93 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2019
  2. Aug 2019
  3. Jun 2019
  4. May 2019
  5. Apr 2019
  6. Feb 2019
    1. In 2016, the top seven advanced to the grand championship finale, where they’d need to enter a full cyber-reasoning system—one that would not merely notice a problem but could also infer its nature.
  7. Jan 2019
  8. Dec 2018
  9. Nov 2018
    1. Here's How to Tell if You Have a Cold or the Flu

      Overall scientific credibility: 'high' to 'very high', according to scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

      Find more details in Health Feedback's analysis

    1. A lot of Democrats believe in what is called Enlightenment reasoning, and that if you just tell people the facts, they’ll reach the right conclusion. That just isn’t true.
  10. Oct 2018
    1. As the power is unleashed, computers on the Semantic Web achieve at first the ability to describe, then to infer, and then to reason. The schema is a huge step, and one that will enable a vast amount of interoperability and extra functionality. However, it still only categorizes data. It says nothing about meaning or understanding.

      The author presents an interesting progression for the Web to eventually learn to reason. The picture he paints of more accessible content on the internet hinges on the internet learning to reason, which is a human characteristic. It seems we need to apply human characteristics to all of our mechanics for them to progress in their usefulness.

  11. Sep 2018
    1. Hurricane Florence is not climate change or global warming. It's just the weather.

      Overall scientific credibility: 'low' to 'very low', according to scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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  12. Aug 2018
    1. In contrast, activities of invention almost always progress towards the creation of new or better things but not necessarily through refi nement. Normally we invent by combining a set of things we already understand how to create into larger, more complex, or more capable things that did not previously exist.

      The purpose of HCI as invention:

      • "understanding can sometimes decrease" due to complexity of making things

      • "things are more capable"

    2. Activities of discovery can have a variety of aims, including generating rich, empirically based descriptions, and creating new theoretical understandings

      The purpose of HCI as discovery:

      •"form framing truths"

      • elaborate to "progress toward improved understandings"

      • refined to "explain more phenomena or to be more predictive"

      • "developing and testing competing ideas"

    3. Another way of understanding technical HCI research is by contrasting it with other types of technical work that is not research. For our purposes, research can be seen as having the creation of reusable knowledge at its core. More specifi cally technical HCI research emphasizes knowledge about how to create something (invention) but also knowledge that might be reused to assist in the creation of a whole class of similar things or even multiple types of different things.

      HCI research definition. Contrast this with the previous development-based definition.

    4. In an interdisciplinary setting such as HCI, we often shift between disciplines that have stable and functional but potentially con-tradictory world views. In doing so, we are confronted with the need to select and use (or at least appreciate, understand, and evaluate) a wide range of methods and with them a wide range of expectations and values.

      The interdiscipliinary nature of HCI provides an impetus to consider non-STEM perspectives but can also reveal frictions between approaches, practices, values, and goals.

    5. Technical HCI focuses on the technology and improvement aspects of this task—it seeks to use technology to solve human problems and improve the world. To accom-plish this, the fundamental activity of technical HCI is one of invention —we seek to use technology to expand what can be done or to fi nd how best to do things that can already be done.

      HCI definition

  13. Jun 2018
    1. Hurricanes Are Moving Slower—And That's a Huge Problem

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very high', according to scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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  14. May 2018
    1. In a Warming West, theRio Grande Is Drying Up

      Overall scientific credibility: 'high', according to scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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    1. The Sea Is Rising, but Not Because of Climate Change

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very low', according to scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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  15. Apr 2018
    1. A Startling New Discovery Could Destroy All Those Global Warming Doomsday Forecasts

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very low', according to scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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  16. Feb 2018
    1. Satellite observations show sea levels rising, and climate change is accelerating it

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very high', according to scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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  17. Jan 2018
    1. Arctic’s Winter Sea Ice Drops to Its Lowest Recorded Level

      Overall scientific credibility: 'high', according to scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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    1. Earth Sets a Temperature Record for the Third Straight Year

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very high', according to scientists who analyzed this article.

