1,083 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. This website is a free website that allows for users to access summaries of learning theories, educational guides and much more!

    2. This site includes links to brief discussions of more than 100 learning theories, some of which relate to technology enhanced learning. Those include gamification and online collaborative learning among others. Usability is adequate and this is sufficient for an introduction to the theories though not necessarily a nuanced understanding. rating 4/5

    1. 25 examples of mobile teaching This is a brief page that is cluttered with some irrelevant content that occurs in the form of rather large graphics. It is oriented toward higher education environments though the ideas would be quite easy to implement in other contexts, such as for training adult learners. The text is not in depth enough to be tremendously helpful but this resource does nonetheless make a contribution not made by other resources in that it shows actual teaching techniques. rating 4/5

    1. A context aware personalize M-learning application based on m-learning preferences This is a scholarly paper presented in the context of engineering and is not readily accessible by the layperson; it is also dated. Nonetheless it includes some scenarios and recommendations for consideration of learner preferences. It is included in this list solely because it introduces the concept of context aware personalized mobile learning. rating 1/5

    1. Top ten benefits of personalization of e-learning The text that addresses this question is toward the bottom of the page. These include increased ROI (a rationale for this is not presented).It is an enumerated list with sufficient readability and usability although the viewer does have to scroll past less relevant information to get to the list. rating 3/5

    1. 2018 mobile learning This is a Pinterest style presentation of various posts related to mobile learning and its advantages. It relates primarily to adult learning and also includes information about trends and apps. It is neatly presented. rating 5/5

    1. The benefits of personalized learning through technology This resource is included in part because it connects personalized learning and technology. A brief list of benefits, such as increasing student engagement and bridging the gap between teachers and students, are listed. This is presented by a marketing unit of a university so there may be an agenda. Nonetheless it provides useful considerations such as helping learners develop 'design thinking.' rating 3/5

    1. learning in the 21st century mobile devices + social media = personalized learning This appears to be oriented toward K-12 students but several components seem applicable to professional learning. The context is schools. Key findings are listed at the beginning of the report. The report is somewhat dated but still makes some points worth considering, such as the potential for devices to serve as a distraction just as much as a tool. rating 2/5

    1. What's possible with personalized learning: an overview of personalized learning for schools, families, and communities. This 32 page PDF is included in part due to its credibility and also to its breadth. The focus is personalized learning in schools. All ages are considered and there is a discussion of 'what personalized learning means for teachers.' It is sufficiently readable and rather attractively presented for a report. rating 5/5

    1. A national landscape scan of personalized learning in K-12 education in the United States This is included because it is associated with the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation, among other indicators of credibility, and because it provides (as the title suggests) a portrait of the state of personalized learning in schools, addressing topics that are not addressed by other resources in this list. rating 5/5

    1. defining personalized learning This link is included because there is a degree of research-based sources behind their comments. There is an easy to read graphic that succinctly characterizes personalized learning. It is written for someone who is beginning their understanding of this type of learning and plans to implement it at a future point. rating 3/5

    1. personalize learning infographic

      This is not quite what it sounds like. It is a Pinterest style page with links to assorted articles that relate to personalized learning, most of which are presented in an infographic. It is sufficiently useful if one has the patience to click through to the infographics. Usability is satisfactory although the top half of the page is taken up with graphics that are not directly related to the content. rating 3/5

    1. personalized learning: how does it differ from traditional learning Some of the text here is gray and it is also small, so that does not make it easy to read. Nonetheless it is an infographic about personalized learning from which a fair amount of information can e learned in a short time. rating 4/5

    1. stages of personalized learning: infographic This is here because it shows the progression of personalized learning from teacher centered to learner center to learner driven. It has other links to learn more about personalized learning. Usability for the article is adequate but less than ideal for the infographic (which nonetheless has useful information).

