112 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. One might weU see a further example of this process in the incorporation into Alsted's Consiliarius académicas et schohsticus (1610) of a category of random, day-to-day observations and reading notes ("ephemerides" or "diaria").

      Is this similar to the mixing of a daily journal page with note taking seen in systems like Roam Research and the way some use Obsidian?

    1. Paper Discovery:

      • Research Rabbit
      • Connected Papers
      • Citation Gecko
      • Papers With Code

      Zotero SciHub - for downloading papers into one's Zotero instance

      Academic Networking

      • lens.org (also good for discovery)
      • OrcID
      • Impact Story

      Ginko App (trees and cards interface) for writing with interesting import and export

      around 2:56: A bit too much Andy Matuschak worship? Pretty sure he didn't invent the so-called Andy Mode. Index cards pre-dated them surely as did Ward Cunningham's Smallest Federated Wiki. There are many other idex-card UIs prior to Matuschak.

      Map of Content (MOC) apparently comes from How to Make a Complete Map of Every Thought You Think by Lion Kimbro.

      • it's a glorified Table of Contents really

      Plugins he's using:

      • 3:22:15 add codemirror matchbrackets js
      • 3:23:31 advanced tables
      • 3:26:09 Better word count
      • 3:26:41 calendar
      • 3:27:32 copy code block
      • 3:28:25 cycle through panes
      • 3:29:55 Dataview
      • 3:30:33 editor syntax highlight
      • 3:30:43 extended mathjax
      • 3:31:08 file explorer note count
      • 3:32:04 full-screen mode
      • 3:32:23 highlgiht public notes
      • 3:33:11 kanban
      • 3:33:35 kindle highlights
      • 3:33:56 metatable
      • 3:34:24 mindmap
      • 3:35:36 NLP dates
      • 3:36:10 pane relief
      • 3:36:42 paste URL
      • 3:37:21 periodic notes
      • 3:37:44 recent files
      • 3:37:59 relevant line number
      • 3:38:33 show current open note
      • 3:38:45 review
      • 3:39:43 sliding panes
      • 3:40:42 super charged links
      • 3:41:11 random note
      • 3:41:39 tag wrangler
      • 3:42:22 templater
      • 3:46:05 zoom

      textsniper for OCR and potentially text-to-speech, apple only, so leark for others.

      MathPix

    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G4Qsu03Oz30

      This same sort of functionality is something I'd built into my TiddlyWiki ages ago. Interesting to see some of these same sorts of functionalities being built into other note taking tools.

      Sort of makes me want to consider nested tags in Obsidian...

    2. He mentions Amazon wishlists that pile up and never get used. Similar to the way people pile up bookmarks and never use or revisit them.

      One of the benefits of commonplace books (and tools like Obsidian, et al.) is that one is forced to re-see or re-discover these over time. This restumbling upon these things can be incredibly valuable.

    1. https://medium.com/@benenewton/my-obsidian-daily-note-template-a4bdab53dc62

      General overview of a someone's daily note template which uses the Templater plugin and the Tasks plugin.

      Includes a link to a gist for those who'd like to copy the format or extend it for themselves.

  2. Jul 2021
    1. https://forum.obsidian.md/t/epub-support/1403

      Some interesting resources here, though none currently suit workflows I'm keen to support yet. There is a reference to FuturePress' epub.js which could be intriguing, though even here, I'm more likely to stick with Hypothes.is for annotating and note taking to keep context.

    1. The goal of Quartz is to make hosting your own public digital garden free and simple. You don’t even need your own website. Quartz does all of that for you and gives your own little corner of the internet. https://github.com/jackyzha0/quartz

      Quartz runs on top of Hugo so all notes are written in Markdown .

    1. Watched up to 2:33:00 https://youtu.be/wB89lJs5A3s?t=9181 with talk about research papers.

      Some interesting tidbits and some workflow tips thus far. Not too jargony, but beginners may need to look at some of his other videos or work to see how to better set up pieces. Definitely very thorough so far.

      He's got roughly the same framing for tags/links that I use, though I don't even get into the status pieces with emoji/tags as much as he does.

      I'm not a fan of some of his reliance on iframes where data can (and will) disappear in the future. For Twitter, he does screencaptures of things which can be annoying and take up a lot of storage. Not sure why he isn't using twitter embed functionality which will do blockquotes of tweets and capture the actual text so that it's searchable.

      Taking a short break from this and coming back to it later.

