130 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2024
    1. Thoreau also said that we will be “rich in proportion to the numberof things which we can afford to let alone.”

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  2. Jan 2024
    1. what kind of character type might he fit?

      Krishna is the incarnation of Vishnu. He's supposed to be the embodiment of a godlike character and hold many powerful qualities. He has many different character types he portrays in this story and is extremely accomplished. He urges the reader in a way to think about reincarnation which is obviously a big part of his character. "The place of the infinite spirit" (line 851) Krishna fits a representation of love, duty, honor and self control. Learning what type of character type Krishna is this early on is important to keep in mind as the story is read. If the reader doesn't understand the true depth of his character the story may not be as powerful. He shows many attributes of a fully developed character that knows the true power of who they are. In HIndu culture, a character like Krishna is all powerful but also shows a variety of character traits that make him a very admirable character.

    1. It would seem like a zettelkasten joke, but Cahall has an index entry on "singular focus", yet it has two entries in disparate places in his zk. [14:02]

      🤣

    1. Shanks saves Luffy from a sea beast. He shows complete mastery over his mind. First, he saves Luffy without any regard to his arm that is bitten off. Second, he directs and focuses his attention and anger at the sea beast. His anger is focused and redirected.

      "It's only an arm. It's no big deal" says Shanks

      One Piece Ep 4.

  3. Dec 2023
    1. at the Cascade Institute based on partly because of work that I've been doing for uh now almost 20 years looking at the implications of converging crises uh we have really focused on the 00:09:07 relationships between between all these different challenges that humanity is facing what are the Deep connections between them
      • for: Cascade Institute - research focus

      • Cascade institute - research focus

        • looking at the deep connections between converging crisis
    1. Whatever one thinks of Sultan Al Jaber, one statement he’s made repeatedly makes perfect sense: “We cannot unplug the world from the current energy system before we build a new energy system.” The focus, then, has to shift.
      • for: quote - Sultan Al Jabber, quote - energy replacement instead of phase out, key point - focus on energy transition instead of just fossil fuel phase out

      • quote

        • Whatever one thinks of Sultan Al Jaber, one statement he’s made repeatedly makes perfect sense: “We cannot unplug the world from the current energy system before we build a new energy system.”
        • The focus, then, has to shift.
          • Instead of focusing on dismantling the incumbent system,
          • we need to focus on accelerating the deployment of the new system that will replace it
      • author: Nafeez Ahmed
      • date : Dec 6, 2023

      • key point

        • we must focus on the energy shift instead of just the phase out or down of the old energy system
  4. Nov 2023
      • for: BEing journey - adapt to, DH, Deep Humanity

      • comment

        • Potentiality coupled with limitations - Daseitz Suzuki and the elbow does not bend backwards.
        • The experience of the unnamable quality present in every moment - infinite potentiality
        • The mundane is the extraordinary. Even when we name it and discover it in all our scientific discoveries and articulate it, and mass produce technologies with it, is is still miraculous
      • adjacency

        • Nora Bateson's book Combining and the Douglas Rushkoff podcast interview
        • potentiality
      • adjacency statement
        • both are alluding to the pure potentiality latent in the moment
        • language can be contextualized as an unfolding of the space of potentiality to a specific trajectory. Each word added to the previous one to form a sentence is a choice in an infinite, abstract space of symbols that communicates intentionality and is designed to focus the attention of the listener to one very narrow aspect of the enormous field of infinite potentiality
    1. I like that she's explicit about not migrating over all of one's highlights and annotations after the fact. Few people focus on this piece which is highly important and many beginners fall trap to thinking that they need to write down, save, and link everything.


      What if the initial exercise of making the fleeting note was enough to have a baseline knowledge of a thing that really isn't going to be used again? Save the time and effort for the really important ideas. Build these.

      An annotation like 2+2=4 is useful in 2nd grade and will be remembered/used for your lifetime. It's so ubiquitously commonplace that it doesn't need to be commonplaced into your zettelkasten. Similarly for basic ideas that anyone in a particular sub-field will already know. Delve deeper for building true insights.

      This is related to the idea of collector's fallacy, but is subtly different from the usual framing. It has to do with focus against the commonplace.

  5. Oct 2023
    1. Also, in the 15th century, Sufi monasteries in Yemen employed coffee as an aid to concentration during prayers.[1]

      Sufis, coffee as aid for focus during prayer

  6. Sep 2023
    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vww7JLcrJl4

      8:05 - 16:20 GTD - Capture - Clarify - What is it? - Is it actionable? What is the action? - Is it a project? - Batching - Reflect - Review over lists/calendars daily/weekly - Engage


      17:30 They use the phrase "atomic" paper based index cards, so they've been infected by the idea of "atomic notes" from somewhere, though it seems as if he's pitching that he's "invented" his card system as if from scratch.


