286 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2020
    1. *Game star mechanic

      • Creativity is expressed via making video games online
      • problem solving skills increase
      • comments-feedback
      • constructive criticism needed
      • teachers need to be constructive in terms of feedback How does this change as school has become more online?
    1. I like how the technology and collaborative aspects are being used to relate the issue of homelessness not only to the past events but also the issues facing their community on both a local and personal level.

    1. Learners are encouraged to be creative as they build and revise content. They should look to see if it meets their needs and how representative it is to other elements of online information. But, most importantly, they are to use the expertise of other students and the teacher in the classroom. I would also suggest including elements of abstracted replay, or viewing the work of experts as they revise and edit their own work process and produ

      Work collaboratively and smart not hard

    2. Construction is equal parts inspiration and perspiration. Construction calls on creativity as well as persistence, flexibility, and revision. Construction asks our students and teachers to focus on the power and patience employed during work process…and not just the final resultant work product

      Nothing is ever finished on the internet

    3. our understanding of construction and creation needs to be broad enough to allow for change in the future.

      the internet is constantly changing everyday as more information is uploaded daily. Nothing is ever finished being constructed

    4. The ideas and concepts in all of this work does overlap sometimes…and students and teachers should feel empowered to move in, out, and between all of the concepts. Working online is a fluid experience which calls for flexible learners.

      This is very true as flexibility is needed in the classroom.

    5. . In order to fill the void I would see concerning the creativity, composition, and design skills students need…we have been developing online content construction (OCC)

      This is especially important as technology integration in the classroom has become critical under our current situation.

  2. Jul 2020
    1. By creating a curriculum that allows for problem-based inquiry learning, high-level discussion, and collaboration. One approach, Internet reciprocal teaching, involves problem-based tasks in which readers create their own text. This provides students a path for navigating the Cs of change.

      Problem-based learning to help teach 5 C's (creativity, communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and comprehension

    1. understanding approaches to successful technology integration requires educators to develop new ways of comprehending and accommodating this complexity.

      teachers must be up to date on the new tech trends as well as student interests.

    1. a supportive community on Wattpad, an online publishing app. She begins writing her own fanfiction on there, gaining a following and confidence.

      Common interests motivated her to want to build relationships with others in order to gain opportunities later on.

    1. the most resilient, adaptive, and effective learning involves individual interest as well as social support to overcome adversity and provide recognition.

      Interest in the subject provides purpose to want to succeed.

    1. Final exams.

      Has anybody tried to do a semester walkthrough using a screencasting tool and a presentation tool of some kind? I think that might be a valuable tool for first year comp students.

      Or maybe a short simulation like Clark Aldritch uses:

    2. Here is a place to add more possible guidelines:

      1. Provide a scratchpad each week where students can reflect on the week on progress or regress.

      2. Get lots of quick feedback from learners with Google Forms.

      3.Introduce the idea of feedforward to students and teachers.

  3. www.literacyworldwide.org www.literacyworldwide.org
    1. Think of the use of social media during the Arab Spring. People used social media in a way that went far beyond knowing how to click and deep into civic uses and navigating ways to communicate with others under the radar of a communication-hindering government. It was a way of both encouraging one another to remain critical and supporting one another through adversity in creative ways.

      This example shows the importance of technology and social media not only within the classroom, but also in the real world in how events are interpreted and analyzed. This is a very crucial skill in teaching humanities related courses such as ELA and Social Studies. In particular, social media can encourage students to be more thoughtful about the origin and biases of a particular source.

    1. Teachers must have access to high-quality UbD curriculum materials. Weak or flawed examples convey the wrong idea of what UbD curriculum should look like, and teachers who use imperfect resources

      How do we ensure that all schools obtain high-quality UbD curriculum materials?

    2. This, too, is false. Indeed, the data from released national tests show conclusively that the students have the most difficulty with those items that require understanding and transfer, not recall or recognition.

      This can possibly be due to the mentality of "Teaching to the test" where teachers focus on having students memorize rather than analyze information to prepare them for standardized testing.

    3. Teaching for understanding requires that students be given numerous opportunities to draw inferences and make generaliza-tions for themselves (with teacher sup-port).

      This is why it is important for teachers to build relationships with students to discover what their individual interests are. This way, teachers can use those interests to infer on crucial points found within the lesson.