    1. Xynopxies · 5dI use hypothesis.io. But it doesn't have any functional export option available. So what I do is Copy everything that it displays and then run some regex to extract the text(removing junks like username, time,tags) using phrase express and then paste it on my obsidian. It usually takes a few seconds.

      If you mean hypothes.is, you might take a look at https://forum.obsidian.md/t/retrieve-annotations-for-hypothes-is-via-templater-plugin-hypothes-idian/17225 which has some options for doing this easily.

    1. This plugin adds two new views to Obsidian, the breadcrumb matrix/list view, and the breadcrumbs trail view. The wiki has more in-depth info on the plugin than the readme.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Eleanor Konik</span> in 2021-07-24: Showcases, Link Cards, & Better Tablet Toolbars (<time class='dt-published'>07/29/2021 12:14:15</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Inline dice rolling for Obsidian

      Might be useful for opening up random notes as well.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Eleanor Konik</span> in 2021-07-24: Showcases, Link Cards, & Better Tablet Toolbars (<time class='dt-published'>07/29/2021 12:14:15</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Opens a specified note upon launching Obsidian, instead of the most recent note.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Eleanor Konik</span> in 2021-07-24: Showcases, Link Cards, & Better Tablet Toolbars (<time class='dt-published'>07/29/2021 12:14:15</time>)</cite></small>

    1. A Rich Links plugin for Obsidian to convert URLs in your notes to rich link previews or hovercards.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Eleanor Konik</span> in 2021-07-24: Showcases, Link Cards, & Better Tablet Toolbars (<time class='dt-published'>07/29/2021 12:14:15</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Nothing new.

      Good demonstration of some of the simple graph views of Obsidian and the depth of display.

    1. Nothing tremendously new to me, but a good example of how one might use graph view within an Obsidian based zettelkasten.

      I am curious as to how he creates the "Slipbox" section of the first note that he shows... that could be cleverly useful.

    1. Task related plugin for Obsidian.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Eleanor Kronik</span> in 2021-07-17: Obsidian Mobile, Community Events & Graph Tips (<time class='dt-published'>07/29/2021 11:13:14</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Obsidian Notes plugin for pasting text and blockquotes to the cursor's current level of indentation.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Eleanor Konik</span> in 2021-07-17: Obsidian Mobile, Community Events & Graph Tips (<time class='dt-published'>07/29/2021 11:06:38</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Interactive map view for Obsidian.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Eleanor Konik</span> in 2021-07-17: Obsidian Mobile, Community Events & Graph Tips (<time class='dt-published'>07/29/2021 11:06:38</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Task related plugin for Obsidian.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Eleanor Konik</span> in 2021-07-17: Obsidian Mobile, Community Events & Graph Tips (<time class='dt-published'>07/29/2021 11:06:38</time>)</cite></small>

    1. This is pretty slick and looks pretty in its published form. Great to see others are using clever set ups like this as posting interfaces.

      I have a feeling that other TiddlyWiki users would love this sort of thing. While TW may not seem as au courant, it's still got some awesome equivalent functionality and great UI which is what most of the users in the note taking space really care about.

      I do still wish that there was a micropub set up for Hypothes.is to make this sort of thing easier for the non-technical users.

    1. Then in your daily note Template add a tag that flags it as a daily note somewhere (eg. “#journal”. Also add an embedded query that looks like this: ```query {{date}} -"#journal" ```

      Embeddable search queries for Obsidian

    1. Revisiting this essay to review it in the framing of digital gardens.

      In a "gardens and streams" version of this metaphor, the stream is flow and the garden is stock.

      This also fits into a knowledge capture, growth, and innovation framing. The stream are small atomic ideas flowing by which may create new atomic ideas. These then need to be collected (in a garden) where they can be nurtured and grow into new things.

      Clippings of these new growth can be placed back into the stream to move on to other gardeners. Clever gardeners will also occasionally browse through the gardens of others to see bigger picture versions of how their gardens might become.

      Proper commonplacing is about both stock and flow. The unwritten rule is that one needs to link together ideas and expand them in places either within the commonplace or external to it: essays, papers, articles, books, or other larger structures which then become stock for others.

      While some creators appear to be about all stock in the modern era, it's just not true. They're consuming streams (flow) from other (perhaps richer) sources (like articles, books, television rather than social media) and building up their own stock in more private (or at least not public) places. Then they release that article, book, film, television show which becomes content stream for others.

      While we can choose to create public streams, but spending our time in other less information dense steams is less useful. Better is to keep a reasonably curated stream to see which other gardens to go visit.