    1. How a non traditional approach to professional development supports personalized learning This article is on point, discussing personalized learning among teachers that can conceivably be done by mobile devices. It discusses one specific school district. While the article is presented in a reasonable manner, it lacks substance. rating 1/5

    1. 25 apps for professional development As the title suggests, this lists 25 apps for professional development. They are suited to micro and mobile learning, for the most part. In some cases, the apps seem suited to an early career employee rather than a mid career employee. There are reader comments. rating 3/5

    1. is your company embracing just in time learning This article, by shift learning (a credible if not foremost publisher) lists benefits of just in time learning. Among those are the ability to provide up to date and easily accessed information. They argue that it creates more engaged employees but do not provide data to support this argument. rating 3/5

    1. 4 tips to implement just in time learning at your organization This article is published by Udemy so it would appear to be credible. Reading is a bit difficult because of the light font and a sales orientation can be discerned. Nonetheless it does have some useful tips such as encouraging professional developers to 'redefine how you measure learning.' rating 3/5

    1. 5 technology enabled learning trends in 2017 This article was produced by a credible publisher and is included here because it points to the need for both mobile learning and micro learning. The authors assert but do not provide data for the increasing need for microlearning. This form of learning is said to be important because it is associated with the real world. Rating 4/5

    1. Evaluation of technology enhanced learning programs for health care professionals: systematic review This article is included because it is a systematic review. It is presented in academic language. The intention is to evaluate the quality of the articles themselves, not to guide e-learning development. Criteria for evaluating articles was established in advance. The utility of the article for my purposes may be a new search term, continuous professional development. rating 2/5

    1. what is just in time learning: build an engagement engine This article helps professional developers strategize about the use of just in time learning. Some of the tips are unsurprising while others offer new ideas. It is a quick read and useful for ideas for professional developers. rating 5/5

    1. 8 unexpected benefits of microlearning online training libraries While I am not sure that the benefits are unexpected, this does provide a list of advantages for employee driven voluntary professional development that happens via mobile devices in small doses. The usability of the page is satisfactory. rating 4/5

    1. macro to micro learning: how to transform your course library This short article has limited utility because of its lack of breadth and reading is a bit difficult because of the small gray typeface. Nonetheless it is a current article that provides a few tips for those who seek to have a greater number of micro learning opportunities among their professional development offerings. rating 2/5

    1. mobile learning technologies for 21st century classrooms This undated article discusses mobile learning in classrooms in a nonspecific way. One of the sources is Marc Prensky, whose work has been called into question by multiple authors. The type of information provided by this article seems rather basic and a function of common sense. A few apps are discussed. rating 1/5

    1. what is the definition of mobile learning This is a brief article that explains mobile learning for a layperson (not an academic). It is described in the context of schooling. It does not necessarily relate to informal learning specifically. The advantages (such as motivation and distance) are discussed, as well as the disadvantages (such as the potential for distraction). It is adequate as a definition. rating 3/5

    1. bridging formal and informal learning through technology in the twenty first century: issues and challenges This article is in a fully online journal. It relates to schools but the learning is by students, not teachers. However, professional development is called for. The article addresses the desired topic in that it refers to social networking and other technology enabled forms of learning; however, it does not seem to be substantive enough to be tremendously helpful. rating 1/1

    1. difference between formal and informal learning This article addresses the topic it proposes to: it describes the difference between formal and informal learning and to some extent provides some advice about selecting the type. It describes by example more than by definition and seems aimed at adults. rating 1/5

    1. Factors influencing engagement in informal learning activities This article describes features that encourage informal learning among teachers. Those are: initiative, self-efficacy, love of learning, interest in the profession, commitment to professional development, a nurturing personality, and an interesting personality. One noteworthy feature is that the factors they refer to are personal in nature. This article does appear to fill a unique niche among the collection that I have found so far. rating 5/5

