16 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2018
    1. NewsNightly NewsMeet the PressDatelineMSNBCTODAYSearchSponsored ByHalf of women in STEM have experienced gender discrimination at work, study finds Share this —U.S. newsHalf of women in STEM have experienced gender discrimination at work, study finds An Assistant Professor of Genetics and Developmental Biology works on stem cells.Spencer Platt / Getty Images filemps._execAd("interstitial");Breaking News EmailsGet breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.SUBSCRIBEJan. 9, 2018 / 2:26 PM CST / Updated Jan. 9, 2018 / 2:26 PM CSTBy Elizabeth ChuckHalf of all women working in science, technology, engineering and math have experienced gender discrimination at work, according to a new study released the day after a disgraced Google engineer filed a lawsuit claiming white conservative men are the true victims of Silicon Valley.James Damore was fired from Google after writing a 10-page memo citing women's "neuroticism" as a reason there are fewer female workers in high-stress jobs at the search giant. The lawsuit he filed Monday argues that Google was so overly concerned with filling gender and racial quotas that it was hurting male employees as well as potential male employees.Video Will Begin In...3Fired Google engineer James Damore defends his manifesto about diversityAug. 10, 201702:34But a study out on Tuesday from the Pew Research Center, which polled more than 4,900 workers in the U.S., found that in the traditionally male-dominated fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), only 19 percent of men said they had experienced gender discrimination at work, versus 50 percent of women.mps._execAd("boxinline");In certain STEM subsets, the proportion of women reporting discrimination was even higher: 78 percent of those who work in majority-male workplaces reported gender discrimination, followed by 74 percent of those working in computer jobs.Even outside of STEM, the numbers were high, with 41 percent of women in non-STEM jobs saying they've dealt with discrimination, the Pew study found."The challenges that women in STEM face often echo the challenges of all working women," said Cary Funk, lead author of the report and Pew's director of science and society research. "What the study does is take a broad-based look at the issues facing the STEM workforce. I think they really speak to the complex issues surrounding diversity in the workplace."The Pew study, which was conducted last July and August, before Hollywood's sexual misconduct scandal led to a national reckoning, also polled women on sexual harassment. Both groups were equally likely to say they had experienced sexual harassment at work — 22 percent.mps._execAd("boxinline",0,1,false);Both groups were less likely than their male counterparts to think that women are "usually treated fairly" when it comes to opportunities for promotion and advancement.RecommendedVideo Will Begin In...3Penny Marshall, famed actress and comedian, dead at 75Video Will Begin In...3Actress Penny Marshall dead at 75Damore's viewpoint, both in and outside of Google, is disputed. Google faces a separate suit filed by three women who allege the company pays women less than men for similar work and gives them less opportunity for promotions, bonuses and raises — a claim Google denies.Stephanie Newby, the CEO of Crimson Hexagon, an artificial intelligence company that provides consumer insights based on publicly available data, said she was "not at all surprised" by Pew's findings.In 2004, Newby founded Golden Seeds, an investment firm that provides capital to women-led businesses. At Crimson Hexagon, she said she has made a point of hiring and promoting qualified female candidates after seeing first-hand the challenges that women entrepreneurs and women in male-oriented jobs face.mps._execAd("boxinline",0,2,false);"We need environments where women can thrive, not be cornered about how they look or have to think about the kinds of things that make them worry about being different or trying to prove themselves, because so much energy can be expended on that instead of getting the job done," she said. "I think it provides a competitive advantage for us that we have women in senior positions."by Taboolaby TaboolaSPONSORED STORIESNationLandlines Are Disappearing with This Increasingly Popular OptionNationUndoExperianWhat is Alternative Credit