      Currently is the online media space we have structures like microblogs and blogs (and most social media in general) which are reasonably good at creating streams (flow) and blogs, static sites, and wikis which are good for creating gardens (stock).

      What we're missing is a structure with the appropriate and attendant UI that can help us create both a garden and a stream simultaneously. It would be nice to have a wiki with a steam-like feed out for the smaller attendant ideas, but still allow the evolutionary building of bigger structures, which could also be placed into the stream at occasional times.

      I can imagine something like a MediaWiki with UI for placing small note-like ideas into other streams like Twitter, but which supports Webmention so that ideas that come back from Twitter or other consumers of one's stream can be placed into one's garden. Perhaps in a Zettelkasten like way, one could collect atomic notes into their wiki and then transclude those ideas into larger paragraphs and essays within the same wiki on other pages which might then become articles, books, videos, audio, etc.

      Obsidian, Roam Research do a somewhat reasonable job on the private side and have some facility for collecting data, but have no UI for sharing out into streams.

  3. Jun 2021
  4. dash.eloquent.works dash.eloquent.works
    1. An interesting tool for taking notes from Jeremy Ho. Designed with Roam Research in mind.

      The Eloquent tool is available to install! Capture ideas in-context with:<br>• On-page highlighting<br>• Nested bullets<br>• /snippets<br>• [[braces]] and #tag syntax<br>Quick capture is a hotkey away. Bonus hotkey sends your highlights/links to @RoamResearch pic.twitter.com/vLLbPX4zwW

      — Jeremy Ho (@jeremyqho) July 21, 2020
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      I wish it could save data as a local text or markdown file so it would also be easier to use with Obsidian or other note taking tools. It's similar in nature to the Roam Highlighter extension.

      Details at https://www.notion.so/Eloquent-Resource-Center-72f95c2a71d34c5181e4907edf7a96e1

    1. Example of a digital garden using Obsidian Publish. It's also a guide about how to create your own the same way.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>u/tanepiper</span> in Obsidian Garden - A in-progress guide to creating your digital garden : ObsidianMD (<time class='dt-published'>06/18/2021 09:02:31</time>)</cite></small>

  5. May 2021
    1. Extracting .pdf annotations using [[Zotfile]]

      Go to Settings > Advanced > Config Editor and then filtering by pdfExtraction.

      The end section on templates was rushed and make take some more time to properly configure Zotfile and the notes exports to get what I want.

    1. 🔗 Eleanor's amazingly awesome website: https://eleanorkonik.com/ 📟 Research Rabbit referral code: l17JvlK ——— THINGS TO DOWNLOAD 1🔗 Zotero: https://www.zotero.org/ 2🔗 Zotfile: http://zotfile.com/ 3🔗 Better Bibtex: https://retorque.re/zotero-better-bib... 4🔗 MD Notes: https://github.com/argenos/zotero-mdn... 5🔗 Obsidian: https://obsidian.md/ 6🔗 Citations plugin: Install it through the Obsidian community plugins ——— LEARN EVEN MORE ABOUT ZOTERO WORKING WITH OBSIDIAN 🔗 Argentina's in-depth video tutorial on Zotero 101: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9SzGx... 🔗 Cat's in-depth tutorial on Zotero » zotfile » mdnotes » obsidian » dataview Workflow: https://forum.obsidian.md/t/zotero-zo...

      Resources for implementation.

    2. dataview plugin - check in on this for queries and MOC

      citations plugin - zotfile

      • cat's walkthrough shows all this stuff

      A somewhat useful overview, but skips some of the detailed specifics which we'll need to pull up elsewhere.

    1. A Zotero plugin to export item metadata and notes as markdown files

      Could be of potential use with respect to Obsidian.

    1. You can now search for tasks using task: similar to block:. There is also task-todo: and task-done: which will match only the tasks that are incomplete or complete, respectively. Use task:"" to match all tasks.

      This will be incredibly useful to create as a view.

    2. Task lists [x] can now contain any character to indicate a completed task, instead of just x. This value can be used by custom CSS to change the appearance of the check mark, and is also available for plugins to use.

      I'll need to create some custom CSS for these in the past as I've used:

        • [>] to indicate that an item was pushed forward
        • [?] to indicate something I'm not sure was done in retrospect (typically for a particular day)
      • others?
    1. o create a "task" just start the quick capture text with a semicolon ";"

      Чтобы созда задачу нужно начать строку с ;

    1. A Digital Garden Theme for Gatsby. Gatsby Garden lets you create a static HTML version of your markdown notes

      This also supports Obsidian wikilinks

    1. A similar tool Foam is. Foam is currently not far enough along their path of development to my taste, but will get there, and I will certainly explore making the switch.