    1. informal learning with mobile devices - microblogging as learning resource This article uses the work of Schon, a theorist on learning and reflection whose work is often used to address workplace learning. The paper is on topic, relating to informal learning with mobile devices, but it focuses on high school students--which seems to be a rather unusual use of Schon's writing. Also the writing itself is both general and dated. There is a 2x2 that describes the relationship of formal and informal learning to intentional and unintentional learning as well as the use of devices. rating 1/5

    1. reconceptualizing learning: a review of the literature on informal learning This is an 80 page PDF that has the support of Rutgers. It is presented in the usual manner in which reports are written. Unsurprisingly the writing is clean and accessible. The role of technology in online learning is discussed.Mentoring and communities of practice are addressed. The writing is fairly general. rating 3/5

    1. Simulations and games in informal learning contexts This article seems to discuss science learning, which is not my foremost interest, but it does give an example of how informal online learning can be used to allow the learner to explore his or her own interests. It is not specific enough to be of high value but is useful as a preliminary reading that can perhaps inform search terms to use for future research. rting 2/5

    1. This is a discussion of informal learning that focuses on ensuring that incidences of informal learning are recognized. This discussion portrays it has happening through casual conversations, online discussions, or social media. The page is easy enough to read though it does not try to be comprehensive. rating 2/5

    1. Using mobile devices to support formal, informal, and semi-formal learning: uses and implications for teaching and learning This online article is presented with 'draft' stamped across it; it does not appear to be from a recognized publisher. The content does connect the topics I am looking for (informal or personalized learning, mobile devices, and teacher professional development). They discuss their recommendations and connect informal mobile learning to personalized learning. rating 4/5

    1. The cutting edge of informal learning: makers, mobile, and more. This article discusses the features of informal learning and also discuss how it can be 'meaningful' and engaging. Constructivism and constructionism are mentioned though not at length. This may be useful given the limited resources I have but it is not one of the more impressive journal articles I have seen. rating 3/3

    1. designing for sustainable mobile learning: evaluating the concepts formal and informal This is a journal article that is freely available online. They argue that informal learning is more 'enriching' than formal learning. They write about mLearning (mobile learning) and state that some 'design aspects' must be left to learners. This is formatted in the standard way and has the usability one would expect of an online journal article. There are citations as one would expect but I am not qualified to evaluate the information quality. rating 5/5

    1. This is a dated online journal article about the use of mobile learning for teachers. The authors interviewed participants. The authors argue that mobile learning can contribute to professional learning yet this article does not seem to have multiple well-supported findings. rating 3/5

    1. This online journal article is a reflective piece about mobile learning for teachers. It appears to be connected to the work of Argyris and Schon (reflection in action) and it appears that they argue that adoption of mobile learning for teachers is not occurring at a fast pace. While disappointing, the article appears useful. rating 5/5

    1. personalized mobile learning solutions to create effective learning paths This appears to blend personalized learning and mobile learning. It is prepared by a specific vendor, MagicBox, so they might be assumed to have their own agenda. This page describes some of the affordances of personalized mobile learning, such as the capacity to track and presumably respond to learner preferences. rating 2/5

    1. This site explains the features that instructional designers or others would integrate with personalized design. Based on a graphic, it may have been meant for K-12 students, but appears applicable to other forms of learning as well. This appears to be more credible and more informative than other pages I have found so far. rating 4/5

    1. This page is meant to demonstrate what personalized learning 'looks like' and that seems to mean the principles or characteristics that it has. This page relates to kids, not adults, but the principles mostly seem relevant to adults just as much as kids. I do not know enough about this topic to evaluate the information quality, but the aspects I can evaluate, such as the writing and presentation, seem to suggest at least moderate credibility. rating 2/5

    1. This blends a discussion of professional development and personalized learning. This relates to the professional development of teachers, which I think I will shift my focus to since I am not finding public health education resources as I had hoped. This page discusses underlying cultural or other practices that contribute to professional development of this type. rating 2/5