    4. Can explain concepts, principles, and processes by putting it their own words, teaching it to others, justifying their answers, and showing their reasoning.• Can interpret by making sense of data, text, and experience through images, analogies, stories, and models.• Can apply by effectively using and adapting what they know in new and complex contexts.• Demonstrate perspective by seeing the big picture and recognizing differ-ent points of view.• Display empathy by perceiving sensitively and walking in someone else’s shoes.• Have self-knowledge by showing meta-cognitive awareness, using productive habits of mind, and reflect-ing on the meaning of the learning and experience.

      These six facets are crucial for students to learn not only the facts related to a subject, but how to properly using analysis when learning and writing about the subject. This is especially crucial as technology has become more integrated into the classroom as well as the real world.

    5. Stage 1 focuses on “transfer of learning.” Essential companion questions are used to engage learners in thoughtful “meaning making” to help them develop and deepen their understanding of important ideas and processes that support such transfer.

      This helps encourage student engagement in the subject that you are teaching.

    6. o recognize that factual knowledge and skills are not taught for their own sake, but as a means to larger ends

      This is very important in helping students find interest not only in the course that you are teaching, but in learning altogether.

  4. Jun 2020
  5. May 2020
    1. A grade book to record student progress. Web pages or sites that allow you to present text, videos, or links to other sources.Assessment tools so students can submit their assignments, or take a quiz or an exam.Discussion forums that enable students to engage in conversations about class content with you and with one another.

      this also connects to the teaching presence since it resonds to how a teacher sets up the course and focusing on the assessment of student learning

  6. Apr 2020
    1. This is a great time to individualize instruction and have students work at different paces. You don’t want 100-120 papers coming at you all at one time. Spread it out, and it will keep you from getting short-tempered with your students.

      As the educational system operates today, many teachers easily put in 60 hours of work per week. But when you teach remotely, it sounds like work becomes much more manageable.

      Do I want to become a teacher? If I can teach like this I do—and no, not because it seems easier but because it seems easier AND more effective.

    2. For my literature students, my emphasis is helping them understand stories that come from cultures other than theirs. Are they able to see the humanity and connections across the stories? That’s essential. Whether they remember all of the characters and the authors—that’s not essential.

      My goodness! This woman deserves to be Teacher of the Year! She's teaching empathy too!

    3. For my more advanced students, they need to learn research skills: how to locate, evaluate, and use information. Online learning offers great opportunities for that, including with what’s going on in the news right now.

      ...how to function independently in the world too.

    4. Then there is the option of getting students to talk to each other online on discussion boards and videoconferences. Some students adapt to it quickly and like it. Some don’t, because it feels impersonal. You have to be patient with that and give them some time and space to adjust.

      Introverts v extroverts. Oil and water. They've always differed, always will. Maybe this virtual, personalized learning movement will finally allow introverts to stop feeling so defeated in the presence of extroverts who live so much more loudly than they do. Finally, they'll be able to live peacefully in their own mind, undisturbed by the stress of feelings like you need to be more extroverted to fit in.

      Btw: I'm not encouraging each party to distance themselves from each other all the time. What I am saying is that when value is trying to be distributed, distribute it however it'll best be received. Then, later, once teaching time is over, they can socialize in traditional ways... IF that's what they want to do.

    5. Rizga: How have you been translating this online?Moore: It depends on the student. Some students work very well asynchronously. They are very comfortable working alone on a draft; I make color-coded comments in a word document or their PDF, and then I send it back. Some students need me to explain things to them in person before I send them the comments; we’ll do a video or audio chat. Others need even more interaction: I’ll hook them up to a videoconference, and we’ll go through all the comments together. Some students I need to refer to a grammar-brushup program or a YouTube video on how to do some of the mechanical stuff like uploading papers online.

      Sounds like Mrs. Moore deserves a raise! This woman knows what's up! She represents the future while living in a community that (probably) latches on to tradition.

      Any of you big city school systems reading this? If you are, hire her. You can probably pay her less than what your other teachers are earning and still give her a bump in pay compared to what she's earning in Mississippi.

    6. The other big issue is that many of the teachers don’t have the skills to teach online.

      Sorry, but this begs the question...

