43 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2019
    1. MONSAM Portable Sinks are the top manufacturers of portable sinks. They offer portable sinks with self-contained sinks. Their range of products also includes customized portable sinks according to the colour, dimensions, basin size, etc. For more details, visit their website.

  2. Aug 2019
  3. Jul 2019
    1. So the solution for the U.S.’s relatively high poverty rate will probably rely little on personal responsibility and moral rectitude. Instead, the U.S. should look to European countries, or to Australia and Canada, for ideas on how to reduce poverty. There’s just no substitute for a strong social safety net.

      Poverty is not due to individuals, especially when class mobility in the USA does not exist anymore.

  4. May 2019
      • 0:37 - need to recognize the networked nature of today's media
      • 0:37 - need to recognize the networked nature of today's media
      • 0:48 - work within traditional media literacy and build on things that have worked for decades, but recognize what has changed and use the strengths of networked media
      • 1:05 - how do children check sources on the internet
      • 1:20 - one of the simplest ways is to follow the links back to the source
      • 1:34 - when it's a photo, you can do a reverse image search
      • 1:50 can do a news search and sort by date to see if the news story is current
      • 2:45 - misinformation campaigns happening - mixing genuine content with misinformation
      • 3:25 - some create alternate identities or fake accounts
      • 4:25 - important to get a sense of how reliable a source is
      • 4:35 - what is the purpose of the source and what is their business model? - is there accuracy and reliability in this, then likely will trust it as a source
      • 5:10 - impact that we don't get our news from a limited number of sources
      • 5:45 - some of these sources are from friends on social media, others are algorithmically determined
      • 6:08 - some advantages and disadvantages - the old model was news curated in a newspaper; new model has the potential of getting news we may not have gotten in the old model
      • 6:20 but in the old system you had gatekeeping and 'provenance'; in online news it's sometimes an effort to see where the information originates; gate keeping falls to us now
      • 7:05 we need to train young people to do this
      • 7:30 how should we teach this?
      • 7:35 - with the concept approach you don't need to feel like an expert
      • 7:40 - success teaching media literacy from the key concepts for three decades; begin from these
      • 7:52 - media are constructed;
      • 7:55 - they have commercial considerations;
      • 7:58 they have social and political implications;
      • 8:00 that audiences negotiate meaning;
      • 8:05 that each medium has a unique form and the form influences the content
      • 8:20 these can be applied to any form of media and adapted to any grade from K-12
      • 8:30 so the key concepts of digital literacy are paralleled and are in addition to those, they don't replace the original five concepts
      • 8:40 now have implications of digital literacies in that they are networked so we need to understand the idea of the network
      • 8:50 understand that content now is shareable, that this is the default rather than the exception
      • 8:55 - the ways the tools we use influence not just the content but the ways we use them
      • 9:05 - this has an impact, an ethical dimension
      • 9:10 - these can be applied in any context and to any grade level
      • 9:20 - we have a full digital literacy curriculum that we offer (speaking about Media Smarts Canada); it has lessons on seven different aspects that a teacher or school board can use
      • 9:45 - the value of the key concepts is teachers can modify these resources to their contexts
      • 9:50 - teachers have in those key concepts what is essentially a GUIDING STAR to understand what they are supposed to be achieving with these lessons
  5. Apr 2019
    1. Seized with the desire to improve the visibility of Canadian music in the world, a ragtag band of librarians led by Stacy Allison-Cassin set out to host Wikipedia edit-a-thons in the style of Art+Feminism, but with a focus on addressing Canadian music instead. Along the way, they recognized that Wikidata offered a low-barrier, high-result method of making that data not only visible but reusable as linked open data, and consequently incorporated Wikidata into their edit-a-thons. This is their story.

  6. Feb 2019
    1. This makes me wonder about the realities of Australia’s indigenous people and and systemic inequality in Australia’s society.

      You might be interested in the last section of a recent episode of <cite>On the Media</cite>. It discusses a documentary (bordering on reality show) relating to indigenous peoples of Canada, which I think made brief mention of Australia and a similar project there. While I'm sure there are some very striking differences between these indigenous peoples, there are also some not surprising similarity in the ways in which they are exploited and marginalized.

      In general I liked the idea of what the documentary was and represented and wish there were versions for other countries.

