40 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
  2. Sep 2018
    1. The basic assumption that underlies typical reading instruction in many schools is that learning to read is a natural process, much like learning to talk. But decades of scientific research has revealed that reading doesn't come naturally. The human brain isn't wired to read. Kids must be explicitly taught how to connect sounds with letters — phonics.
  3. Aug 2018
    1. Similarly, the moral foundations theory originally put forth by Jonathan Haidt and Jesse Graham purports that humans have (in the most common and widely discussed versions of the theory) five innate moral building blocks: care/harm; fairness/cheating; loyalty/betrayal (associated with in-group/out-group consciousness); authority/subversion; and sanctity/degradation (“sanctity” is also often referred to as “purity” in the relevant discussions). Liberals are highly attuned to care/harm and fairness/reciprocity, but conservatives, while valuing care, also emphasize authority and purity, which means that their approach to care/harm will be very different from that of liberals. (In fairness, many on the far Left also emphasize purity and fall into authoritarianism.)

      This could be worth a read as well.

  4. Jul 2018
    1. “INFORMATION RULES”—published in 1999 but still one of the best books on digital economics—Carl Shapiro and Hal Varian, two economists, popularised the term “network effects”,

      I want to get a copy of this book.

  5. May 2018
  6. Mar 2018
    1. A high-level technical explanation of how Dropbox's PDF annotation interface is implemented.

      Quite interesting for Hypothesis.

  7. Nov 2017
    1. To support text and data mining as a standard and essential tool for research, the UK should move towards establishing by default that for published research the right to read is also the right to mine data, where that does not result in products that substitute for the original works. Government should include potential uses of data for AI when assessing how to support for text and data mining.
    1. Harvey Weinstein’s Army of SpiesThe film executive hired private investigators, including ex-Mossad agents, to track actresses and journalists.
    1. “You Can’t Go Any Lower”: Inside the West Wing, Trump Is Apoplectic as Allies Fear ImpeachmentAfter Monday’s indictments, the president blamed Jared Kushner in a call to Steve Bannon, while others are urging him to take off the gloves with Robert Mueller.
  8. Oct 2017
    1. U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said Thursday that the U.S. military has more than 1,000 personnel in the region, an apparent reference to an area that includes Niger as well as Mali and Nigeria.
    1. It’s a Fact: Supreme Court Errors Aren’t Hard to Find A ProPublica review adds fuel to a longstanding worry about the nation’s highest court: The justices can botch the truth, sometimes in cases of great import.
    1. But these are also all characteristics that make What3Words completely unsuitable as either a global or national address register. So I was dismayed to read that Mongolia have decided to adopt it as their national register. I’m hoping that this isn’t really the case and that story is similar to the apocryphal tales of Honduras’s blockchain based land registry.
    2. The problem is that What3Words is a proprietary, closed system. The algorithm is patented. The data is closed, with the terms and conditions spelling out in great detail all of the things you can’t do with the system
    1. Trump blindsides advisers with promised opioid plan Officials are scrambling to produce an emergency declaration by next week.
    1. The Boomtown That Shouldn’t Exist Cape Coral was built on total lies. One big storm could wipe it off the map. Oh, and it’s also the fastest-growing city in the United States.
    1. Justice John G. Roberts Jr., arguing that the South had taken great strides that made the protections of the act unnecessary, based his decision in part on a Senate Judiciary Committee analysis that misinterpreted how the Census Bureau reports race and ethnicity data and wrongly suggested that registration gaps between minorities and whites had shrunk significantly, an error that neither he nor his clerks caught.

      Stunning Omission

    1. Neil Postman noted in his 1985 book Amusing Ourselves to Death

      Need to look into this book. The cultural shift (text->image = logic->emotion) is an interesting idea, but I'd like to see how it is argued.

  9. Sep 2017
  10. Oct 2016
    1. Previously, intensity-dependent metabolic changes have been found with positron emission tomography and blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance imaging after TMS to motor/prefrontal cortex; bilateral motor/prefrontal and auditory activation is induced, which becomes stronger with increasing pulse intensity [Bohning et al.,1999,2000; Fox et al.,1997; Nahas et al.,2001; Siebner et al.,1999; Speer et al.,2003]. However, these results are not directly comparable with our EEG findings. Arising a few seconds poststimulus, metabolic changes reflect relatively long-lasting activity of interconnected neuronal networks, whereas we were interested in the TMS-evoked events that occurred within a fraction of a second.
  11. Jul 2016
    1. That is what Barack and I think about every day as we try to guide and protect our girls through the challenges of this unusual life in the spotlight, how we urge them to ignore those who question their father’s citizenship or faith.

      Many writers and thinkers have speculated about how the first black family has dealt with the what historian Carol Anderson calls the inevitable "white rage" backlash to Obama's election. Having served her time, Michelle seems more willing to take the criticisms head-on. This is what many of us would call "shade".

    2. How we insist that the hateful language they hear from public figures on TV does not represent the true spirit of this country.

      This line does some work. On one level, it is red meat for colorblind white (and some non-white) liberals who require all black figures to be hopeful (I've discussed this more here: http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/08/between-the-world-and-me-book-club-not-trying-to-get-into-heaven/400271/).

      On another level, it is doing some inter-group communication or what Stuart Hall called encoding/decoding and what Mark Anthony Neal translates into "black code" when he talks about Hall's work through modern media cultures. Obama is signaling here that she has noted those who have directed racist, sexist, classist rhetoric at her family. She has taken note.

    3. So, look, so don’t let anyone ever tell you that this country isn’t great, that somehow we need to make it great again. Because this right now is the greatest country on earth!

      This is a dig at Donald's nihilism the other night. But it is also saying, hey, there is no great american past. Remember, Obama had just referenced slavery a paragraph earlier. She's making an elegant case that any allusion to the past is necessarily one that is closer to slavery. We are great now, she says, because we are at least greater than that. It is the idea that for black Americans, this country's best days are always necessarily yet to come. It's a stark contrast to the idea that America was only great when, as historian Ira Katznelson said, "affirmative action was white".

  12. Jun 2016
  13. Dec 2015
  14. Oct 2015
  15. Jun 2015
  16. May 2015
    1. McDonald, R. J., Cloft, H. J. & Kallmes, D. F. Fate of submitted manuscripts rejected from the American Journal of Neuroradiology: outcomes and commentary. Am. J. Neuroradiol. 28, 1430–1434 (2007)
    2. Schroter, S, et al. What errors do peer reviewers detect, and does training improve their ability to detect them? J. R. Soc. Med. 101, 507–514 (2008)

      Look this one up

  17. Jan 2014
    1. common appropriation regimes do not give a complete answer to the sustainability of motivation and organization for the truly open, large-scale nonproprietary peer production projects we see on the Internet.

      Towards the end of our last conversation the text following "common appropriation" seemed an interesting place to dive into further for our future discussions.

      I have tagged this annotation with "meta" because it is a comment about our discussion and where to continue it rather than an annotation focused on the content itself.

      In the future I would be interested in exploring the idea of "annotation types" that can be selectively turned on and off, but for now will handle that with ad hoc tags like "meta".