    1. This is a research based report (of which I have found few) that connects professional development and personalized learning. I had hoped to find links that applied to health care and have not found a great many so far, but this article, which is more oriented toward professional development for teachers, still has applications since public health education professionals participate in many of the same practices. rating; 5/5

    1. I am not familiar with the sponsor, Capterra. This page describes what they consider the best e-learning apps for business. The article seems to have credible citations (such as Gartner). I notice that some of the apps may be limited to individuals whose organizations use a particular LMS. rating 3/5

    1. train and develop your staff with mobile apps I am not sure why the first two components of this page are included, but there is a bulleted list of contexts or applications of mobile apps for e-learning, such as leadership training, onboarding, and integrating interns who are part of the organization. This is interesting but I do not yet know how essential it is.

    1. 10 awesome ways to use mobile learning for employee training This is an article about strategies and applications of mobile learning for employee development. A number of ideas are presented. I lack the knowledge base to evaluate the soundness, novelty, etc. of these ideas. There are screen shots and they are interesting enough but give only a limited idea of the concept being discussed. rating 3/5

    1. This is a round-up article that describes four apps that employees can use for mobile learning. The apps are Udemy, Skill Pill, Designjot, and BoostHQ. It is not appropriate for me to evaluate the information quality; however, this particular source (eLearning industry) generally produces accurate articles. rating 4/5

    1. Using Just in Time Training for Active Learning in The Workplace

      This does not necessarily seem to be of top quality but it is the only item I have found so far that addresses just in time training specifically within healthcare. It does not do so in great depth. It does briefly address technology and mobile learning but not in a way that is tremendously insightful. rating 2/2

    1. This article explains just in time learning (such as that which can be done via devices) within the context of higher education. My interest is in public health education, but at this moment, I am not sure how much I can narrow in on that topic, so I will save this for now. This is obviously not a scholarly article but is of some interest nonetheless. rating 2/5

    1. Edward Thorndike's three laws of learning. The page does not explain this, but his theories came out in about 1900. His three laws of learning appear to be relevant to our course work. This simple page features black text on a white page. It is brief and it simply describes the three laws of learning. rating 5/5

    1. This is Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive objectives. I selected this page because it explains both the old and new versions of the taxonomy. When writing instructional objectives for adult learning and training, one should identify the level of learning in Blooms that is needed. This is not the most attractive presentation but it is one of the more thorough ones. rating 4/5

    1. This page, Top Tools for Learning, is updated every year. It lists and briefly describes the top tech tools for adult learning. For the current (2018) list, they are YouTube, PowerPoint, and Google Search. The list proceeds through the top 200 and there are links to each tool. The purpose of this page is to list them; tutorials, etc. are not offered. Rating 4/5

    1. Campus Technology magazine This is the website for a magazine that is also published on paper. Articles are freely accessible (a subscription is not required). The design of the page is messy and as with any magazine, the content varies, but the site does give a description of the use of technology in higher education. The same technologies can sometimes be applied in adult learning in general. Rating 4/5

    1. This link is to a three-page PDF that describes Gagne's nine events of instruction, largely in in the form of a graphic. Text is minimized and descriptive text is color coded so it is easy to find underneath the graphic at the top. The layout is simple and easy to follow. A general description of Gagne's work is not part of this page. While this particular presentation does not have personal appeal to me, it is included here due to the quality of the page and because the presentation is more user friendly than most. Rating 4/5

    1. This page is a simply presented list of many learning theories, both popular and less well known. The layout is clean. The pages to which the listed items link are somewhat minimal in nature so this would give a basic tour or overview of the models and would allow viewers to review the names of some of the learning theories. This page does not prioritize learning theories or identify and establish those theories that are the most prominent.