  7. Nov 2018
    1. Canada is the first case of the expansion of hospital medicine beyond the United States, and as of 2008, Canada had more than 100 hospital medicine programs.7 Currently, the estimated number of hospitalists in Canada has increased to ~3,000 (Colleen Savage, Administrator, Canadian SHM, personal communication, December 6, 2017). Yousef and Maslowski describe several drivers for the development of the hospitalist model, which are related to physicians, patients, and systems. Work–life balance and the desire for non-hospital work among primary care providers (PCPs) were leading physician factors. Two major patient-related factors were the increasing age and complexity of patients and the increasing number of “unattached” patients. Unattached patients are those who either do not have a PCP or their PCP does not have admitting hospital privileges. System drivers included PCP shortages, reduction in resident duty hours, higher need for health system efficiency, and cost reduction. Further, increasing health system complexity led to PCPs withdrawing from hospital care.7
    2. Hospital medicine is the fastest growing specialty in the United States. An interesting aspect of the rapid expansion of hospital medicine is the expansion of the field beyond the United States. Although the health care systems, regulations, and cultural norms in these nations differ, there are striking similarities in the profession’s development.
  8. Oct 2018
    1. Conditions and procedure
      • You must not start a new study program
      • You must not wait more than 36 months
      • Any DEC, or 1800 h from DEP or 1800 h from DEP followed by the respective ASP
      • 3 years of full-time study completed entirely in French
      • A regular licence to practise from a professional order
    1. not eligible for the PEQ if: You hold a bursary with a clause requiring a return to your country (unless you have already fulfilled this condition) You have started a new study program in Québec More than 36 months have elapsed between the time you completed your study program in Québec and the date you submitted your application for permanent selection 
      • Program Experience Quebec - PEQ.
      • You must not start a new study program
      • You must not wait more than 36 months from your completed program
  9. Aug 2018
    1. Geological models that aid in the understanding of buried valleys are a product of recent studies in the Oak Ridges Moraine (ORM) (e.g., Barnett et al. 1998; Sharpe et al. 2002a; Russell et al 2003a; Logan et al. 2005). This work has contributed an emerging robust geological framework, yet these data have not been analysed in the context of the Laurentian valley system and its evolution over time. In contrast, conceptual hydrogeological models that might provide a framework for Laurentian valley aquifers (Fig. 1) a

      Learn more about this.

  10. May 2018
    1. In the Canadian context, Jhangiani & Jhangiani (2017) surveyed 320 undergraduates in various postsecondary institutions in British Columbia in 2015 and asked how much they had spent on textbooks in the last 12 months; the mean was about C$700 (median was $500). In a 2016 survey of about 1500 students from the University of British Columbia, nearly half of respondents (49%) said they spend at least C$500 on textbooks each year, and the mean reported cost per year for textbooks was $620 (So & Doering, 2016).
  11. Jan 2018
  12. Nov 2017
  13. Aug 2017
    1. At the core of human rights are the ideals and goals of the “four freedoms” articulated by US President Franklin Delano Roosevelt—freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from fear, and freedom from want—and also the primary goal of self-determination. To achieve these conditions, it is also understood that while all rights are “interrelated, interdependent and indivisible,” the absolute basics of life (e.g., water, food, clothing, and shelter) must first be met.

      Canada gets it. The US does not. This must change and quickly.

  14. Jul 2017
    1. Looking for rig work? Rig Tech Service Rig Drive Member Login E-mail * Password * Request new password

      Representation for Canadian oil drilling contractors. Provides services for works in oil industries, as well as major oil companies.

    1. Industries usually measure economic impact by approximating a dollar value to represent their purchasing power.The oil and gas industry measures economic impact by counting active rigs. A drilling rig requires many oilfield support services to drill a well. And after the well is complete, other oilfield services go to work to bring the well into production and to maintain it.

      One of the primary activities of the Canadian Association of Oilwell Drilling Contractors seems to be in counting oil rigs, a a measure of economic impact.

  15. Jun 2017
    1. Quebec does not meet the threshold of a colonial people or an oppressed people, nor can it be suggested that Quebecers have been denied meaningful access to government to pursue their political, economic, cultural and social development.

      International Law declarations would require some form of exploitation, oppression or exploitation to be proved. In general, the bar would be high for this belief -- as in Quebec citizens being refused the right to vote, for instance.

    1. We stand in solidarity with Chief Theresa Spence’s attempts to change the abusive manner in which the Canadian Government has ignored, threatened, and bullied Indigenous peoples

      Idle No More framed as part of a centuries-long conflict between First Nations and the Canadian government. The term "bullied" may have significance here as the omnibus bill was perceived to be a way for government to bully through their agenda without debate. It also have a loose connection to cyberbullying which was a policy issue gaining traction at this time.

    1. everyday the Idle No More movement is gaining more sympathizers and allies around the globe

      Unclear whether this was people sympathizing with Idle No More or appropriating the phrase Idle No More to other issues and causes. This is an important theme in digital humanism - it is quite easy to apply a term to a situation or give support to a cause, but it is never very clear that this translates into material support -- such as public pressure, resource sharing and so on.