      19:45 He mentions potentially using both sides of the card, against the usual (long term) advice.

      20:00 Analogizes his cards as ballerinas which work together, but each have their own personalities and function within the ballet

      He's using a leather cover for Moleskine pocket notebook and Manufactum A7 index cards, as well as a box

      Sections of his box: - to erase - inbox - next actions - projects (3 categories of projects) - someday - to delegate - tickler (by month and by day; 12 months and 31 days) - blank cards

      Mentions erasing cards as he finishes them rather than archiving them.

      Inspiration by How to Take Smart Notes by Ahrens

      Recommends one item per card to make things easier and more actionable; also improves focus versus having a longer list. (28:00)

      Portability

      Sustainable (he erases)

      High quality textile experience

      The ability to shift between associative modes and sequential modes seems to work well with such a system.

      They distinguish between atomic notes and "stellar" notes. Stellar being longer lists or more dense notes/outlines/etc.

      Project cards<br /> titles and project numbers (for reference) Project numbers in the top right with a P and/or M below it for<br /> - P for paper<br /> - M for email data<br /> - D for digital files which helps him find reference materials

      Weekly review with all cards out on the table

      Expansion pack includes: - action - calendar - waiting

      Search was quick and easy, but had to carry his box back and forth to work.

      Stopping doing it because he was losing the history (by erasing it). Moving to notebook and he likes fountain pens. He likes the calendar portion in his notebook.

      He tried it out for the sake of experiment.

      In the paper world things are more present and "in your face" versus digital formats where things can disappear.

  7. Aug 2023
  8. Jul 2023
    1. You can tell people just like I have you to focus their attention, choose a target. Imagine there's a spotlight shining just on it. Don't pay much attention to what's in your periphery almost as if you have like blinders on, right? So don't pay attention to those distractors. People can do that. We have them talk to us about like, well, what is it that you're focused on? What's catching your attention right now? Those are easy instructions to understand and it's easy to make your eyes do it. What's important though is that that's not what their eyes do naturally. When they're walking or when they're running, people do take a sort of wider perspective. They broaden their scope of attention relative to what these instructions are having them do. And when we taught people that narrowed style of attention, what we found is that they moved 23% faster in this course that we had set up. From the start line to the finish line, it was always exactly the same distance. And we were using our stop watches to see how fast did they move. They moved 23% faster and they said it hurt 17% less. Right? So exactly the same actual experience, but subjectively it was easier and they performed better. They increase the efficiency of this particular exercise.

      (24:58) In order to perform significantly better, you need to FOCUS your attention on a single thing only. Multitasking won't work, and thinking about different things at once also doesn't work. Set up your environment to foster this insane level of focus.

    1. For any action, habit, and belief you have, ask yourself: "Does this help toward my goals and future self or not?", if the answer is no, it is a distraction and part of the 80% you need to let go in order to reach 10X

      Your future self and 10X (or 100X) vision and goals serve as a massive filter for action and belief.

      Note: You should not 10X everything! Just 3 priorities.

    2. What is the game you want to play? What is the game you could play? What is a game you could go all in on and succeed at and be really good at?

      This defines your pathways and strategies within your 20%

      The path can change and adjust over time.

    3. Hope = 1. Clear and Committed Goal 2. Agency Thinking 3. Pathways Thinking

      This turns into definite optimism.

    4. To achieve goals, raise the floor, FOCUS on removing bottlenecks. Also create constraints by Schwerpunkt (primary objective), contrary to common wisdom, constraint actually gives freedom, it prevents analysis paralysis.

  9. Jun 2023
    1. (14:20-19:00) Dopamine Prediction Error is explained by Andrew Huberman in the following way: When we anticipate something exciting dopamine levels rise and rise, but when we fail it drops below baseline, decreasing motivation and drive immensely, sometimes even causing us to get sad. However, when we succeed, dopamine rises even higher, increasing our drive and motivation significantly... This is the idea that successes build upon each other, and why celebrating the "marginal gains" is a very powerful tool to build momentum and actually make progress. Surprise increases this effect even more: big dopamine hit, when you don't anticipate it.

      Social Media algorithms make heavy use of this principle, therefore enslaving its user, in particular infinite scrolling platforms such as TikTok... Your dopamine levels rise as you're looking for that one thing you like, but it drops because you don't always have that one golden nugget. Then it rises once in a while when you find it. This contrast creates an illusion of enjoyment and traps the user in an infinite search of great content, especially when it's shortform. It makes you waste time so effectively. This is related to getting the success mindset of preferring delayed gratification over instant gratification.