      Potentially even better, it may be the case that Foam comes up to speed and potentially offers some slightly different but useful functionality using the same data source. Then one could keep the files in one's own space and use Obsidian, Foam, or even other tools to access and work with it.

    1. I really need to delve back into some of the plugins and test out using them more frequently. The workspace one I tried briefly when it first came out, but it had a few problems for me which are now likely fixed.

    1. Thanks for an awesome post. I think that I have quite similar ideas to how you think about notes and note-taking, although the terminology is different. But even so, you raised several points that were not only linked to my own thinking, but gave me new thoughts and ideas to work with. Cheers for that.

      I was just about to ask you what your system looked like Michael, but then I realized that you've tucked many of them into Hypothes.is at https://via.hypothes.is/https://www.zylstra.org/blog/2020/11/100-days-in-obsidian-pt-4-writing-notes/

    2. Ton delineates his ideas between notions, notes, ideas, and work notes. It's not too dissimilar to the ideas others like Maggie Appleton have written about various smaller pieces being built up from small "seedlings" into larger evergreen pieces within a digital gardens framing.

      I do like the idea of emergent outlines he notes over Ahrens' speculative outlines.

    1. I started using Obsidian to make better notes (Notions as I call them), and link them together where I see relevance.

      Interesting that there is also a silo version of Obsidian called Notion, which is also similar to Evernote. I wonder if this had any influence on your name? This is a reasonable indicator that it's a good name for these.

    1. Perhaps I’m trying to use Obsidian for something it wasn’t intended – a note pad full of simple scratch notes that eventually become to-do lists, emails, blog posts, etc. It should be used to build a knowledge base – a collection of information that rounds out a subject. I just simply don’t do that type of note taking.

      I'm using it to do both of these things and definitely find it more useful for the knowledge base work. I've never used Simplenote heavily, but it's definitely more focused on your use case Colin.

      For the quick notes scratchpad idea, I've been relying on Markor and syncing the results from my phone to my Obsidian data store to get those notes into my notebook more easily. Often when I'm at my desktop I may move those notes to other more appropriate places to keep track of them. Hopefully Obsidian's mobile version (in beta) will make this portion easier.

    1. I love the phrase "elephant paths" (the correct translation?) for maps of content.

      I also like the idea of having a set up for doing digital captures of physical notebook pages. I'll have to consider how to do this most easily. I should also look back and evaluate how to continue improving my digital process as well.

    1. An Obsidian meetup? This is a great idea. Wish I hadn't missed it. (Also wish I spoke Dutch...)

    1. esterday evening, Ton Zijlstra organized the first Dutch Obsidian meetup. I didn’t really know what to expect, and in the end I’m glad I let my curiosity get the better of me, as we chatted for almost two hours on various struggles with contemporary note-taking using the relatively new note-taking player, Obsidian. Read Frank Meeuwsen’s expectations and Ton’s afterthoughts on their respective blogs (in Dutch). Together with Sebastiaan Andeweg and myself, the four of us had a great time showing each other how we tackle digital note-taking. It turned out to be a small but quirky group of like-minded people: all active note-takers, life-hackers, and apparently also IndieWeb-enabled bloggers!

      This sounds like a fun way to get together. I'm personally curious to see people taking their Obsidian data and turning them into IndieWeb-friendly linked Memexes. It's interesting to use Obsidian to have a thought conversation with one's self, but it could also be interesting if they could have conversations with each other via Webmention.

      For me the more difficult piece is not so much getting the thing online, but setting it up so that the backlinks all work properly using the [[wikilink]] syntax.

    2. Sebastiaan is writing a review plugin that takes advantage of the concept of spaced repetition, which sounded really cool. I hope it’ll get published someday.

      This sounds promising. I'll keep my eye on a possible release.

  6. Apr 2021
    1. I’m resisting the temptation to add bibliographical cards into the Obsidian vault. Niklas Luhmann, you may recall, had a set of cards in his zettelkasten that were source citations. I don’t get the impression from reading his descriptions of his process or Schmidt’s research into it, that these were really an active part of the network of ideas in the boxes, which seem to have been based on his digested reactions to sources.

      I've done some bibliographical cards in the past myself, but find that I never used or revisited them or had great need to have them crosslinked myself. I've been moving away from doing this as well.

    1. An interesting outline of how Colin Madland uses Notion for his Ph.D. research work.

      He's got a good list of some pros and cons at the bottom. The export sounds a bit hairy on one front, but at least gives you some sort of back up in case the worst were to happen.

