3,849 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Inclusion however is a concept in OPML: I can add a list as a new branch in another list. If you do that once you only clone a list, and go your own seperate way again. You could also do it dynamically, where you always re-import the other list into your own. Doing it dynamically is a de-facto subscription. For both however, changes in the imported list are non-obvious.

      When this is done with RSS, you have what is known as OPML subscription. Some feed readers like Inoreader let you subscribe to someone's OPML list of RSS feeds which means your feed reader will autoupdate to show you new feeds from the list you've subscribed to.

      Ha! I'm noticing you mention it in the next section! :)

    1. A strong and cogent argument for why we should not be listening to the overly loud cries from Tristan Harris and the Center for Human Technology. The boundary of criticism they're setting is not extreme enough to make the situation significantly better.

      It's also a strong argument for who to allow at the table or not when making decisions and evaluating criticism.

    2. These companies do not mean well, and we should stop pretending that they do.
    3. Prominence as a critic tends to reinforce itself. The person who appears on news shows is the person who gets to star in a documentary is the person who gets to testify before the Senate is the person who gets invited back onto the news shows, and so forth.

      Another specific example of this has been noted by Zeynep Tufekci of an economist becoming the face of criticism of the education space being open or closed during the coronavirus pandemic. The woman, who had no background in public health or epidemiology, became the public face of the argument about whether schools should be open or closed.

    4. it makes a difference whether the argument made before Congress is “Facebook is bad, cannot reform itself, and is guided by people who know what they’re doing but are doing int anyway—and the company needs to be broken up immediately” or if the argument is “Facebook means well, but it sure would be nice if they could send out fewer notifications and maybe stop recommending so much conspiratorial content.”

      Note the dramatic difference between these spaces and the potential ability for things to get better.

    5. Which brings us back, once again, to the question with which we began: why does it matter who gets to be seen as a prominent “tech critic”? The answer is that it matters because such individuals get to set the bounds for the discussion.

      The ability to set the bounds of the discussion or the problem is a classical example of "power-over" instead of power-with or power-to.

    6. But “humane technology” is precisely the sort of pleasant sounding but ultimately meaningless idea that we must be watchful for at all times. To be clear, Harris is hardly the first critic to argue for some alternative type of technology, past critics have argued for: “democratic technics,” “appropriate technology,” “convivial tools,” “liberatory technology,” “holistic technology,” and the list could go on.

      A reasonable summary list of alternatives. Note how dreadful and unmemorable most of these names are. Most noticeable in this list is that I don't think that anyone actually built any actual tools that accomplish any of these theoretical things.

      It also makes more noticeable that the Center for Humane Technology seems to be theoretically arguing against something instead of "for" something.

    7. Big tech can patiently sit through some zingers about their business model, as long as the person delivering those one-liners comes around to repeating big tech’s latest Sinophobic talking point while repeating the “they meant well” myth.
    8. The point here is not to defend the uses of surveillance technology in China, the point is to emphasize that when big tech talks about China they are stoking Sinophobia in order to distract from their own malfeasance. By screeching with nationalistic panic “look what they’re doing over there!” the tech companies shift the conversation from what they themselves are doing over here.
    9. Yet in Harris’s Sinophobic comments about “the rise of China” one can detect the thinking of two fairly forgotten writers on technology: Oswald Spengler and Ernst Jünger. Writing in interwar Germany, these reactionary modernist thinkers, wrote at length about the ways that technology was changing the world. And what Spengler and Jünger both argued was that technology could only be properly harnessed, could only be effectively controlled, if it was done so by “Western” societies. With open xenophobia dripping from their words, Spengler and Jünger warned that “Western” societies needed to master technology lest it should be deployed against them by foreign others.
    10. Thus, these companies have launched a new strategy to reinvigorate their all American status: engage in some heavy-handed techno-nationalism by attacking China. And this Sinophobic, and often flagrantly racist, shift serves to distract from the misdeeds of the tech companies by creating the looming menace of a big foreign other. This is a move that has been made by many of the tech companies, it is one that has been happily parroted by many elected officials, and it is a move which Harris makes as well.

      Perhaps the better move is to frame these companies as behemoths on the scale of foreign countries, but ones which have far more power and should be scrutinized more heavily than even China itself. What if the enemy is already within and it's name is Facebook or Google?

    1. One of the major problems that underlies our society is that the police represent power-over when what we really need is power-with or power-to.

