244 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2021
  2. Sep 2021
    1. Generally, shrank is the simple past tense form of "shrink" like in "I shrank the shirt in the wash." Shrunk is the past participle being paired with "have" as in "I have shrunk the jeans." There are rarer examples of shrinked and shrunken in literature but not enough to support those usages as standard.
    1. When referring to a change in direction, position, or course of action, the correct phrase is to change tack. This is in reference to the nautical use of tack which refers to the direction of a boat with respect to sail position. This phrase has long been confused as "change tact" but this is technically incorrect.
  3. Aug 2021
    1. The figures are relatively flattened, and in the case of the Virgin Mary and Gabriel, placed against a diapered ground (a traditional, flat patterned background).

      diaper: decorate (a surface) with a repeating geometric or floral pattern.

      I've not come across this usage before.

    1. When writing about programming, I prefer to use 'annotation' as the general term. Although .NET was first, the word 'attribute' is just too widely used for different things.
    1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypomnema

      Hypomnema (Greek. ὑπόμνημα, plural ὑπομνήματα, hypomnemata), also spelled hupomnema, is a Greek word with several translations into English including a reminder, a note, a public record, a commentary, an anecdotal record, a draft, a copy, and other variations on those terms.

      Compare and contrast the idea of this with the concept of the commonplace book. There's also a tie in with the idea of memory, particularly for meditation.

      There's also the idea here of keeping a note of something to be fixed or remedied and which needs follow up or reflection.

  4. Jul 2021
    1. One constant is that, to achieve all the purposes of read­ing, the desideratum must be the ability to read different things at different-appropriate-speeds, not everything at the greatest possible speed.

      desideratum

    1. Doxography (Greek: δόξα – "an opinion", "a point of view" + γράφειν – "to write", "to describe") is a term used especially for the works of classical historians, describing the points of view of past philosophers and scientists. The term was coined by the German classical scholar Hermann Alexander Diels.

      doxography

    1. Perhaps a better way of understanding what Anaximander has to say is to study carefully the doxography, which goes back to people like Aristotle and Theophrastus, who probably have had Anaximander’s book before their eyes, and who tried to reformulate what they thought were its central claims.

      doxography

      Much like attempting to reconstruct history from portions of the Bible, one must consider the context of the pieces in its own time and with the context of the authors' time, space, and other thought.

    2. Therefore, we offer a translation, in which some poetic features of the original, such as chiasmus and alliteration have been imitated:

      chiasmus

    3. The important thing is, however, that he did not just utter apodictic statements, but also tried to give arguments. This is what makes him the first philosopher.

      apoditic

    1. Though my relationship to time fluctuates, the gravamen of my disclosures remains constant.

      gravamen

    1. Hesse described each imagined Life as an “entelechy,” that is, the realization of a potential—but perhaps that assumes something like the pre-existence of souls, an Identity that somehow exists before it is embodied in, realized in, a particular culture, a particular gender, a particular ethnicity.

      :en·tel·e·chy /ənˈteləkē/ noun [PHILOSOPHY]

      ; the realization of potential.

      • the supposed vital principle that guides the development and functioning of an organism or other system or organization. plural noun: entelechies

      "such self-organization required a special biological force—entelechy"

      • the soul.
    1. 23-24) Latin epulis does not = “grand salons,” and Lucretius’ language is not recherché enough to warrant “gewgaws” and “garnitures.”

      I quite like the portmanteau garniture.

      [[recherché]]

    1. And even long-term, canonical sources such as books and scholarly journals are in fugacious configurations—usually to support digital subscription models that require scarcity—that preclude ready long-term linking, even as their physical counterparts evaporate.

      [[fugacious]] what a great word not often seen in adjectival form.

    1. Either you have a spare computer on hand or spin up a VPS and have the technical nous to run a Gemini server on it, or you find somebody running a site like Flounder, or a tilde, and ask them very nicely if they’ll give you some space to upload to.

      I love the word nous. It's definitely underused.

    1. Von der Bücherordnung zur Buchführung

      From book keeping to bookkeeping

      Interesting to note that the German has two different physical words for these concepts which are more similar in English: keeping books (librarianship) to bookkeeping (accounting)

    1. The relationship between Phillips — one of whose most famous works is A Humument, an ongoing-for-decades collage/manipulation/adaptation of a Victorian book — and Eno is a fascinating one in the history of aleatory or, as I prefer, emergent art.

      Humument sounds interesting, particularly the descriptions of collage/manipulation

      aleatory is a great word that one sees infrequently and all too randomly

  5. Jun 2021
    1. When dealing with the verb, the issue of how to treat the past participle is a contentious one, with much blood being shed on both sides. Some people feel that the past participle of input should be input, not inputted, based on the reasoning that the word comes from put, and we don’t say “he putted the papers on the shelf.” A similar line of reasoning has caused many people to aver that words such as broadcast should never be written as broadcasted, since the cast portion of the word remains unchanged with tense.
    1. They also have a sound

      I recently learned about ticker-tape synesthesia. My sister has it. In addition to "closed captioning for life", many folks with it see the words they read in their heads as they read them (leading to a doubling of the words). It's made me think about the process of reading in a whole new way...