      Should teachers who don't have the skills to teach online be teaching at all? If they can't, they're either not qualified for the job or they're unwilling to put in the effort required to learn.

    7. Then, you have to think about accessibility issues. How will my vision-impaired and deaf students access it? Have I put everything in print? Do I have to put in some audio? There are whole series of checks you have to do for different access issues.

      Sure, new problems will surface. But so will solutions. And hopefully, in the end, there will be fewer problems using the new approach than the old.

  7. Jan 2020
    1. 2. "Teach students to request permission when in doubt about the status of a particular work or the appropriateness of their use of that work." Students should understand that the materials they want to use are probably protected by copyright; that the creator owns copyrighted wor

      this should be handled in conjunction with an early research phase and having a back up plan.

    1. I didn’t know where the class was headed

      Another Reggio philosophy is understanding that to practice a Pedagogy of Listening and teaching into the intentions of our students makes us vulnerable and that we have to become more comfortable living with doubt and uncertainty. We participate in a process of Negotiated Learning that is child originated and teacher framed. This is an early childhood approach, and my background (K-4). Possibly adolescents can frame their own learning? Here is more info on Negotiated Learning.

    1. Based on economic and industrial theory,Peters proposed the following new categories (terminology) for the anal-ysis of distance education:

      Peter's theory/terminology/analysis

    2. Theory of Industrialization of Teaching

      another tag.

  8. Nov 2019
    1. To optimize learners' experience and the efficacy of learning outcomes, instructors need to consider how technology can offer approaches better suited to adult learning.

      This website from University of Arizona provides a list of trends and issues in learning technologies

      Rating 9/10

    1. Teaching and learning methods: opreparing for teaching ofacilitating the integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes oteaching and learning in groups ofacilitating learning and setting ground rules oexplaining ogroup dynamics omanaging the group olectures osmall group teaching methods and discussion techniques oseminars and tutorials ocomputer based teaching and learning – information technology and the World Wide Web ointroducing problem based learning ocase based learning and clinical scenarios

      this website is consisted of available resources.

      Rating: 9/10

  9. Oct 2019
    1. interesting story about how this guy, who did play football professionally, would like math teachers to take a few points from football coaches.

      good for the overall sentiment and the individual interest & inspiration

  10. Sep 2019
    1. A narrative weaves together otherwise isolated bits of information into a meaningful whole, linking them in important ways but also chunking the information so that it takes up less space in working memory and connects to existing threads in long-term memory
    2. students quite often reported choosing their major based on taking introductory courses with particularly dynamic professors.
    3. your enthusiasm as an instructor is indeed contagious and helps predict variables like student motivation in the course.
    4. make the entire course relevant to students’ daily lives. All of the labs center around chemicals and materials that students interact with regularly. For instance, they evaluate bottled water versus tap water, test both for pH, conductivity, and taste, and then debate why so many people choose bottled over tap
    5. You can also make class activities relevant to contemporary social movements, to future careers in your major, or to some transcendent purpose
    6. Jennifer Gonzalez, editor of the teaching blog Cult of Pedagogy, summed up the concept quite nicely in the title of a blog post: “To Learn, Students Need to DO Something.”
    1. essential goal for me in every course has always been to make students feel comfortable participating in class, and to encourage as many of them as possible to speak up. Peer instruction, aided by electronic polling, gave me an opportunity to invite quiet students to engage more actively in class, both through the polls and through the subsequent discussions
    1. When new knowledge is integrated with and connected to existing knowledge, that new knowledge is easier to understand and to remember. A professor’s job is to build scaffolding from existing knowledge on which to hang incoming new knowledge. Using a concept map is one way to build that scaffolding.
    1. When assignments are optional, compliance will vary and you risk exacerbating differences in study skills, background knowledge, and the like.

      I can't help but wonder if the emphasis on "content retention" and "compliance" that seems to be core to the authors' concept of learning doesn't make some bad assumptions: that learning is something that an instructor does to a student, and not something that students have agency over. This seems to me to be in extreme conflict with what might be even more inclusive practice: far less emphasis on the grade, more individual attention and greater emphasis on personal growth, less teacher control and more student agency. This is basic Freire stuff. Students aren't vessels to be filled.