      It would be useful to reflect and introspect on your dopaminic baseline, and see what actually increases and decreases your dopamine, in addition to whether or not these things help to achieve your ambitions. As a high dopaminic baseline (which means your dopamine circuit is getting used to high hits from things as playing games, watching shortform content, watching porn) decreases your ability to focus for long amounts of time (attention span), and by extent your ability to learn and eventually reach success. Studying and learning can actually be fun, if your dopamine levels are managed properly, meaning you don't often engage in very high-dopamine emitting activities. You want your brain to be used to the low amounts of dopamine that studying gives. A framework to help with this reflection would be Kolb's.

      A short-term dopamine reset is to not use the tool or device for about half an hour to an hour (or do NSDR). However, this is not a long-term solution.

    2. Huberman states that doing these 4 things consistently and regularly, as a habit, might seem to take time, therefore decreasing performance. BUT, in reality they increase performance, as these things improve your health, focus, and awareness significantly.

      Therefore they are so-called Performance Enablers

    3. The 4 (behavioral) keypoints for great physical and mental as well as cognitive health:

      One) (2:00-4:05) View sunlight early in the day. The light needs to reach the eyes--increasing alertness, mood, and focus, through certain receptors. Also increases sleep quality at night, according to Huberman. Ideally five to ten minutes on a clear day, and ten to twenty minutes on an overcast day. No sunglasses, and certainly not through windows and windshields. If no sun is out yet, use artificial bright light. Do this daily.

      Two) (4:05-6:10) Do physical exercise each and every day. Doesn't have to be super intense. Huberman recommends zone two cardiovascular exercise. Walking very fast, running, cycling, rowing, swimming are examples. He says to get at least between 150 and 200 minutes of this exercise per week. Some resistance training as well for longevity and wellbeing, increases metabolism as well. Do this at least every other day, according to Huberman. Huberman alternates each day between cardiovascular exercise and resistance training.

      Three) (6:20-9:10) People should have access to a rapid de-stress protocol or tools. This should be able to do quickly and instantly, without friction. You can just do one breath for destress. ( Deep long breath through nose, one quick breath in nose to completely fill the longs, and then breathe out through mouth long.)

      Four) (9:12-14:00) To have a deliberate rewiring nervous system protocol to use. A thing that can be done is NSDR (Non-Sleep Deep Rest protocol), this is specifically to increase energy.

      Ideally the NSDR should be done after each learning session as well to imitate deep sleep (REM) and therefore accelerate neuroplasticity and thus rewire the nervous system; increasing the strength of connections between neurons and therefore increase retention significantly.

      NSDR is also a process of autonomity and control, it allows one to find that they are in control of their body and brain. It makes one realize that external factors don't necessarily have influence. According to Huberman, NSDR even replenishes dopamine when it is depleted, making it also suitable for increasing motivation.

    1. Deep focus is possible. Take care of the base (the body): • Nutrition • Sleep • Exercise Then train your focus by observing the mind. It gets easily distracted. You can be aware of this. And suddenly you are in flow, without the 'You' being there.

      Test Twitter Two

    1. Focus is a muscle. Start with 4 sets of 20 minutes. Rest between sets. Progressive overload still applies to mental lifting. When you get stronger, add more weight. Increase to 4 sets of 45 minutes. Train your focus to hit your ideal financial physique in record time.

      Test Twitter Annotation

  10. Mar 2023
    1. The state of current technology greatly impacts our ability to manipulate information, which in turn exerts influence on our ability to develop new ideas and technologies. Tools designed to enable networked thinking are a step in the direction of Douglas Engelbart’s vision of augmenting the human intellect, resulting in “more-rapid comprehension, better comprehension, the possibility of gaining a useful degree of comprehension in a situation that previously was too complex, speedier solutions, better solutions, and the possibility of finding solutions to problems that before seemed insolvable.”

      There's a danger to using digital tools to help with Higher Order Thinking; namely, it offloads precious cognitive load, optimized intrinsic load, which is used to build schemas and structural knowledge which is essential for mastery. Another danger is that digital tools often make falling for the collector's fallacy easier, meaning that you horde and horde information, which makes you think you have knowledge, while in fact, you simply have (maybe related) information, not mastery. The analog way prevents this, as it forces you to carefully evaluate the value of an idea and decide whether or not it's worth it to spend time on writing it and integrating it into a line of thought. Evaluation/Analysis is forced in an analog networked thinking tool, which is a form of Higher Order Learning/Thinking, as they are in the higher orders of Bloom's Taxonomy/Hierarchy.

      This is also true for AI. Always carefully evaluate whether or not a tool is worth using, like a farmer. (Deep Work, Cal Newport).

      Instead, use a tool like mindmapping, the GRINDE way, which is digital, for learning... Or the Antinet Zettelkasten by Scott Scheper, which is analog, for research.