    1. I completely understand that master have two meanings: A man who has people working for him, especially servants or slaves; and An original recording, film, or document from which copies can be made.
    2. I think it's just a bad English/mis-translation problem. I'm guessing @pmmmwh assumed 'master' meant like 主 in 奴隸主 (slave owner/master). Actually a better translation would be 師 like 功夫大師 (Kung Fu master). The specimen copies are made from.
    3. The specimen copies are made from.
    1. I basically destroyed my favorite books with the pure logorrheic force of my excitement, spraying them so densely with scribbled insight that the markings almost ceased to have meaning.

      logorrheic force is a great phrase

    1. When the Net absorbs a medium, that medium is re-created in the Net’s image. It injects the medium’s content with hyperlinks, blinking ads, and other digital gewgaws, and it surrounds the content with the content of all the other media it has absorbed.

      Curious use of the nearly archaic word gewgaws here. Definitely harkens back to a technophobic time where physical machinery was the terrifying new thing. Is it admitting a bit of a Luddic stance?

    1. You draw a box not only around any word that does not seem quite right but also around words that fulfill their as-signment but seem to present an op-. A portunity.

    Tags

    Annotators

  6. May 2021
    1. Apophenia is the name for that tendency in humans to see patterns where none exist, to draw connections, to make links.
    1. Like a plowjockey with a dybbuk in him, he can'tbe certain whether he's a genius or anut, a funny man or a fool.

      dyb·buk /ˈdibək/

      noun: dybbuk; plural noun: dybbuks; plural noun: dybbukim

      : (in Jewish folklore) a malevolent wandering spirit that enters and possesses the body of a living person until exorcized.

      Origin from Yiddish dibek, from Hebrew dibbūq, from dāḇaq ‘cling’.

    2. Yet, a fewweeks later, safe at home on the JackPaar show. Winters was his old self:prancing out in a satyr wig, he turnedon the audience subliminally with aninsanely fruity tribute to "thrping";

      thrping

  7. Apr 2021
    1. Originally, one of these marks (or a plain line) was used in ancient manuscripts to mark passages that were suspected of being corrupted or spurious; the practice of adding such marginal notes became known as obelism. The dagger symbol †, also called an obelisk, is derived from the obelus, and continues to be used for this purpose.
    1. recension

      re·cen·sion

      /rəˈsen(t)SH(ə)n/

      noun

      noun: recension; plural noun: recensions

      a revised edition of a text; an act of making a revised edition of a text.

      Example "under the Carolingians new recensions of the code were made"

      Origin mid 17th century (in the sense ‘survey, review’): from Latin recensio(n- ), from recensere ‘revise’, from re- ‘again’ + censere ‘to review’.

      See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recension

    1. a remark or passage that departs from the theme of a discourse : digression The speaker inserted some often amusing parentheses during his speech.
    2. an amplifying (see amplify sense 1) or explanatory word, phrase, or sentence inserted in a passage from which it is usually set off by punctuation explained further in a parenthesis
    3. one or both of the curved marks ( )

      strange that it means one or both of them

    1. There’s an amazing thing that happens when you start using the right dictionary. Knowing that it’s there for you, you start looking up more words, including words you already know. And you develop an affection for even those, the plainest most everyday words, because you see them treated with the same respect awarded to the rare ones, the high-sounding ones.

      The value of using the right dictionary.

    2. In 1807, he started writing a dictionary, which he called, boldly, An American Dictionary of the English Language. He wanted it to be comprehensive, authoritative. Think of that: a man sits down, aiming to capture his language whole.

      Johnson's dictionary is much like this article describes too.

      Perhaps we need more dictionaries with singular voices rather than dictionaries made by committee?

    3. A book where you can enter “sport” and end up with “a diversion of the field” — this is in fact the opposite of what I’d known a dictionary to be. This is a book that transmutes plain words into language that’s finer and more vivid and sometimes more rare. No wonder McPhee wrote with it by his side. No wonder he looked up words he knew, versus words he didn’t, in a ratio of “at least ninety-nine to one.”

      The real reason for using a dictionary.

    4. le mot juste.

      "the right word" in French. Coined by 19th-century novelist Gustave Flaubert, who often spent weeks looking for the right word to use.

