166 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2021
    1. Recently, redox-responsive biomolecules such as phenazines have been used in several electrochemical strategies to interrogate a range of biological activities30,31 and to control gene expression in living cells32,33, where the redox status of the biomolecules could be measured or manipulated by application of electronic potentials
  2. Dec 2020
    1. RFC 3463 [25], specifies further structuring of the reply strings, including the use of supplemental and more specific completion codes (see also RFC 5248 [26]).

      To-do: look at the mentioned RFCs.

    1. Ariela had written a book about the history of theeveryday law of slavery in the U.S. Deep South that emphasized localculture and law,

      2019-12-30 12:12:53 AM

    2. Martha S. Jones,Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in AntebellumAmerica

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  3. Nov 2020
    1. How many times have you heard the cliché, for example, read between the lines? It turns out, the key to reading between the lines is actually to write between the lines. Once you start, you'll discover a whole new reading experience, elevated from that of a one-sided lecture to a two-sided conversation.

      reading as a conversation between myself and the text.

    1. political scientists Keith Poole and Howard Rosenthal, who have long tracked historical trends in political polarization, said their studies of congressional votes found that Republicans are now more conservative than they have been in more than a century. Their data show a dramatic uptick in polarization, mostly caused by the sharp rightward move of the GOP.
  4. Oct 2020
    1. The idea of the hermeneutic circle is to envision a whole in terms how the parts interact with each other, and how they interact with the whole. That may sound a little bit out there, so let’s have a look at a concrete example.

      This is a general concept, the rest of the article extrapolates the idea to the act of reading. This may be a stretch, since it implies that whatever can be broken into parts will belong to the hermeneutic circle, while this only applies to interpreting (text)

    1. A reasonably clean alternative would be to map a function over the array and use destructuring in the each loop: {#each [1, 2, 3, 4].map(n => ({ n, sqr_n: n * n })) as { n, sqr_n }} {sqr_n} {sqr_n / 2}<br> {/each}
    1. Safiya Noble, Algorithms of Oppression (New York: New York University Press, 2018). See also Mozilla’s 2019 Internet Health Report at https://internethealthreport.org/2019/lets-ask-more-of-ai/.
    1. “INFORMATION RULES”—published in 1999 but still one of the best books on digital economics—Carl Shapiro and Hal Varian, two economists, popularised the term “network effects”,

      I want to get a copy of this book.

    1. In the Ars memorandi noua secretissima, published in 1500 or 1501,20 Jodocus Weczdorff de Triptis (Weimar) inserted an alphabetical list of words, similar to that of Celtis, but he simply suggested that it could be used as a memory house without any scope for our private associations. Moreover, the alphabetic table of Celtis was included in the famous Margarita philosophica nova of Gregor Reisch, which was probably the most popular handbook of the artes scholars in the fi rst two decades of the 16th century.

      Books on memory that used Celtes' trick

    2. “The Art of Memory in Late Medieval East Central Europe (Bohemia, Hungary, Poland): An Anthology,” co-written by Lucie Doležalová, Rafał Wójcik and myself.

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    1. In 1945 Jacques S. Hadamard surveyed mathematicians to determine their mental processes at work by posing a series of questions to them and later published his results in An Essay on the Psychology of Invention in the Mathematical Field.

      I suspect this might be an interesting read.

    1. Horwitz argued a fairly radical point, which I think never received wide enough recognition due to the subject matter and his extremely difficult (dense and dry) style.  He said, “I seek to show that one of the crucial choices made during the antebellum period was to promote economic growth primarily through the legal, not the tax, system, a choice which had major consequences for the distribution of wealth and power in American society”

      I'll have to add this book to my to read stack.

    1. Universal Design for Learning: Theory and Practice by Meyer, Rose, and Gordon (a book recognized as the core statement about UDL, which you can read for free) walks us through how educators actively change their practice to become more inclusive and helps us weigh choices in terms of how we create unnecessary barriers:
  5. Sep 2020
    1. Why the obfuscation of remaining to r and callbacks to c? This is fine for function-local variables but in this instance makes the code significantly harder to reason about? There is no notion of what c and r mean.
    1. Personally for me, this is incredibly hard to read. Regex everywhere, nested objects with different rules and configurations that are very intuitive, multiple loaders that resolve backwards, built in loaders having obscure issues that require using third party loaders in between, separation of plugins and loaders, and so on.
    1. Circe by Madeline MillerThis magnificent story of the famous witch goddess from Homer’s Odyssey was shortlisted for the 2019 Women’s prize for fiction. It is both hugely enjoyable, showing the very male classical epic from a female point of view, and profoundly affecting in its depictions of the trials of immortality. This book is the closest you can get to experiencing what it might really be like to be a goddess, with all its benefits and sacrifices.
    1. There are other mathematical models of institutionalized bias out there! Male-Female Differences: A Computer Simulation shows how a small gender bias compounds as you move up the corporate ladder. The Petrie Multiplier shows why an attack on sexism in tech is not an attack on men.
    2. Schelling's model gets the general gist of it, but of course, real life is more nuanced. You might enjoy looking at real-world data, such as W.A.V. Clark's 1991 paper, A Test of the Schelling Segregation Model.
    1. Figures like Kenneth Hagin, his protégé Kenneth Copeland, Oral Roberts, and, of course, Osteen himself built up individual followings: followings that often grew as a result of cross-promotion (something religious historian Kate Bowler points out in her excellent Blessed, a history of the prosperity gospel movement). One preacher might, for example, feature another at his conference, or hawk his cassette tapes.

