79 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2019
    1. While the predominant value of existentialist thought is commonly acknowledged to be freedom, its primary virtue is authenticity.[6] In the view of the existentialist, the individual's starting point is characterized by what has been called "the existential attitude", or a sense of disorientation, confusion, or dread in the face of an apparently meaningless or absurd world.[7] Many existentialists have also regarded traditional systematic or academic philosophies, in both style and content, as too abstract and remote from concrete human experience.[8][9]
    2. According to Albert Camus, the world or the human being is not in itself absurd. The concept only emerges through the juxtaposition of the two, where life becomes absurd due to the incompatibility between human beings and the world they inhabit.[
    1. What I really need is to get clear about what I must do, not what I must know, except insofar as knowledge must precede every act. What matters is to find a purpose, to see what it really is that God wills that I shall do; the crucial thing is to find a truth which is truth for me, to find the idea for which I am willing to live and die.
    2. One must first learn to know himself before knowing anything else (γνῶθι σεαυτόν). Not until a man has inwardly understood himself and then sees the course he is to take does his life gain peace and meaning; only then is he free of that irksome, sinister traveling companion — that irony of life, which manifests itself in the sphere of knowledge and invites true knowing to begin with a not-knowing (Socrates) just as God created the world from nothing. But in the waters of morality it is especially at home to those who still have not entered the tradewinds of virtue. Here it tumbles a person about in a horrible way, for a time lets him feel happy and content in his resolve to go ahead along the right path, then hurls him into the abyss of despair. Often it lulls a man to sleep with the thought, "After all, things cannot be otherwise," only to awaken him suddenly to a rigorous interrogation. Frequently it seems to let a veil of forgetfulness fall over the past, only to make every single trifle appear in a strong light again. When he struggles along the right path, rejoicing in having overcome temptation's power, there may come at almost the same time, right on the heels of perfect victory, an apparently insignificant external circumstance which pushes him down, like Sisyphus, from the height of the crag. Often when a person has concentrated on something, a minor external circumstance arises which destroys everything. (As in the case of a man who, weary of life, is about to throw himself into the Thames and at the crucial moment is halted by the sting of a mosquito.) Frequently a person feels his very best when the illness is the worst, as in tuberculosis. In vain he tries to resist it but he has not sufficient strength, and it is no help to him that he has gone through the same thing many times; the kind of practice acquired in this way does not apply here. (Søren Kierkegaard's Journals & Papers IA Gilleleie, 1 August 1835)
  2. Mar 2019
    1. Simplicity is a state of mind. It dwells in the main intention of our lives. A man is simple when his chief care is the wish to be what he ought to be, that is, honestly and naturally human. And this is neither so easy nor so impossible as one might think. At bottom, it consists in putting our acts and aspirations in accordance with the law of our being, and consequently with the Eternal Intention which willed that we should be at all. Let a flower be a flower, a swallow a swallow, a rock a rock, and let a man be a man, and not a fox, a hare, a hog, or a bird of prey: this is the sum of the whole matter.
    2. I despair of ever describing simplicity in any worthy fashion. All the strength of the world and all its beauty, all true joy, everything that consoles, that feeds hope, or throws a ray of light along our dark paths, everything that makes us see across our poor lives a splendid goal and a boundless future, comes to us from people of simplicity, those who have made another object of their desires than the passing satisfaction of selfishness and vanity, and have understood that the art of living is to know how to give one’s life.
    3. Herein is summed up the experience of humanity, and this experience, which each man must remake for himself, is more precious in proportion as it costs more dear. Illumined by its light, he makes a moral advance more and more sure. Now he has his means of orientation, his internal norm to which he may lead everything back; and from the vacillating, confused, and complex being that he was, he becomes simple. By the ceaseless influence of this same law, which expands within him, and is day by day verified in fact, his opinions and habits become transformed . . . The necessary hierarchy of powers is organized within him: the essential commands, the secondary obeys, and order is born of simplicity. We may compare this organization of the interior life to that of an army. An army is strong by its discipline, and its discipline consists in respect of the inferior for the superior, and the concentration of all its energies toward a single end: discipline once relaxed, the army suffers. It will not do to let the corporal command the general. Examine carefully your life and the lives of others. Whenever something halts or jars, and complications and disorder follow, it is because the corporal has issued orders to the general. Where the natural law rules in the heart, disorder vanishes.