      Not sure it's the thing for me and I'm happier with my workflow using Obsidian at the moment, though some of the ideas about process here could be helpful.

      It looks like he's got some of the same issues in using Grav for his knowledge work as I do in WordPress, though the taxonomy and Webmention portions do tend to help me a bit.

      Colin brought this to my attention at the OERxDomains21 conference.

    1. Joplin is a free, open source note taking and to-do application, which can handle a large number of notes organised into notebooks. The notes are searchable, can be copied, tagged and modified either from the applications directly or from your own text editor. The notes are in Markdown format.

      This might be an interesting tool to do import/export from Evernote and/or OneNote to get documents into markdown format (possibly for use in Obsidian.)

  7. Mar 2021
    1. The Obsidian vault that I've created for the students is secure (by invitation only in Dropbox) and THEY CAN CONTRIBUTE to it. I've put the questions for discussion in the content sections, and have asked students to answer the questions on the page. This hasn't resulted in the types of threaded discussions I was hoping for, but improvements to the interface and better questions will hopefully lead to that.

      This is similar to teachers in the last two decades creating class wikis which students can add to.

      I'm curious how the differences in user interface with Obsidian may actually make this process simpler and easier. With all of these experiments, some of the issue may be the learning curve of using the new tool, so having simpler UIs certainly goes a long way.

      The side benefit of some of these is that students (within a Domain of One's Own space), might see the power and value of these systems in their introduction and then take and use these tools in their learning and working lives thereafter.

    1. In the attached YouTube video Dan talks through his post as usual, but he has the added bonus here of showing a split screen of his annotated copy of the book with his Obsidian notebook open. We then see a real time transcription of his note taking process of moving from scant highlights in the book to more fleshed out thoughts and notes in his notebook. We also see him cross referencing various materials for alternate definitions and resources.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8HBL-c_nXXQ

  8. Feb 2021
    1. Hypothes.is has both RSS and Atom Feeds. So the IFTTT “if” is a new item in your feed which creates a text post in some appropriate storage account. I use OneDrive as the “that” target, but I’m sure you could potentially use others with some experimentation. If you have something that only saves as .txt files, that’s fine, you can simply rename them as .md files for your vault later.

      I’ve described some of this before at https://boffosocko.com/2020/08/29/a-note-taking-problem-and-a-proposed-solution/ for those interested in further details.

      Hopefully this helps (until someone has a more automated version).

    2. In academia it’s critical to have a system that allows us to read and mine important ideas from papers into your vault as efficiently as possible. My method has continued to evolve and I’m finding it more efficient now. In a nutshell, I’m now adding the one-sentence summaries to highlights as I’m reading (and the tags where possible). This means I don’t need to read the source more than once; instead I’m processing them as I’m reading because that’s when I discover them as important points in the first place. I then bring them into Obsidian in a single note per paper/source. I title each note Surname, date (e.g., Smith, 2018). It’ll make sense why in a moment. Each idea within the note is structured like this: One-sentence summary of idea | Original idea in the author’s words (Reference, date, page number). T: #tags #go #here C: Any connections to other notes or ideas - not necessary to include for every idea but it’s useful to think of connections where possible If you structure all the notes this way, it means you can then add the ideas straight into your index with transclusion without needing to create any additional notes (in the past I created a new evergreen note for each idea). An example of a transcluded idea to pop into your index would be like this: ![[Smith, 2018#One-sentence summary of idea]] This allows you to see the source and the summary of the note in edit mode and just that idea transcluded from your note page in the preview mode. I have another approach for actually turning those ideas into publications, but this is the main approach for processing notes into my index. There may be even more efficient ways to do this. The key I think is being able to process ideas into your vault as quickly as possible while still tagging and making connections to help with later retrieval of ideas. Since changing to this approach I’ve written a couple of book chapters with very little cognitive strain and I’m reading more than in the past (it’s addictive because every paper has the potential to be used to level up your knowledge base). Hope this is somewhat helpful to others. The evolution will undoubtedly continue. I know there are awesome examples of how to do all kinds of things in Obsidian but all I’m really aiming for is being more productive in my academic role. The rest is all interesting but additional to my main purpose for this wonderful app.

      Another great synopsis of useful tips in using Obsidian for research.

      The idea of using the general form ![[Smith, 2018#One-sentence summary of idea]] can be particularly powerful for aggregating smaller ideas up into a longer work.

