23 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Are Cucumbers Acidic or Alkaline?

      I'm working on a new page to explain this. Because the answer depends on why you ask this question.

      Is it because you are: * Interested in canning cucumbers? * Concerned about the effects of cucumbers on the mouth, esophagus, or stomach? * Analyzing foods for the effect on your kidneys after digestion?


      To get updates on my new content before it is published, I recommend that you subscribe to my free newsletter.

  2. Dec 2022
    1. Related Topics

      I'm updating my pork research. So if you want to see my progress or join in, contact me via your subscriber confirmation email.


      Subscribe to my free GoutPal Links Newsletter.


  3. Nov 2022
    1. milk

      I'm starting to research milk for gout. As a new page related to Almonds and Almond Milk For Gout


      GoutPal Links Documentation

      Notes like this are part of my GoutPal Links service. Which is currently in the pre-launch phase. I will add documentation for this feature as I answer requests from readers. So if you need help using this feature, the best way is to subscribe to my free GoutPal Links Newsletter. Where you can email and message me directly. Or you can use the feedback options near the end of every page.

    1. concerns about gout and itching

      For example, does acupuncture help with itchy gout?

      During the discussion that prompted this page, we mentioned acupuncture. Specifically, an acupuncture practitioner noted that acupuncture relieves gout itching. So this is a potential research area. But as I have no acupuncture experience, I need questions, experiences, and opinions from you about acupuncture and gout itch.

      Also, there is one reference to a study in the Progress Notes if anyone cares to join me on a research project. Min, Seorim, Koh-Woon Kim, Won-Mo Jung, Min-Jung Lee, Yu-Kang Kim, Younbyoung Chae, Hyangsook Lee, and Hi-Joon Park. "Acupuncture for histamine-induced itch: association with increased parasympathetic tone and connectivity of putamen-midcingulate cortex." Frontiers in neuroscience 13 (2019): 215.


      GoutPal Links Documentation

      Notes like this are part of my GoutPal Links service. Which is currently in the pre-launch phase. I will add documentation for this feature as I answer requests from readers. So if you need help using this feature, the best way is to subscribe to my free GoutPal Links Newsletter. Where you can email and message me directly. Or you can use the feedback options near the end of every page.

    2. Allopurinol Itch

      I am preparing: * A GoutPal library review for Allopurinol & Itching Research * An article for this allopurinol side effects section with a working title of Allopurinol and Itching.

      GoutPal Links Newsletter subscribers can access my progress notes through their files link

    1. Allopurinol Side Effects Concerns

      Does allopurinol make you itchy?

      I'm writing a new research project on allopurinol and itchiness. In preparation for help in resolving concerns. Including, does allopurinol make you itchy?


      If you need help using this feature, the best way is to subscribe to my free GoutPal Links Newsletter. Where you can email and message me directly. Or you can use the feedback options near the end of every page.

    1. ice cream

      Keep an eye out for my gout nutrition profile for ice cream. With a working title of Is ice cream bad for gout?

      GoutPal Links Subscribers can follow my progress in the usual way.

    1. Dairy

      Dairy Foods Group Nutrition

      The third guideline, with respect to dairy foods group, is: <q>Focus on meeting food group needs with nutrient-dense foods and beverages, and stay within calorie limits. […] The core elements that make up a healthy dietary pattern include: […] Dairy, including fat-free or low-fat milk, yogurt, and cheese, and/or lactose-free versions and fortified soy beverages and yogurt as alternatives.</q>

      Dairy Foods

      The DGA defines dairy foods as: <q>All fluid, dry, or evaporated milk, including lactose-free and lactose-reduced products and fortified soy beverages (soy milk), buttermilk, yogurt, kefir, frozen yogurt, dairy desserts, and cheeses (e.g., brie, camembert, cheddar, cottage cheese, colby, edam, feta, fontina, goat, gouda, gruyere, limburger, Mexican cheeses [queso anejo, queso asadero, queso chihuahua], monterey, mozzarella, muenster, parmesan, provolone, ricotta, and Swiss). Most choices should be fat-free or low-fat. Cream, sour cream, and cream cheese are not included due to their low calcium content.</q> So the foods included in the dairy group are not straightforward. Because they do not exactly match traditional views of dairy produce. Or food and drink we might expect to see in the supermarket dairy aisles. But this should be made clearer as you read my detailed nutrition pages for individual dairy foods.

    1. Excel Spreadsheet Permissions on Android

      I've been notified of a problem for some Microsoft Excel users on Android. Which affects access to spreadsheets for Shrewd Learning followers, subscribers, and members. So I'm preparing documentation for this.

      Shrewd Learning Subscribers can access my progress notes.

    1. Historic Names for Gout

      New page for this. Referencing research reviews for those terms that remain current. With a Other Historic Gout Names section for obsolete gout names.

    1. Start with the 2020 ACR probenecid guidelines.

      Then, after learning how those guidelines apply to you, consider: * Research after 2020 * Specialized probenecid topics. Such as probenecid side effects. Or probenecid in gout with comorbidities.

      So my next probenecid research page combines those 2 considerations. Because almost all current probenecid research is about diseases other than gout. Therefore, it is most applicable to gout sufferers with comorbidities.

      For access to my progress notes, subscribe to my free GoutPal Links Newsletter.

  4. Oct 2022
    1. Probenecid in Gout Treatment

      I'm working on a new hub page to connect all my probenecid pages.

      For access to my progress notes subscribe to my free GoutPal Links Newsletter.

    2. Probenecid Related Topics

      I'm working on new versions of my probenecid-related pages.

      For access to my progress notes subscribe to my free GoutPal Links Newsletter.

