8 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Apr 2021
  3. Mar 2021
  4. Jun 2020
  5. Jan 2017
    1. In this sense it has a role very close to that of confession to the director, about which John Cassian will say, in keeping with Evagrian spirituality, that it must reveal, without exception, all the impulses of the soul (omnes cogitationes)

      To me, this idea of writing that speaks and reveals information to a "director" is the very basic idea for what first person narratives are.

      Furthermore, this idea of confessing to an audience through an interactive narrative translates to various media, as well. However, even though these confessions are seemingly necessary in textual renditions of narratives, they can often be misconstrued as more intrusive fourth wall breaks due to this change in media. This creates a very thin line between these confessions being additive to the narrative or if they take away from the overall intent of the author.

      To keep this idea going still, upon researching the definition of "cogitationes," the definitions were either of self-reflection, thoughts, or the act of thinking; something clearly represented through Foucault's writing, but a connection I found interesting, nonetheless.

  6. Sep 2016
    1. They knew that the story mattered; that people in the real world looked up to Superman, even though he was fictional, and could thus be persuaded to use him as a moral compass
  7. Dec 2015
    1. Pixar Animation co-founder Ed Catmull has warned that virtual reality technology may not be the revolution in storytelling that some of its evangelists have claimed. “It’s not storytelling. People have been trying to do [virtual reality] storytelling for 40 years. They haven’t succeeded. Why is that? Because we know that if they succeed then people would jump on it.”

      What? Who says VR has to be "just wandering around in a world"? You don't have to give the viewer full mobility, or any mobility. You can put their point of view where you want, and disallow interaction with the scenery -- which makes the experience precisely a 3D immersive motion picture. And I'm sure scripted stories can be told while giving the viewer some interaction with characters, and much freedom to move around -- that's just trickier. You'd plan for all the characters in various locations to push the story in a particular direction, or one of several directions, regardless of what the viewer does. The more you let the viewer affect events, the more it becomes a game, rather than a story.