494 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Web 4.0: The Internet of Things and AI

      Web 4.0 : The Internet of Things en AI Web 4.0 article Web_4.0 comes after Web 3.0, Web 2.0 and Web 1.0. What does it mean and what can we expect from it? The new web 4.0 has the following internet features....

  2. Dec 2021
    1. it seems we’re moving to that direction

      None of this is really relevant. Of all the apps listed, none are especially relevant to the Web. They'd best be classified as internet apps. Granted, they might be dealing in HTTP(S) at some point as a bodge, but then again, almost everything else does, too, whether it's part of the Web or not.

      (re @eric_young_1 https://twitter.com/eric_young_1/status/1470524708730851328—not sure how well the twitter.com client and Hypothesis interact)

    1. Fiber optic WiFi vs. ADSL: which is better?

      Fiber optic WiFi vs. ADSL: which is better? https://en.itpedia.nl/2021/10/08/glasvezel-wifi-versus-adsl-wat-is-beter/ An unreliable or slow Internet can lead to slow transaction processing, such as bill failures, video conferences that often lag or buffer, or business orders that take too long to process. There are several options for fast internet. Two of these options are fiber optic WiFi and ADSL. Which of these two can better meet our need for fast internet?

    1. This Internet of Everything needs a Ledger of Everything. Business, commerce, and the economy need a Digital Reckoning.

      Internet of Everything -- Ledger of Everything

  3. Nov 2021
    1. ʰᵉʳᵉ ᵃʳᵉ ᵗʰᵉ ᵈʳʸʷᵃˡˡ ʷᵉᵇˢᶤᵗᵉ ᵉᵃˢᵗᵉʳ ᵉᵍᵍˢ

      Please be warned: a friend noticed some very insensitive language I had forgotten about entirely. I've chosen to leave it since this website should not be surfaced in any discovery engines beyond NeoCities... Hoping that isn't a stupid idea.

    1. I spend most of my day in iOS Notes app.

      Did I ever really find this man intelligent??? Things sincerely do make a lot more sense now. Such a specific lack of aspiration.

    1. You.com’s big differentiating feature is that it lets people influence which sources they see. You can “upvote” and “downvote” specific categories, so when you run searches, you’ll see preferred sources first, neutral searches next, and downvoted sources last.

      THIS IS LITERALLY THE ANSWER TO SEARCH.

      Just… FYI.

      All you need to do is give users more control.

    1. But dig into the story of anyone who has been a genuine victim of modern mob justice and you will often find not an obvious argument between “woke” and “anti-woke” perspectives but rather incidents that are interpreted, described, or remembered by different people in different ways, even leaving aside whatever political or intellectual issue might be at stake.

      Cancel culture and modern mob justice are possible as the result of volumes of more detail and data as well as large doses of context collapse.

      In some cases, it's probably justified to help level the playing field for those in power who are practicing hypocrisy, but in others, it's simply a lack of context by broader society who have kneejerk reactions which have the ability to be "remembered" by broader society with search engines.

      How might Google allow the right to forget to serve as a means of restorative justice?

  4. Oct 2021
    1. Facebook could say that its platform is not for everyone. It could sound an alarm for those who wander into the most dangerous corners of Facebook, and those who encounter disproportionately high levels of harmful content. It could hold its employees accountable for preventing users from finding these too-harmful versions of the platform, thereby preventing those versions from existing.

      The "moral majority" has screamed for years about the dark corners of the internet, and now they seem to be actively supporting a company that actively pushes people to those very extremes.

    1. India voted in favour of a resolution condemning Internet shutdowns when it orders the largest number of Internet shutdowns.

    1. Supporting 4×4 MIMO takes a lot more power, and for battery powered devices, runtime is FAR more important.

      Reason why client devices still use 2x2 MIMO, not 4x4 MIMO

    2. How did your router even get a 'rating' of 5300 Mbps in the first place? Router manufacturers combine/add the maximum physical network speeds for ALL wifi bands (usually 2 or 3 bands) in the router to produce a single aggregate (grossly inflated) Mbps number. But your client device only connects to ONE band (not all bands) on the router at once. So, '5300 Mbps' is all marketing hype.

