109 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2021
    1. Sure, the slow way is always "good enough" — until you learn a better way of doing things. By your logic, then, we shouldn't have the option of including "Move to" in our context menus either — because any move operation could be performed using the cut and paste operations instead? The method you proposed is 6-7 steps long, with step 4 being the most onerous when you're in a hurry: Select files "Cut" "Create New Folder" Think of a name for the new folder. Manually type in that name, without any help from the tool. (We can't even use copy and paste to copy some part of one of the file names, for example, because the clipboard buffer is already being used for the file selection.) Press Enter Press Enter again to enter the new folder (or use "Paste Into Folder") "Paste" The method that Nautilus (and apparently Mac's Finder) provides (which I and others love) is much more efficient, especially because it makes step 4 above optional by providing a default name based on the selection, coming in at 4-5 steps (would be 3 steps if we could assign a keyboard shortcut to this command like Mac apparently has ): Select files Bring up context menu (a direct shortcut key would make this even sweeter) Choose "New Folder With Selection" Either accept the default name or choose a different name (optional) Press Enter Assuming "Sort folders before files" option is unchecked, you can continue working/sorting in this outer folder, right where you left off: Can you see how this method might be preferable when you have a folder with 100s or 1000s of files you want to organize it into subfolders? Especially when there is already a common filename prefix (such as a date) that you can use to group related files together. And since Nemo kindly allows us to choose which commands to include in our context menu, those who don't use/like this workflow are free to exclude it from their menus... Having more than one way to accomplish something isn't necessarily a bad thing.
  2. Jun 2021
    1. git diff-index --name-status --relative --cached @ might be a bit easier to parse (and only includes staged files so you don't have to do an extra step to filter them). Also, I couldn't use git status --porcelain because my Rails app is in a sub-folder so I needed the list of files to be relative to the Rails root instead of relative to the git repo root (although git status in general seems to respect the --relative option, git status --porcelain seems to not).
    1. https://github.com/rycus86/githooks is a really option for managing hooks It is... safe (it uses an opt-in model, where it will ask for confirmation whether new or changed scripts should be run or not (or disabled)) configurable handles a lot of the details for you lets you keep your hooks nicely organized. For example:
    1. Oversharing. Crying, disclosing intimate details, and telling long (unrelated and/or unsolicited) stories about one’s personal life may indicate the lack of an essential social work skill: personal boundaries.

      Testing out the annotate feature. Student 1 will highlight sections according to the prompts, as shown HERE.

      For example: "This is me during interviews. I say too much and veer off topic."