    1. Zo wordt erop gewezen dat wij een zeer beperkt werkgeheugen hebben, het belang van aandacht, en dat “multitasking” (eigenlijk schakelen tussen taken) door leerlingen interfereert met aandachtig luisteren en het functioneren van het werkgeheugen. Andere uitkomsten zijn dat ook kinderen die zelf niet bezig zijn met mobieltje of laptop last hebben van klasgenoten die dat wel doen (trekt de aandacht). Een verschijnsel dat vergelijkbaar is met gedwongen meeroken.
  11. Feb 2023
    1. “I only dowhat is easy. I only write when I immediately know how to do it. If Ifalter for a moment, I put the matter aside and do something else.”(Luhmann et al., 1987, 154f.)[4]

      https://youtu.be/qRSCKSPMuDc?t=37m30s (all links are on takesmartnotes.com)<br /> Luhmann, Niklas, Dirk Baecker, and Georg Stanitzek. 1987. Archimedes und wir: Interviews. Berlin: Merve.

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  12. Jan 2023
    1. It’s far more complicated than that, obviously. Different parts of this process are going on all the time. While working on one chapter, I’m also capturing and working on unrelated—for the time being at least—notes on other topics that interest me, including stuff that might well end up in future books.

      Because reading, annotating/note taking, and occasional outlining and writing can be broken down into small, concrete building blocks, each part of the process can be done separately and discretely with relatively easy ability to shift from one part of the process to another.

      Importantly, one can be working on multiple different high level projects (content production: writing, audio, video, etc.) simultaneously in a way which doesn't break the flow of one's immediate reading. While a particular note within a piece may not come to fruition within a current imagined project, it may spark an idea for a future as yet unimagined project.


      Aside: It would seem that Ryan Holiday's descriptions of his process are discrete with respect to each individual project. He's never mentioned using or reusing notes from past projects for current or future projects. He's even gone to the level that he creates custom note cards for his current project which have a title pre-printed on them.

      Does this pre-titling help to provide him with more singular focus for his specific workflow? Some who may be prone to being side-tracked or with specific ADHD issues may need or be helped by these visual and workflow cues to stay on task, and as a result be helped by them. For others it may hinder their workflows and creativity.

      This process may be different for beginning students or single project writers versus career writers (academics, journalists, fiction and non-fiction writers).


      As a concrete example of the above, I personally made a note here about Darwin and Lamarck for a separate interest in evolution which falls outside of my immediate area of interest with respect to note taking and writing output.

  13. Dec 2022
    1. Monastic and bimodal modes are rather reserved for professions that can manage work without intensive communication with people, like writers, scientists, researchers, etc. Journalist mode fits best to people that are experienced with deep work and can easily switch into that state. From my experience, the best option to start with deep work is the rhythmic mode.

      Advices around 4 different deep work modes

    2. As far as deep work is concerned, it can be performed in four different modes:

      4 different modes of deep work (see below)

  14. Nov 2022
  15. Aug 2022
  16. Jul 2022
    1. Newton’s discovery of the differing refrangibility of colors indicated to him how telescope lenseswould always produce ill-focused images because of chromatic aberration. In order to avoid the use oflarge lenses, he devised the reflecting telescope

      Because light of different colors refracts at different angles, attempting to focus light using curved lenses will cause the focus point of each to be slightly different and thus not focus in total.

      This chromatic aberration means that one cannot build large functional refracting telescopes.

      As a result of this discovery about chromatic aberration in optics, Isaac Newton built reflecting telescopes instead. A large mirror collects the light and reflects it through a very thin lens, which doesn't accentuate refraction the way very large and thick lenses would have in a refracting telescope.

  17. Jun 2022
    1. UsingPARA is not just about creating a bunch of folders to put things in. Itis about identifying the structure of your work and life—what you arecommitted to, what you want to change, and where you want to go.

      Using the P.A.R.A. method puts incredible focus on immediate projects and productivity toward them. This is a dramatically different focus from the zettelkasten method.

      The why's of the systems are dramatically different as well.

    1. pathways examined here addressed a nexus with six foci of analysis, which were chosen to represent important nature-related challenges to sustainable development and to reflect the underlying bodies of literature (e.g. food production is split between the land and the oceans). These six were considered separately while attending to interdependencies: ● Feeding humanity without deteriorating nature on land; ● Meeting climate goals while maintaining nature and nature's contributions to people; ● Conserving and restoring nature on land while contributing positively to human well-being; ● Maintaining freshwater for nature and humanity; ● Balancing food provision from oceans and coasts with nature protection; and ● Resourcing growing cities while maintaining the nature that underpins them.

      six focus areas of nexus analysis

  18. May 2022
    1. The focus event does not bubble in Internet Explorer. Therefore, scripts that rely on event delegation with the focus event will not work consistently across browsers. As of version 1.4.2, however, jQuery works around this limitation by mapping focus to the focusin event in its event delegation methods, .live() and .delegate().
  19. Apr 2022
    1. Since most of our feeds rely on either machine algorithms or human curation, there is very little control over what we actually want to see.