    1. Edutech wiki This page has a somewhat messy design and does not look very modern but it does offer overviews of many topics related to technologies. Just like wikipedia, it offers a good jumping off point on many topics. Navigation can occur by clicking through categories and drilling down to topics, which is easier for those who already know the topic they are looking for and how it is likely to be characterized. Rating 3/5

    1. This is one of many discussions of Kirkpatrick's four levels of evaluation. More of the page is taken up with decoration and graphics than needs to be the case but this page is included in this list because it offers a printable guide and because the hierarchy of the four levels is clearly shown. The text itself is printed in black on a white background and it is presented as a bulleted list (the bullets are not organized as well as they could be). Nonetheless it is a usable presentation of this model. rating 3/5

    1. This page offers general guidelines for facilitating class discussions. It is written for college environments and in usable in adult learning and training settings also. The presentation is straightforward but the content is not in depth. Part of the value of the page is links on the left side that address other teaching topics related to course design and course management. Rating 2/2

  2. www.pblworks.org www.pblworks.org
    1. project based learning While project based learning is more frequently used with children than adults, it can be useful for limited-time instruction for adults. This is a user friendly page that provides a decent description of project based learning and also discusses the design elements and teaching practices that should be used. rating 4/5

    1. problem based learning This gives a brief overview of problem based learning. This is a teaching method in which learners receive an ill structured problem that they continue to define and then solve. This web page serves as an overview but if one were teaching with this approach, more information would be needed than is contained on the typical introductory web page. Rating 3/5

    1. This is better than the problem-based learning page I already posted so I will post this one too. it is easy to read and gives the instructional designer or teacher a quick and better-than-average explanation about problem based learning, which is a method of teaching in which learners form teams and learn through solving real problems. rating 4/5

    1. This is a reasonable list of Knowles' assumptions about adult learners -- not as complete or nuanced as one might find in a textbook, but worth having a look at when starting a new project. rating: 3/5

    1. While there are many pages that somehow 'address' adult learning, I found few insightful as I reviewed them. This page is a bit different though as it does integrate transformational learning into adult learning theory and also has a different presentation of Knowles' work that is found on many other web pages. Rating 5/5

    1. This page is associated with Thiagi's interactive lectures, which are characterized in a book that is available via this site. This particular page involves links to types of interaction, such as games, puzzles, and so forth. It would be better to read or review the book, but since that option is not available, I will provide a link here. rating 2/5

    1. This is one of many pages that describes team based learning. The layout and typeface make this page easy enough to read. The content is rather brief and would suffice for someone who is trying to understand this approach and decide whether it is workable for their own adult learning and training context.

    1. Mager's tips on instructional objectives This is a very simple page that consists of black and white text without any graphics. As is, the text on the page is rather small and difficult (for me, anyway) to read, so one may wish to enlarge it. The process of creating instructional objectives in this format is explained in a clear and straightforward way. Rating 5/5

  3. Mar 2019
    1. Phase 3: Student-Centered Learning During Phase 3, students work both individually and in small groups at using strategies and skills from the previous phases to develop lines of inquiry around curricular topics. This type of project requires clear questions, multiple reliable sources, citations, and a final product that communicates that information to others.

      Students should be taught the material but should also be set free in order to collaborate with peers as well as technology to “tinker” and figure out the answer to the problem on their own which promotes a student centered approach to learning

    1. Friction

      AP Physics 1 - Algebra based

      Dynamics- 3.C.4.2:

      The student is able to explain contact forces (tension, friction, normal, buoyant, spring) as arising from interatomic electric forces and that they therefore have certain directions. [SP 6.2] https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-physics-1-course-and-exam-description.pdf (See page 23)

    2. simulations

      Next generation science standards- Science and engineering practices

      Practice 2: Developing and using models

      https://ngss.nsta.org/PracticesFull.aspx

    3. This prompted us to use nanodiamond as an additive

      The Nature of Science and the Next Generation Science Standards:

      Scientific knowledge is open to revision in light of new evidence (NS3)

    4. The temperature and velocity range for maintaining stable superlubricity is further backed by theoretical simulations (tables S2 and S3)

      Common Core State Standards English Language Arts-Literacy

      RST.11-12.8

      Evaluate the hypotheses, data, analysis, and conclusions in a science or technical text, verifying the data when possible and corroborating or challenging conclusions with other sources of information.

