9 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2020
    1. The architecture of the platform where I published allowed authorial control of content but could not control context collapse or social interactions.

      These are pieces which the IndieWeb should endeavor to experiment in and attempt to fix. Though I will admit that pieces of the IndieWeb layers on top of platforms like WordPress can help to mitigate some context collapse and aggregate social interactions better. (eg: reply context and POSSE)

    1. When I think about it, likes and bookmarks are somewhat difficult to distinguish for my purpose. A bookmark inherently implies that I liked a post because I usually only bookmark posts on Pocket that I like and want to save for later. I use Firefox bookmarks to track the articles that I have not yet read and want to come back to later. There is a distinction. A like is clearer. It’s my way of saying that I did like your content. Not everybody will know my policy on bookmarks, so having a like feature is useful.

      My general heirarchy is that bookmarks are things I want to come back to (and usually read) later, reads are things that I've read, like are things I've read and want to send appreciation for, and replies are things that usually are both read, liked, and needed even a bit more.

      Here's more on how I've thought about it before: https://boffosocko.com/2018/03/10/thoughts-on-linkblogs-bookmarks-reads-likes-favorites-follows-and-related-links/

    1. There’s also the fact that wikis are used to store information that can be edited at a later time by a third party, which is something that blogs cannot do.

      Perhaps this is a part of where the definition changes for me to blur the difference between the two modalities (wikis vs. blogs). If a wiki is held as public, yet still personal and any changes to it are done by a fork and edit by a third party with a webmention back to the original, then the barrier can be removed. If one can use a webmention notification from the branch back to the original so that the new knowledge can either be aggregated or not at the first party's discretion. This allows the ideas and potentially growing voice of atomicules of information to grow and spread.

      This gives a bit of the best of the both worlds. There can be multiple minds and models working, but the information can still be shared and aggregated over time. This may also expand creativity as there isn't necessarily one canonical source, but many.

      Thus a personal wiki and blog combination can use small atoms of information in a wiki-like style to slowly build up a set of facts where a longer blog-like article then becomes a crystallization of a specific voice's synthesis and analysis of those underlying facts.

      If the wiki chunks are copyable and sharable then different people may synthesize different ideas. Additionally by reshuffling the various pieces, the author of a particular blog article may rewrite or revise their original thinking with additional smaller wiki-like pieces to come to an alternate or expanded conclusion.

      Thinking of a wiki as something that has to be voiceless and communal may be the biggest wall between the two modalities. If there were a larger community of personal wikis that were interlinked then these barriers might be broken down.

      Additionally, this is more like what the OER community may be looking for. There are very concrete topics like calculus, as an example, but there can certainly be dozens of approaches to the topic in as many or more voices to suit the needs of particular learners. In fact there are many calculus textbooks geared toward different audiences: biologists, physicists, economists, mathematicians, social sciences, etc. The underlying ideas may all be incredibly similar but could be remixed in different and creative ways.

    1. Vancouver (Washington, not British Columbia) said farewell to its Old Apple Tree, an English Greening, apparently. Although the article says cuttings have been distributed far and wide, I couldn’t find it in the US apple variety database. Shoots from the ungrafted rootstock will also live on, with one replacing the original.

      This has apparently become a relatively popular culture story as I've also heard references to this story on two different radio shows this week.

  2. Aug 2020
    1. As a result, I end up quoting multiple people, sometimes quoting several people back-to-back, before even writing my reply. In those instances it feels like I'm not properly citing those individuals. I feel like it might seem I'm not providing new readers appropriate context for a given quote. It might also be implied that separate quotes are from the same person, leading to mis-attribution.
  3. Jun 2016
    1. Although much of the letters' interest lies in the fact they give individual voices to the anonymous mass of the 'reading public', it is possible to identify several common themes which unify them as a group. A vast majority of these women express feelings of alienation from the world, identification with Byron, and a desire to make some kind of contact with the poet.

      I agree with Joseph, as this statement follows a clear presentation of a thesis, starting with a qualification, "Although much of...", and continuing with a claim/reason to investigate, "it is possible to identify..."