      Flaubert spent his life agonizing over "le mot juste." Now Madame Bovary is available in 20 different crappy english translations, so now it doesn't really make a damn bit of difference. by namealreadyusedbysomeoneelse July 21, 2009 at https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=le%20mot%20juste

    5. John McPhee — one the great American writers of nonfiction, almost peerless as a prose stylist — once wrote an essay for the New Yorker about his process called “Draft #4.” He explains that for him, draft #4 is the draft after the painstaking labor of creation is done, when all that’s left is to punch up the language, to replace shopworn words and phrases with stuff that sings.

      I quite like the idea of this Draft #4 concept.

    1. why do you guys think have_css matcher is named the way it is? I mean, it sure deals with css identifiers, but have_css gives(at least to me) the impression that the page has certain stylesheet loading.
  8. Mar 2021
    1. Lexical (semiotics) or content word, words referring to things, as opposed to having only grammatical meaning
    1. place

      place?

      to me that connotes a physical location.

      How can they be using that in semantics? Is that a common term/jargon used in the terminology/lexicon of semantics?

    1. antiphrasis, which refers to the usually ironic or humorous use of words in senses opposite to the generally accepted meanings, such as in a phrase like "an ancient creature 2 days old."
    1. The word authority in authority control derives from the idea that the names of people, places, things, and concepts are authorized, i.e., they are established in one particular form.
  9. Feb 2021
    1. There are two definitions of ‘Enterprise’ 1 - Enterprise as a business. In fact, in French, ‘enterprise’ literally means ‘business’ 2- Enterprise as a large business. This is the most common use of the term in business, differentiating between small, medium, and large businesses. In this context, there is no official rule, however it is generally accepted for enterprise to mean companies with over 1,000 employees and/or $1B in revenue
    1. The intellectual cesspool of the inflation truthers

      Powerful Headline (words) from a Washington Post article under Economic Policy. WORDS.....! Words..... When you study Legal Theory you learn that "words" play a significant role in all aspects of social order.

      Controlling the rhetoric with consistent narrative

      This statement simply implies the use of consistent narrative (story) to allow control of the rhetoric. Narrative can be viewed as believable while Rhetoric is a general pejorative. When the rhetoric is mis or dis-information the narrative must be credible.

      Main stream media (MSM) has held a long-term standing across the world as being credible. This standing is eroding. It has eroded considerably over the last 25 years among critical thinkers and the general population has started to take notice.

      I question everything from MSM especially when narrative is duplicated with identical rhetoric across known government media assets. History is a wonderful thing when searching for Truth. Events in historical time periods can be researched, parsed and studied for patterns based on future evidence and outcomes.

      Information "Spin" is real and happens for one purpose, that purpose is to benefit a position, agenda, person, plan, etc., by manipulating (advertising, PR, propaganda) information. Spin is difficult to refute without hard facts. Spin has a short-term shelf life, but that is all it needs to chart a new course, set the "ball" in motion so to say.

      History allows Truth to overcome Spin.

    1. There is an additional civic value here, one that goes beyond simply preserving professional journalism. For about ten years now, a few of us have been waging a sometimes lonely battle against the premise that the internet leads to political echo chambers, where like-minded partisans reinforce their beliefs by filtering out dissenting views, an argument associated with the legal scholar and now Obama administration official Cass Sunstein. This is Sunstein’s description of the phenomenon:If Republicans are talking only with Republicans, if Democrats are talking primarily with Democrats, if members of the religious right speak mostly to each other, and if radical feminists talk largely to radical feminists, there is a potential for the development of different forms of extremism, and for profound mutual misunderstandings with individuals outside the group

      This is an early reference to the idea of a "filter bubble" dating back to 2004 that predates the 2010 coining of the word by Eli Pariser.

    1. In German, Buchstabensalat ("letter salad") is a common term for this phenomenon, and in Spanish, deformación (literally deformation).
    2. Mojibake means "character transformation" in Japanese. The word is composed of 文字 (moji, IPA: [mod͡ʑi]), "character" and 化け (bake, IPA: [bäke̞], pronounced "bah-keh"), "transform".
  10. Jan 2021
  11. Dec 2020
  12. Nov 2020
    1. the adjective strong or the adverb strongly may be added to a mathematical notion to indicate a related stronger notion; for example, a strong antichain is an antichain satisfying certain additional conditions, and likewise a strongly regular graph is a regular graph meeting stronger conditions. When used in this way, the stronger notion (such as "strong antichain") is a technical term with a precisely defined meaning; the nature of the extra conditions cannot be derived from the definition of the weaker notion (such as "antichain")
  13. Oct 2020
    1. Looking at all those bearing, heading, orientation, navigation, position, direction, etc. I think we have a bigger problem here. Someone has decided how to use tag (e.g. orientation is about page orientation), but there are 100 other cases. Imho, to disallow misusing there should be no "heading", but rather "html-heading", "gps-heading", "whatelse-heading", which make mistakes impossible. So yes, "heading" should go.
    1. As Ajax spoke, a bird flew out on the right, a high-flying eagle. Encouraged by the omen, the Achaean soldiers responded with a cheer.