    2. the three types of power commonly discussed in management theory: power-over, power-with, and power-to. These three types of power were first identified by the Mother of Modern Management, Mary Parker Follett. You may also recognize her as the person who coined the term “win-win.” Here are the three types of power: Power-over is extractive. Power-over is extracted from other people, the natural world, etc. Power-over means getting more of the pie. Power-with is gained when we work together, i.e, collective action. Power-to is generative. Power-to is the power we have to create new things. Power-to means making the pie bigger. 

      An interesting break down of power.

    1. One of the flaws of using Digital Mappa for projects like this appears to be that it acts more as a viewer (as a result of it's original use with maps) than as something for text. As a result, when looking at various pages, the URL of the page and it's attendant resources doesn't change, so one can't link to particular resources within the work, nor can one easily use digital tools (Hypothes.is for example), to anchor and annotate portions of the text.

    2. Susanna Collet's Commonplace Book

    1. This is a facsimile and diplomatic edition of Codex Vercellensis CXVII, Archivio e Biblioteca Capitolare di Vercelli.

      An interesting example of a digitized version of a book.

    1. Despite the surprising lack of digital editions, the commonplace book, more than any other genre of writing, seems well suited to a digital format, since, by its very structure, it is a linked web of fragments that have been “coded” and “marked up” with metadata. For this reason, we have put much thought and planning into which tools to use and how design this digital edition.
    1. A standalone React/Redux web application for for presenting unique printed books and manuscripts in digital facsimile.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Whitney Trettien</span> in Digital Book History (<time class='dt-published'>04/07/2021 12:59:11</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Cut/Copy/Paste explores the relations between fragments, history, books, and media. It does so by scouting out fringe maker cultures of the seventeenth century, where archives were cut up, “hacked,” and reassembled into new media machines: the Concordance Room at Little Gidding in the 1630s and 1640s, where Mary Collett Ferrar and her family sliced apart printed Bibles and pasted the pieces back together into elaborate collages known as “Harmonies”; the domestic printing atelier of Edward Benlowes, a gentleman poet and Royalist who rode out the Civil Wars by assembling boutique books of poetry; and the nomadic collections of John Bagford, a shoemaker-turned-bookseller who foraged fragments of old manuscripts and title pages from used bookshops to assemble a material history of the book. Working across a century of upheaval, when England was reconsidering its religion and governance, each of these individuals saved the frail, fragile, frangible bits of the past and made from them new constellations of meaning. These fragmented assemblages resist familiar bibliographic and literary categories, slipping between the cracks of disciplines; later institutions like the British Library did not know how to collate or catalogue them, shuffling them between departments of print and manuscript. Yet, brought back together in this hybrid history, their scattered remains witness an emergent early modern poetics of care and curation, grounded in communities of practice. Stitching together new work in book history and media archaeology via digital methods and feminist historiography, Cut/Copy/Paste traces the lives and afterlives of these communities, from their origins in early modern print cultures to the circulation of their work as digital fragments today. In doing so, this project rediscovers the odd book histories of the seventeenth century as a media history with an ethics of material making—one that has much to teach us today.
    1. The European Commission has prepared to legislate to require interoperability, and it calls being able to use your data wherever and whenever you like “multi-homing”. (Not many other people like this term, but it describes something important – the ability for people to move easily between platforms

      an interesting neologism to describe something that many want

    2. The problem with US Big Tech is bigger, deeper – iceberg-dimensioned, you might say – and not even remotely blockchain-sized or shaped. Leslie Daigle has described the consolidation of the entire Internet stack under the hierarchical and totalizing business models of US tech firms as “climate change for the Internet’. If we don’t fix it, I personally do not believe we will be able to fix much else. That’s why my life’s work is helping to fix it. And by fix, I mean destroy.

      I want this career!

    3. I’ve also written about China’s no less corrosive version of the Internet and how it’s marketed to developing and middle income countries as “Autocracy-as-a-Service”.

      Autocracy-as-a-Service---it's so sad that this apt phrase exists and worse that it has such a benign feeling to it.

      https://onezero.medium.com/now-any-government-can-buy-chinas-tools-for-censoring-the-internet-18ed862b9138

    4. To change incentives so that personal data is treated with appropriate care, we need criminal penalties for the Facebook executives who left vulnerable half a billion people’s personal data, unleashing a lifetime of phishing attacks, and who now point to an FTC deal indemnifying them from liability because our phone numbers and unchangeable dates of birth are “old” data.