    2. Governor-General David Johnston said he would not attend the meeting, against the wishes of Chief Spence

      The significance of the GG meeting was that the relationship among First Nations and Canada is through the Crown via the Royal Proclamation Act of 1763. This was the first treaty (also known as the "Peace and Friendship" treaties) between European settlers and First Nations. Spence was emphasizing that the treaty pre-dates Confederation, and possibly subtly suggesting that the PM did not have power in this case.

  16. May 2017
    1. National Research Council
      The National Research Council (NRC) is an organization within the Government of Canada dedicated to research and development. Today, the NRC works with members of the Canadian industry to provide meaningful research and development for many different types of products. The areas of research and development that the NRC participates in include aerospace, aquatic and crop resource development, automotive and surface transportation, construction, energy, mining, and environment, human health therapeutics, information and communications technologies, measurement science standards, medical devices, astronomy and astrophysics, ocean, coastal, and river engineering, and security and disruptive technologies. The NRC employs scientists, engineers, and business experts. The mission of the NRC is as follows: “Working with clients and partners, we provide innovation support, strategic research, scientific and technical services to develop and deploy solutions to meet Canada's current and future industrial and societal needs.” The main values of the NRC include impact, accountability, leadership, integrity, and collaboration. The most recent success stories of the NRC include research regarding “green buildings,” math games, mechanical insulation, and many more (Government of Canada 2017). Here is a link to their achievement page where these stories and more are posted: http://www.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/eng/achievements/index.html. Here is a link to the NRC webpage: http://www.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/eng/index.html.  
      

      References

      Government of Canada. 2017. National Research Council Canada. May 5. Accessed May 8, 2017. http://www.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/eng/index.html.

    1. French Canadians

      French-Canadians is a term used when describing the families that speak French and live mostly in Quebec, Canada. Settling in this area long before the French and Indian War, the French began their settlements in the early 1600's. They were Roman Catholic, and had a distinct culture from their Protestant southern neighbors settling what would be called New England at the same time. These French-Canadians settled modern day Montreal and Quebec City, along with many other municipalities in the hundreds of miles in Eastern Canada and along the St. Lawrence River. They were farmers, priests, traders and voyageurs. Their biggest influence in the United States came when large numbers of French Canadians immigrated to work in the mills of New England in the era of 1870-1920.

      Moogk, Peter N. La Nouvelle France: The Making of French Canada: a Cultural History. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 2000.

  17. Mar 2017
    1. the Beaufort Sea

      (https://www.google.com/maps/place/Beaufort+Sea/@70.8553171,-158.2142268,4z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x51743798efc593cb:0x41234bfebcaad073!8m2!3d72.8431409!4d-145.5684843)

      The Beaufort Sea is a division of the Atlantic Ocean in northwest Canada and northwest Alaska. It is where the Mackenzie River empties into the Canadian side of the sea. This area of the Arctic is known to be a major source of oil and petroleum. It has been the target of pipeline and drilling projects both in the past and presently.

      Not much has changed for the Beaufort Sea when it comes to oil extraction. Recently, new oil and gas drilling has been suspended for the next five years in the Beaufort Sea in order for the US and Canada to evaluate the environmental impacts drilling would have on the area. In the 1970’s when this article was written, the same caution was taken by both governments in order to understand the impacts that the pipeline would have on the area and it’s inhabitants. Currently, although the Beaufort Sea is a major reserve for gas and petroleum, it is still dangerous to drill. The landscape of the arctic is much different of that in the Gulf of Mexico, making it more difficult and more dangerous to drill. Even after three decades, this area is still facing the same challenges with its reserves.

      Annotation taken from Amman, Jordan Canada cancel extension of the existing Arctic offshore oil exploration licenses. (Energy Monitor Worldwide, 2017)

    2. Pacific Science Congress

      The Pacific Science Congress is in core meeting for the Pacific Science Association. These meetings take place every four years in various locations throughout the Asia- Pacific Rim and Basin. Various scientists, at different levels of expertise, present at the congress. Presentations are based on the central theme and have anywhere between 1000 and 2000 people in attendance. Each meeting has a President and a Secretary-General who represent them. The first meeting took place between August 2 and 20, 1920 in Honolulu, HI. The meetings and the

      Starting in 1969, there have been twelve Pacific Science Inter-Congresses. These meetings are smaller and focus on a more central theme. They, like the Pacific Science Congresses, take place every four years, staggered between them. They also are located in similar locations in the Pacific region.