    4. Need we say that one does not rise to this point of view without a struggle? The spirit of simplicity is not an inherited gift, but the result of a laborious conquest . . . But by dint of action, and exacting from himself strict account of his deeds, man arrives at a better knowledge of life. Its law appears to him, and the law is this: Work out your mission. He who applies himself to aught else than the realization of this end, loses in living the raison d’etre of life. The egoist does so, the pleasure-seeker, the ambitious: he consumes existence as one eating the full corn in the blade — he prevents it from bearing its fruit; his life is lost. Whoever, on the contrary, makes his life serve a good higher than itself, saves it in giving it. Moral precepts, which to a superficial view appear arbitrary, and seem made to spoil our zest for life, have really but one object — to preserve us from the evil of having lived in vain. That is why they are constantly leading us back into the same paths; that is why they all have the same meaning: Do not waste your life, make it bear fruit; learn how to give it, in order that it may not consume itself!
    5. Art is the realization of a permanent idea in an ephemeral form. True life is the realization of the higher virtues — justice, love, truth, liberty, moral power — in our daily activities, whatever they may be. And this life is possible in social conditions the most diverse, and with natural gifts the most unequal. It is not fortune or personal advantage, but our turning them to account, that constitutes the value of life. Fame adds no more than does length of days: quality is the thing.
    6. confounding the secondary with the essential, substance with form. They are tempted to believe that simplicity presents certain external characteristics by which it may be recognized, and in which it really consists. Simplicity and lowly station, plain dress, a modest dwelling, slender means, poverty — these things seem to go together. Nevertheless, this is not the case . . . No class has the prerogative of simplicity; no dress, however humble in appearance, is its unfailing badge. Its dwelling need not be a garret, a hut, the cell of the ascetic nor the lowliest fisherman’s bark. Under all the forms in which life vests itself, in all social positions, at the top as at the bottom of the ladder, there are people who live simply, and others who do not.
    7. At no epoch have the exterior conditions which man has made for himself by his industry or his knowledge, been able to exempt him from care for the state of his inner life. The face of the world alters around us, its intellectual and material factors vary; and no one can arrest these changes, whose suddenness is sometimes not short of perilous. But the important thing is that at the center of shifting circumstance man should remain man, live his life, make toward his goal. And whatever be his road, to make toward his goal, the traveler must not lose himself in crossways, nor hamper his movements with useless burdens. Let him heed well his direction and forces, and keep good faith; and that he may the better devote himself to the essential — which is to progress — at whatever sacrifice, let him simplify his baggage.
    8. We must search out, set free, restore to honor the true life, assign things to their proper places, and remember that the center of human progress is moral growth. What is a good lamp? It is not the most elaborate, the finest wrought, that of the most precious metal. A good lamp is a lamp that gives good light. And so also we are men and citizens, not by reason of the number of our goods and the pleasures we procure for ourselves, not through our intellectual and artistic culture, nor because of the honors and independence we enjoy; but by virtue of the strength of our moral fiber. And this is not a truth of today but a truth of all times.
    9. we have in abundance that which, if must be, we can go without, and are infinitely poor in the one thing needful.
    10. When one passes in review the individual causes that disturb and complicate our life, by whatever names they are designated, and their list would be long, they all lead back to one general cause, which is this: the confusion of the secondary with the essential.
    1. What really matters is . . . what really matters.There are lots of reasons why people aren’t doing what they want to do. For one thing, many of us don’t know what that is. When I was still in real estate, I met with a career counselor. The counselor said, “Why don’t you take a year off and figure out what you really want to do?” The suggestion was mind-boggling. My schedule wouldn’t let me take a day off – let alone a year! But that suggestion, as crazy as it sounded at first, forced me to ask basic questions about my professional life. In fact, I did spend a year away from my job. And if I hadn’t taken that time, I would have been in real estate forever.If you’ve spent years not knowing what you want to do – in your career, in your family life, with your civic obligations – it can seem like an impossible challenge to figure it out. For many people, it’s easier to keep doing what they know they don’t want to do, or what they don’t mind doing. Simplifying your life frees up time for you to figure out what really matters.
  3. Feb 2019
    1. Sublime which subdues us with Nobleness of Thought and Grandeur of Expression, will fly out of sight and by being Empty and Bombast become con­temptible.