    1. Same feature in TypeScript¶ It's worth mentioning that other languages have a shortcut for assignment var assignment directly from constructor parameters. So it seems especially painful that Ruby, despite being so beautifully elegant and succinct in other areas, still has no such shortcut for this. One of those other languages (CoffeeScript) is dead now, but TypeScript remains very much alive and allows you to write this (REPL): class Foo { constructor(public a:number, public b:number, private c:number) { } } instead of this boilerplate: class Foo { constructor(a, b, c) { this.a = a; this.b = b; this.c = c; } } (The public/private access modifiers actually disappear in the transpiled JavaScript code because it's only the TypeScript compiler that enforces those access modifiers, and it does so at compile time rather than at run time.) Further reading: https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/2/classes.html#parameter-properties https://basarat.gitbook.io/typescript/future-javascript/classes#define-using-constructor https://kendaleiv.com/typescript-constructor-assignment-public-and-private-keywords/ I actually wouldn't mind being able to use public/private modifiers on instance var parameters in Ruby, too, but if we did, I would suggest making that be an additional optional shortcut (for defining accessor methods for those instance vars) that builds on top of the instance var assignment parameter syntax described here. (See more detailed proposal in #__.) Accessors are more of a secondary concern to me: we can already define accessors pretty succinctly with attr_accessor and friends. The bigger pain point that I'm much more interested in having a succinct shortcut for is instance var assignment in constructors. initialize(@a, @b, @c) syntax¶ jsc (Justin Collins) wrote in #note-12: jjyr (Jinyang Jiang) wrote: I am surprised this syntax has been repeatedly requested and rejected since 7 years ago. ... As someone who has been writing Ruby for over 10 years, this syntax is exactly that I would like. I grow really tired of writing def initialize(a, b, c) @a = a @b = b @c = c end This would be perfect: def initialize(@a, @b, @c) end I'm a little bit sad Matz is against this syntax, as it seems so natural to me. Me too!! I've been writing Ruby for over 15 years, and this syntax seems like the most obvious, simple, natural, clear, unsurprising, and Ruby-like. I believe it would be readily understood by any Rubyist without any explanation required. Even if you saw it for the first time, I can't think of any way you could miss or misinterpret its meaning: since @a is in the same position as a local variable a would normally be, it seems abundantly clear that instead of assigning to a local variable, we're just assigning to the variable @a instead and of course you can reference the @a variable in the constructor body, too, exactly the same as you could with a local variable a passed as an argument. A workaround pattern¶ In the meantime, I've taken to defining my constructor and list of public accessors (if any) like this: attr_reader \ :a, :b def new( a, b) @a, @b = a, b end ... which is still horrendously boilerplatey and ugly, and probably most of you will hate — but by lining up the duplicated symbols into a table of columns, I like that I can at least more easily see the ugly duplication and cross-check that I've spelled them all correctly and handled them all consistently. :shrug: Please??¶ Almost every time I write a new class in Ruby, I wish for this feature and wonder if we'll ever get it. Can we please?
    1. Thanks, this was just what I was looking for! This is a perfect appropriate use of instance_eval. I do not understand the nay-sayers. If you already have your array in a variable, then sure, a.reduce(:+) / a.size.to_f is pretty reasonable. But if you want to "in line" find the mean of an array literal or an array that is returned from a function/expression — without duplicating the entire expression ([0,4,8].reduce(:+) / [0,4,8].length.to_f, for example, is abhorrent) or being required to assign to a local, then instance_eval option is a beautiful, elegant, idiomatic solution!!
    2. instance_eval is analogous to using tap, yield_self, … when you are dealing with a chain of method calls: do use it whenever it's appropriate and helpful! And in this case, I absolutely believe that it is.
    1. some peer annotations might evenimpede their understanding

      I've never really heard this before, though it's clearly an issue when thinking about public annotation on the web in terms of the whole "don't read the comments" thing.

      I suppose it's also a pedagogical dilemma. Can noise be as instructive as signal? Is distinguishing the two, and perhaps leveraging both, part of the work of educaiton?

  3. May 2021
    1. If instead of commenting, you write a response on your blog, you are standing behind your words, and associating them with the rest of your writing. The social dynamics are very different; you think more before responding instead of posting a quick flame. You can't really spam, as you are only soiling your own garden.
  4. Apr 2021
    1. We’ve been working on a sort of SPLOT-type thing which is essentially slimmed-down backend for sites whose sole purpose is completing a writing assignment(s) for a single class. I like the TRU SPLOT approach and we’re going to use that in some use cases, but we wanted something that functions kinda like a SPLOT but begins to introduce students & fac to the real WP backend. We’re viewing it as a beginning on-ramp to later those students feel comfortable with their own WP blog with simplified options. Then onto more WP options and then maybe to full DoOO someday.

      While reading this, I'm thinking that I ought to build a SPLOT version of commentpara.de that allows a WordPress based anonymous commenting functionality for sending Webmentions.

    1. I love the idea of Webmention becoming part of core.

      One of the benefits I've seen with it is that to comment on my site, you need to post it on your own site first to send me the notification. People are much less likely to publicly spam me when they have to host the spam for themselves and associate it with their identity directly. (I'll admit that this doesn't get rid of all spam, but it does help to significantly cut back on it. To date, I don't believe there's been any Webmention spam seen in the wild.) If anything I've actually seen more civil and substantive conversations from those using Webmention. It'd be interesting to see WP Tavern support it.

      Reframing the design, UI, prevention of abuse, and set up of how comments are done on the web is certainly a laudable goal and one which could use some rebuilding from the ground up.

      (syndicated to https://wptavern.com/yes-comments-are-still-relevant-but-we-need-a-better-system?unapproved=373040&moderation-hash=b55adb70109112d26a7bff2e87c00aa9#comment-373040)

  5. Mar 2021
    1. Q: Can I access my personal comment history? A: No, there will not be a way to access archived comments.

      In this instance, it's similar to a site death taking one's data off-line. This is a good reason to post one's comments on their own site first.