      While algorithmic feeds and "artificial intelligences" might control large swaths of what we see in our passive acquisition modes, we can and certainly should spend more of our time in active search modes which don't employ these tools or methods.

      How might we better blend our passive and active modes of search and discovery while still having and maintaining the value of serendipity in our workflows?

      Consider the loss of library stacks in our research workflows? We've lost some of the serendipity of seeing the book titles on the shelf that are adjacent to the one we're looking for. What about the books just above and below it? How do we replicate that sort of serendipity into our digital world?

      How do we help prevent the shiny object syndrome? How can stay on task rather than move onto the next pretty thing or topic presented to us by an algorithmic feed so that we can accomplish the task we set out to do? Certainly bookmarking a thing or a topic for later follow up can be useful so we don't go too far afield, but what other methods might we use? How can we optimize our random walks through life and a sea of information to tie disparate parts of everything together? Do we need to only rely on doing it as a broader species? Can smaller subgroups accomplish this if carefully planned or is exploring the problem space only possible at mass scale? And even then we may be under shooting the goal by an order of magnitude (or ten)?

    1. Reviewing The Original of Laura, Alexander Theroux describes the cards as a “portable strategy that allowed [Nabokov] to compose in the car while his wife drove the devoted lepidopterist on butterfly expeditions.”

      While note cards have a certain portability about them for writing almost anywhere, aren't notebooks just as easily portable? In fact, with a notebook, one doesn't need to worry about spilling and unordering the entire enterprise.

      There are, however, other benefits. By using small atomic pieces on note cards, one can be far more focused on the idea and words immediately at hand. It's also far easier in a creative and editorial process to move pieces around experimentally.

      Similarly, when facing Hemmingway's White Bull, the size and space of an index card is fall smaller. This may have the effect that Twitter's short status updates have for writers who aren't faced with the seemingly insurmountable burden of writing a long blog post or essay in other software. They can write 280 characters and stop. Of if they feel motivated, they can continue on by adding to the prior parts of a growing thread. Sadly, Twitter doesn't allow either editing or rearrangements, so the endeavor and analogy are lost beyond here.

  20. Feb 2022
    1. his suggests that successful problem solvingmay be a function of flexible strategy application in relation to taskdemands.” (Vartanian 2009, 57)

      Successful problem solving requires having the ability to adaptively and flexibly focus one's attention with respect to the demands of the work. Having a toolbelt of potential methods and combinatorially working through them can be incredibly helpful and we too often forget to explicitly think about doing or how to do that.

      This is particularly important in mathematics where students forget to look over at their toolbox of methods. What are the different means of proof? Some mathematicians will use direct proof during the day and indirect forms of proof at night. Look for examples and counter-examples. Why not look at a problem from disparate areas of mathematical thought? If topology isn't revealing any results, why not look at an algebraic or combinatoric approach?

      How can you put a problem into a different context and leverage that to your benefit?

  21. Jan 2022
    1. I went to Portland, Oregon, to interview Prof Joel Nigg, who is one of the leading experts in the world on children’s attention problems, and he told me we need to ask if we are now developing “an attentional pathogenic culture” – an environment in which sustained and deep focus is harder for all of us.

      : attentional pathogenic culture ; an environment in which sustained and deep focus is harder for all of us

  22. Dec 2021
    1. “focus mode,”

      The idea of a "focus mode" or "distraction free mode" is exactly the wrong framing for writing. You don't want to focus on the nothing and emptiness of a page or a screen. You want to start by focusing on an idea and preferably many ideas. Do this first and then proceed from there.

  23. Sep 2021
    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gJ7CyM1Zrqc

      An interesting experiment to change one's schedule this way.

      I feel like I've seen a working schedule infographic of famous writers, artists, etc. and their sample work schedules before. This could certainly fit into that.

      One thing is certain thought, that the time of waking up is probably more a function of the individual person. How you spend your time is another consideration.

      “Without great solitude, no serious work is possible.” ― Picasso

      “Everybody has the same energy potential. The average person wastes his in a dozen little ways. I bring mine to bear on one thing only: my paintings, and everything else is sacrificed to it...myself included.” ― Picasso

      Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up. —Picasso

      see also: https://quoteinvestigator.com/2015/03/07/child-art/

    1. https://nesslabs.com/eisenhower-matrix

      The Eisnehower matrix is a means of helping one to implement the Pareto principle.

      Seen this basic idea so many times before and have it generally implemented in the bullet journal portion of my digital commonplace book. I should spend more time gardening in there regularly though.

    1. A recent review of the evidence finds that when students are cognitively overloaded, they disengage more often, perform badly and learn less. You can help students stay focused by making your presentations less cognitively overloaded. So, shorten slides, reduce text, use diagrams, remove irrelevant images, progressively reveal content and stick to one idea per slide. Take a careful look at the materials you use and ask yourself: “What’s my main message? What distracts from that? How can I remove distractions?”

