28 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2020
    1. To double down on this agenda our aim will be to build the company around open source software.

      From the RM Unger whitepaper:

      "The more one knows and discovers, the easier it is to make the next discovery. If the process of production can be organised on a model of scientific inquiry and experimentalism, innovation can stop being episodic and become permanent. Continuous innovation undermines the basis for the constraint of diminishing marginal returns."

    1. knowledge economy

      Worth having a look at the whitepaper produced by R.M. Unger for Nesta, "Imagination unleashed: Democratising the knowledge economy"

  2. Apr 2020
    1. Dame Wendy Hall and Jérôme Pesenti conclude that “AI could positively affect every area of STEM education”

      I worked briefly in the SOCIAM consortium with Dame Wendy Hall. I wonder if some of the stakeholders in the AI report mentioned here could be approached to ask how they are sourcing technical talent. Benevolent AI would be one interesting possibility.

      A first step could be to follow up with the Southampton folk about the Innovate UK proposal.

    2. [33] “Uncovering the Dynamics of Crowdlearning and the Value of Knowledge”. Proc. Tenth ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining. 2017 [34] “Emergent Complexity via Multi-Agent Competition”. arXiv preprint arXiv:1710.03748, 2017

      These look like particularly worthwhile references.

    3. Universities UK

      Universities are a primary incumbent for any kind of skill sourcing! https://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/

    4. Wolfram Research

      Another possible speculative angle. They will have a broad interest in sourcing technical talent, not just programmers but also mathematicians.

    5. developing new business models for education using open source software

      London-based experts in this aspect of things include Canonical.

    6. Elsevier

      It's a bit of a strange angle but at the level of a brainstorm we could look at how publishers source technical talent. They are probably not the biggest employer of programmers out there, but it would be a non-trivial number.

    7. Building our Industrial Strategy

      "The aim of the Industrial Strategy is to boost productivity by backing businesses to create good jobs and increase the earning power of people throughout the UK with investment in skills, industries and infrastructure."

    8. IBM

      I have a couple of rather remote links to people who work at IBM, I wonder how they go about sourcing talent there.

    1. Simulating Developer Communities

      I found some earlier work, though it's not very fine grained.

      • Modeling the Free/Open Source Software Community: A Quantitative Investigation

      Also:

      • Agent-based Simulation of Open Source Software Evolution
    1. A short bio and link to LinkedIn would be perfect.

      A link to Github would perhaps be more relevant for many developers. Indeed, wouldn't a good starting place be to crawl Github and try to recruit people whose profiles look suitable?

    1. The real test of meaningfulness will come in the use of the extracted information, via evaluation of agent performance on both synthetic tasks and human-in-the-loop applications.

      This sentence kicks off a paragraph with a grab-bag of different methods: all interesting, but from different domains. As such they seem likely to confuse the reader. Don't get me wrong, TPGs, PP/AI, and IAD are all really cool, but their application here remains speculative! The actual problem being addressed exists at a higher level of abstraction.

    2. “complex feed-backs present between individuals and their environments”

      Clearly this wasn't a watertight case for getting the job. Nevertheless I think there are interesting connections between this way of thinking and the Andy Clark way of thinking about niche construction.

    3. Helena Miton’s work on “the role of institutions in generating and transmitting technical knowledge and practices” would find concrete analogues within the work I have proposed.

      I wonder if we could set up an interview to talk about this!

    4. koans

      As people learn programming, what else do they need besides koans?

    5. In order for agents to explore this domain, they will need stepping stones, starting from the simplest possible tasks and growing in complexity.

      This is a worthwhile principle to keep in mind.

    1. We're beginning by marking up these old proposals with new commentary.

      Annotations are via the Hypothes.is sidebar. Anyone is welcome to add them!

    1. rationale

      Instead of a Problem, Solution, Rationale triple, the Y Combinator folks talk about a Problem, Solution, Insight triple. The insight concerns unfair advantages related to growth. It could come from across several "suits": Founders, Market, Product, Acquisition, and Monopoly.

      Whereas the rationale concerns repeatable patterns, startup ideas concern more time-, location- and context-specific opportunities. So, OK, there are some differences: but it seems to me that the common features between these two design languages is worth keeping in mind!

      The breakdown across different "suits" reminds me also of the multiple capitals theory used by XinX.

    2. We can build computational models of social processes and research heuristics using a formal variant of the design pattern methodology

      What I think I have only just realised today is that the process based material could be combined with Monocl and properly formalised inside of category theory.

    3. The latter will draw on direct observation, interviews, “instrumentation” of the social media accounts of researchers who agree to participate in the study, and software integration work as relevant.

      This epistemic aspect is preserved in many of the proposals and seems to be a key aspect of the offering.

    4. enrich the inquiry with both technical and “common sense” features

      I think the "impact" again falls flat in this paragraph.

      The last bit here harkens back to a disagreement that I had with Bob Boyer at UT Austin circa 2003. I felt it would be worthwhile to model mathematics in more common sense terms, but he did not see the value of that pursuit and wanted me to work on a project more oriented towards theorem proving. But all of the interest (and difficulty) of that proposal is implicit here.

      Naturally people will be interested in the adventure but once people begin to grasp the technical ideas they ask "Is it possible? What's really required? What are the stepping stones or proof points?"

    5. a content-oriented model of technical domains, which will be directly useful for education and research

      It's as if the big ideas here are buried (perhaps because I didn't want to be too bold, but in that case it's strange to write a paragraph about 'importance')! To be clear, if it actually worked this idea would transform the way we do knowledge work. That's a bit more bold! The 2019 whitepaper "Imagination Unleashed: Democratising the Knowledge Economy" might say some of this better than I can, even now! (I have only had a look so far.)

    6. The next step in understanding the relationship between content and process could be made using simulation studies

      This should probably have been pulled to the top of the document, since it is an overall thesis for the proposal.

    7. One example application is a recommender system that shows questions and answers from Stack Exchange to a programmer at work.

      I think this is referring "Seahawk: Stack Overflow in the IDE" by Luca Ponzanelli et al. (https://lucaponzanelli.gitlab.io/).

    8. The people who visit the library can teach you where the data that surrounds you comes from.

      This is basically the thesis statement of this paragraph, embedded here in the middle.

    9. ContentMine

      http://contentmine.org/ "We offer a broad range of text mining services for small, medium size and large projects. Our mission is to give researchers an easy-to-use open source text mining code allowing them to find, download, analyse and extract knowledge from academic papers."

    1. Admas Kanyagia

      It would be great to talk with her about the project of building a 'talent incubator' for engineers!