      Birds have been a reoccurring theme within this chapter and have been referenced to several times.

    1. virtual-dom exposes a set of objects designed for representing DOM nodes. A "Document Object Model Model" might seem like a strange term, but it is exactly that. It's a native JavaScript tree structure that represents a native DOM node tree.
    1. BitTorrent is a peer-to-peer (P2P) communications protocol for file sharing. It may also refer to: BitTorrent (company), a company which develops and maintains the BitTorrent protocol BitTorrent (software), the original BitTorrent client
    1. encapsulation refers to one of two related but distinct notions, and sometimes to the combination thereof:[3][4] A language mechanism for restricting direct access to some of the object's components.[5][6] A language construct that facilitates the bundling of data with the methods (or other functions) operating on that data.[1][7]
    1. I decided I wanted something that was a cross between a wiki and a blog - which Ward Cunningham immediately dubbed a bliki.
  14. Sep 2020
    1. Can this word be used to describe the property in computing where a value can be dynamic? I feel like "dynamicness" would be a better term for this.

      It seems to refer more to personality:

      1a: marked by usually continuous and productive activity or change a dynamic city b: ENERGETIC, FORCEFUL a dynamic personality

      See also the same sentiment here: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=4137596

    1. I considered it, but dynamism refers to personality and philosophy, while dynamicity is just the condition of being dynamic.
  15. Aug 2020
    1. The timescales on which a system’s processes run have critical consequences for its ability to predict and adapt to the future.

      A layer of architecture that is too slow to change: technical debt. (Pace layering)

    2. We also know that if individuals are bad at collecting good information – if they misinterpret data due to their own biases or are overconfident in their assessments – an aggregation mechanism can compensate.

      "wisdom of crowds"

    1. When it comes to exercise, the terms “stamina” and “endurance” are essentially interchangeable. However, there are some subtle differences between them.
  16. Jul 2020
    1. And

      shows addition. It shows the important effects of tree .

    2. But

      it shows contrast. it show the differences of her feeling how she love to sit out side while the heat can be unbearable for her.

  17. Jun 2020
    1. In systems engineering and requirements engineering, a non-functional requirement (NFR) is a requirement that specifies criteria that can be used to judge the operation of a system, rather than specific behaviors. They are contrasted with functional requirements that define specific behavior or functions

      This is a strange term because one might read "non-functional" and interpret in the sense of the word that means "does not function", when instead the intended sense is "not related to function". Seems like a somewhat unfortunate name for this concept. A less ambiguous term could have been picked instead, but I don't know what that would be.

    1. No, the term has nothing to do with racism, in current significance or historically. I am assuming the reference in the question is to racism based on skin color.
  18. May 2020
    1. corporatist

      From Google: relating to or characterized by advocacy for the control of a state or organization by large interest groups

    1. Also known as "serverless", "client-side", or "static" web apps, unhosted web apps do not send your user data to their server. Either you connect your own server at runtime, or your data stays within the browser.

      serverless has another meaning (that does actually use a server) so I prefer the term "unhosted" since it has no such ambiguity.

      See also:

    1. A serverless app is an app that doesn't require a server for it to work. Most apps nowadays require a server, such as Facebook, quora, twitter etc. As a rule of thumb any app that doesn't connect to the internet is a serverless app (there are some others that are serverless but that is harder to tell). Flappy bird is an example you’ll be familiar with that is serverless.

      See also this comment:

      While this answer is true in the literal sense of the term, the question is most likely referring the new serverless trend in cloud infrastructure, with services like AWS Lambda and Iron.io.

    2. Serverless architectures allow you to build and run applications and services without having to manage infrastructure. Your application still runs on servers, but all the server management is done by Provider. You no longer have to provision, scale, and maintain servers to run your applications, databases, and storage systems.Serverless architecture accelerates development as a set of small, distinct, and independent actions. By abstracting away infrastructure, by doing this the developers can just concrete on building micro services/functions which performs some action and integrate with others to build a bigger service.
    1. This has too many, very different meanings.

      Especially these 2 which are themselves similar, but seem unlike the first 3:

      • an establishment engaged in doing business for another
      • an administrative division (as of a government) Both are basically an organization.
    1. A "tag" is a snippet of code that allows digital marketing teams to collect data, set cookies or integrate third-party content like social media widgets into a site.

      This is a bad re-purposing of the word "tag", which already has specific meanings in computing.

      Why do we need a new word for this? Why not just call it a "script" or "code snippet"?

    1. Is "customizability" an English word? Yes. It is a root word in English, "custom," with English suffixes added according to the rules of English morphology. So even if it isn't in the dictionary, it is a perfectly legitimate English word.