      Why routers get such a high rating

    3. The only thing that really matters to you is the maximum speed of a single 5 GHz band (using all MIMO antennas).

      What to focus on when choosing a router

    4. You have 1 Gbps Internet, and just bought a very expensive AX11000 class router with advertised speeds of up to 11 Gbps, but when you run a speed test from your iPhone XS Max (at a distance of around 32 feet), you only get around 450 Mbps (±45 Mbps). Same for iPad Pro. Same for Samsung Galaxy S8. Same for a laptop computer. Same for most wireless clients. Why? Because that is the speed expected from these (2×2 MIMO) devices!

      Reason why you may be getting slow internet speed on your client device (2x2 MIMO one)

  5. Sep 2021
    1. With Amazon the sole customer of the substation it will (via Oppidan) pay for the 26 month-long design and construction process, with the exception of the City-owned control building. It is expected to cost $5,388,260 across three payment milestones, one of which has already been paid.After it is built, property rights will transfer over to SVP, which will operate and maintain the substation.

      OK. so it's not so much a substation owned like a block box.But Amazon is the sole customer, and it likely bought the site so :

      a) it would stop others making a datacentre there b) it could then make use of the substation, and providing extra distribution for the other DCs it wants to operate and use so it can expand further

    1. This verticalization will have the great flaw of making the real consumption of these infrastructures invisible. Today we can still retrieve some data from water and energy providers but when Amazon builds its own substations, like in Santa Clara, or Google its own pumping stations then the black box will continue to grow.

      I had no idea Amazon is building its own substations.

    2. At the environmental level, the territorial approach makes it possible to get out of the mystique of relative efficiency values to align consumption in absolute value with a local stock and a precise environment.

      Absolutt comsumption as a percentage of the local resources would be a huge jump forward here

    3. However, the possible unsustainability of the new data center project was outweighed by an $800 million project with various financial benefits to the community, so the construction project was voted 6-1 in the city council.

      It's worth comparing this to other water reservations for context. Comparing it to agriculture in the same area might help, to see the choices people are facing

    4. It also raises the point that data centers could crowd out renewable energy capacity on the grid, slowing down the country's energy transition.

      I think the arguent made here is that the load can exceed the generation coming from renewable sources, meaning that this would end up leading to more dirty power coming online to meet the demand.

      The alternative might be to adjust demand, with the virtual capacity curves proposed in the google paper,and supplemen that with storage

    5. Energy used in a mine, in freight, in the supply and production chain is much less likely to be renewable.

      It's worth considering things like how a CBAM a carbon border adjustment mechanism might affect this, as it's designed specifically to address this issue of high carbon intensity goods crossing country or trading block borders, like the EU

    6. The US giant advertises that its data center in Eemshaven in the Netherlands would be 100% powered by RE since its opening in 2016. However, on Google's electricity supply matrices we can clearly see that 69% of the electricity supply was provided by RE. The remaining 31% is offset by RECs or virtual PPAs. Google's statement in the preamble is therefore not factually correct.

      These might still be offset by RECs that are tied to a specific point in time, sometimes referred to as TEACS.

    7. In this scientific literature, it is estimated that the manufacturing phase (construction of the building + manufacturing of the IT equipment) represents on average 15% of the energy and GHG footprint of a data center in a country with "medium" carbon electricity (approx. 150-200gCO2/kWh).. To get to this figure, it is assumed that the building is new and will last 20 years and that the IT equipment is replaced every 4 to 5 years. Based on GAFAM's Scopes 3, a recent publication by researchers from Facebook, Harvard and Arizona University estimated that the carbon impact of data centers related to IT equipment, construction and infrastructure was higher than imagined. There is therefore a growing interest in better understanding these "omissions".

      This is a good point. Refresh rates can be closer to a 1-2 years in some hyperscalers. Good for use phase carbon, bad for embodied carbon

    1. The Commission found that the arrangement, as currently written, could result in annual revenue shortfalls ranging in the millions of dollars, which other customers would have to cover due to the credits that could completely zero-out Facebook’s bill.“The Commission noted this is not logical— that a customer could reduce its bill by using more resources,” it said.