      This feels related to some of the potential power of sketchnotes.

      I'd like the reference to this particular research though.

    1. “Be careful, though, about your reading in many authors and different types of books. It may be that there is something wayward and unstable in it. You must stay with a limited number of writers and be fed by them if you mean to derive anything that will dwell reliably with you. One who is everywhere is nowhere. Those who travel all the time find that they have many places to stay, but no friendships. The same thing necessarily happens to those who do not become intimate with any one author, but let everything rush right through them.”

      One who is everywhere is nowhere. Seneca in his second letter to Lucilius, (Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium, Letter 2, On Discursiveness in Reading, in a translation by Margaret Graver and A. A. Long)

      Applicable not only to reading, but also to doing.

    1. I will be looking for your conscious choice in your entry selections, dedicated organizational patterns and curation techniques, self-reflection and thoughtful responses in your short writing exercises, and as a whole, your engagement with and understanding of our various texts.

      Focus on some of the conscious choices, organization and curation are pieces missing from modern digital note taking space in talking about digital gardens and zettelkasten.

  24. Jul 2021
    1. After a good deal of reflection and consultation with my family, I have decided that (aside from pre-existing commitments, of which I have a few) I will no longer give lectures or participate in conferences, whether in person or via video link. I have a great deal that I want to think about and write about, and a dwindling supply of time in which to pursue the tasks I care about most. I understand that this decision might limit sales of my books, and make me even more isolated and ignored than I am already. That’s a trade-off that I simply must make. I feel sure that this is the right thing to do; indeed, the necessary thing to do. I hope that the work I produce in the future will bear out that judgment.

      An interesting take on valuing one's time.

    1. Setting Up Scope and Topic

      You need to establish boundaries with respect to what you want to learn, otherwise you'll keep going towards whatever catches your attention in the moment.

  25. Jun 2021
  26. May 2021
    1. We know we can't hold a lot of things in our mind at once. While you’re focusing on deep work, minimise the number of things in your mind. Don’t connect to everything else.
  27. Apr 2021
    1. Sprint Goal.

      The importance of the Sprint Goal escalated again. This crucial bit of discussion during Sprint Planning empowers the team to make Yes/No decisions on work pulled into a sprint, not only during planning, but also during the sprint itself. It focuses the product owner and development team on delivering something valuable to be shown in the Sprint Review. (Start with the end in mind.)

  28. Feb 2021
    1. Trailblazer offers you a new, more intuitive file layout in applications.
    2. Instead of grouping by technology, classes and views are structured by concept, and then by technology. A concept can relate to a model, or can be a completely abstract concern such as invoicing.
    3. Concepts over Technology
    4. While Trailblazer offers you abstraction layers for all aspects of Ruby On Rails, it does not missionize you. Wherever you want, you may fall back to the "Rails Way" with fat models, monolithic controllers, global helpers, etc. This is not a bad thing, but allows you to step-wise introduce Trailblazer's encapsulation in your app without having to rewrite it.
  29. Jan 2021
  30. Dec 2020
    1. That means when I record them, I need to have a large block of uninterrupted time, completely free of distractions, and I need to be well-rested, in a good mood, full of joyful energy and inspiration.
    2. Well, I have a four-year-old at home. I absolutely love being with my son all day, but there's definitely not much stillness around here, and any extra energy is either spent on getting some freelance work done, cleaning up the house, or trying to fit in a grownup movie or game before bed.
  31. Nov 2020
    1. This means that there needs to be a ‘focus’ state for a button to show that it is ‘clickable, but not clicked yet’.
    1. We are working to develop better communication within TC39 and with the broader JavaScript community so that this sort of problem can be corrected sooner in the future.
  32. Oct 2020
    1. light microscopes

      This scientific instrument is used to visually depict the details of an object through the use of a magnified image shown by a series of glass lenses. These glass lenses focus the light shining down onto the object and then the lenses magnify the object for better depiction. The lenses can rotate out to for more/less magnification, and the floor platform the object is held onto can also be lowered/risen for a better focus as well.

  33. Sep 2020
    1. To be reliably able to focus on something, you need to be intuitively, emotionally invested in the outcome.

      Without emotions, you might not get the right focus level on the problem

    2. The output of knowledge workers is extremely skewed based on focus. The productivity tiers seem to be:<10% focused on the job at hand: meaningful risk of getting fired.10-50% focus: “meets expectations,” gets regular raises.50%+ focus: superstar, 10x engineer, destined for greatness.

      3 focus levels in a career

  34. Jun 2020
  35. May 2020
    1. One common choice is to set daily goals for a certain number of hours at work. Success with this strategy requires a clear theory of how those hours will inexorably accumulate to the desired outcome. Simply spending some number of hours on a project is a fairly weak constraint: it’s easy to work with focus many hours unproductively.