    3. I’m an Australian academic in the field of education. I read the How to take smart notes book and a couple of Luhmann’s articles which were translated into English. I also would recommend looking at the writing of Andy Matuschak on how to label your notes, what to include in them, and so on. Here’s the process I’ve come up with (which continues to evolve): Initial highlighting: Read journal article via Zotero. Highlight the parts that are relevant to you using the default PDF viewer on your computer. Use Zotfile to extract the highlights (and any notes) in Zotero, then paste them into Obsidian in a new note. I have a template I copy and paste to start each new highlight note with relevant details like the author names, date of publication and so on before the highlights. Refine highlights: Look through your highlights from the article and use the Obsidian highlighting feature (==like this==) to pinpoint what’s valuable in each highlight. This makes it easier to complete the next step, particularly if it’s a long paper or you have to come back to it. Skip if necessary. Process highlights into literature notes: Summarise the highlights into your own words. Add any personal insights. Each literature note should relate to one idea. I do this directly above the highlight notes using bullet points and a L - for literature notes and a H - for highlight notes. Try to write the literature note as if it was part of a journal article. Add a label to each literature note: Above each literature note, I add a label, which should be the briefest possible summary of the literature note. Have this label inside double square brackets. Avoid labels like “Definition of X”. Instead, write “X is y and z”. Try to be specific. I mainly use the bracket links in this way. An example label might be [[E - X is y and z]]. I use E - because it will soon be an evergreen note. Add each label to an index: The index will be a long list of all your literature note labels. Categorise the labels in a logical manner. Create evergreen notes: Click the label (which is a link to a new note) and copy/paste the literature note text (which will be quite short) into this new evergreen note. Add connections to other notes categorised in the same place in your index plus any other relevant evergreen notes. Add relevant tags. The index may not be overly important in the long run, but it definitely helps at this point with connection making. I also add the reference details at the bottom of each evergreen note. Next it’s time to create your paper. 7a. (Top down approach) Create journal article outline: Create an outline for your article, chapter, application, or whatever you’re working on. You can make a quick template with the relevant stages of the genre (e.g. introduction, literature review, and so on). Then, drag relevant evergreen notes into the sections. You’ll need to massage the gaps between notes to make it cohesive. If you use a note, add a tag to say so. You’ll need to reword the note if you use it again in another paper to avoid self-plagiarism. 7b. (Bottom up approach) Add evergreen notes to papers: Instead of starting with a paper outline, you might look at your notes in the index and consider what kind of interesting questions they might help you answer, then build your paper from there. I hope someone out there finds all this useful. One of the best things I’ve done is create a note called master production line which includes these numbered steps as headings, and then I can add my highlight notes as they’re created and move them down the production line as they’re processed. I also organise them in certain steps (like 2 and 3) as high, medium and low priority. It means you never lose track of notes and there’s always something you could be working on. The bit I’m still figuring out is the last step: how to go from evergreen notes to paper drafts as efficiently as possible. I’m a little old fashioned, so I’ll probably so the final edit in Word once everything else is done in Obsidian. The multiple window support in Obsidian is great, but still a bit janky, and this method requires multiple windows to be open at a time. Hopefully a future update keeps the windows in the one spot.

      This is an excellent overview of how to take notes for academic research and creating writing output.

    4. Others on the page here (specifically Dpthomas87's A, B, C) have done a great job at outlining their methods which I'm generally following. So I'll focus a bit more on the mechanics.

      I rely pretty heavily on Hypothes.is for most of my note taking, highlights, and annotations. This works whether a paper is online or as a pdf I read online or store locally and annotate there.

      Then I use RSS to pipe my data from Hypothes.is into a text file in OneDrive for my Obsidian vault using IFTTT.com. I know that a few are writing code for the Hypothes.is API to port data directly into Roam Research presently; I hope others might do it for Obsidian as well.)

      Often at the end of the day or end of the week, I'll go through my drafts folder everything is in to review things, do some light formatting and add links, tags, or other meta data and links to related ideas.

      Using Hypothes.is helps me get material into the system pretty quickly without a lot of transcription (which doesn't help my memory or retention). And the end of the day or end of week review helps reinforce things as well as help to surface other connections.

      I'm hoping that as more people use Hypothesis for social annotation, the cross conversations will also be a source of more helpful cross-linking of ideas and thought.

      I prefer to keep my notes as atomic as I can.

      For some smaller self-contained things like lectures, I may keep a handful of notes together rather than splitting them apart, but they may be linked to larger structures like longer courses or topics of study.

      If an article only has one or two annotations I'll keep them together in the same note, but books more often have dozens or hundreds of notes which I keep in separate files.