      As I understand this, structuring this deal to give a a low cost for a loooong term agreement would mean bills would have to be raised on other rate payers to make sure the company with the monopoly is able to make the pre-agreed rate of return it as allowed to make each year.

    1. After techUk’s Emma Fryer released the results of the second period of the UK data center sectors climate change agreement (CCA) 2nd Period findings in 2017, I conducted some desk-based research which looked at the issue from a UK PLC perspective and included all those enterprise data centers, server cupboards and machine rooms that are largely hidden.

      John mentioned to me the the CCA notes from 2017 might be a little out. It's worth sanity checking that.

    1. What’s left are two options, but only one for the WWW. To capture the most internet users, the best option is to use a .is TLD; however, for true anonimity and control, a .onion is superior.

      The 2 most liberal domains: .is (Iceland) and .onion (world)

  6. Aug 2021
    1. The Internet, to dateboth a repository of information that could be useful for acting in the worldand an instrument of fantasy escape, has expanded potentiality. We do not yetknow to what end.
    2. What the Internet has done to date is expand the potentiality formore widespread, instantaneous awareness of activity and consequences on aglobal scale. This means that verifiability need not be personal—so long asreliable information can be retrieved from information systems. But havingretrieved the information or having it instantaneously available does not meanthat we have the capacity to act upon it.
  7. Jul 2021
  8. datatracker.ietf.org datatracker.ietf.org
    1. It is similarly intended to fail to establish a connection when data from other protocols, especially HTTP, is sent to a WebSocket server, for example, as might happen if an HTML "form" were submitted to a WebSocket server. This is primarily achieved by requiring that the server prove that it read the handshake, which it can only do if the handshake contains the appropriate parts, which can only be sent by a WebSocket client. In particular, at the time of writing of this specification, fields starting with |Sec-| cannot be set by an attacker from a web browser using only HTML and JavaScript APIs such as XMLHttpRequest [XMLHttpRequest].
    2. The WebSocket Protocol is designed on the principle that there should be minimal framing (the only framing that exists is to make the protocol frame-based instead of stream-based and to support a distinction between Unicode text and binary frames). It is expected that metadata would be layered on top of WebSocket by the application Fette & Melnikov Standards Track [Page 9] RFC 6455 The WebSocket Protocol December 2011 layer, in the same way that metadata is layered on top of TCP by the application layer (e.g., HTTP). Conceptually, WebSocket is really just a layer on top of TCP that does the following: o adds a web origin-based security model for browsers o adds an addressing and protocol naming mechanism to support multiple services on one port and multiple host names on one IP address o layers a framing mechanism on top of TCP to get back to the IP packet mechanism that TCP is built on, but without length limits o includes an additional closing handshake in-band that is designed to work in the presence of proxies and other intermediaries Other than that, WebSocket adds nothing. Basically it is intended to be as close to just exposing raw TCP to script as possible given the constraints of the Web. It's also designed in such a way that its servers can share a port with HTTP servers, by having its handshake be a valid HTTP Upgrade request. One could conceptually use other protocols to establish client-server messaging, but the intent of WebSockets is to provide a relatively simple protocol that can coexist with HTTP and deployed HTTP infrastructure (such as proxies) and that is as close to TCP as is safe for use with such infrastructure given security considerations, with targeted additions to simplify usage and keep simple things simple (such as the addition of message semantics).
    1. By making the storage and organization of information everyone’s responsibility and no one’s, the internet and web could grow, unprecedentedly expanding access, while making any and all of it fragile rather than robust in many instances in which we depend on it.
    2. A solid overview article about the architectural deficiencies of the web for long term archival and access as well as some ideas for fixing the issue and a plea to attempt to make things better for the future.

    3. Suppose Google were to change what’s on that page, or reorganize its website anytime between when I’m writing this article and when you’re reading it, eliminating it entirely. Changing what’s there would be an example of content drift; eliminating it entirely is known as link rot.