    2. Reach out to those who didn’t do so well and express your willingness to help them. Check in with students who have missed a class or two.

      It's worth noting that none of this is easy or efficient. If it was, we'd all do it. One must make a concerted effort to ensure students feel like they belong and that they're supported so that they can learn best. If that's not part of an instructor's job, then what exactly is the instructor's job?

    3. minimize inequities

      minimize inequities = reduce harm; clear similarities to Hippocratic oath. See also Kaufman & Schipper (2018) Teaching With Compassion, p. xxiii

    4. Traditional teaching methods do not serve all students well.

      Emphasis on all. Frequently defensiveness kicks in when traditional teaching is called into question, because it does work, but just for some.

    1. One reason why the students assigned open textbooks may use those textbooks more is that they perceive a greater need for/relevance of their textbook relative to those assigned traditional textbooks

      The absence of the teacher here seems like an issue. To what extent may the students have come up with that perception on their own, or might they perceive it because the teacher told them about the work involved in vetting this particular textbook? What, if anything, did the traditional textbook teachers say?

      (Further down the paragraph it's made clear that the OERs were adapted to be more relevant, which I agree is part of the attraction of OERs and including that is fair. But I'd still like to know what the teachers said in class about it, if anything.)

    2. students taking classes in the classroom report significantly higher rates of underutilized textbooks than those taking classes online

      Seems to hint to me that on-campus students may be receiving (or perceiving) a superior level of instructor support (thereby making the textbook less relevant). Interesting responsibility for F2F faculty and interesting possible criticism of the level of instructor support provided to online students.

  11. Jul 2019
    1. focus is on the process of inquiry

      focuses on inquiry instead of the final product of research

    2. During Phase 3, students work both individually and in small groups at using strategies and skills from the previous phases to develop lines of inquiry around curricular topics. This type of project requires clear questions, multiple reliable sources, citations, and a final product that communicates that information to others.

      Phase 3 focuses on students independent thinking and collaborative thinking and builds on skills developed in previous phases. This phase requires that the students have defined questions, reliable resources, citations, and a final product that communicates their learning and research to others.

    3. Phase 2 is a collaborative phase during which both teachers and students conduct think-aloud demonstrations and minilessons. Teacher modeling in the beginning of the phase gives way to student modeling in the latter half. Students take responsibility for teaching their peers a variety of online reading comprehension strategies. Instruction also begins to move from search skills to critical evaluation and synthesis skills. (See a complete checklist of skills.)

      Phase 2: Essentially students and teachers initially have a thinking brainstorm session about the topic/theme. Teacher is the model in the start of this phase and then lets the student take the reigns. Students have responsibility for teaching their peers online reading comprehension strategies. Also moves into critical evaluation and synthesis skills.

    4. Phase 1 centers on computer basics, word processing skills, Web searching, navigation basics, and e-mail.

      phase 1; basics and introduction to internet skills, searching, etc.

    5. The gradual release of responsibility to students is central to both approaches

      reminds me of scaffolding; students are released into doing more and more of their own thinking one step at a time

    6. Internet reciprocal teaching, involves problem-based tasks in which readers create their own text. This provides students a path for navigating the Cs of change.

      definition of Internet Reciprocal Teaching

    7. In addition, the rise of the Internet means that teachers must shift how they teach reading and writing

      important to consider; the world is no longer simply paper and pen or type-writers. The literacy tools we have now are virtuously endless.

    8. Internet Reciprocal Teaching Promotes the Five Cs

      5 C's of Internet Reciprocal Thinking: Creativity, Communication, Collaboration, Critical Thinking, Comprehension

    1. Orientation Handbook

      Dear all, Please provide us with some feedback on the Orientation Session and this resource by leaving a few annotations for:

      • 1-2 things that you found interesting
      • 1-2 general remarks on any items discussed today
      • 1 question that you still need answered
      • any suggestions relating to the workshop and/ or the Handbook resource

      Thank you very much for your time! We look forward to working with you in the future! Joerdis (and the TC team)

    1. A passage from Oppenheimer’s book kept coming to mind: “For decades, we have taken people whom we hold responsible for the intellectual and moral development of our children, put them in chaotic, overcrowded institutions, robbed them of creative freedom and new opportunities for their own learning, imposed an ever-changing stream of rules and performance requirements that leave them exhausted and hopeless, and paid them about $40,000 a year.”
  12. May 2019
    1. The first thing I would show our players at our first meeting was how to take a little extra time putting on their shoes and socks properly.