      Astell seems to be using sublime in the sense "Of a person, personal attribute, action, etc.: morally, intellectually, or spiritually superior; of great nobility or grandeur. Hence: perfect, consummate; supreme" (usage starting around 1600)

      Not to be confused with the later concept of the sublime (starting around 1750, which I'm familiar with in reference to Romantic literature) as "Of a feature of nature or art: that fills the mind with a sense of overwhelming grandeur or irresistible power; that inspires awe, great reverence, or other high emotion, by reason of its beauty, vastness, or grandeur."

      http://www.oed.com.ezp.slu.edu/view/Entry/192766?rskey=35FZPc&result=1&isAdvanced=false#eid

  4. Jan 2019
    1. media do notemerge independently and outside of specific historical practices. Yet atthe same time history is itself a system of meaning that operates across amedia-technological abyss of non-meaning that must remain hidden

      I was with Siegert until the "media-technological abyss of non-meaning that must remain hidden." Why must non-meaning remain hidden?

    2. However, while US post-cybernetic media studies are tied to thinking about bodies and organisms,German media theory is linked to a shift in the history of meaning arisingfrom a revolt against the hermeneutical tradition of textual interpretationand the sociological tradition of communication

      So in Siegert's assessment, US posthumanism is focused on the body whereas German posthumanism is focused on meaning and signification.

      To grasp the distinction, I think I need better understanding of where meaning was and where it shifted to (and how that becomes posthuman).

  5. Dec 2018
    1. L: It happened to us a couple of times to come up with these kinds of ideas where the audience really understands what we meant and feels as strongly as we did. We want to communicate feelings that we feel ourselves. Whatever the tool is, we wish to convey what we think is great. It sounds a little bit cliché but if you’re out just for the pretty picture, I think it’s a waste of time.
  6. Oct 2018
    1. more.

      The speaker regrets her past relationships and realizes they were so meaningless that she does not even remember them. She wishes she could have stayed with the one person she truly did love

    1. discover other ways of knowing

      or to express other ways to communicate information as through images

  7. Apr 2018
    1. Since September 27, 2004, the jinmeiyō kanji (人名用漢字, kanji for use in personal names) consist of 3,119 characters, containing the jōyō kanji plus an additional 983 kanji found in people's names.

      人名用漢字(じんめいよう・かんじ)literally means "person's-name-use kanji" or "kanji for use in peoples' names."

      Kanji have been added and (re)moved from the list several times throughout its history. See the page Wikipedia: Jinmeiyoo Kanji

    2. The jōyō kanji (常用漢字, regular-use kanji) are 2,136 characters consisting of all the Kyōiku kanji, plus 1,130 additional kanji taught in junior high and high school[9].

      常用(じょうよう)漢字(かんじ)means "daily use" kanji.

  8. Jan 2018
  9. Dec 2017
    1. finding patterns where there seems to be nothing but noise

      Finding patterns where there is noise vs flashes of meaning that occur

  10. Oct 2017
  11. Aug 2017
    1. struggle upstream against the discursive power of the term, or playfully subvert it

      How to deal with the problem of conceptualization, as the process of finding terms and applying meaning to things always means reduction of complexity? A solution might be to subvert connotations and implicit meanings by highlighting certain presuppositions. This might be the task of social science, in a broader sense of philosophy (cf. Adorno, who defines philosophy's major task, simply put, in interpreting the world).

  12. Jul 2017
  13. Apr 2017
    1. Meal1ing;-contextisageu"eral.couditiQI1ofhumancommunicationandisnot~~onymouswithrhetoricalsituation

      This is obviously key, but I feel like some examples would help.

      Can we think up some good examples of this difference?

      I suspect it's the difference between situational factors which are not directly relevant/impactful to the rhetoric (such as whether the speech was delivered on a Wednesday, whether there was a light rain the night before, the size of the room in which the rhetor is speaking) and the factors which contribute to some urgency that demands a rhetorical response (recent political actions, a sudden death, impending threats from an outside force, etc.)

  14. Mar 2017
    1. One minute left. Terry, Keith, Kevin, Susan, Maha, Mia, Jim, Maritta, Marcin, Paul, Teresa, Maxime, Alexis, Camille, Clarissa, Blaise, Leena, Jurgen, Jose, Alan, Howard, Alec, Laura, Christine, Marie Christine, Dave, Bonnie et al -

      time people connection

    2. He chose to live, to believe in himself after watching a short video on Youtube which somehow connected with him in his moment of despair.

      connection storyteller witness youtube

    3. An ex-student came to my class, he has become a successful manager in IKEA in Clermont Ferrand. He came to talk about his experience. We sat down in the comfy chairs in our learning space. His presence resulted in an extraordinary moment of connection. He told the story of how he had been at a cross-roads in his life. He had lived a crisis, he made a conscious decision to live, rather than to die.