    1. Salad

      Salad for Gout

      For nutrition purposes, I regard salad as part of the vegetable food group. In fact, there are typical salad foods in all the vegetable subgroups. And I'm working on summary pages for vegetables. In preparation for detailed nutrition pages for all foods.

      GoutPal Links subscribers can follow my progress with access to draft copies and research notes for salad foods. Otherwise, return to this page regularly to see updated notes and links.

    2. Related Topics

      I'm currently reformatting comments and related topics to my latest standard. Including a new related topic: mustard.

      Now, I assume the interest here is because mustard is often used in salad dressings. Anyway, I'm going to start a new mustard research project. As usual, I'll keep GoutPal Links subscribers informed of my progress prior to publication.

      Interestingly, I've become aware that the spice, condiment, or vegetable that we refer to as mustard is also a botanical family of plants. Being brassicaceae, or more commonly the brassica family. I'm aware of this as the cabbage family. But I've now learned it's also known as the mustard family.

      Although that is interesting to me of itself. It is more interesting from a gout perspective. Because there are many more plants to consider that are beneficial.

      For example, candytuft!

      Now, I don't want to slow down my mustard articles by exploring this wider scope. But neither do I want to forget. So I'm logging my new inspiration here. Schempp, H., Totha, A., Weiser, D. and Elstner, E.F., 2003. Antioxidative properties of Iberis amara extracts in biochemical model reactions. Arzneimittelforschung, 53(08), pp.568-577.

      ROS, generated during xanthine oxidase (XOD)-catalysed oxidation of xanthine into uric acid, were also efficiently decreased by IAE (https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0031-1297151)

    1. Identifying the DGA Food Group for each food that concerns you is a good first step.

      So, to help you take that first step, I will describe each food group in terms of daily and weekly requirements. Thus, creating food group index pages. Then, I will link gout nutrition pages for foods within each food group.

    1. This needs replacing with...

      Lettuce & Uric Acid Research in GoutPal Library.

      Lettuce and Gout Nutrition Facts & FAQs in GoutPal Blog * Usual nutrients * Science summary, including different types of lettuce as well as seeds and extracts.

    1. Butternut squash

      I'm planning to do an article about Butternut Squash Nutrition for Gout. But an important nutrient is beta-carotene, So before that, I will publish Beta-Carotene Foods & Gout. In the meantime, there are facts to discuss with your health avisers at Butternut Squash & Uric Acid.

      GoutPal Links subscribers can follow my progress on both new pages.

    1. If you want me to prioritize any studies

      Including ideas that I've noted here. Because I often jot an idea here as a note, pending my updating this article.

      Vinegar

      There seem to be lots of interesting health benefits besides vinegar's help with arthritis.

    1. Potato Nutrition Article

      I urgently need to update potato information on Foodary.com. So I'm starting with a quick review of key health benefits of potato. Because I will use this on a new Potato Nutrition Facts hub page. Later, I'll investigate specific benefits in greater detail.

      Foodary Nexus Subscribers get free access to my potato article progress notes.

  5. Sep 2022
    1. Vegetables

      Vegetable Food Groups Nutrition

      New hub pages for vegetables.

      Vegetable Food Groups Nutrition Intro

      What Are Vegetable Food Groups?

      Dark-Green Vegetables

      All fresh, frozen, and canned dark-green leafy vegetables and broccoli, cooked or raw: for example, amaranth leaves, basil, beet greens, bitter melon leaves, bok choy, broccoli, chamnamul, chrysanthemum leaves, chard, cilantro, collards, cress, dandelion greens, kale, lambsquarters, mustard greens, poke greens, romaine lettuce, spinach, nettles, taro leaves, turnip greens, and watercress.

      Red and Orange Vegetables

      All fresh, frozen, and canned red and orange vegetables or juice, cooked or raw: for example, calabaza, carrots, red chili peppers, red or orange bell peppers, pimento/pimiento, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, 100% tomato juice, and winter squash such as acorn, butternut, kabocha, and pumpkin.

      Beans, Peas, Lentils

      All cooked from dry or canned beans, peas, chickpeas, and lentils: for example, black beans, black-eyed peas, bayo beans, brown beans, chickpeas (garbanzo beans), cowpeas, edamame, fava beans, kidney beans, lentils, lima beans, mung beans, navy beans, pigeon peas, pink beans, pinto beans, split peas, soybeans, and white beans. Does not include green beans or green peas.

      Starchy Vegetables

      All fresh, frozen, and canned starchy vegetables: for example, breadfruit, burdock root, cassava, corn, jicama, lotus root, lima beans, immature or raw (not dried) peas (e.g., cowpeas, black-eyed peas, green peas, pigeon peas), plantains, white potatoes, salsify, tapioca, taro root (dasheen or yautia), water chestnuts, yam, and yucca.

      Other Vegetables

      All other fresh, frozen, and canned vegetables, cooked or raw: for example, artichoke, asparagus, avocado, bamboo shoots, bean sprouts, beets, bitter melon (bitter gourd, balsam pear), broccoflower, Brussels sprouts, cabbage (green, red, napa, savoy), cactus pads (nopales), cauliflower, celeriac, celery, chayote (mirliton), chives, cucumber, eggplant, fennel bulb, garlic, ginger root, green beans, iceberg lettuce, kohlrabi, leeks, luffa (Chinese okra), mushrooms, okra, onions, peppers (chili and bell types that are not red or orange in color), radicchio, sprouted beans (e.g. sprouted mung beans), radish, rutabaga, seaweed, snow peas, summer squash, tomatillos, turnips, and winter melons.