    5. environmental benefits

      Next Generation Science Standards Disciplinary Core Ideas:

      ESS3.D Global climate change

      Though the magnitudes of human impacts are greater than they have ever been, so too are human abilities to model, predict, and manage current and future impacts. (HS-ESS3-5)

    1. EFFICIENT METHODS AND HARDWARE FOR DEEP LEARNING

      Deep Compression" can reduce the model sizeby 18?to 49?without hurting the prediction accuracy. We also discovered that pruning and thesparsity constraint not only applies to model compression but also applies to regularization, andwe proposed dense-sparse-dense training (DSD), which can improve the prediction accuracy for awide range of deep learning models. To efficiently implement "Deep Compression" in hardware,we developed EIE, the "Efficient Inference Engine", a domain-specific hardware accelerator thatperforms inference directly on the compressed model which significantly saves memory bandwidth.Taking advantage of the compressed model, and being able to deal with the irregular computationpattern efficiently, EIE improves the speed by 13?and energy efficiency by 3,400?over GPU

    1. A Sensitivity Analysis of (and Practitioners’ Guide to) Convolutional Neural Networks for Sentence Classification

    1. A Gentle Tutorial of Recurrent Neural Network with ErrorBackpropagation

      A Gentle Tutorial of Recurrent Neural Network with ErrorBackpropagation

  4. arxiv.org arxiv.org
    1. To the best of our knowl-edge, there has not been any other work exploringthe use of attention-based architectures for NMT

      目前并没人来用attention来做机器翻译

    1. One of the challenges of deep learning is that the gradients with respect to the weights in one layerare highly dependent on the outputs of the neurons in the previous layer especially if these outputschange in a highly correlated way. Batch normalization [Ioffe and Szegedy, 2015] was proposedto reduce such undesirable “covariate shift”. The method normalizes the summed inputs to eachhidden unit over the training cases. Specifically, for theithsummed input in thelthlayer, the batchnormalization method rescales the summed inputs according to their variances under the distributionof the data

      batch normalization的出现是为了解决神经元的输入和当前计算值交互的高度依赖的问题。因为要计算期望值,所以需要拿到所有样本然后进行计算,显然不太现实。因此将取样范围和训练时的mini-batch保持一致。但是这就把局限转移到mini-batch的大小上了,很难应用到RNN。因此需要LayerNormalization.

    2. Layer Normalization

    1. A potential draw-back with such pre-training approach is that themodel may suffer from the mismatch of dialoguestate distributions between supervised training andinteractive learning stages. While interacting withusers, the agent’s response at each turn has a di-rect influence on the distribution of dialogue statethat the agent will operate on in the upcoming di-alogue turns.

      策略学习也是对话过程很重要的一环。 最近的策略学习过程有用基于有监督的预训练然后线上强化学习再训练的来提高学习的方案。但是这种方案有个潜在的毛病,在离线的数据中受限于数据量,线上一旦碰到了不常见的情况,容易直接恢复不来。(这个问题应该只是推断吧?有什么实证么?)

      所以本文其实想说的是用一种方法来减轻线上和离线的差距。

    1. teaching machines that provided continuous participation and reinforcement.

      Wait, this already happened?!

    2. ow the human made use of that time.

      In education, learning data and analytics?

    3. We have developed quite a few concepts and methods for using the computer system to help us plan and supervise sophisticated courses of action, to monitor and evaluate what we do, and to use this information as direct feedback for modifying our planning techniques in the future.

      This reminds me of "personalized learning."

  5. Feb 2019
    1. Which segments of text are being highlighted?

      Do we capture this data? Can we?

    2. What types of annotations are being created?

      How is this defined?

    3. Who is posting most often? Which posts create the most replies?

      These apply to social annotation as well.