      We don't talk about content drift very much. I like that some sites, particularly wiki sites, actually document their content drift in diffs and surface that information directly to the user. Why don't we do this for more websites? The Wayback machine also has this sort of feature.

    1. It’s a familiar trick in the privatisation-happy US – like, say, underfunding public education and then criticising the institution for struggling.

      This same thing is being seen in the U.S. Post Office now too. Underfund it into failure rather than provide a public good.

      Capitalism definitely hasn't solved the issue, and certainly without government regulation. See also the last mile problem for internet service, telephone service, and cable service.

      UPS and FedEx apparently rely on the USPS for last mile delivery in remote areas. (Source for this?)

      The poor and the remote are inordinately effected in almost all these cases. What other things do these examples have in common? How can we compare and contrast the public service/government versions with the private capitalistic ones to make the issues more apparent. Which might be the better solution: capitalism with tight government regulation to ensure service at the low end or a government monopoly of the area? or something in between?

    1. Another interpretation of the “Small Web” concept is that it refers to the use of alternative protocols to the dominant HTTP(S), lightweight ones like the older Gopher and newer Gemini. For example, the blog post Introduction to Gemini describes these collectively as “the Small Internet”.

      Maybe the idea of a "personal internet" is what we're all really looking for? Something with some humanity? Something that's fun? Something that has some serendipity?

  9. Jun 2021
    1. For example, the Wikipedia article on Martin Luther King, Jr cites the book To Redeem the Soul of America, by Adam Fairclough. That citation now links directly to page 299 inside the digital version of the book provided by the Internet Archive. There are 66 cited and linked books on that article alone. 

      I'd love to have a commonplace book robot that would do this sort of linking process within it for me. In the meanwhile, I continue to plod along.

      This article was referenced today at [[I Annotate 2021]] by [[Mark Graham]].

    1. Betsch, C., & Sachse, K. (2013). Debunking vaccination myths: Strong risk negations can increase perceived vaccination risks. Health Psychology: Official Journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association, 32(2), 146–155. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0027387

    1. Once I was a scuba diver in the sea of words. Now I zip along the surface like a guy on a Jet Ski.

      A great metaphor for the Internet.

    1. IoT in retail works in multiple channels to let retail operators reach out to new customers, and enhance the experience of existing customers. Here are some key areas of retail wherein the Internet of Things impacts.
  10. May 2021
    1. Recently, Apple released a seemingly innocuous software update: a new privacy feature that would explicitly ask iPhone users whether an app should be allowed to track them across the other apps and sites that they use.

      Apple privacy feature

    1. My assertion is based on the observation that a great deal of learning does take place in connective environments on the world wide web, that these have scaled to large numbers, and that often they do not require any institutional or instructional support.
  11. Apr 2021
    1. I like the metaphors of Dark Forrest and Cozy Web, but I'm not sure that this visualization of it really works for me.

    1. Binstock: You once referred to computing as pop culture. Kay: It is. Complete pop culture. I’m not against pop culture. Developed music, for instance, needs a pop culture. There’s a tendency to over-develop. Brahms and Dvorak needed gypsy music badly by the end of the nineteenth century. The big problem with our culture is that it’s being dominated, because the electronic media we have is so much better suited for transmitting pop-culture content than it is for high-culture content. I consider jazz to be a developed part of high culture. Anything that’s been worked on and developed and you [can] go to the next couple levels. Binstock: One thing about jazz aficionados is that they take deep pleasure in knowing the history of jazz. Kay: Yes! Classical music is like that, too. But pop culture holds a disdain for history. Pop culture is all about identity and feeling like you’re participating. It has nothing to do with cooperation, the past or the future—it’s living in the present. I think the same is true of most people who write code for money. They have no idea where [their culture came from]—and the Internet was done so well that most people think of it as a natural resource like the Pacific Ocean, rather than something that was man-made. When was the last time a technology with a scale like that was so error-free? The Web, in comparison, is a joke. The Web was done by amateurs.

      This is a great definition of pop culture and a good contrast to high-culture.