      I've run into this problem.

      You can spend time in flow state, very focused, but this time still doesn't bring you closer to your goal.

  36. Apr 2020
  37. Feb 2020
    1. Someone who took the afternoon off shouldn't feel like they did something wrong. You don't have to defend how you spend your day. We trust team members to do the right thing instead of having rigid rules. Do not incite competition by proclaiming how many hours you worked yesterday. If you are working too many hours talk to your manager to discuss solutions.
    2. We believe great companies sound negative because they focus on what they can improve, not on what is working. Our first question in every conversation with someone outside the company should be: what do you think we can improve?
    1. Who communicates what to whom on social media with what effects? It forgets users’ subjectivity, experiences, norms, values and interpre-tations, as well as the embeddedness of the media into society’s power structures and social struggles. We need a paradigm shift from administrative digital positivist big data analytics towards critical social media research. Critical social media research combines critical social media theory, critical digital methods and critical-realist social media research ethics.
  38. Jan 2020
  39. Dec 2019
    1. you are allowed to comment on a specific point, giving you the chance to be more critical on a specific point instead of being critical on the overall of the reading.
  40. Aug 2019
    1. const useFocus = () => { const htmlElRef = useRef(null) const setFocus = () => {htmlElRef.current && htmlElRef.current.focus()} return [ setFocus, htmlElRef ] }

      exampleOf: useRef exampleOf: custom hook

  41. Apr 2019
    1. ​Technology is in constant motion. If we try to ignore the advances being made the world will move forward without us. Instead of trying to escape change, there needs to be an effort to incorporate technology into every aspect of our lives in the most beneficial way possible. If we look at the ways technology can improve our lives, we can see that technology specifically smartphones, have brought more benefits than harm to the academic and social aspects of teenagers lives, which is important because there is a constant pressure to move away from smart devices from older generations. The first aspect people tend to focus on is the effect that technology has on the academic life of a teen. Smartphones and other smart devices are a crucial part of interactive learning in a classroom and can be used as a tool in increasing student interest in a topic. For example, a popular interactive website, Kahoot, is used in many classrooms because it forces students to participate in the online quiz, while teachers can gauge how their students are doing in the class. Furthermore, these interactive tools are crucial for students that thrive under visual learning, since they can directly interact with the material. This can be extended to students with learning disabilities, such as Down Syndrome and Autism,​ research has shown that using specialized and interactive apps on a smart device aids learning more effectively than technology free learning. Picture Picture Another fear regarding technology is the impact it has on the social lives of young adults, but the benefits technology has brought to socializing outweighs any possible consequences. The obvious advantage smartphones have brought to social lives is the ability to easily communicate with people; with social media, texting, and calling all in one portable box there is no longer a struggle to be in contact with family and friends even if they are not in your area. Social media can also be used for much more In recent years, social media has been a key platform in spreading platforms and movements for social change. Because social media websites lower the barrier for communicating to large groups of people, it has been much easier to spread ideas of change across states, countries, or the world. For example, after Hurricane Sandy tore apart the northeastern United States, a movement called "Occupy Sandy" in which people gathered to provide relief for the areas affected was promoted and organized through social media. Other movements that have been possible because of social media include #MeToo, March for Our Lives, #BlackLivesMatter, and the 2017 Women's March. ​

    2. The music we listen to highly impacts our decision making, especially as adolescents. Adolescents are extremely impressionable, and the music they listen to has a great impact on how they decide to live their day to day lives. Popular musicians are seen as role models by the people who idolize them, and adolescents may try to represents the songs in which they favor through their actions every day.

      Recent studies have found that adolescents who listen to music that supports substance abuse and violence have a greater chance to act upon what they listen to. What young adults and teenagers listen to through music and popular media will affect their decision making process. Specifically with substance abuse, and there is a direct uptake in use of illegal substances by adolescents who listen to music that promotes such activities. This can cause a whole societal problem considering most of todays popular music among adolescents touches upon substance abuse and violence. Adolescents are extremely impressionable and the music they listen can shape how a person tries to act, or represent themselves.

  42. Nov 2018
  43. Oct 2018
    1. Does the United States have a strategy for North Korea, or are these twists and turns merely the whims of a temperamental president?”

      This questioning is a big US focus. Even though I think it is important to question these things and monitor coordination between the president and the administration, the view that the government is disorganized and failing is in turn leading to further distrust in our democratic process

    2. What makes it particularly dangerous is that it is an authoritarianism born within the framework of democracy itself.”

      I think this is a large part of our current crisis and what I want to focus on -- the backslide in our current democracy from lack of belief/maintenance. We are (arguably) not in a major war and have no global agenda to the scale of the Cold War or the WWs.Is not fighting things as a country preventing us from having pride/belief in our political system?