    4. Session Profile

      Are we capturing the right data/how can Hypothesis contribute to this profile?

    5. Does overall time spent reading correlate with assessment scores? Are particular viewing patterns/habits predictive of student success? What are the average viewing patterns of students? Do they differ between courses, course sections, instructors, or student demographics?

      Can H itself capture some of this data? Through the LMS?

    1. to expand their pedagogical repertoire

      Indeed. Just as it requires knowledge and skill to design, develop, and deliver an online learning experience, the same applies to blended learning. Making informed decisions about how to blend is deep, deep, deep.

    1. personalized learning products will be used not to improve student learning, but as cheaper and “good enough” replacements for faculty labor.

      Yeah, this is scary.

    1. ecent advances of deep learning have inspiredmany applications of neural models to dialoguesystems. Wen et al. (2017) and Bordes et al.(2017) introduced a network-based end-to-endtrainable task-oriented dialogue system, whichtreated dialogue system learning as the problemof learning a mapping from dialogue histories tosystem responses, and applied an encoder-decodermodel to train the whole system

      Wen和Bordes介绍了一种基于网络的端到端的任务型对话系统,这个系统将对话系统学习看成是从历史回话到系统回复的映射关系的学习问题,并且应用了一个编码解码器来训练整个系统。

      这个思路很有意思,和我之前想构建一个电销员的语料库来做用户回复响应很像。这个很有可能。

    1. Algorithms will privilege some forms of ‘knowing’ over others, and the person writing that algorithm is going to get to decide what it means to know… not precisely, like in the former example, but through their values. If they value knowledge that is popular, then knowledge slowly drifts towards knowledge that is popular.

      I'm so glad I read Dave's post after having just read Rob Horning's great post, "The Sea Was Not a Mask", also addressing algorithms and YouTube.

    2. Some questions to use when discussing why we shouldn’t replace humans with AI (artificial intelligence) for learning

      Great discussion of what questions to ask about artificial intelligence and learning from Dave Cormier.

    1. Transfusion: Understanding Transfer Learning with Applications to Medical Imaging

      基于模型参数的迁移学习对 proformace 影响不大,当然训练更快啦。有趣的是,迁移 trained 模型参数的均值/方差统计性也可以得到不错的迁移效果。

    1. Encouraging students to reach out to each other to solve problems and share knowledge not only builds collaboration skills, it leads to deeper learning and understanding

      Students can help each other learn by collaborating their efforts. Each student can bring a certain strength to the group so that they can all work out problems together

    1. The cost of not having a comprehensive base of content knowledge can be prohibitive; for example, students can receive incorrect information and develop misconceptions about the content area (National Research Council, 2000; Pfundt, & Duit, 2000)

      The importance of understanding the full extent of the content we are teaching is to give our students correct information. Learning incorrect information and having "misconceptions about the content area" is detrimental to our students' learning.

    1. Connected learning is realized when a young person is able to pursue a personal interest or passion with the support of friends and caring adults, and is in turn able to link this learning and interest to academic achievement, career success or civic engagement

      Helping students to have a relatable interest with their learning can help them to succeed in their futures. Making our lessons more understandable and related to their interests is important when setting up their learning environment.

    1. Connected learning does not rely on a single technology or technique. Rather, it is fostered over time through a combination of supports for developing interests, relationships, skills, and a sense of purpose.

      When we start off the year using different teaching methods and establishing healthy relationships with our students, we can help them to grow immensely in the small amount of time that we know them.

    2. Opportunities

      Providing our students with opportunities to learn outside the classroom or using technology as a tool when we are teaching are good ways to get them involved in their learning and can eventually help them to take control of their learning experience all together, with us being the facilitators of knowledge.

    3. Learning is irresistible and life-changing when it connects personal interests to meaningful relationships and real-world opportunity

      When we understand our student's interests and build relationships with them, we can help them to love learning. We can do this collectively with our classes and we can do it with each student individually.