      For those who don't have a clear idea of what or why they're doing this, I highly recommend reading [[Sönke Ahrens]]' book Smart Notes.

      I do have a handful of templates for books, articles, and zettels to help in prompting me to fill in appropriate meta data for various notes more quickly. For this I'm using the built-in Templates plug-in and then ctrl-shift-T to choose a specific template as necessary.

      Often I'll use Hypothes.is and tag things as #WantToRead to quickly bookmark things into my vault for later thought, reading, or processing.

      For online videos and lectures, I'll often dump YouTube URLs into https://docdrop.org/, which then gives a side by side transcript for more easily jumping around as well as annotating directly from the transcript if I choose.

      I prefer to use [[links]] over #tags for connecting information. Most of the tags I use tend to be for organizational or more personal purposes like #WantToRead which I later delete when done.

      When I run across interesting questions or topics that would make good papers or areas of future research I'll use a tag like #OpenQuestion, so when I'm bored I can look at a list of what I might like to work on next.

      Syndicated copies: https://forum.obsidian.md/t/research-phd-academics/1446/64?u=chrisaldrich

  9. Dec 2020
    1. However, the opposite was actually experienced in this study. Students reflected a lack of interest in and ability to participate in blended learning activities which seemed quite frustrating to most participan

      Because there is nothing "good" about blended learning in itself. All teaching and learning activities, if implemented poorly, have poor outcomes. Students disengage when the activity has no value (or perceived value) regardless of the medium in which the activity takes place. It has little to do with technology.

    2. hat’s all that I tried, and I got such a fright that I stopped... So again, for fear of wasting time and embarrassment, rather leave it.

      It doesn't seem like anyone has suggested to these participants that they should only be using technology to try and solve problems that they are experiencing and only when the technology presents a simpler solution than alternatives.

    3. UNLearn courses is like a garden. It needs constant attendance. So it’s a large amount of work to do it, and once it’s done, it doesn't require that much work to tweak it and fiddle with it, but it needs constant work.

      OK but so should your F2F course. You should also constantly be maintaining and refining those resources. I think that this is another opportunity for the researcher to highlight how many academics just don't see all of the time and effort that F2F requires, simply because it's what they do. They "see" the additional work of online but they ignore all the work that's supposed to be going into F2F as well.

    4. Confidence implies competence

      Not at all. These two things might be associated but they are by no means necessarily associated. In fact, there is good evidence that the least competent can sometimes be the most confident. See the Dunning-Kruger effect.

    5. Therefore, it could be argued that belief regarding the usefulness of technologies could lead to change and ultimately the actual use of digital technologies in teaching and learning.

      This goes both ways. A teacher who believes that their job is to control access to specialised information, and to control assessment may use technology to close down learning opportunities (e.g. by banning the use of Wikipedia, YouTube, etc.) and even insisting on the installation of surveillance (proctoring) software on students' personal computers.

      Again, you can argue that technology in itself doesn't make the difference.

    6. Some teachers might believe that their traditional way of transmitting knowledge to students is still the best (Owens, 2012). These pedagogical beliefs can determine whether teachers will implement technologies or not (Judson, 2006; Owens, 2012).

      This seems to continue the assumption that "using technology" = good and "not using technology" = bad. But I really want to see the candidate articulate the understanding that good teaching with technology can be great, but that bad teaching with technology can be awful. Technology can amplify what is there but it doesn't inherently improve something that is bad.

      It would also be interesting, based on the candidate's writing, to hear some reflexivity on their own beliefs, and how these beliefs about the inherent goodness of technology has influenced the direction of the thesis.

    7. It is clear from Bandura’s theory that individuals have the capacity to make their own choices and that several factors influence these choices

      Is there a conflict here with the notion of free will (i.e. that we don't have any)? See Dennet, Harris, Coyne for alternative positions to the notion that we have any agency i.e. that in any situation we could have done something other.

    8. Self-efficacy is defined by Bandura as people’s “judgment of their capabilities to organise and execute courses of action required to attain designated types of performances. It is concerned not with the skills one has but with judgments of what one can do with whatever skills one possesses” (Bandura, 1986:391). In other words, self-efficacy refers to the belief in one’s own ability to perform a task or behaviour (Bandura, 1997), influencing how we think, what we believe and how we conduct ourselves.
    9. n order to determine behavioural intention in a new innovation, Venkatesh and Davis (2000) refer to two key belief constructs to examine: perceived usefulness (PU) and perceived ease of use (PEOU), which are the predictors of users’ attitudes towards using digital technologies. Consequently, attitude depicts the intention to use digital technologies, which affects actual use.