    2. Q: So, this means you don’t value hearing from readers?A: Not at all. We engage with readers every day, and we are constantly looking for ways to hear and share the diversity of voices across New Jersey. We have built strong communities on social platforms, and readers inform our journalism daily through letters to the editor. We encourage readers to reach out to us, and our contact information is available on this How To Reach Us page.

      We have built strong communities on social platforms

      They have? Really?! I think it's more likely the social platforms have built strong communities which happen to be talking about and sharing the papers content. The paper doesn't have any content moderation or control capabilities on any of these platforms.

      Now it may be the case that there are a broader diversity of voices on those platforms over their own comments sections. This means that a small proportion of potential trolls won't drown out the signal over the noise as may happen in their comments sections online.

      If the paper is really listening on the other platforms, how are they doing it? Isn't reading some or all of it a large portion of content moderation? How do they get notifications of people mentioning them (is it only direct @mentions)?

      Couldn't/wouldn't an IndieWeb version of this help them or work better.

    3. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Inquirer.com</span> in Why we’re removing comments on most of Inquirer.com (<time class='dt-published'>03/18/2021 19:32:19</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Many news organizations have made the decision to eliminate or restrict comments in recent years, from National Public Radio, to The Atlantic, to NJ.com, which did a nice job of explaining the decision when comments were removed from its site.

      A list of journalistic outlets that have removed comments from their websites.

    2. Experience has shown that anything short of 24-hour vigilance on all stories is insufficient.
    3. Racism has been a persistent presence in Inquirer comments. The Inquirer is committed to making the changes required to be an actively anti-racist news organization. Removing comments is a step in the right direction, with many more to come.
    4. Commenting on Inquirer.com was long ago hijacked by a small group of trolls who traffic in racism, misogyny, and homophobia. This group comprises a tiny fraction of the Inquirer.com audience. But its impact is disproportionate and enduring.
  6. Feb 2021
  7. Jan 2021
  8. Dec 2020
  9. Oct 2020
    1. Comment, according to communications studies professor Joseph Reagle, Jr., is a genre of communication that is reactive, short, and asynchronous.4
    1. That said: I will try to work out using webmentions to reply to folks replies that get backfed to my site, using my site’s comments. We’ll see.

      I spent some time trying to figure this out. It's not as hard as I would have presumed to thread comments between WordPress and Twitter. https://boffosocko.com/2018/07/02/threaded-conversations-between-wordpress-and-twitter/

      I do wish I had an automated way to write the comment on my site and syndicate it to Twitter automatically and have the threading work properly. For now I'm doing it manually--the few times I do do it.

    1. We analyzed our Disqus data and we found that roughly 17,400 comments were made on our site in 2019, but 45% came from just 13 people. That data tells us that social media, email, phone calls, letters to the editor, our Crosscut events and an occasional visit to the newsroom are far better tools for us to hear about your concerns, story ideas, feedback and support.

      The Disqus data statistics here are fascinating. It also roughly means that those 13 people were responsible for 600+ comments on average or roughly 2 a day every day for the year. More likely it was a just a handful responsible for the largest portion and the others tailing off.

      Sadly missing are their data about social media, email, phone, and letters to the editor which would tell us more about how balanced their decision was. What were the totals for these and who were they? Were they as lopsided as the Disqus numbers?

    1. For instance, if someone replies to a post on Twitter, the reply gets sent back here as a comment. However if I reply here to that comment, it doesn’t get sent back to Twitter.

      This is an interesting problem. It also becomes an issue of having the comment reply on the WP site be able to have the Twitter responses to that come back to the original, potentially as a comment with a URL with a fragment.

    1. Think of this essay as a series of strongly held hypotheses; without access to the types of data which i’m not even sure exists, it’s difficult to be definitive. As ever, my wise readers will add or push back as they always do.

      Push back, sure, but where? Where would we find this push back? The comments section only has a few tidbits. Perhaps the rest is on Twitter, Facebook, or some other social silo where the conversation is fraught-fully fragmented. Your own social capital is thus spread out and not easily compiled or compounded. As a result I wonder who may or may not have read this piece...

    1. So - I’m not quite ready to ditch disqus and move completely to Hypothesis annotations

      I do quite like the idea of using Hypothes.is as a service for implementing one's website comments in a broader way. It's sort of reminiscent of how some static site generators are leveraging webmention.io as a third party comment/webmention provider. Of course this presuposes that one is comfortable offloading this to a third party that could disappear and take the data with them, though your spreadsheet set up would help to protect against that.