      Things like this are easy to forget or better said, it's easy to assume basics like socks/shoes are universally well-performed. I was reminded of this: it's the last month of school and I'm teaching individuals how to "control-click" on a google search page to open promising web pages worthy of more detailed examination.

    2. it's the little details that make the big things come about.

      If excellence is your aim, such details--and they are countless in education--must be addressed in a thoughtful, systemic way.

    1. interesting story about how this guy, who did play football professionally, would like math teachers to take a few points from football coaches.

      good for the overall sentiment and the individual interest & inspiration

  13. Apr 2019
    1. We expect authentic writing from our students, yet we do not write authentic assignments for them.

      I'd like to understand this better. How much choice is required for an assignment to be "meaningful" or "authentic". I can't recall a single writing assignment when I didn't have some freedom to choose a topic (within the bounds of the class) - though there were certainly lots of formal constraints in the way I wrote.

    1. Hi I'm and Oberman and I'm from much Paladin State University of Denver and I'm using hypothesis currently in a course and so I teach social work.

      Ann starts speaking here about her experience teach with Hypothesis in the classroom. Close this sidebar and click on the text to advance the video to this point (53:29). Ann speaks for about 4 minutes. Worth watching till the end.

    1. This article is a breakdown from the U.S. Department of Education around the types of learning environments that exist in the technology arena. It provides examples of schools fulfilling these different environments and offers a collection fo additional resources.

      Rating: 9/10

  14. Mar 2019
    1. Behaviorism

      Learning-Theories.com published a very handy few pages that describe various learning theories. This is a quick, straightforward, simple way to access information on the different theories. This article, Behaviorism, explains that the theory assumes learners learn by responding to external stimuli in their environment. Learning under behaviorism is characterized by a change in the learner's behavior. I use this in my horse training as I use both positive reinforcement (clicker training) and negative reinforcement (pressure-release) to structure my horse's behaviors. Behaviorism can be translated to human work, too. I've used TAG teaching (clicker training for humans) to teach people to get on and off horses with ease and also to trim horses' hooves. I also use it to clicker train my cats! 6/10

    1. Overview of Learning Theories

      The Berkeley Graduate Division published an interesting and straightforward table of learning theories. The table compares behaviorism, cognitive constructivism, and social constructivism in four ways: the view of knowledge, view of learning, view of motivation, and implications for teaching. This is an easy-to-read, quick resource for those who would like a side-by-side comparison of common theories. 9/10

    1. 25 examples of mobile teaching This is a brief page that is cluttered with some irrelevant content that occurs in the form of rather large graphics. It is oriented toward higher education environments though the ideas would be quite easy to implement in other contexts, such as for training adult learners. The text is not in depth enough to be tremendously helpful but this resource does nonetheless make a contribution not made by other resources in that it shows actual teaching techniques. rating 4/5

    1. personalize learning infographic

      This is not quite what it sounds like. It is a Pinterest style page with links to assorted articles that relate to personalized learning, most of which are presented in an infographic. It is sufficiently useful if one has the patience to click through to the infographics. Usability is satisfactory although the top half of the page is taken up with graphics that are not directly related to the content. rating 3/5

    1. just in time teaching This article provides practice strategies by which one can use just in time teaching. This was authored for use in higher education environments but can easily be used in other settings. It appears to have practical use. rating 5/5

    1. mobile learning technologies for 21st century classrooms This undated article discusses mobile learning in classrooms in a nonspecific way. One of the sources is Marc Prensky, whose work has been called into question by multiple authors. The type of information provided by this article seems rather basic and a function of common sense. A few apps are discussed. rating 1/5

    1. Edutech wiki This page has a somewhat messy design and does not look very modern but it does offer overviews of many topics related to technologies. Just like wikipedia, it offers a good jumping off point on many topics. Navigation can occur by clicking through categories and drilling down to topics, which is easier for those who already know the topic they are looking for and how it is likely to be characterized. Rating 3/5