      Storyteller connection

    4. The person is often only aware of feeling of constraint. We pick away at those constraints little by little. Meaningful time spent with one person has a viral effect on other students who are witnesses to the uniquely meaninful dialogue. Such moments of connection become virtuous, viral messages.

      meaningful connection

      constraint meaningless

      WHY

      KEY

      https://vimeo.com/195637079

    5. We attempt to make meaningful connection with each person.

      meaningful connection

    6. Terry, in his solitary picnic, talked of the difficulty of creating the conditions in which his students will want to connect with others in the CLAVIER network.

      common ground desire to connect. Why reach out?

    7. Mia talked about translating meaning through boxes, inside boxes.

      Key. translation of meaning through boxes, inside boxes

    8. I can work with you, these guys and not feel that I am selling myself, ourselves short. That feels like freedom.

      freedom values community

    1. What does this say about our desire to connect, to search for meaning?

      Desire to connect

      Desire for meaning.

    2. Half a life later, I am investigating those elements which connect us to the other, which enable us to journey a while with a fellow learner.

      What connects us? What is the story?

    3. It was all that I could do to put the pieces together on the carpet. I have no memory of whether I finished the puzzle.

      complexity

      life

    4. a giant jigsaw puzzle.

      puzzle. life mapping pieces

    1. I met Catherine Cronin, I think first in London and then again in Plymouth, I met Mary Anne Reilly, we spoke over dinner about Nomads, about Rhizomatic Learning. I felt connected. I felt that I could communicate, I felt nurtured. I was not al

      mentorship leaders community

      Herein lies the problem of confidence - that feeling of being an imposter (imposter syndrome) others have the possibility to connect - photos of people smiling in exotic places.

      Jealousy.

      Feeling of being part of something...but a part of what?

      Problem of recognition.

      Problem of being disheartened.

      Problem of barriers..

      Also that feeling of not wanting to be disconnected from local reality - not wanting to be a satellite.in heaven.

      Feeling of others being a cosy clique.

      Not wanting to play career games in academia.

  15. Dec 2016
    1. There are things you must apply yourself to very specifically because there are two aspects to life: There are concrete accomplishments and there is Mystery. You must approach both. Mystery opens you to a greater assistance than you could provide for yourself and saves you from condemning circumstances. Applying yourself to tangible things enables you to reclaim your self-respect and to build a foundation that is sound and firm. That is what personal growth is for-to build a foundation for Knowledge. What other value does it have? The person you are attempting to improve will be shed like a garment when you leave. As you become stable, then you can represent something greater. Without Knowledge, you are still profoundly confused and subject to miseries. Without purpose, meaning and direction, your life is still a desperate event.
    2. to be a student of Knowledge, allow your life to have its mysteries. Do not try to explain everything and justify everything. Knowledge will emerge within you once you have chosen that this be your life. You will become less certain about particulars and more certain about your purpose, meaning and direction. Then you will begin to find freedom from anxiety and ambivalence, and that is the greatest gift of all because a life without anxiety or ambivalence is completely rendered into the world.
    3. to be happy and to have meaning in the world, you must concentrate on developing Knowledge and allow it to contribute itself where it knows it can be of the greatest benefit. This will fulfill your need for relationship and community.
    4. This has a very important spiritual meaning because you are at work reclaiming Knowledge for a long time, in time.
  16. Oct 2016
    1. Part of the meaning, in fact, depends upon ignoring parts of the text all-together, or seeing them as part of something that is not immediately representable in the lines of the poem.

      makes me wonder that how do people know what to ignore and what to highlight if the reader is not given a theme to look for.

    2. When The text mentions that sometimes parts of meaning depend on what parts are to be ignored in paragraph 13 makes me wonder that how do people know what to ignore and what to highlight if the reader is not given a theme to look for.

  17. Sep 2016
    1. She would have to listen to the members of this college community, watch what they did, and participate in their activities to learn such meanings.