  10. Sep 2020
    1. The dynamic routes are a great way to keep the routing.rb DRY and avoid unneeded dependencies between the routing and the controller files That is exactly the problem: I've already defined the (white)list of actions in the controller; I just want to make them all available via routes. I shouldn't have to repeat myself in the routes file.
  11. Aug 2020
  12. Jul 2020
  13. Jun 2020
  14. May 2020
    1. Updated to add .join. Also looked like the 2nd example was missing result.save so added that too. Haven't tested the code, so hopefully it is correct...
  15. Apr 2020
    1. descriptive study of a large develop-ment team—roughly 450 people producing about 9,000 annotationson about 1,250 documents over 10 months—using a Web-based anno-tation system.
  16. Mar 2020
    1. I've been meaning to remind readers that I do read the comments. Some time ago, one disappointed commenter mused that others' reflections seemed to go (as I recall) "into a void," because I remained silent to each. Perhaps I was ignoring readers' remarks? I assure you that is not the case. I read them all — although on this site, for some reason, "all" means somewhat sparse — and I find them nearly all remarkable in their perceptiveness. I especially welcome, and enjoy, intelligent disagreement. I choose not to respond, however, only because of my editorial philosophy, which holds that the comment section is, rightfully, for commenters — and commenters alone. I've already had my say, and it seems to me rather rude to take another whack in reply. Whenever I'm so substantively shaky or incoherent as to make my case unpersuasively the first time around, I figure I should live with the consequences. And whenever I find criticism flawed, I figure readers — perceptive as they are — will see the flaw as well, therefore there's no need for me to rub it in. So, I beg you not to take my silence personally.
  17. Feb 2020
  18. Jan 2020
  19. Dec 2019
    1. If none of this worked, please comment in this issue and we’ll try to help. Try to create a small reproducing example — you might discover the problem as you’re doing it.
  20. Nov 2019
    1. Threads are closed to new comments after two weeks, or if the submission has been killed by software, moderators, or user flags.
  21. Oct 2019
    1. The comment length is limited to 600. But sometimes I want to post a link to some code on typescriptlang.org/play whose URL is ~ 650 chars long.
  22. Aug 2019
    1. tate it.Whenever an annotation was added to a Madison document, a few technical features helped to further facilitate conversation. First, the document’s sponsor was automatically notified of a new annotation. Second, the annotation also appeared in-line as marginalia that could be responded to, liked, or flagged by others. And third, the annotation was displayed as a “comment” along with others at the end of the document. This process was described as “the future of crowdsourced legislation,” and illustrated how social and collaborative annotation could contribute to and improve civic life.Among noTroy Hicks1 week agoIt seems that these technical features were ones that, I am assuming, where only known and used by a very few of the users. Again, speaking to power and access, what does that mean for the kinds of democratized annotation experiences that we aspire to? How is this (entirely) dissimilar from conversations on social media, perhaps even off-putting or inaccessible to average users?

      Or additionally consider the vast amounts of un-curated noise that annotations may make in instances like these when they hit larger scale. How can these systems better delineate the authority of the individual authors?

      As a foil, consider how often people may read the several thousands of comments on a particular New York Times article? How many readers delve into these conversations and interact with them—particularly when they aren’t moderated or are overpopulated by trolls? We need better UI to indicate those annotating with some authority (or provide their background and expertise) or who may even be the original author responding to questions.

    1. Annotation and comment do share similar characteristics, but not all forms of annotation are synonymous with comment.
  23. Jul 2019
  24. Jun 2019
    1. I wonder why Dave doesn’t interact on micro.blog?

      My best guess is that he doesn't need to because he gets most of his interaction on his own site or Twitter, or both since his site is somewhat integrated into Twitter. I suspect he hasn't looked closely at micro.blog and/or the Webmention pieces and simply views it as an easy place to syndicate his content into. (I hope most realize that their comments aren't going anywhere and don't bother to use it to communicate with him though.)

  25. May 2019
  26. Feb 2019
    1. If you would like to comment on this story or anything else you have seen on BBC Culture, head over to our Facebook page or message us on Twitter.