      What we believe influences how we behave.

      "...when a tool is both useful and easy to use, actual system use is more likely"

    10. TAM is based on Fishbein and Ajzen’s theory of reasoned action (TRA), which offers a theoretical perspective that explains human conduct and the significance of one’s beliefs in order to anticipate behaviour (Ajzen & Fishbein, 1975).
    11. This section will focus on the technology acceptance model (TAM) (Davis et al., 1989) and the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) (Ajzen, 1985). The commonality in these theories (TAM, TPB and SCT) will then be discussed. These three perspectives provide a theoretical foundation for understanding the individual’s reactions in the integration of digital technologies in teaching and learning. While TAM and TPB focus exclusively on teachers’ beliefs about digital technologies, SCT focuses on the teachers’ behaviour.
    12. Bandura (1986:18) suggests that these three factors, namely the person, the behaviour and the environment are “all inseparably entwined to create learning in an individual”
    13. heories such as the theory of reasoned action (TRA) (Fishbein & Ajzen, 1975) were drawn on, which initiated one of the most well-known theories in technology adoption, namely the technology acceptance model (TAM) (Davis, Bagozzi & Warshaw, 1989), which will be discussed later in this chapter. In the early 1990s, researchers started using social cognitive theory (SCT) (Bandura, 1986) when they realised the importance and relevance of self-efficacy in the adoption of digital technologies
    14. influences their need to self-direct their learning and discover information

      Categorising entire cohorts of students based on their date of birth.

      There is evidence that the simplistic categorisation of entire cohorts of students based on their date of birth is problematic. It also often fails to distinguish between those who feel comfortable using relatively simple tools in the context of social media (sharing, liking, etc.) and the more complex and nuanced use of digital tools to engage in professional learning, especially when that learning includes collaboration.

    1. If you look at the same graph with distance 2, the layer of additionally visible nodes show how my new Notion might be connected to things like online identity, using the environment to store memory and layered access to information. This triggers additional thoughts during the writing process.

      Lovely. This is such a great insight that I can already see is going to help me a lot.

    2. Usually while writing a Notion, I show the graph of how it connects to other Notions/Notes alongside it. I set the graph to show not only the 1st level links, as that only shows the links already apparent from the text I have in front of me. I set it to show 3 steps out at the start, and reduce to two steps when there are more links.

      This is a great idea that hasn't occurred to me before. When looking for non-obvious relationships between concepts (something that I think forms part of creativity), it makes sense to have the graph view open alongside the note you're working on.

  10. Oct 2020
    1. Obsidian is a powerful knowledge base that works on top of a local folder of plain text Markdown files.

      Alright, I think I may now have things set to use an IFTTT applet to take my Hypothes.is feed and dump it into a file on OneDrive.

      The tiny amount of clean up to the resultant file isn't bad. In fact, a bit of it is actually good as it can count as a version of spaced repetition towards better recall of my notes.

      The one thing I'll potentially miss is the tags, which Hypothes.is doesn't include in their feeds (tucked into the body would be fine), but I suppose I could add them as internal wiki links directly if I wanted.

      I suspect that other storage services that work with IFTTT should work as well.

      Details in a blogpost soon...

      Testing cross-linking:

      See Also:

      • [[Obsidian]]
      • [[Hypothes.is]]
      • [[note taking]]
      • [[zettlekasten]]
      • [[commonplace books]]
      • [[productivity]]

      hat tip to Hypothesis, for such a generally wonderful user interface for making annotating, highlighting, bookmarking, and replying to web pages so easy!

    1. Long comment threads on blog posts are a mixed blessing. It is great to have stirred up such great community discussion. But anything beyond, say, 20 comments is beginning to get beyond what anyone is willing to actually read. What likely happens is people read the article, read the first few comments, then start just scanning them (at increasingly swift rates) until they hit the bottom, then read the last one or two. At least, that’s what I do.

      Doing a quick test of Hypothes.is notes to Obsidian.via a storage source.

      Also checking the difference between html as a source and markdown as a source.

    1. So today, as a somewhat limited experiment, I played around with my Hypothes.is atom feed (https://hypothes.is/stream.atom?user=chrisaldrich, because you know you want to subscribe to this) and piped it into IFTTT. Each post creates a new document in a OneDrive file which I can convert to a markdown .md file that can be picked up by my Obsidian client.

      Trying to see if this work for me when linking with google drive. Unsure how to convert to markdown.