      Here's the link to the entire interview: https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/bbm%3A978-3-319-90008-7%2F1.pdf

    1. a keyword could get you to encyclopedia entries, travel information, weather, and even soap opera summaries of the week.

      A keyword could get you to encyclopedia entries, travel information, weather, and even soap opera summaries of the week.

  12. Mar 2021
    1. . Barbrook shows how this futurist prophecy is borrowed from America’s defunct Cold War enemy: Stalinist Russia. Technological progress was the catalyst of social transformation. With copyright weakening, intellectual commodities were mutating into gifts. Invented in capitalist America, the Net in the late-1990s had become the first working model of communism in human history.

      Amzing mix of stalinism, gift-economy, less copyrights & social progress in one paragraph.

    1. There's a reasonably good overview of some ideas about fixing the harms social media is doing to democracy here and it's well framed by history.

      Much of it appears to be a synopsis from the perspective of one who's only managed to attend Pariser and Stround's recent Civic Signals/New_Public Festival.

      There could have been some touches of other research in the social space including those in the Activity Streams and IndieWeb spaces to provide some alternate viewpoints.

    1. his environment of uncontrolled information is not all bliss, however. Some critics point out that the same giant media companies that dominated the older forms of media produce much of the content available on the internet.

      Tada! And major companies also own most of the infrastructure on which the internet runs.

    1. internet being used as the screening venue

      Add this to a growing list I call "Internet as..."

      Internet as human right Internet as film screening venue Internet as public square Internet as digital library Internet as tool/instrument for creative expression Internet as....

    2. “The Internet is a diverse set of independent networks, interlinked to provide its users with the appearance ofa single, uniform network.”

      I prefer this definition from former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, "The Internet is the first thing that humanity has built that humanity doesn't understand, the largest experiment in anarchy that we have ever had" at Internet World Trade Show, New York, 18 November 1999

    1. Or think of the iPhone owners who patronize independent service centers instead of using Apple's service: Apple's opening bid is "You only ever get your stuff fixed from us, at a price we set," and the owners of Apple devices say, "Hard pass." Now it's up to Apple to make a counteroffer. We'll know it's a fair one if iPhone owners decide to patronize Apple's service centers.

      Een vergelijkbaar voorbeeld is het schoonmaken van gebouwen. Het zou vreemd zijn als je een vloer die je laat leggen alleen door bepaalde schoonmakers kan laten schoonmaken. Of garages. Er zijn merkgarages maar net zoveel generieke garages. Soms zijn merkgarages beter, maar vaak kun je ook prima terecht bij een generieke garage.

    1. For a really competitive, innovative, dynamic marketplace, you need adversarial interoperability: that’s when you create a new product or service that plugs into the existing ones without the permission of the companies that make them. Think of third-party printer ink, alternative app stores, or independent repair shops that use compatible parts from rival manufacturers to fix your car or your phone or your tractor.

      De term adversial interoperability is een belangrijke term om te snappen hoe open platformen en protocollen kunnen werken. En wat ze bijdragen aan een meer divers landschap aan producten en diensten.

  13. Feb 2021
    1. Worlds Chat and many other such spaces are relics exemplifying the boundless imagination of an earlier era of the internet. Documenting these worlds does more than highlight history that could otherwise be lost; it preserves a time when users were creators and not products. 

      Ik zou het iets breder willen zien. Het was een tijd dat internetgebruikers bijna standaard ook creeëren ipv alleen consumeren en data afstaan. De naald was meer die kant uitgeslagen

    1. Bookmark This Selection What I would like from the bookmark feature in the browser is the ability to not only bookmark the full page but be able to select a piece of the page that is reflected in the bookmark, be through the normal menu as we have seen above or through the contextual menu of the browser.

      Sounds kind of like they're wishing for Hypothes.is?