      The article quotes Dr. Ian McTaggart-Cowan, who was speaking on August 26, 1975, during the 13th Pacific Science Congress in Vancouver, Canada at the University of British Columbia. Dr. McTaggart Cowan was the President for this meeting. For that year, the Pacific Science Congress's theme was “Sublethal Effects of Pollution on Aquatic Organisms”. Since this meeting, there hasn’t been another meeting in Canada or one with focus on the issues Arctic Canada faces. The most recent congress took place summer of 2016 in Taipai, Taiwan, with the theme “Sceince, Technology, and Innovation: Building a Sustainable Future in Asia and the Pacific.” These meetings are so important because they bring together a group of scientists with similar studies and interests. By presenting and sharing their ideas, scientists can work together to have a conscious and sustainable Pacific.

      Annotated from the Pacific Science Association's website www.pacificscience.org.

    3. Petro Canada

      The Canadian government established Petro-Canada as a state owned Crown Corporation to manage oil resources in the country. This decision was aided by a variety of international pressures, mainly the OPEC (Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries) embargo in which the oil rich Middle Eastern countries prohibited the sale of oil to the U.S., Canada, U.K., Netherlands, and Japan due to U.S. support of Israel during the 1973 Yom Kippur war. This oil embargo sparked a world shortage which spiked prices and caused Canada to look at moving towards more domestic sources of oil independence. With a new government, under the leadership of Trudeau, they adopted a more nationalist focus to their energy independence emphasizing the importance of Canadian industry. The Canadian government looked to reduce the influence of U.S. multinational oil companies in their own abundant oil fields in Alberta. Additionally, as a Crown Corporation, Petro-Canada was tasked to perform many tasks that wouldn’t be expected of privately owned companies. For example, the Canadian Government expected that Petro-Canada would explore the frontier for various, harder to access, resources like tar sands, heavy oil, or areas that would be difficult to develop transport chains. This charge from the state made it so Petro-Canada was more invested than private companies in exploring difficult to reach areas like the Mackenzie Delta in the mid 1970’s. The duties of the Crown Corporation were beyond simply providing energy for the nation, but also ensuring a sustainable future of energy independence.

      Annotation drawn from Fossum, John Erik. Oil, the State, and Federalism: The Rise and Demise of Petro-Canada as a Statist Impulse. Vol. 2. University of Toronto Press, 1997.

    1. Sachs Harbour

      Sachs Harbour, located on Banks Island, is a small settlement in northern Canada visited by Berger during the Inquiry. The map below shows the location of Sachs Harbour and gives a sense of the breadth of the north Berger travelled. According to the Canadian census, only 112 people lived in the settlement in 2011. The vast majority of residents speak english today, though some report english and non-official language, probably a local indigenous language (Census). Permanent indigenous residents of the island are permitted subsistence hunting and trapping of wild animals to preserve their way of life (Parks Canada). Evidence of pre-Dorset inhabitation of the island has been uncovered and dated to 1500 BCE. Eastern Arctic Dorset, Thule, and Inuvialuit all have left physical traces on the island. European explorers came in the 1850s in an unsuccessful search for the northwest passage (Parks Canada).

      Sachs Harbour is the administrative site of Aulavik national park (Parks Canada). The park covers ~4600 square miles (12,000 square kilometers) and is home to a wide variety of land animals as well as the Thompsen river. Over 68,000 muskox make their home on Banks island, the highest concentration of muskoxen in the world with a significant portion living in the park itself. The Thompsen river is the northernmost navigable waterway and home to a wide variety of freshwater fish and related aquatic organisms. An isolated wilderness park, the land and organisms that live there are set aside to conserve "pristine arctic environment" (Parks Canada).

      (https://www.google.com/maps/place/Sachs+Harbour,+NT,+Canada/@70.6651894,-124.6126443,4.59z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x5109fd63f172c395:0xae7a914c6901e9c2!8m2!3d71.985123!4d-125.246483)

      1. Canada, Statistics. "Sachs Harbour, Northwest Territories (Code 6101041) And Northwest Territories (Code 61) (Table)". Statistics Canada. N.p., 2012. Web. 9 Mar. 2017.

      2. "Parks Canada - Aulavik National Park - Aulavik National Park Of Canada". 2013. Pc.Gc.Ca. http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/nt/aulavik/index.aspx.

  18. Dec 2016
    1. vice-chair of Brain Canada, a national non-profit organization dedicated to furthering our understanding of the brain and brain diseases

      Tanenbaum (Larry?) heads Brain Cda - non-profit - what is his role and why?

  19. Dec 2015
  20. Nov 2015
    1. Canada is unique in the world in that it is the only country whose national government has no authority in education;

      Though it may be taken for granted by actors in the sphere of learning in Canada, this factoid can have a large impact in terms of “Canadian Exceptionalism”.

  21. Jun 2015