      We definitely need penalties and regulation to fix our problems.

    5. I know tech policy pretty well, and this absolute dumpster fire of a policy area isn’t just a cool new place to build a blockchain-based commons, but a hard-right haven of male libertarians asset-stripping the social democratic state to build global monopolies that re-run nineteenth century colonialism, but bigger.

      A well stated version of our current problem.

    6. Right now, most of the blockchain mining in the world happens in China, where provinces with the cheapest energy set up mining operations to do the ‘proof of work’ calculations that the dominant paradigm of blockchain requires. Factories that ostensibly make other things now acquire significant computing hardware and dedicate energy in order to, essentially, print money that’s then stored offshore. A recent study shows that 40% of China’s mostly bitcoin mining is powered by coal-burning. We also already know that non-blockchain server farms in cheap energy countries consume so much energy they distort national grids, and throw off huge amounts of heat that then need cooling for the servers to operate, creating a vicious cycle of energy consumption
    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>kickscondor</span> in Web Curios Returns! (<time class='dt-published'>05/01/2021 10:37:56</time>)</cite></small>

    1. A Digital Garden Theme for Gatsby. Gatsby Garden lets you create a static HTML version of your markdown notes

      This also supports Obsidian wikilinks

    1. Perhaps I’m trying to use Obsidian for something it wasn’t intended – a note pad full of simple scratch notes that eventually become to-do lists, emails, blog posts, etc. It should be used to build a knowledge base – a collection of information that rounds out a subject. I just simply don’t do that type of note taking.

      I'm using it to do both of these things and definitely find it more useful for the knowledge base work. I've never used Simplenote heavily, but it's definitely more focused on your use case Colin.

      For the quick notes scratchpad idea, I've been relying on Markor and syncing the results from my phone to my Obsidian data store to get those notes into my notebook more easily. Often when I'm at my desktop I may move those notes to other more appropriate places to keep track of them. Hopefully Obsidian's mobile version (in beta) will make this portion easier.

    1. An interesting thread with some links to the [[agora]] and various pieces others are building.

    1. Exact memorization of individual lines like this is difficult at best, even with these methods.

    1. Sidewiki does another interesting thing - it matches comments to the same words elsewhere on the web. For example, my comment on Douglas Adams excellent 1999 piece also shows up in SideWiki on JP Rangiswami's blog where he quotes Douglas Adams too.This hints at a greater possibility for SideWiki - to weave the web together by better by showing commentary across the web from all places that quote and cite each other, correlating by textual quotation and adding annotated links to the commentary from people we trust most.
    1. If instead of commenting, you write a response on your blog, you are standing behind your words, and associating them with the rest of your writing. The social dynamics are very different; you think more before responding instead of posting a quick flame. You can't really spam, as you are only soiling your own garden.
    1. Whether Trump can return to Facebook (and Instagram) will be determined on Wednesday morning, when Facebook’s Oversight Board offers its ruling on the company’s indefinite ban. Check TheWrap.com around 6:15 a.m. PT on Wednesday for an update.

      Let's hope that the answer is a resounding "NO!"

    2. You can check out the new platform — which is essentially a short-form blog — by heading to www.DonaldJTrump.com/desk.

      Apparently he's invented the idea of a microblog? And he's got a /desk page?

      What comes next?

      But let's be honest, he was posting these short status updates like this just a few days after he got kicked off of Twitter. He's just got a slightly better UI now.

    1. Nuzzel has been one of the few apps I've truly loved. It's been great for discovery. It's one of the very few I use every day and it's one of only three apps that I allow to give me notifications on my phone.

      I'm devastated....

    1. Their care for the communities and the journalists and creators that serve them is not isolated to the people who are explicitly paid to care about such things. That sense of service permeates the whole company. Seeing that has been a unique experience.

      Care for the communities? Really?! I'm not so sure here...

      However, we’re not moving fast enough.

      I'm also a bit reticent about the We're not moving fast enough part. Sure we need to help out journalists, but usually moving fast in the social space has been a disservice to the user.

    1. This looks interesting, but not quite sure where they may be going. Looks like a company that Twitter has bought out.

    1. I wish they'd gone into some more detail on the headless piece and how to actually do that portion, though that's not much of a video thing.