Data?ExperianUndoby Taboolaby TaboolaSPONSORED STORIESDroneX ProThis $99 Drone Might Be The Most Amazing Invention In 2018DroneX ProUndoMy Smart Gadgets19 Insanely Cool Gadgets That Are Going To Sell Out This YearMy Smart GadgetsUndoUSA TodayMilitary Dad Comes Home To Unexpected ReactionUSA TodayUndogo.gadgetspost.com23 Cool Products Flying Off Shelves These Holidaysgo.gadgetspost.comUndoMicrosoft AzureHere’s What Makes An Azure Free Account So Valuable...Microsoft AzureUndoGadgets PostThe 19 Best Products Of 2018 RankedGadgets PostUndoTactical WatchMilitary Watch Everybody in United States is Talking AboutTactical WatchUndoTact WatchFinally. The Smart Watch Every Man In United States Has Been Waiting For!Tact WatchUndoU.S. newsSenate passes sweeping criminal justice reform billThe House is expected to take up the Senate version of the bill at a later date before sending it to the president.Senate Majority Leader Republican Mitch McConnell speaks during a news conference on negotiations to avoid a partial shutdown of the federal government on Capitol Hill on Dec. 18, 2018.Michael Reynolds / EPABreaking News EmailsGet breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.SUBSCRIBEDec. 18, 2018 / 8:02 PM CST / Updated 8:38 PM CSTBy Rebecca Shabad and Phil HelselWASHINGTON — The Senate passed a huge criminal law reform bill on Tuesday night, seizing on bipartisan support for the broadest set of changes to federal crime statutes in a generation.A rare coalition of conservatives, liberals, activists, prosecutors and defense attorneys — spanning the political spectrum — pushed senators to pass the "First Step Act" by a final vote of 87-12.mps._execAd("boxinline",0,3,false);The House is expected to take up the Senate version of the bill at a later date. The House passed a similar version of the bill back in May by a wide margin, 360-59.President Donald Trump announced in November that he backs the legislation.Supporters of the bill claim that changes passed in the Senate would make America's criminal justice system fairer, reduce overcrowding and save taxpayer dollars — much to the benefit of drug and non-violent offenders.The bill would not affect state prisons. It only covers federal prisoners, who make up less than 10 percent of America's prison population.mps._execAd("boxinline",0,4,false);Trump quickly jumped on Twitter to hail the bill’s passage, and said "America is the greatest Country in the world and my job is to fight for ALL citizens, even those who have made mistakes.""This will keep our communities safer, and provide hope and a second chance, to those who earn it. In addition to everything else, billions of dollars will be saved. I look forward to signing this into law!” the president tweeted.Durbin: Kushner 'very important partner' in passing criminal justice reform billDec. 18, 201802:44The Senate bill overcame late obstacles by Sens. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., and John Kennedy, R-La.RecommendedSchool district police officer hit and run caught on cameraMcConnell convinced government shutdown won't happenCotton railed against the First Step Act as a "jailbreak" and said too many crimes were being included to allow prisoners consideration for early release.mps._execAd("boxinline",0,5,false);Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, in urging senators to reject an amendment sponsored by Cotton, said “this law is centered towards those people that are the least violent people that are in prison already," and that “we’re only going to help low-level offenders.""Let's see if we can keep our bipartisan coalition together, to pass a bill that the president said that he is ready to sign," Grassley said. The amendment was defeated.A major provision of the bill gives judges more leeway to diverge from strict mandatory minimum sentences for nonviolent drug offenders with criminal histories.House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., tweeted after the Senate vote: "Criminal justice reform is about giving more Americans a chance at redemption. The House looks forward to sending it to the president to become law."Rebecca ShabadRebecca Shabad is a congressional reporter for NBC News, based in Washington.Phil HelselPhil Helsel is a reporter for NBC News.David K. Li and Frank Thorp V contributed.MORE FROM newsAboutContactCareersPrivacy policyTerms of ServiceSiteMapAdvertiseAdChoices© 2018 NBC UNIVERSAL