      Some of this is the leveraging of individual platforms for cross-promotion here, which helped in a pre-social media space and which now happens regularly online, particularly in the "funnel" sales space.

    1. James Suzman’s ‘Work: A History of How We Spend Our Time’ is published next month by Bloomsbury.
  6. Aug 2020
  7. Jul 2020
    1. In our series, learning linked data, we've covered several topics related to querying linked data using several SPARQL features and techniques, producing linked data using RDFa and working with JSON-LD.

      I don't see a link to the other articles in this series...

  8. Jun 2020
  9. May 2020
    1. “Make it right” means that the code is maintainable and easy to change. Humans can read it, not just computers. New engineers can easily add functionality to the code. When there’s a defect, it is easy to isolate and correct.
  10. Apr 2020
  11. Mar 2020
  12. Feb 2020
  13. Jan 2020
    1. Thyroxine was added to their antidepressant medication, and the doses were increased to a mean of 482 ± 72 μg/day.

      This is the highest dose of levothyroxine that I've seen administered. Even treatment for thyroid cancer rarely goes beyond 300 mcg (or even 200 mcg, which is more common).

    1. a private library is not an ego-boosting appendages but a research tool. The library should contain as much of what you do not know as your financial means … allow you to put there. You will accumulate more knowledge and more books as you grow older, and the growing number of unread books on the shelves will look at you menacingly. Indeed, the more you know, the larger the rows of unread books. Let us call this collection of unread books an antilibrary.
    1. Timothy Morton is Rita Shea Guffey Chair in English at Rice University in Houston. He is the author of Realist Magic: Objects, Ontology, Causality and Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology after the End Of The World.

      want to read these

    1. he ZORA Canon, our list of the 100 greatest books ever written by African American women, is one of a kind, yet it exists within a rich cultural tradition.
  14. Dec 2019
    1. n their book “New Power,” Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans lay out the characteristics of old and new power.<img class="ex t u je ak" src="https://miro.medium.com/max/1862/1*jmW_5ey9vS_fNMPt5qO5Cg.png" width="931" height="522" role="presentation"/>
  15. Nov 2019
    1. Seeking more fuel from art, Proust started reading John Ruskin, whose influential The Seven Lamps of Architecture (1849) and The Stones of Venice (1851-53) revived popular interest in medieval art.

      want to read

  16. Oct 2019
    1. I wanted my students to gain an awareness of a growing body of work by sociologists, theorists, historians and literary scholars in a field known as “whiteness studies,” the cornerstones of which include Toni Morrison’s “Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination,” David Roediger’s “The Wages of Whiteness,” Matthew Frye Jacobson’s “Whiteness of a Different Color: European Immigrants and the Alchemy of Race,” Richard Dyer’s “White” and more recently Nell Irvin Painter’s “The History of White People.”

      Want to read

    2. I wondered if he was an ethnic white rather than a white Anglo-Saxon Protestant. The historian Matthew Frye Jacobson, in “Whiteness of a Different Color,” describes “the 20th century’s reconsolidating of the 19th century’s ‘Celts, Slavs, Hebrews and Mediterraneans.’ ” By the 1940s, according to David Roediger, “given patterns of intermarriage across ethnicity and Cold War imperatives,” whites stopped dividing hierarchically within whiteness and begin identifying as socially constructed Caucasians.

      I wonder if it's possible to continue this trend to everyone else? Did the effect stop somewhere? What caused it to? What might help it continue?

  17. Sep 2019
  18. Aug 2019
    1. Which brings me back to 1984.  Also in that year, Michael Piore and Charles Sabel published The Second Industrial Divide: Possibilities for Prosperity (Basic). They found their new highly flexible manufacturing firms in northwestern and central Italy instead of Silicon Valley.  Their entrepreneurs had ties to communist parties and the Catholic Church instead of liberation sympathies. But the idea was much the same: computers would be the key to flexible specialization. For all the talk since about economic complexity, that is the book about the changing division of labor worth re-reading.

      want to read this

  19. Jul 2019
    1. I wondered if he was an ethnic white rather than a white Anglo-Saxon Protestant. The historian Matthew Frye Jacobson, in “Whiteness of a Different Color,” describes “the 20th century’s reconsolidating of the 19th century’s ‘Celts, Slavs, Hebrews and Mediterraneans.’ ” By the 1940s, according to David Roediger, “given patterns of intermarriage across ethnicity and Cold War imperatives,” whites stopped dividing hierarchically within whiteness and begin identifying as socially constructed Caucasians.

      I wonder if it's possible to continue this trend to everyone else? Did the effect stop somewhere? What caused it to? What might help it continue?

    2. I wanted my students to gain an awareness of a growing body of work by sociologists, theorists, historians and literary scholars in a field known as “whiteness studies,” the cornerstones of which include Toni Morrison’s “Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination,” David Roediger’s “The Wages of Whiteness,” Matthew Frye Jacobson’s “Whiteness of a Different Color: European Immigrants and the Alchemy of Race,” Richard Dyer’s “White” and more recently Nell Irvin Painter’s “The History of White People.”

      Want to read

  20. May 2019