    1. A similar tool Foam is. Foam is currently not far enough along their path of development to my taste, but will get there, and I will certainly explore making the switch.

      Potentially even better, it may be the case that Foam comes up to speed and potentially offers some slightly different but useful functionality using the same data source. Then one could keep the files in one's own space and use Obsidian, Foam, or even other tools to access and work with it.

    1. I really need to delve back into some of the plugins and test out using them more frequently. The workspace one I tried briefly when it first came out, but it had a few problems for me which are now likely fixed.

    1. Thanks for an awesome post. I think that I have quite similar ideas to how you think about notes and note-taking, although the terminology is different. But even so, you raised several points that were not only linked to my own thinking, but gave me new thoughts and ideas to work with. Cheers for that.

      I was just about to ask you what your system looked like Michael, but then I realized that you've tucked many of them into Hypothes.is at https://via.hypothes.is/https://www.zylstra.org/blog/2020/11/100-days-in-obsidian-pt-4-writing-notes/

    2. Ton delineates his ideas between notions, notes, ideas, and work notes. It's not too dissimilar to the ideas others like Maggie Appleton have written about various smaller pieces being built up from small "seedlings" into larger evergreen pieces within a digital gardens framing.

      I do like the idea of emergent outlines he notes over Ahrens' speculative outlines.

    1. I started using Obsidian to make better notes (Notions as I call them), and link them together where I see relevance.

      Interesting that there is also a silo version of Obsidian called Notion, which is also similar to Evernote. I wonder if this had any influence on your name? This is a reasonable indicator that it's a good name for these.

    1. I love the phrase "elephant paths" (the correct translation?) for maps of content.

      I also like the idea of having a set up for doing digital captures of physical notebook pages. I'll have to consider how to do this most easily. I should also look back and evaluate how to continue improving my digital process as well.

    1. An Obsidian meetup? This is a great idea. Wish I hadn't missed it. (Also wish I spoke Dutch...)

    1. all active note-takers, life-hackers, and apparently also IndieWeb-enabled bloggers!

      We really need to get around to scheduling the second session of Gardens and Streams.

    2. I’m ashamed to admit I’m the only English blogger, and I love the idea of writing in Dutch, but I’ve been there, and it didn’t work. Should I reconsider - again?

      Why not both?

    3. esterday evening, Ton Zijlstra organized the first Dutch Obsidian meetup. I didn’t really know what to expect, and in the end I’m glad I let my curiosity get the better of me, as we chatted for almost two hours on various struggles with contemporary note-taking using the relatively new note-taking player, Obsidian. Read Frank Meeuwsen’s expectations and Ton’s afterthoughts on their respective blogs (in Dutch). Together with Sebastiaan Andeweg and myself, the four of us had a great time showing each other how we tackle digital note-taking. It turned out to be a small but quirky group of like-minded people: all active note-takers, life-hackers, and apparently also IndieWeb-enabled bloggers!

      This sounds like a fun way to get together. I'm personally curious to see people taking their Obsidian data and turning them into IndieWeb-friendly linked Memexes. It's interesting to use Obsidian to have a thought conversation with one's self, but it could also be interesting if they could have conversations with each other via Webmention.

      For me the more difficult piece is not so much getting the thing online, but setting it up so that the backlinks all work properly using the [[wikilink]] syntax.

    4. Sebastiaan is writing a review plugin that takes advantage of the concept of spaced repetition, which sounded really cool. I hope it’ll get published someday.

      This sounds promising. I'll keep my eye on a possible release.

    1. I hope to have this site when I’m 80. I may not like some of the things I wrote 50 years prior, but at least I will be able to reacquaint myself with former me-s. I hope I don’t lose sight of this purpose.

      This seems akin to Heraclitus's thought that "No one ever steps in the same river twice." But here the river is actually a person who changes over a lifetime.

    2. Now this is interesting, and it sort of hits on the difference between a personal blog and a blog that feels more like a personal brand exercise. The best personal blogs I’ve come across feel like a glimpse in to someone’s personal notebook, something filled mostly with notes written with the author in mind first and foremost vs notes that have been written with a wider audience in mind. A good personal blog can (and maybe should) contain a mixture of both, since they both can be absolutely great and useful. But when it is only ever writing for an audience… well that doesn’t feel like a personal blog, to me.