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  18. Dec 2017
    1. It’s a real event, and it’s violence.

      it is important to her and the greater commmunity

    2. The history of painting is full of graphic violence and narratives that don’t necessarily belong to the artists own life

      she means it doesnt matter ab race it matters ab what is being conveyed through the art

  19. Nov 2017
    1. Climate change might be worse than thought after scientists find major mistake in water temperature readings

      Overall scientific credibility: 'low', according to scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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  20. Oct 2017
  21. Sep 2017
    1. Has Climate Change Intensified 2017’s Western Wildfires?

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very high', according to scientists who analyzed this article.

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  22. Aug 2017
    1. Alaska’s PermafrostIs Thawing

      Overall scientific credibility: 'high' to 'very high', according to scientists who analyzed this article.

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  23. Jul 2017
    1. In Collaborative Reasoning discussions, students are engaged with texts through reasoning and deliberation with one another about the multi-faceted issues raised in the text(s). The discussion is a process of teasing out and working through "big" issues; handling of ambiguity and opposing viewpoints; reasoning, exploring, evaluation and building of arguments; and holding one's own or letting go within a social context.

      Collaborative Reasoning

  24. Jun 2017
  25. May 2017
    1. Racing to Find Answers in the Ice

      Overall scientific credibility: 'high' to 'very high', according to 9 scientists who analyzed this article.

      card

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  26. Apr 2017
    1. From extreme drought to record rain: Why California's drought-to-deluge cycle is getting worse

      Overall scientific credibility: 'high', according to 4 scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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  27. Mar 2017
    1. Earth heading for 'mini ice age' within 15 years

      Overall scientific credibility: 'low' to 'very low', according to the 6 scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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  28. Feb 2017
    1. Scientists: Here's What Really Causes Climate Change (And It Has Nothing To Do With Human Beings)

      Overall scientific credibility: 'low' to 'very low', according to 4 scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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    1. The Alarming Thing About Climate Alarmism

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very low' to 'low', according to 7 climate scientists who evaluated this article.

      evaluation card

      Find more details in the annotations below and on ClimateFeedback.org

      This evaluation features contributions by MIT Prof. Kerry Emanuel (see annotations below) and by Wesleyan University Prof. Gary Yohe (see his comments on the article)

      karmour:

      The article contains numerous scientific errors, does not provide references for some of its key claims, and ignores much of the published literature on the subjects discussed. It appears that many details have been cherry-picked or misconstrued in service of making a political point.

      anonymous reviewer:

      The author tries to rebut the narrative "that the world’s climate is changing from bad to worse". In doing so, he erects a straw-man, cherry-picks studies and misrepresents current climate science. Furthermore, the logic that since things are not 'worst-than-we-thought', we shouldn't take action and do the things we would do if things were simply 'bad', is lost on me…

      emvincent:

      The article is imprecise, for instance, about who the “doomsayers” and the “alarmists” are: since the core of the argumentation is about them, a definition of who they are and what they argue exactly cannot be avoided. It is also vague in its conclusion: “we need balance”, here again what exactly is meant by balance should be made clearer.

      jgdwyer:

      Tries and fails to make a convincing case for why humans need to worry about climate change less than they currently do.

      bmv:

      Although this author appears to have read parts of the IPCC report and carefully selected the facts which support his narrative, he presents information in a very misleading way, and some of his statements (e.g. "despite endless successions of climate summits, carbon emissions continue to rise") do not support his thesis that action on climate change is alarmist and unnecessary. His conclusion that "climate change is not worse than we thought. Some indicators are worse, but some are better" suggests a false equivalency between the indicators that are "worse" and those that are "better".

      drchavas:

      The author on multiple occasions presents blatantly inaccurate information and otherwise uses selective information to argue his point, which is highly misleading.

    1. El Niño, explained: Why this year's could be one of the strongest on record

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very high' to 'high', according to 5 scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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    1. fact

      So Campbell seems to have a lot of "causal chains," so where are the "bundles of evidence" exactly? I mean, this definitely seems to be moral reasoning, but this looks like more of a chain than a bundle.

    2. Spirit, which here comprises only the Supreme Being and the human soul, is surely as much included under the notion of natural object as body is, and is know-able to the philosopher purely in the same way, by observation and experience.

      The soul is as much part of nature as the body is, and thus needs to be included taxonomically.