    1. This page offers general guidelines for facilitating class discussions. It is written for college environments and in usable in adult learning and training settings also. The presentation is straightforward but the content is not in depth. Part of the value of the page is links on the left side that address other teaching topics related to course design and course management. Rating 2/2

    1. teachthought This particular page is entitled '20 simple assessment strategies you can use every day' but the reason it is listed here is because the page itself serves as a jumping off point for reviewing or learning about many educational theories and principles. This site may have been designed for K-12 teachers - I am not sure, but it is quite usable for those who teach adults. This is a place to come if you are interested in browsing - not if you have a specific thing you need at the moment. Rating 3/5

  15. www.pblworks.org www.pblworks.org
    1. project based learning While project based learning is more frequently used with children than adults, it can be useful for limited-time instruction for adults. This is a user friendly page that provides a decent description of project based learning and also discusses the design elements and teaching practices that should be used. rating 4/5

    1. problem based learning This gives a brief overview of problem based learning. This is a teaching method in which learners receive an ill structured problem that they continue to define and then solve. This web page serves as an overview but if one were teaching with this approach, more information would be needed than is contained on the typical introductory web page. Rating 3/5

    1. This is better than the problem-based learning page I already posted so I will post this one too. it is easy to read and gives the instructional designer or teacher a quick and better-than-average explanation about problem based learning, which is a method of teaching in which learners form teams and learn through solving real problems. rating 4/5

    1. Nine alternatives to lecturing This page briefly describes nine ways to teach other than lecture. Some of these are common, such as case study; others, such as a pro and con grid, are explained less often. This page, like the others I have bookmarked, is oriented toward teaching college students and adults.

    1. This is one of many pages that describes team based learning. The layout and typeface make this page easy enough to read. The content is rather brief and would suffice for someone who is trying to understand this approach and decide whether it is workable for their own adult learning and training context.

  16. Feb 2019
    1. Motivating Learners

      Notes from Video -embracing change -hardcore gamers- surprising things that you find- kids are incredibly bottom-line oriented- want to be measured to see how much they are improving -"if i am not learning, then i am not having fun"- embracing change, leveling up, higher order tasks, or the game is changing -Questioning position helps students to embrace change -Compete with each other and collaborate each other -Start looking at other people online to help them to learn new things -kids that have been turned on to learning- there is no stopping them -passionate community interest group that students can join -learning has to do with learning how to join a group with a common interest -what you are doing becomes a platform for something new -trajectories through life pace as opposed to fixed points -power and importance of play- how to I take an idea and play with it to become something new -learn that not everything works- need to be willing to realize that instead of being afraid of things not working- we need to be willing to change what hasnt worked to make it work for us

    1. Encouraging students to reach out to each other to solve problems and share knowledge not only builds collaboration skills, it leads to deeper learning and understanding

      Students can help each other learn by collaborating their efforts. Each student can bring a certain strength to the group so that they can all work out problems together

    1. A primary goal of this research is to understand the relationships between two key domains: (a) teacher thought processes and knowledge and (b) teachers’ actions and their observable effects. The current work on the TPACK framework seeks to extend this tradition of research and scholarship by bringing technology integration into the kinds of knowledge that teachers need to consider when teaching

      How can teachers instruct using what they know about teaching, their content knowledge about a subject, and their knowledge about technology tools that will help them to gain full student understanding?

    2. Each situation presented to teachers is a unique combination of these three factors, and accordingly, there is no single technological solution that applies for every teacher, every course, or every view of teaching. Rather, solutions lie in the ability of a teacher to flexibly navigate the spaces defined by the three elements of content, pedagogy, and technology and the complex interactions among these elements in specific contexts

      Every teacher is student and every group of students are different. The way to use this information is to base it on how we teach the best and how our students learn the best. There is no "right" or "wrong" way but there are many different ways that work for different teachers and students

    3. As such, pedagogical knowledge requires an understanding of cognitive, social, and developmental theories of learning and how they apply to students in the classroom

      Theories help us relate what we are teaching to the learning abilities of our students. Every student learns in a different way so it is important to understand the ways that have worked in the past and relate them to our students now.