      This is much the way I feel and write. I keep my site more as a personal commonplace book and write primarily for myself. Others read it from time to time and comment, but in the end, it's really all just for me.

    3. Louise Brigham, an American designer and teacher best known for her box furniture.

      This reminds me of folks making FedEx furniture a decade or so back: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FedEx_furniture

    4. This is not to say that I don’t also cherish more traditionally precious heirlooms, it’s just that the objects with utility feel like they maybe have more of the life of the person in them.

      I love this idea about heirlooms and utility.

    5. In the early 1910s, she set up a woodworking “laboratory” for children called the Home Thrift Association. During WWI she started one of the earliest ready-to-assemble furniture companies, Home Art Masters.

      Precursor of Ikea and others in the modern era. I wonder if there are other earlier/contemporaneous examples? Shipping would certainly have been at a bigger premium at the time compared to containerized shipping now.

  2. May 2021
  3. Apr 2021
    1. Firefox extension: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/promnesia/

      Promnesia is a browser extension for Chrome/Firefox (including Firefox for Android!) which serves as a web surfing copilot, enhancing your browsing history and web exploration experience.

      TLDR: it lets you explore your browsing history in context: where you encountered it, in chat, on Twitter, on Reddit, or just in one of the text files on your computer. This is unlike most modern browsers, where you can only see when you visited the link.

      I've been doing something a bit like this manually and it looks a lot like the sort of UI examples I've been collecting at https://boffosocko.com/2019/06/29/social-reading-user-interface-for-discovery/

    1. I like how Dr. Pacheco-Vega outlines some of his research process here.

      Sharing it on Twitter is great, and so is storing a copy on his website. I do worry that it looks like the tweets are embedded via a simple URL method and not done individually, which means that if Twitter goes down or disappears, so does all of his work. Better would be to do a full blockquote embed method, so that if Twitter disappears he's got the text at least. Images would also need to be saved separately.

    1. After the recent brouhaha at Basecamp (context: https://www.platformer.news/p/-what-really-happened-at-basecamp), a great example of someone using their own domain because they didn't want the bad press of a silo/platform to stick to them

    1. Rajiv reminded us that: “Openness can be leveraged for justice, but it can also do harm. Closed practices can also do harm, but there are times when closed is the empowered choice. Choice is key. We must serve justice, rather than merely being open.”
    2. Rajiv cited an example highlighted by tara robertson of an instance where openness raised troubling ethical issues.  When the lesbian porn magazine On Our Backs was digitised and released under CC BY licence, women who had modelled for the magazine felt that work they had created for their own community had been appropriated for uses they had never intended and did not consent to. 

      It can be important when opening content up, especially at higher corporate levels, to take into account future uses of material that might not have been forseen when they were created. This may be especially important with the use of algorithms.

    3. Discord really did have the feel of a physical conference space, where everyone came together to chat, share and hang out, and the live Youtube comment facility that accompanied the presentations and keynotes really helped to encourage discussion.  My only small regret is that with so much of the engagement happening across multiple conference platforms, there was less activity on the hashtags on twitter, which makes it a little harder to look back over all the discussions that took place.

      Having multiple channels to check and watch both during and after a conference can certainly split up the conversation stream, make things difficult to follow and can create context collapse. It can also be overwhelming to have multiple different channels that one feels like they need to watch to stay on top of what is going on.

      It did help here to have the hashtag(s) for the conference piped into the Discord stream so that they could be watched in their own space without needing to leave the conference space created by the Discord server.

    1. Thanks for all your hard work Meredith! The conference went so well and in large part it's down to your work which hasn't gone unnoticed.

    1. But syllabi, as long as I’ve known them, are too often defensive documents aimed at controlling students through absurd levels of bureaucracy.

      This is certainly an apt definition of syllabi

    1. Facebook provides some data portability, but makes an odd plea for regulation to make more functionality possible.

      Why do this when they could choose to do the right thing? They don't need to be forced and could certainly try to enforce security. It wouldn't be any worse than unveiling the tons of personal data they've managed not to protect in the past.