      It is what differentiates humans from all other living things, and how God "made us in His image". A soul creating souls. This is also why humans are the only known thing to routinely be persuaded by moral reasoning.

    3. and by the justness of the reasoning the passion may be more deeply rooted and enforced; and that thus both may be made to conspire in effectuating that persuasion which is the end proposed

      I appreciate that Campbell values the relationship between logic and passion and that both are necessary to ensure that rhetoric is successful. Again, he contrasts previous thinkers, such as the Stoics, who disregarded the importance of passion, and only viewed "passions" as a hindrance to human happiness.

    1. Providence seems plainly lo have pointed out this useful purpose lo which the pleasures of taste may be applied, by interposing them in a middle station between the pleasures of sense and those of pure intellect.

      According to Blair, taste is a nice mixture between emotions/feelings and reason. He also recognizes that both are important for an individual to achieve satisfaction.

  29. Jan 2017
    1. U.S. scientists officially declare 2016 the hottest year on record. That makes three in a row. The inside track on Washington politics. Be the first to know about new stories from PowerPost. Sign up to follow, and we’ll e-mail you free updates as they’re published. You’ll receive free e-mail news updates each time a new story is published. You’re all set! Sign up *Invalid email address Got it Got it

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very high', according to 12 scientists who analyzed this article.

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  30. Dec 2016
    1. Australia’s Great Barrier Reef has worst coral die-off ever

      Overall scientific credibility: 'high' to 'very high', according to 5 scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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    1. Stunning new data indicates El Nino drove record highs in global temperatures suggesting rise may not be down to man-made emissions

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very low', according to 7 scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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  31. Nov 2016
    1. The Phony War Against CO2

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very low', according to 6 scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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    1. About Those Non-Disappearing Pacific Islands

      Overall scientific credibility: 'low', according to 12 scientists who analyzed this article.

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  32. Oct 2016
    1. James Lovelock: ‘Before the end of this century, robots will have taken over’

      Overall scientific credibility: 'low' to 'very low', according to 5 scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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  33. Sep 2016
    1. Greenland's huge annual ice loss is even worse than thought

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very high', according to 7 scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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    1. It is an outdated burden on the Cuban people.  It's a burden on the Americans who want to work and do business or invest here in Cuba.  It's time to lift the embargo.

      This a use of "Begging the Question", or circular reasoning because it asserts that [the embargo] is a burden on the Cuban people, and goes on to invoke that it likewise impedes Americans. But is the embargo actually burdensome to either populations? It is not addressed.

    1. Flooding of Coast,Caused by Global Warming,Has Already Begun

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very high', according to 12 scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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  34. Aug 2016
    1. Disasters like Louisiana floods will worsen as planet warms, scientists warn

      Overall scientific credibility: 'high', according to the 7 scientists who analyzed this article.

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  35. Jul 2016
    1. What science can tell us about the links between global warming and massive heat waves The inside track on Washington politics. Be the first to know about new stories from PowerPost. Sign up to follow, and we’ll e-mail you free updates as they’re published. You’ll receive free e-mail news updates each time a new story is published. You’re all set! Sign up *Invalid email address Got it Got it

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very high' to 'high', according to the 10 scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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    1. Thanks to climate change, the Arctic is turning green The inside track on Washington politics. Be the first to know about new stories from PowerPost. Sign up to follow, and we’ll e-mail you free updates as they’re published. You’ll receive free e-mail news updates each time a new story is published. You’re all set! Sign up *Invalid email address Got it Got it

      Overall scientific credibility: 'neutral' to 'high', according to the 8 scientists who analyzed this article.

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  36. Mar 2016
    1. What we’re doing to the Earth has no parallel in 66 million years, scientists say The inside track on Washington politics. Be the first to know about new stories from PowerPost. Sign up to follow, and we’ll e-mail you free updates as they’re published. You’ll receive free e-mail news updates each time a new story is published. You’re all set! Sign up *Invalid email address Got it Got it .hideText{position:absolute;left:-10000px}

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very high' to 'high', according to 7 scientists who analyzed this article.