    1. which have recently become umbrella terms referring to any piece of quickly-consumed comedic or relatable content
    1. A long, but worthwhile read. This goes into some valuable ideas about public spaces that the typical article on the independent web doesn't explore.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Fluffy</span> in Notes: All Our Selves In One Basket (<time class='dt-published'>2021-01-31 12:31:00 </time>)</cite></small>

    1. A broad overview of the original web and where we are today. Includes an outline of three business models that don't include advertising including:

      • Passion projects
      • Donation-based sites
      • Subscription-based sites
  14. Jan 2021
    1. Ever since a certain car salesman tweeted “Use Signal”

      I've seen this linking pattern once or twice before in the wild. This is an obvious subtweet of Elon Musk, but the link is an archived version of a Tweet that is mirrored through Nitter. This is done to ensure that the original Tweet link is as heavily demoted as possible.

  15. Dec 2020
    1. CodeCarbon, sviluppato nel suo Montreal Institute for Learning Algorithms (Mila), assieme Bcg Gamma, Haverford College e Comet.
    2. (infografiche animate a cura di Gedi Visual)

      CO2-Ausstoß:

      <table> <thead><tr> <th></th> <th></th> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>0,014g</td> <td>eine SMS oder eine Telefonat von einer Minute</td> </tr> <tr> <td>3-50 g</td> <td>Senden einer Chat-Botschaft</td> </tr> <tr> <td>28-57g</td> <td>30 Minuten Video-Streaming</td> </tr> <tr> <td>0,2g</td> <td>ein Tweet</td> </tr> <tr> <td>4-50g</td> <td>eine Mail</td> </tr> <tr> <td>299g</td> <td>ein Facebook-Nutzer im Jahr</td> </tr> </tbody> </table>
    1. The carbon footprint of our gadgets, the internet and the systems supporting them account for about 3.7% of global greenhouse emissions, according to some estimates. It is similar to the amount produced by the airline industry globally, explains Mike Hazas, a researcher at Lancaster University. And these emissions are predicted to double by 2025.
    2. , it means each of us is responsible for 400g (14oz) of carbon dioxide a year.

      400g CO2-Ausstoß jährlich pro Internet-User (zur Zeit 4,1 Milliarden), Verdoppelung wird bis 2025 erwartet.

    1. My next move will be to further lower my visibility to 3rd party tracking with a combination of pi-hole caching DNS blocker and wireguard VPN .
  16. Nov 2020
    1. They are often cited as the first website to feature banner ads.

      If, indeed, Wired invented the banner ad, it is also worth mentioning that wired.com was one of the last websites to be rendered completely unusable by them (when it was still running on the old CMS. idk about now.)

      I love @LaurenGoode and find her insight very worthwhile even in this format, but I really wish the platform on which it now resides (Wired's CMS) wasn't *completely* and *entirely* broken. Chorus should've been a package deal. https://t.co/OweeG30jR6

      — ※ David Blue ※ (@NeoYokel) July 13, 2019
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

    2. The first Wired website, therefore, has a unique distinction of being an unofficial, amateur project led by two people from a different country uploading copyrighted content they didn’t own to a site that lacked any of the panache, glitz, or unconventional charm that had made Wired famous.

      Not sure how to feel about this...

      Now that I have read the story this way, I'm wondering...

      Might one say that Wired only went online as early as it did because of their ban from Singapore?

    1. SpaceX każe sobie zapłacić jednorazowo 500 dolarów za modem i talerz oraz 100 dolarów miesięcznie za dostęp do sieci. Musk zapowiedział, że jeszcze w tym roku po ziemskiej orbicie będzie przemieszczało się blisko 1000 satelitów Starlink. Dzięki temu, sprawność sieci ma jeszcze wzrosnąć, a użytkownicy będą mogli liczyć na download z prędkością 200 Mb/s, upload z prędkością 50 Mb/s i ping na poziomie 20 ms. Starlink ma zawitać do Europy już w marcu przyszłego roku.

      Cost of Starlink internet:

      • 500$ for modem
      • 100$/month for access to the internet

      Speed of Starlink internet:

      • generally, Starlink has a great availability
      • possible download of 200 Mb/s, upload of 50 Mb/s, pink of 20 ms
      • Starlink should be in Europe in March 2021
  17. Oct 2020
    1. every page on my blog contains a link to its archive in the page footer. This ensures that you can not only browse the latest version of all of my blog articles in case of a server breakdown. This also enables you to browse all previous version, probably changed over time. Go ahead, try a few "Archive" links of my articles. If any of my articles start with an "Updates:" section, you know for sure that there are older versions accessible via the Internet Archive.