    4. Pedagogical knowledge (PK) is teachers’ deep knowledge about the processes and practices or methods of teaching and learning. They encompass, among other things, overall educational purposes, values, and aims. This generic form of knowledge applies to understanding how students learn, general classroom management skills, lesson planning, and student assessment

      This is what we learn in "teacher school". This is why we learn about many different ways of teaching and why the education system is set up the way that it is. Pedagogy is probably the most important aspect of lesson planning because it shows that we have an understanding of not only making content interesting to our students but managing behavior and assessing if they understand the information, all at the same time.

    5. Equally important to the model are the interactions between and among these bodies of knowledge, represented as PCK, TCK (technological content knowledge), TPK (technological pedagogicalknowledge), and TPACK

      The interaction of all three areas is important because it will help us to understand technology when it comes to lesson planning and content knowledge. Knowing what types of technology to use based on our pedagogical methods and the content that we are teaching our students will help us to implement them to ensure full understanding from our students.

    6. There is no “one best way” to integrate technology into curriculum. Rather, integration efforts should be creatively designed or structured for particular subject matter ideas in specific classroom contexts

      We should find ways to incorporate technology based on the content that we are teaching, the students' abilities in our classes, and our understanding of the technology that we are using. If we don't understand a certain technology or it doesn't relate to what we are teaching or the technology is too advanced for our students then incorporating the technology will be unuseful in our lessons.

    7. Understanding how these affordances and constraints of specific technologies influence what teachers do in their classrooms is not straightforward and may require rethinking teacher education and teacher professional development

      We must continue to learn new information and about new technologies so that we can better teach our students. Professional development can help us to understand the problems that can arise when using technology so that we can easily work through them when they do happen.

    8. By their very nature, newer digital technologies, which are protean, unstable, and opaque, present new challenges to teachers who are struggling to use more technology in their teaching

      How do we incorporate new technology into our teaching? What are ways in which these new technology features can be used in other ways than instruction? There has to be some place that we can use the new technology that will be beneficial to our students.

    9. Teaching with technology is complicated further considering the challenges newer technologies present to teachers. In our work, the word technology applies equally to analog and digital, as well as new and old, technologies

      We must always be prepared to learn about new information or new technology so that we can plan lessons around them. New technology and information will always come about so we must be ready when things do change (which is often).

    10. Teachers practice their craft in highly complex, dynamic classroom contexts (Leinhardt & Greeno, 1986) that require them constantly to shift and evolve their understanding

      As teachers, we must be able to think on the fly and change the direction of the lesson if students are not understanding the information we are teaching them. When we lesson plan, we try to make sure that all the students in our class are learning the information. Sometimes it doesn't work out as planned, so we have to be ready for any type of mishap or misunderstanding.

    1. It’s about the student and his or her feelings and thoughts, though often articulated clumsily and from an as yet unthought through position.

      The advice to separate self from role is good... but let's think about this as a reaction to the student above who says they feel like the instructor doesn't allow equal opportunities to contribute in the class. Sometimes, despite all best efforts, the faculty member may be wrong, and deep listening and learning has to allow for that possibility. Don't take it personally, but model the kind of leadership which recognizes the need for personal change.

    2. For example, when discussing how women’s remarks are often ignored in business settings, the class or the instructor may be ignoring the remarks of women in the class. Seeing this and talking about it in the moment can enhance people’s understanding of the issue.

      True, but how does this interact with the power differential in the classroom? Can students really be expected to productively call out faculty members' biased behavior? It seems like an option not discussed in this paper is finding external facilitators to help navigate some of these issues.

    1. Sponsorship of Youth Interests

      It is important to get on our students levels when we are teaching them information. We need to find out what their favorite things are and try to base our lesson plans on incorporating what they like along with the curriculum that we need to teach them.

    2. Connected learning does not rely on a single technology or technique. Rather, it is fostered over time through a combination of supports for developing interests, relationships, skills, and a sense of purpose.

      When we start off the year using different teaching methods and establishing healthy relationships with our students, we can help them to grow immensely in the small amount of time that we know them.

    1. 1) develop more educators, advocates, and community leaders who can leverage and advance the web as an open and public resource, and 2) impact policies and practices to ensure the web remains a healthy open and public resource for all.

      Teaching people how to use the internet safely can allow for the internet to continue to be a place that helps someone obtain information, communicate with others, and express their knowledge to others. Providing a safe environmet for people to do these things is important for successful internet usage.

