • ecological and evolutionary research,
          • conservation strategies, and
          • the maintenance of ecosystem services,
        • pointing to a significant need for broader cross-disciplinary engagement between:
          • archaeology
          • the biological sciences and
          • the environmental sciences.
    2. Ecological consequences of human niche construction: Examining long-term anthropogenic shaping of global species distributions
      • Title: Ecological consequences of human niche construction: Examining long-term anthropogenic shaping of global species distributions
      • Author:
        • Nicole L. Bolvin
        • Melinda A. Zeder
        • Dorian O. Fuller
        • Michael D. Petraglia
    1. At the same time, the vision of a good life for all integrates our in-dividual pursuit of this goal with an immediate concern for others.In other words, we can enjoy and exercise freedoms only to the extentthat doing so does not impinge on others. Achieving this vision under-lines both the crucial role of freedom but also the necessity of limitsfor this freedom to exist. Thereby, pursuing the vision of a good lifefor all has the potential of bridging current political divides, as it is avision that all people can adhere to.

      // - Baked into the Good Life for All within Limits approach is human INTERbeing - It is something that is familiar to us - we already know and live under such limitations. This is what laws are, limitations of freedom and nobody is above the law, and the law is written to enforce social harmony, - Social harmony is the ability for people to live together - for each individual to enjoy freedoms, but not at the expense of taking away freedoms of others

    1. Because then we have a world in which grown men, sipping tea, posit thought experiments about raping talking sex dolls, thinking that maybe you are one too.
  12. Feb 2023
    1. Döring, Tanja, and Steffi Beckhaus. “The Card Box at Hand: Exploring the Potentials of a Paper-Based Tangible Interface for Education and Research in Art History.” In Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction, 87–90. TEI ’07. New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery, 2007. https://doi.org/10.1145/1226969.1226986.

      This looks fascinating with respect to note taking and subsequent arranging, outlining, and use of notes in human computer interaction space for creating usable user interfaces.

    1. rank is not an assessment of who has thebest intrinsic properties, but rather a useful consensus view thatprovides rules for how to behave toward others.

      Rank (social or otherwise) can be a signal for predictability from the perspective of consensus views for how to behave towards others with respect to the abilities or values being measured.


      Ranking people for some sort of technical ability may be a better objective measure rather than ranking people on social status which is far less objective from a humanist perspective. In employment situations, individuals are more likely to rely on social and cultural biases and racist tendencies rather than on objective measures with respect to the job at hand. How can we better objectify the actual underlying values over and above the more subjective ones.

    1. Our most conservative point estimates imply that the data glitch isdirectly associated more than 120,000 additional infections and over 1,500 addi-tional COVID-19-related deaths

      The results from using the old version of Microsoft Excel.

  13. Jan 2023
    1. In each case, a small population produced a star-burst of pioneers who permanently changed our way of thinking. Genius erupted in groups as well as in individuals. It seems likely that these bursts of creative change were driven by a combination of cultural with biological evolution. Cultural evolution was constantly spreading ideas and skills from one community to another, stirring up conservative societies with imported novelties. At the same time, biological evolution acting on small genetically isolated populations was causing genetic drift, so that the average intellectual endowment of isolated communities was rising and falling by random chance. Over the last few thousand years, genetic drift caused occasional star-bursts to occur, when small populations rose to outstandingly high levels of average ability. The combination of imported new ideas with peaks of genetic drift would enable local communities to change the world.

      !- explaining human history : combination of cultural and biological evolution

    1. Beware the person, party, or project that claims to be the incarnation of the common good. The common good is imminent within the polis in all its possibility, but it is never the embodiment of any one version of the polis. That way of thinking, always tempting, often deployed, never ends well. The common good is not something extra added on to what other practices of right recognition provide for a society. Instead, the common good shifts the frame and changes the subject of political life from the declarative as is to the subjunctive as if—the corrected fullness of equality, justice, and interdependent mutuality that are already but not yet.

      !- comment : Deep Humanity multi-meaningverse / situatedness and perspectival knowing - One perspective cannot rule all - By definition, an individual is one person, as soon as there are two, there are at least two perspectives - We are the entanglement of the similar and the different; if we did not share fundamental human traits, we could not communicate, and yet, being nurtured in unique lifeworlds, we are so distinct - the intersection of these two opposing qualities is the inherent contradiction of our human nature

    1. We believe that we have demonstrated the use of abstract marks to convey meaning about the behaviour of the animals with which they are associated, on European Upper Palaeolithic material culture spanning the period from ~37,000 to ~13,000 bp. In our reading, the animals integral to our analytical modules do not depict a specific individual animal, but all animals of that species, at least as experienced by the images’ creators. This synthesis of image, mathematical syntax (the ordinal/linear sequences) and signs functioning as words formed an efficient means of recording and communicating information that has at its heart the core intellectual achievement of abstraction.
    2. We appreciate this is a long span of time, and were concerned why any specific artificial memory system should last for so long.

      I suspect that artificial memory systems, particularly those that make some sort of logical sense, will indeed be long lasting ones.

      Given the long, unchanging history of the Acheulean hand axe, as an example, these sorts of ideas and practices were handed down from generation to generation.

      Given their ties to human survival, they're even more likely to persist.

      Indigenous memory systems in Aboriginal settings date to 65,000 years and also provide an example of long-lived systems.