      This is an interesting pattern. How could one make this more obvious from a uI perspective?

    1. ot only is it wired, but it is also relatively centralized—far from the early vision of the Internet as a rhizomatic and distributed network

      Intéressant compte tenu qu'on décrit Internet comme un réseau de réseaux et qu'on le dit donc décentralisé.

    1. To escape from the chaos, we will need new norms of behavior that incline us away from gossip.

      To balance out this gossip-driven world, Arnold Kling argues we need new norms of behavior (I would argue perhaps we need new mechanisms), to incline us away from gossip.

    1. you are granting us the right to use your User Content without the obligation to pay royalties to any third party
    2. You or the owner of your User Content still own the copyright in User Content sent to us, but by submitting User Content via the Services, you hereby grant us an unconditional irrevocable, non-exclusive, royalty-free, fully transferable, perpetual worldwide licence to use, modify, adapt, reproduce, make derivative works of, publish and/or transmit, and/or distribute and to authorise other users of the Services and other third-parties to view, access, use, download, modify, adapt, reproduce, make derivative works of, publish and/or transmit your User Content in any format and on any platform, either now known or hereinafter invented.
    1. By submitting, posting or displaying Content on or through the Services, you grant us a worldwide, non-exclusive, royalty-free license (with the right to sublicense) to use, copy, reproduce, process, adapt, modify, publish, transmit, display and distribute such Content in any and all media or distribution methods now known or later developed (for clarity, these rights include, for example, curating, transforming, and translating). This license authorizes us to make your Content available to the rest of the world and to let others do the same.
    1. you grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, and worldwide license to host, use, distribute, modify, run, copy, publicly perform or display, translate, and create derivative works of your content (consistent with your privacy and application settings).
    1. Alors que la référence est investie de significations multiples par celui qui la place dans son texte (honorer, critiquer, marquer l’antériorité, préciser, faire acte d’ostentation, etc.), en revanche, la citation efface en une abstraction univoque la diversité des significations contextuelles de la référence qui l’a fait naître.

      C'est là un grand élément qui facilite les manipulations des algorithmes de PageRank. D'où le fait que Google sévisse contre les compagnies qui tentent de manipuler les résultats de recherche de plusieurs manières différentes: https://www.smartinsights.com/search-engine-optimisation-seo/seo-strategy/companies-tried-cheat-google-lost-infographic/.

    1. I first briefly lay out alternative media theory as it existed prior to the dominance of Facebook, Google, and Twitter.

      I've been thinking about it for a while but even if all social sites were interoperable, I suspect that a small handful of 2 or 3 would have the largest market share. This is as the result of some of the network theory and research found in Linked: How Everything Is Connected to Everything Else and What It Means for Business, Science, and Everyday Life by Alberto-Llaszlo Barabasi

    1. And so The Year of Intentional Internet began.

      After reading just a few posts by Desiree Zamora Garcia, I'd like to nominate her to give a keynote at the upcoming IndieWeb Summit in June. I totally want to hear her give a talk with the title Year of Intentional Internet.

    1. We need to debate what kind of hypermedia suit our vision of society - how we create the interactive products and on-line services we want to use, the kind of computers we like and the software we find most useful. We need to find ways to think socially and politically about the machines we develop. While learning from the can-do attitude of the Californian individualists, we also must recognise that the potentiality of hypermedia can never solely be realised through market forces. We need an economy which can unleash the creative powers of hi-tech artisans. Only then can we fully grasp the Promethean opportunities of hypermedia as humanity moves into the next stage of modernity.

      Great ending. These words are as true today as they were 25 years ago.

    1. That’s why it’s so important to us that we help you drive sustainable revenue and businesses.

      Compared to Facebook which just uses your content to drive you out of business like it did for Funny or Die. Reference: http://splitsider.com/2018/02/how-facebook-is-killing-comedy/