      What is our praxis here? What do we advocate for here? The whole article is just stating problems.

    1. Michael Polanyi, l'un des plus grands épistémologues du XXe siècle, a montré dans ses ouvrages [14] que la connaissance scientifique se construisait dans un va-et-vient entre connaissance explicite (claire, formelle, décontextualisée) et connaissance tacite (opaque, intuitive, incarnée et contextuelle), va et vient qui fait écho à la dialectique classique de la théorie et de la pratique.
  2. Oct 2018
    1. Dissimilarly, in Teaching to Transgress, bell hooks urges teachers to contemplate “Education as the practice of freedom” as their point of departure for praxis. A phrase originating from the work of Paulo Freire, hooks writes that “education as the practice of freedom” will come easiest “to those of us…who believe that our work is not merely to share information, but to share in the intellectual and spiritual growth of our students. To teach in a manner that respects and cares for the souls of our students is essential if we are to provide the necessary conditions where learning can most deeply and intimately begin.” Transgressive education and disruptive thinking therefore begin with the soul, and not the prospective career opportunities, of students.
    1. In characterizing the change-over from the manipulating and using and so forth which are circumspective in a ‘practical’ way, to ‘theoretical’ exploration, it would be easy to suggest that merely looking at entities is something which emerges when concern holds back from any kind of manipulation. What is decisive in the ‘emergence’ of the theoretical attitude would then lie in the disappearance of praxis. So if one posits ‘practical’ concern as the primary and predominant kind of Being which factical Dasein possesses, the ontological possibility of ‘theory’ will be due to the absence of praxis—that is, to a privation. But the discontinuance of a specific manipulation in our concernful dealings does not simply leave the guiding circumspection behind as a remainder. Rather, our concern then diverts itself specifically into a just-looking-around [ein Nur-sich-umsehen]. But this is by no means the way in which the ‘theoretical’ attitude of science is reached. On the contrary, the tarrying which is discontinued when one manipulates, can take on the character of a more precise kind of circumspection, such as ‘inspecting’, checking up on what has been attained, or looking over the ‘operations’ [“Betrieb”] which are now ‘at a standstill’. Holding back from the use of equipment is so far from sheer ‘theory’ that the kind of circumspection which tarries and ‘considers’, remains wholly in the grip of the ready-to-hand equipment with which one is concerned. ‘Practical’ dealings have their own ways of tarrying. And just as praxis has its own specific kind of sight (‘theory’), theoretical research is not without a praxis of its own. Reading off the measurements which result from an experiment often requires a complicated ‘technical’ set-up for the experimental design. Observation with a microscope is dependent upon the production of ‘preparations’. Archaeological excavation, which precedes any Interpretation of the ‘findings’, demands manipulations of the grossest kind. But even in the ‘most abstract’ way of working out problems and establishing what has been obtained, one manipulates equipment for writing, for example. However ‘uninteresting’ and ‘obvious’ such components of scientific research may be, they are by no means a matter of indifference ontologically. The explicit suggestion that scientific behaviour as a way of Being-in-the-world, is not just a ‘purely intellectual activity’, may seem petty and superfluous. If only it were not plain from this triviality that it is by no means patent where the ontological boundary between ‘theoretical’ and ‘atheoretical’ behaviour really runs!

      Heidegger: "just as praxis has its own specific kind of sight (‘theory’), theoretical research is not without a praxis of its own." ||

  3. Aug 2018
    1. We refer to the plural

      From our perspective, we are seeking to develop a social ecological theory within a broader ecosocialist movement in which there is no privileged praxis, but a plurality of mutually reinforcing practical strategies.

      Already, we can see that "Libertarian Municipalist," dual power, revolutionary syndicalist, and prefigurative approaches can be taken. Often, the praxes that emerge from the broadly ecosocialist sphere start from a high degree of theoretical agreement, but diverge strategically and not antagonistically.

  4. Feb 2017
    1. at least five keywords

      I like questions like “Why do I like chicken nuggets?”

      When a girl in the back of the room blurts out this question, half a joke, half a test (Do they really want us to write down any question that we think of?), she seems a bit surprised to have her query treated seriously.

      Thanks for that question Neisha. Let's use it as an example of how to think of keywords for each of your questions. What would be a good one for that question?

      Chicken nuggets.