      To fully grasp someone's culture, you would have to learn the meanings of real world objects such as love, marriage, animals etc. of that culture

  18. Aug 2016
  19. Jul 2016
  20. Jun 2016
  21. ou-expo.nicklolordo.com ou-expo.nicklolordo.com
    1. , I think I would have wept over it. Somehow, now that it has happened actually, and to me, it seems far too wonderful for tears.

      I really enjoy this idea, for some reason, as something so unfathomably sad has happened to Dorian, as if his life were a novel (hmhmhm) and he finds it too amusing to be bothered by. Wilde demonstrates the surreal reality that plagues life and continues somewhat of a commentary on how precious one's life is, and how it must not be wasted on conforming when one does not see fit.

    2. Because to influence a person is to give him one’s own soul. He does not think his natural thoughts, or burn with his natural passions. His virtues are not real to him. His sins, if there are such things as sins, are borrowed. He becomes an echo of some one else’s music, an actor of a part that has not been written for him. The aim of life is self-development. To realize one’s nature perfectly,—that is what each of us is here for. People are afraid of themselves, nowadays. They have forgotten the highest of all duties, the duty that one owes to one’s self.

      Wilde uses this dialogue to convey his theory on the meaning of life. "People are afraid of themselves nowadays" is Wilde's call to the oppression of individuals by society. Wilde opens the concept of living as one sees fit - their true identity. This dialogue probably cause issue from early critics of Wilde's work, as it holds a somewhat secular message.

  22. serval.unil.ch serval.unil.ch
    1. Grades, a value-laden symbol indicating the rela-tive quality of a performance that is a regular feature of school life(Pope, 2001), are positioned firmly on the evaluative side of thistypology. The value of a grade reflects certain norms, and thegrade attributed reflects the degree to which normatively deter-mined standards have or have not been attained

      Describes grades as "value laden"

  23. Dec 2015
    1. Although the transcript gives some slight indication of what we have been discussing, the emphasis should be placed on the actual experiences which you have had. The value is in the communication of meaning as experienced within your consciousness.

      Words are symbols of symbols twice removed from Reality ~ACIM

      It's the meaning of the words that is important - that has value. Meaning is communicated by experience.

  24. Sep 2015
    1. Cholinergic neurons provide the primary source of acetylcholine to the cerebral cortex,

      I think what is meant is "cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain", or "the cerebral cortex receives projections from cholinergic neurons", as we presume that acetylcholine is coming from cholinergic neurons.

  25. Jul 2015
    1. which was their armor against their world.

      A whole dissertation could be (likely has been) written on this idea of "urban" black style as a kind of "armor against the world."

      It seems incredibly valuable for young people to acknowledge (and be acknowledged for) the cultural power of style.

  26. May 2015
    1. Sensation alone is meaningless

      A claim like this seems to work by positing meaning as something not only separable but already separate from sensation. And yet so much of how we metaphorize is by appealing to senses in order to construct & share meaning...

  27. Sep 2014
    1. The researchers linguistically coded job descriptions found in a U.S. Department of Labor database that were predominately populated for masculine-themed words such as active, ambitious, analytical, competitive, dominate, challenging, confident, decisive, determined, independent, leader, objective, etc., as well as feminine-themed words such as committed, connected, cooperative, dependable, interpersonal, loyal, responsible, supportive, trust, etc. The results confirmed that job descriptions for male-dominated jobs contained more masculine-themed words associated with male stereotypes than job descriptions from female-dominated jobs and vice versa.

      I wish society would spend more time dismantling the gender coding of these words than wringing its hands over the repercussions of using them with their present connotations. We clearly can't ignore how the words we choose make people feel, but I can't help feeling like we do so sometimes at the cost of addressing deeper structural issues.

      It seems sexist to me that these researchers begin from the assumption that these words are gendered.

  28. Jan 2014
    1. Surely the most relevant fact about value types is not the implementation detail of how they are allocated, but rather the by-design semantic meaning of “value type”, namely that they are always copied “by value”.
  29. Oct 2013
    1. 24. Now a strong desire for clearness sometimes leads to neglect of the more polished forms of speech, and indifference about what sounds well, compared with what dearly expresses and conveys the meaning intended.

      Meaning is more important than presentation

    2. What is the difference between searching out the proper meaning and the known meaning?

  30. Sep 2013
    1. for I do not know what my own meaning is as yet

      I suspected as much, and yet he confidently presses on laying ground for argument. interesting.