  44. Aug 2018
    1. Temporal focus is the degree of emphasis on the past, present, and future (Blue­dorn 2000e, p. 124).

      Temporal focus definition. Like temporal depth, both are socially constructed.

      Cites Lewin (time perspective) and Zimbardo & Boyd.

    2. The results presented in Bluedorn (2000e) and the Appendix consistently support the distinction between temporal depth and temporal focus. Concep­tually the two terms refer to different phenomena, and empirical measures of the two share so little variance in common that for practical purposes they can be regarded as orthogonal. Temporal depth is the distance looked into past and

      Differences between temporal depth vs temporal focus are orthogonal -- two separate conceptual ideas and refer to different phenomena.

      Depth = "distance looked into the past and future" Focus = "importance attached to the past, present and future"

    3. However, Boyd and Zimbardo’s interest was not in comparing short-, mid-, and long-term temporal depths; rather, it was in examining the degree to which people were oriented to a transcendental future, and in exam­ining the extent to which this variation covaried with other factors such as age, gender, and ethnicity. This is a natural extension of the questions involved in research on general past, present, and future temporal orientations (e.g., Kluck- hohn and Strodtbeck 1961, pp. 13-15), orientations that at first glance appear similar to issues of temporal depth. However, as I have argued elsewhere in opposing the use of the temporal orientation label, these general orientations are more an issue of the general temporal direction or domain that an individ­ual or group may emphasize (Bluedorn 2000e) than the distance into each that the individual or group typically uses. The latter is the issue of temporal depth; the former, what I have called temporal focus (Bluedorn 2000e)

      Comparison of Bluedorn's thinking about temporal depth vs temporal focus instead of framing it as a temporal orientation (the direction/domain that an individual or group emphasizes in sensemaking).

      ZImbardo and Boyd use the phrase "time perspective" rather than temporal orientation

  45. Jun 2018
    1. global technology firm with social and economic justice at its very core

      Social Justice Pillar.

      Global IT Solutions: Your Quality Solutions Partner.

      1. emphasis on partnership and collaboration
      2. technologies influencing client business decisions
    1. Might consider a slightly more focused trim tab here in this all-page annotation box. This isn't to say that, if invited, improvisation is not encouraged. It must be. House rules gotta make this a playground not a prison.

  46. Feb 2018
    1. The Bottom Line is that you will benefit from using the community group

      Unlike other approaches to learning new PM concepts that span many disciplines and competencies, we help you focus on your strengths and concerns within groups, while developing a holistic solution, that optimally increases your competitive advantage.

      Steps to Creating a Group:

      • Join the Community
      • Create your Own Group
      • Invite Others to Join
  47. Oct 2017
    1. More details related to methods are provided in COREQ file at doi: 10.7910/DVN/V1TKIO20, which follows the COREQ guidelines for reporting qualitative research23.

      That COREQ file is very useful for human consumption, but it would be useful if it were machine actionable as well, which would allow, for instance, to discover it more easily when searching for studies involving, say, native Thai speakers, or NVivo 11.3.2. Just saying - I understand this is beyond the scope of the current paper, but I'm involved in efforts to make data management plans machine actionable, which means dealing with these same issues.

      As an aside, the COREQ file states (at the very bottom):

      For reasons of length, the paper reports only the major themes.

      I don't know of restrictions in Wellcome Open Research in terms of article length, and in the paper's introduction, the authors had stated

      here we focus on findings we believe to be of greatest interest to researchers who share data, or are contemplating doing so.

      which seems a more valid reason to leave out some minor themes.

  48. Sep 2017
    1. The government might well impose martial law as it sought to control the situation, hunt for the perpetrators, and find any additional weapons or nuclear materials they might have

      Primary focus should be on mitigation of effects

  49. May 2017
    1. There are many people with good ideas who don't have the means, the will, or the courage to action them. Similarly, there are very talented business people who have no ideas, but are brilliant at the execution.

      figure out what you want to be and continue on that path, get better at it, and invest time and effort into it.

  50. Feb 2017
    1. Researchsuggeststhatsocialmediaareleadingtoincreasedpoliticalac-tivity,saysJosephKahne,aprofessorofeducationatMillsCollege,inOak-land,Calif.,andchairmanoftheMacArthurFoundation’sResearchNet-workonYouthandParticipatoryPol-itics.

      Generate questions: How does social media impact young voters political participation and civic engagement? ** Potential focussed topic.

      Identify scholar's presence and interests.

    2. makeiteasierandmoretemptingtocommitidentityfraudandhoaxes.

      Generate questions you have about the topic: Is this a valid concern? Have others studied this? Is there evidence to support this?

      • Are frauds and hoaxes more prevalent and tempting on social media?