15 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2022
    1. hard work is magically done for you!

      Haha, it can totally be like that. My garden demonstrates it.

      But over time I've gotten another impression as well: over time, things do get done -- in some shape or form. It usually happens after I end up again in some node which I'd forgotten, but which feels relevant at the time. Reinforcement and all.

      So in a way you could say I believe in magic: some of what I intend to do will eventually be done by some versions of me -- at least in the [[multiverse]] ;)

    1. main principles that I apply from GTD:Capture everything that is relevant: what I’ve explained above and also the mindmap that I always carry around with meReview the notes a first time and decide what is actionable2 minute rule: if it takes less that 2 minutes, do it immediately; otherwise, delegate what can be (see Management 3.0 delegation guidelines)Put reminders for important tasks / tasks where there’s a strict deadlineReview the backlog regularly enough to update/prioritize and decide what to do nextJUST DO IT

      main principles of modified GTD

    1. About the same time I came across the PARA Method which works well with a GTD system to provide some structure and management around your filing system. Within the first book of GTD the filing system is referenced as a store that needs reviewing every so often for cleaning it out, with PARA it splits the mass into “Areas” and “Projects' much like GTD, and assigns the useful information storage to “Resources”.

      How PARA relates to GTD. It provides structure and management to one's filing system.

  2. Mar 2022
  3. Feb 2022
    1. Zeigarnik effect: Open tasks tend to occupy our short-term memory –until they are done. That is why we get so easily distracted bythoughts of unfinished tasks, regardless of their importance. Butthanks to Zeigarnik’s follow-up research, we also know that we don’tactually have to finish tasks to convince our brains to stop thinkingabout them. All we have to do is to write them down in a way thatconvinces us that it will be taken care of.

      The Zeigarnik effect is the idea that open or pending tasks tend to occupy our short-term memory until they are done or our brain is otherwise convinced that they're "finished". This is why note taking can be valuable. By writing down small things, we can free up our short-term or working memories to focus or work on other potentially more important tasks. It is named for Soviet psychologist Bluma Zeigarnik.

      The Zeigarnik effect is some of the value behind David Allen's "Getting Things Done" system. Writing down to do lists tricks our mind into freeing up space from things we need to take care of. If they're really important, we've got a list and can then take care of them. Meanwhile our working memories are freed up for other tasks.

    1. The Workflow: How to Use the Zettelkasten Method

      The entire basis and process of the Zettelkasten method. - Capture - Elaborate - Connect

  4. Aug 2021
    1. The Zeigarnik effect should not be confused with the Ovsiankina effect. Maria Ovsiankina, a colleague of Zeigarnik, investigated the effect of task interruption on the tendency to resume the task at the next opportunity.
  5. Jul 2021
  6. Jun 2019
    1. Recent cognitive science research shows that the number of things you can mentally prioritize, manage, retain, and recall is . . . (hold on) . . . four! If you park any more than that in your head, you will sub-optimize your cognitive functioning. You will be driven by whatever is latest and loudest—rather than by strategy, intuition, or objective assessment.
  7. Jan 2017
  8. Dec 2016
    1. use Evernote as a frictionless GTD list application

      How to use Evernote with the Getting Things Done system.

  9. Nov 2016
  10. Jan 2016