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  37. Feb 2016
    1. Seas Are Rising at Fastest Rate in Last 28 Centuries

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very high' to 'high', according to 7 scientists who analyzed this article.

      evaluation card

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  38. Jan 2016
    1. The Climate Snow Job

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very low' to 'low', according to 10 scientists who analyzed this article.

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    1. 2015 Was Hottest Year in Historical Record, Scientists Say

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very high', according to 8 scientists who analyzed this article.

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    1. Scientists say human greenhouse gas emissions have canceled the next ice age

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very high', according to 8 scientists who analyzed this article.

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  39. Dec 2015
    1. Your Complete Guide to the Climate Debate

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very low' to 'low', according to 12 scientists who analyzed this article.

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  40. Nov 2015
  41. Oct 2015
    1. Climate Change Will Cause Increased Flooding In Coastal Cities

      Overall scientific credibility: 'high', according to 6 scientists who analyzed this article.

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    1. The vested interests at play mean the evidence we see from the research community isn’t always objective. So instead of allowing “experts” to determine the best course of action, why not ask the public? We could demand independent, objective evidence

      Underplays the vast independent scientific research literature that is already out there.

  42. Sep 2015
    1. Wake up, Obama, climate change has been happening forever

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very low', according to 9 scientists who analyzed this article.

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  43. Aug 2015
    1. How Arctic ice has made fools of all those poor warmists

      Overall scientific credibility: 'very low', according to the 8 scientists who analyzed this article.

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  44. Jun 2015
    1. ENCYCLICAL LETTER LAUDATO SI’

      Overall scientific credibility: 'high', according to the 9 climate scientists who analyzed this article.

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  45. Apr 2015
    1. FTT, as it applies to reasoning, is adapted from dual process models of human cognition. It differs from the traditional dual process model in that it makes a distinction between impulsivity and intuition—which are combined in System 1 according to traditional dual process theories—and then makes the claim that expertise and advanced cognition relies on intuition.[57] The distinction between intuition and analysis depends on what kind of representation is used to process information. The mental representations described by FTT are categorized as either gist or verbatim representations: Gist representations are bottom-line understandings of the meaning of information or experience, and are used in intuitive gist processing. Verbatim representations are the precise and detailed representations of the exact information or experience, and are used in analytic verbatim processing.
  46. Jan 2015
    1. 2014 Breaks Heat Record

      Overall scientific credibility: 'high' to 'very high', according to 8 climate scientists who evaluated this article.

      evaluation card

      Find more details in the annotations below and here

      jgdwyer:

      This article accurately describes global warming and puts the news that 2014 is the hottest year on record into appropriate context. The article does a very good job of distinguishing between climate variability and climate change with helpful discussion on ENSO and the relatively cold temperatures in the Eastern United States (while staying within the bounds of the mainstream climate science understanding).

      karmour:

      Very good article overall. I do wish the author had fact checked the incorrect claim by Dr. Christy (that global temperatures have not changed since the end of the 20th century) prior to including his quote in the article.

      aklocker:

      Scientifically this article seems to be correct but it could be a bit more precise in some of its statements. One thing I like is that it mentions different opinions on some points where scientists do not agree rather than giving a biased story.

      bmv:

      This article does a good job of putting the 2014 temperature record in context with quotes from experts and good descriptions of relevant issues such as El Nino. References to "skeptics" were appropriately followed up by evidence of their misinterpretation/mischaracterization of the data.

      aalpert:

      This article provides an accurate and well supported evaluation of the finding that 2014 was the hottest year on record.

      emvincent:

      Overall, this article is fair in its representation of the 2014 temperature record event and in reminding the context of the long-term warming trend+natural climate variability.

      alexis.tantet:

      The quality of this article is overall higher than most newspaper articles on climate change as it avoids the usual pitfalls such as confusing year to year variability with long-term change. It also addresses issues prone to confusion, such as why eastern USA did not experience such a warm year as most of the globe, which can help the readers to put the science in perspective with the seasonal climate they have actually experienced. The fact that the article focuses mostly on the observational record and not on theoretical or modeling studies may be a weakness, but the scope of an article cannot be too broad.