      So sad to see that they've abrogated their responsibility for comments on their site to Twitter and Facebook

  27. Dec 2018
    1. A small blog neighborhood hiding in plain sight.

      An even smaller neighborhood are the folks lurking in an annotation over your post, since they're disconnected from the comment roll below. Possibly an integration opportunity?

  28. Sep 2018
  29. May 2018
    1. Spector is mijn bijdrage voor een respectvoller internet!

      Samen voor een respectvoller internet!

  30. Jan 2018
    1. While a traditional discussion forum is separated from the objects being discussed, a more powerful discourse environment is able to incorporate various web objects into discourse to maintain its contexts.

      Same could be said for page bottom comments in online newspapers/magazines.

  31. Oct 2017
  32. Sep 2017
    1. throughout these 3 years and a half, there’s been many unfortunate situations going on in the political fiel

      I had not stopped to consider the difference between being in high school while Trump is in office, versus my experience when Obama was in office. It must be terrifying to be in your most impressionable stage in life during a time when our political climate is full of hate and discrimination.

    1. most importantly how people in power see you

      This line is important because it claims that power relations are a major factor in racism. If the people leading our country are supposed to be an example of what Americans are like, then our leaders having racist thoughts or actions is detrimental to the health of the community.

    1. For me, racism is something that makes me uncomfortable to talk about

      I was immediately drawn to this article because of this opening line. Racism is something that makes most people uncomfortable, yet it's so important to talk about. According to Kelly Sue DeConnick, being uncomfortable is what helps us to grow. She claims it is her obligation to make people have the conversation that naturally make them shy away. It is the only way to make progress.

  33. Jul 2017
    1. Comments sections often become shouting matches or spam-riddled.

      They can also become filled with "me too" type of commentary which doesn't add anything substantive to the conversation.

      See also the Why Did you Delete my comment at http://www.math.columbia.edu/~woit/wordpress/?page_id=4338

  34. Apr 2017
  35. Feb 2017
    1. object you are photographing b

      "Maybe give some examples..."

    2. I hope to show with this tutorial, however, that the Dino-Lite Premier AM-311S has the potential to create useful models at an affordable price.

      "Good introduction of scope..."

    3. capture images for processing

      "Maybe be more specific..." (generic commentary)

    1. Much of the well-informed and articulate discussion around news, as well as criticism or praise for stories, has moved to social media and online forums. Those communities offer vibrant conversation and, importantly, are self-policed by participants to keep on the fringes those who would abuse the privilege of commenting.

      There are several serious shortcomings to this model: 1. People don't want to navigate outside of the site; 2. Echo chambers on social media; 3. Users still can't comment on specific sections of the article

  36. Sep 2016
    1. commenting

      From one of the Disqus comments:

      Which piece did you read?

      Though seemingly innocuous, this comment gets much closer to an ad hominem attack than to a throughtful conversation. The rest of the comment is ok, but it’s with slips like these that we get into flamewars.

  37. Aug 2016
  38. maurice1979-blog.tumblr.com maurice1979-blog.tumblr.com
    1. t another hello world

      Remarkable the world we can say hello to.

  39. Mar 2016
  40. Feb 2016
    1. comment options,

      I'd be interested to drill down here. Is there a difference between page bottom comments and those made inline? Is there a difference between making such comments in personal notes/private groups/public?...

  41. Dec 2015
    1. improving the quality of comments that a reader sees for Web content

      Sounds like solving the problem with comments is a priority to many, but approaches tend to diverge. Some content publishers have decided to turn off comments, because of perceived issues with the “signal-to-noise ratio”. Others adopt a community management approach, enabling people to monitor and moderate comments as a special type of a group effort. Annotation brings this approach to a new mode, though people may not comments and annotations as occupying the same sphere.

  42. Jul 2015
    1. The first half of his treatise (following his preliminary definitions) covers those topics in the discipline of legal theory that describe the material of Prophetic revelation
    1. We’re here for the community and the communication. We’re here for the conversation. We don’t ever, ever want to whisper to ourselves. We came here to fucking talk, to fucking listen, and think and then talk and listen some more. We can’t grow as a community without conversations and feedback, and we can’t have those conversations without kindness and assumptions of good faith.
    2. We feel confident, after ten years of total immersion in internet dialogue, with stating the following: productive conversations only happen when we assume good faith and treat each other with the patience and kindness that we devote to conversations with our friends and others we know and respect. 
  43. Jun 2015
  44. Jan 2015