    1. Over the years, the machinery of targeted advertising has frequently been used for exploitation, discrimination, and harm. The ability to target people based on ethnicity, religion, gender, age, or ability allows discriminatory ads for jobs, housing, and credit. Targeting based on credit history—or characteristics systematically associated with it— enables predatory ads for high-interest loans. Targeting based on demographics, location, and political affiliation helps purveyors of politically motivated disinformation and voter suppression. All kinds of behavioral targeting increase the risk of convincing scams.

      a succinct summary of the harms of tracking and adtech

    2. The power to target is the power to discriminate. By definition, targeted ads allow advertisers to reach some kinds of people while excluding others. A targeting system may be used to decide who gets to see job postings or loan offers just as easily as it is to advertise shoes. 
    3. You should have a right to present different aspects of your identity in different contexts. If you visit a site for medical information, you might trust it with information about your health, but there’s no reason it needs to know what your politics are. Likewise, if you visit a retail website, it shouldn’t need to know whether you’ve recently read up on treatment for depression. FLoC erodes this separation of contexts, and instead presents the same behavioral summary to everyone you interact with.
    1. Just the sort of draconian silo activity you'd imagine that Apple would be doing.

      So much for their free and open directory as their position in the space.

    1. I’m resisting the temptation to add bibliographical cards into the Obsidian vault. Niklas Luhmann, you may recall, had a set of cards in his zettelkasten that were source citations. I don’t get the impression from reading his descriptions of his process or Schmidt’s research into it, that these were really an active part of the network of ideas in the boxes, which seem to have been based on his digested reactions to sources.

      I've done some bibliographical cards in the past myself, but find that I never used or revisited them or had great need to have them crosslinked myself. I've been moving away from doing this as well.

    1. This is a pretty solid overview of a literature review workflow. He doesn't use the words, but this is not a half bad way to build a digital commonplace book or digital garden/personal wiki for research use.

      I hadn't thought about using Grav as the method for storing and displaying all of it, but perhaps it's worth looking into?

    2. As I was gearing up to start my PhD last fall, I received a piece of advice that made a lot of sense at the time, and continues to do so. My colleague, Inba told me to 'write while I read', meaning that I should take notes and summarize research while I read it, and not just read and underline article after article. That way, not only do I not lose my thoughts while I'm reading an article, but I am actively thinking through the arguments in the paper while I am reading it and my writing is thoroughly grounded in the literature.

      This is generally fantastic advice! It's also the general underpinning behind the idea of Luhmann's zettelkasten method.

      I'll also mention that it's not too dissimilar to Benjamin Franklin's writing advice about taking what others have written and working with that yourself, though there he doesn't take it as far as others have since.

    1. An interesting outline of how Colin Madland uses Notion for his Ph.D. research work.

      He's got a good list of some pros and cons at the bottom. The export sounds a bit hairy on one front, but at least gives you some sort of back up in case the worst were to happen.

      Not sure it's the thing for me and I'm happier with my workflow using Obsidian at the moment, though some of the ideas about process here could be helpful.

      It looks like he's got some of the same issues in using Grav for his knowledge work as I do in WordPress, though the taxonomy and Webmention portions do tend to help me a bit.

      Colin brought this to my attention at the OERxDomains21 conference.

    1. The Cozy web is Venkatesh Rao's term for the private, gatekeeper bounded spaces of the internet we have all retreated to over the last few years.
    2. I like the metaphors of Dark Forrest and Cozy Web, but I'm not sure that this visualization of it really works for me.

    1. 7:09 - Discussion of a custom template for use cases; this sounds a bit like some customization similar to Open Scholar on Drupal

      Here's a link to Alan Levine's work here: https://cogdogblog.com/category/twu-portfolios/

      What has support for WPMU looked like within the pandemic?

      Laurie Miles, UNC Asheville

      • Uptick with faculty looking for tools to be online. They've gone from 6 or 7 in past years to 17
      • Sharing resources with colleagues within the department or at other institutions

      Shannon Hauser, University of Mary Washington

      • They've seen a disconnect between their LMS (Canvas) and Domains with the LMS winning out

      Colin Madland, Trinity Western University

      • Didn't have a culture of online teaching
      • Fine arts department started tinkering and others within the department are using that template. They spent some time and thought in the Summer and that made it easier for them in the fall.

      Jim Groom talked about a "motherblog" (a planet made via RSS). How can we center the idea of a webmention hub to do this?

      There was a lot of reversion to what was comfortable in the move to all online pedagogy. Professors were comfortable with lectures, so they stuck with that. There wasn't an emphasis on actual learning.

      I should note Glenn Zucman's art work to Colin to pass along to their art department. There could be a community of use cases that might help each other experiment and expand on their ideas.