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  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jan 2021
    1. Stephan Lewandowsky. (2021, January 6). The COVID-19 Vaccine Communication Handbook: A practical guide for improving vaccine communication & fighting misinformation https://t.co/3s5JWBvi0m Our new handbook (PDF+living wiki), which helps fighting the spread of misinformation about COVID-19 vaccines. #c19vaxwiki 1/n https://t.co/pRpkcJgVfC [Tweet]. @STWorg. https://twitter.com/STWorg/status/1346969671732490241

  3. Dec 2020
  4. Nov 2020
    1. Those who spread misinformation—false content shared by a person who does not realize it is false or misleading—are driven by sociopsychological factors. People are performing their identities on social platforms to feel connected to others, whether the “others” are a political party, parents who do not vaccinate their children, activists who are concerned about climate change, or those who belong to a certain religion, race or ethnic group. Crucially, disinformation can turn into misinformation when people share disinformation without realizing it is false. Read Our Latest Issue
    1. 3. They're fighting misinformation.

      Agree or disagree with how they obtained info and what that means for digital rights; how much the Chinese government informed or not their people - this is what China did in terms of alerting their population of covid cases.

  5. Oct 2020
    1. “When rumors start to circulate, they can easily become fodder for a disinformation campaign when politicians and the news pick them up in tandem,” said Joan Donovan, the research director at Harvard University's Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy. “This creates a feedback loop — trading misinformation up the media chain until we all have to reckon with it.”mps._execAd("boxinline",0,1,false);
    2. The earpiece conspiracy theory is an example of what disinformation experts call “trading up the chain,” in which the sheer virality of a meme or a conspiracy theory forces mainstream outlets to cover it, giving it a patina of credibility it otherwise would not have.
  6. Sep 2020
    1. Public health officials adhered to an idea dating back to the Middle Ages that infectious diseases were primarily caused by noxious vapors known as “miasma” emitted from rotting organic matter.

      Using historical misinformation seems to be a developing theme

  7. Aug 2020