      Not really. That’s too specific. What's a more general word.

      “Food,” somebody yells.

      Right, write that down Neisha. What kind of food are we talking about?

      Junk food. Fast food. Fried food.

      Right. Right. Where do you get chicken nuggets?

      Down on Nostrand Avenue where all the fast food places are.

      And who…

      Neisha catches the drift, interrupts: It’s in my neighborhood and not in White people's neighborhoods. They get healthy food, which is hard to find where I live.

      So could we add “health” to your keywords?

      Yeah.

      And what else is in your description? What about “inequality?“

      And “racism.”

      What else?

      They’re good, Mister.

      So, what about “delicious? “

      Do we have to write five keywords for every question?

      Yup.

      Ahhhh.

      But what a gift this question was! Do you see how a question can start with something personal, something real for you, even if you aren't sure how important it is? Keep putting the personal pronoun, I, in your questions, then ask your friends and your teachers to help you find the social justice behind them. That's what to look for in your keywords.

  5. Jan 2017
    1. ixingintothecurric

      I'm surprised the term "praxis" never came up in this piece. I haven't done much research on this term and its origin and usage (though I might return to do that), but its basically an ancient Greek term which means enacting ideas. I wonder if writings on praxis, both old and new, could somehow contribute to the Q question, since the Q question, for Lanham, also involves mixing thought and action and challenging the Ramist agenda.

  6. Aug 2016
    1. Playful pedagogy aims to put learners in a flow state—that utterly absorbing state where, as Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi puts it, “nothing else seems to matter” (6).

      Dewey in Democracy and Education on a similar tip:

      In their plays, they like to construct their own toys and appliances. With increasing maturity, activity which does not give back results of tangible and visible achievement loses its interest. Play then changes to fooling and if habitually indulged in is demoralizing. Observable results are necessary to enable persons to get a sense and a measure of their own powers. When make-believe is recognized to be make-believe, the device of making objects in fancy alone is too easy to stimulate intense action. One has only to observe the countenance of children really playing to note that their attitude is one of serious absorption; this attitude cannot be maintained when things cease to afford adequate stimulation.

    2. provide examples of games as pedagogical tools.

      I'll be attempting to roll out a "Reacting to the Past" role-playing game in my Early American literature course this fall. I've been considering ways to incorporate a digital aspect to the classroom performances, perhaps by way of encouraging out-of-class blog/newspaper "wars" between opposing sides.

    3. playful pedagogy uses rules as constraints that foster creativity, rather than stifle it. ¶ 8 Leave a comment on paragraph 8 0 Thi

      This is the way @jessifer talks about writing in the space of a Tweet.

      How to encourage creative rule "breaking" or evading?

    4. crafting transfers the classical rhetorical values of argumentation and persuasion to domains beyond writing and language

      I've also discovered that students assume more accountability and take more pride in "crafting"-type assignments like collaborative Wikis, Genius annotations, &c.

    5. mistakes, failures, and most importantly, second chances

      Crucial point that I find myself struggling to sufficiently explain. Often students seem reticent to write (and/or revise) drafts, and resist integrating free writing practices into the all-important "product" at the semester's end. That's not the students fault. After all, what assignments tend to make up the largest percentage of their final grade?

    6. different for every student, rather than a straight shot toward a desired destination

      Our conceptions of assessment will be transformed with "play" and process at the center of learning. No more word and page counts, or "mastery" of the argument/essay.

    7. Course objectives, learning assessments, grading rubrics, and so on.

      Absolutely! Now how to be "playful" with the requirements of an academic bureaucracy? There's surely a fine line/happy medium I can't seem to toe or grasp in my own course designing efforts. Hence, my syllabuses range from hierarchically stuffy to shamelessly irreverent.

    8. games, performances, and other “not serious” pursuits that stand “outside ‘ordinary’ life,”

      The "ordinary" as confined to the logics of commercial life and biological maintenance? Is this always true of "play"? (And isn't it a Silicon Valley ethos to introduce"play" into the ordinary life of labor--even if cynically?)