    1. Sobel, D. M. & Kirkham, N.Z. (2012). The influence of social information on children’s statistical and causal inferences. In F.Xu (Ed.). Rational constructivism in cognitive development.
    2. Sobel, D. M., & Kirkham, N. Z. (2006). Blickets and babies: The development of causal reasoning in toddlers and infants. Developmental Psychology, 42, 1103-1115.
    3. Sobel, D. M., & Kirkham, N. Z. (2007). Bayes nets and Babies: Infants’ developing representations of causal knowledge. Developmental Science, 10, 298-306.
  47. Feb 2014
    1. Majority Reasoning: (Justice Blackmun) A. Rule: The State of Texas asserts it’s rule (a law banning all abortions) is furthered by 2 interests: (1) Protecting prenatal life and (2) the medical safety of woman. The court accepts these interests, but rejects Texas’s absolute rule because: 1. There are 2 counter-weighing interests of the woman: a. The woman has a privacy right grounded in a "penumbra" of Amendments 1, 4, 5, 9, 14, because "activities relating to marriage, procreation, family relationships, and child rearing and education" are "fundamental" and "implicit in the concept of ordered liberty." b. The woman also has an interest in avoiding possible severe physical and psychological harm if an abortion is denied. 2. Also, a fetus is not a "person" within the meaning of the constitution, so it doesn’t get protection as a person. 3. Therefore, a proper rule balances the interests of the state v. the interests of the woman: in the early stages of pregnancy, the woman has stronger interests than the state, but as a fetus becomes more advanced, the state interests in prenatal life and a woman’s health grow to be "compelling," thus overriding the woman’s interests. This results in a 3-part RULE (trimester framework) the court announces: a. first trimester of pregnancy: no/little state interest in regulating abortion, so most abortion regulations are invalid. b. second trimester: moderate state interest (medical health of woman) so most medical regulations are okay. c. third trimester: Compelling state interest (fetal viability) so can outlaw abortion except to save woman’s life. B. Application: Here (in this case) Texas’s law violates this framework, because it outlaws abortions not just in the third trimester, but also in the first and second trimesters of pregnancy.
    1. Reasoning: This is the most important part of your brief as it describes why the court ruled the way it did; some law professors dwell on facts more than others, some more on procedural history, but all spend the most time on the court’s reasoning as it combines all parts of the case rolled in one, describing the application of the rule of law to the facts of the case, often citing other court’s opinions and reasoning or public policy considerations in order to answer the issue presented. This part of your brief traces the court’s reasoning step by step, so be sure that you record it without gaps in logic as well.
    1. The testimony makes it manifest that he was a special police officer to some extent identified with the work of the prosecutor's office, and that position, upon well-settled grounds of public policy, required him to assist, at least, in the prosecution of offenders against the law. The services he rendered, in this instance, must be presumed to have been rendered in pursuance of that public duty, and for its performance he was not entitled to receive a special quid pro quo.
      • Court finds sufficient evidence to characterize this fellow as a public official.

      • His interaction with the prosecutor's office weighed in as a factor in suggesting he had a legal duty.

      • Since he is characterized within the rule as a public official, he cannot, as a matter of law, receive a reward for the performance of his duties.

    1. Reasoning The reasoning gives the reader insight into how the court arrived at its decision. It is instructive in nature. Courts often back their holdings with several lines of reasoning, each of which should be summarized in this section. Unnecessary repetition of facts or the issue should be avoided. A court�s rationale for its holding might be a simple explanation of its thought process. Alternatively, the reasoning might be based on the plain language of the statute, Congressional intent, the re-enactment doctrine, or other common means of resolving judicial disputes.

      Several lines of reasoning may be used to back the Court's holdings and may be:

      • a simple explanation of the Court's thought processes
      • based on the plain language of the statute
      • congressional intent
      • re-enactment doctrine
      • other common means of resolving judicial disputes (what are those?)
  48. Jan 2014
    1. Once you abandon entirely the crazy idea that the type of a value has anything whatsoever to do with the storage, it becomes much easier to reason about it. Of course, my point above stands: you don't need to reason about it unless you are writing unsafe code or doing some sort of heavy interoperating with unmanaged code. Let the compiler and the runtime manage the lifetime of your storage locations; that's what its good at.

      Understanding what you should (and should not) reason about in the language you are using is an important part of good programming; and a language that lets you reason (nee worry) about only the things you need to worry about is an important part of a good programming language.