    1. rigid adherence to rules does not guarantee favorable response and that deviating from rules often produces wonderful results

      I don't know about anyone else, but part of my personal pedagogical imperative is teaching the 'rules' just so students know how and when to break them well. "Look. Here's what's expected. Now that we're on the same page, let's burn it, shall we?"

  17. Jan 2019
    1. Beware lest ye contend with anyone, nay, strive to make him aware of the truth with kindly manner and most convincing exhortation. If your hearer respond, he will have responded to his own behoof, and if not, turn ye away from him, and set your faces towards God’s sacred Court, the seat of resplendent holiness.
    1. Teaching classes

      This article gives several good tips to teaching for the first time, but each teacher will need to find their own teaching persona, and through trial and error they will learn what works best for them.

    1. grading final papers

      Grading final papers isn't the best time to provide a lot of qualitative feedback because student's aren't likely to read or use it. Formative feedback should be given early in the term.

    1. check in with your students; extend availabilities to meet; offer feedback, and follow up

      These four actions can do a lot to make students feel seen and connected.

    1. Thoughts on bringing current events into your classroom.

      A conversation between a PhD student and a professor of African American studies about how to discuss current events in difficult times.

    1. creating a “humanities lab”,

      I like this idea of creating a lab for problem-based learning in humanities classes. What other STEM-related practices could humanities borrow?

    1. But these tools require we think about their purpose, method, and audience just as carefully as when we design an essay prompt, a problem set, or any other assessment exercise.

      This is an example of when meta-teaching is helpful.

    1. Our discussion made the classroom feel like it was not the professor’s class to run alone, but ours as well.

      What a great example of setting the tone on the first day of class!

    1. Inevitably, what I find reaffirms aspects of writing pedagogy I’m familiar with while giving me fresh ways to express it to the new audiences with whom I’m working.

      Teaching writing in STEM disciplines is beneficial for the students and the teacher.

    1. On bringing lessons from dissertation writing into your classroom.

      What one PhD student learned about teaching from writing his dissertation.

    1. For graduate teaching assistants, this is the time when we introduce ourselves, lay out our expectations, and, hopefully, establish the tone and level of authority that we want to convey throughout the term.

      Good advice for the first day back to school for anyone looking for new ideas.

    1. More forcefully than in any other single class, I realized the importance of universal design for learning (UDL). This curricular design features privilege multiple access points for learning, engagement, and assessment. As Dr. Jennifer Stone puts it, “designing on the front end” with UDL minimizes the need for individual learners to make a special request.

      The incorporation of UDL practices is important for all students.

    1. Regardless of your discipline, there’s a good chance that at some point you will be responsible for teaching or grading writing in some shape or form.

      This is an important point that a lot of people in fields outside of the liberal arts don't realize. Writing happens in all disciplines.

    1. graduate teaching assistants making up almost another 13 percent

      Graduate teaching assistants are filling nearly 15% of all teaching positions in higher ed. What are the consequences for undergrads?

    1. When I received Chris’s comment, my first response was that I should delete my post or at least the incorrect part of it. It’s embarrassing to have your incorrect understandings available for public view. But I decided to leave the post as is but put in a disclaimer so that others would not be misled by my misunderstandings. This experience reminded me that learning makes us vulnerable. Admitting that you don’t know something is hard and being corrected is even harder. Chris was incredibly gentle in his correction. It makes me think about how I respond to my students’ work. Am I as gentle with their work as Chris was to mine? Could I be more gentle? How often have I graded my students’ work and only focused on what they did wrong? Or forgotten that feeling of vulnerability when you don’t know something, when you put your work out for others to judge? This experience has also reminded me that it’s important that we as teachers regularly put ourselves into situations in which we authentically grapple with not knowing something. We should regularly share our less than fully formed understandings with others for feedback. It helps us remember that even confident learners can struggle with being vulnerable. And we need to keep in mind that many of our students are not confident learners.

      I'm reminded here of the broad idea that many bloggers write about sooner or later of their website being a "thought space" or place to contemplate out in the open. More often than not, even if they don't have an audience to interact with, their writings become a way of thinking out loud, clarifying things for themselves, self-evolving, or putting themselves out there for potential public reactions (good, bad, or indifferent).

      While writing things out loud to no audience can be helpful and useful on an individua