310 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2021
    1. 2021-07-13

    2. Keerthivasan, S., Şenbabaoğlu, Y., Martinez-Martin, N., Husain, B., Verschueren, E., Wong, A., Yang, Y. A., Sun, Y., Pham, V., Hinkle, T., Oei, Y., Madireddi, S., Corpuz, R., Tam, L., Carlisle, S., Roose-Girma, M., Modrusan, Z., Ye, Z., Koerber, J. T., & Turley, S. J. (2021). Homeostatic functions of monocytes and interstitial lung macrophages are regulated via collagen domain-binding receptor LAIR1. Immunity, 54(7), 1511-1526.e8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.immuni.2021.06.012

    3. 10.1016/j.immuni.2021.06.012
    4. Myeloid cells encounter stromal cells and their matrix determinants on a continual basis during their residence in any given organ. Here, we examined the impact of the collagen receptor LAIR1 on myeloid cell homeostasis and function. LAIR1 was highly expressed in the myeloid lineage and enriched in non-classical monocytes. Proteomic definition of the LAIR1 interactome identified stromal factor Colec12 as a high-affinity LAIR1 ligand. Proteomic profiling of LAIR1 signaling triggered by Collagen1 and Colec12 highlighted pathways associated with survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Lair1−/− mice had reduced frequencies of Ly6C− monocytes, which were associated with altered proliferation and apoptosis of non-classical monocytes from bone marrow and altered heterogeneity of interstitial macrophages in lung. Myeloid-specific LAIR1 deficiency promoted metastatic growth in a melanoma model and LAIR1 expression associated with improved clinical outcomes in human metastatic melanoma. Thus, monocytes and macrophages rely on LAIR1 sensing of stromal determinants for fitness and function, with relevance in homeostasis and disease.
    5. Homeostatic functions of monocytes and interstitial lung macrophages are regulated via collagen domain-binding receptor LAIR1
    1. 2021-07-13

    2. Burn, G. L., Foti, A., Marsman, G., Patel, D. F., & Zychlinsky, A. (2021). The Neutrophil. Immunity, 54(7), 1377–1391. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.immuni.2021.06.006

    3. 10.1016/j.immuni.2021.06.006
    4. Neutrophils are immune cells with unusual biological features that furnish potent antimicrobial properties. These cells phagocytose and subsequently kill prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms very efficiently. Importantly, it is not only their ability to attack microbes within a constrained intracellular compartment that endows neutrophils with antimicrobial function. They can unleash their effectors into the extracellular space, where, even post-mortem, their killing machinery can endure and remain functional. The antimicrobial activity of neutrophils must not be misconstrued as being microbe specific and should be viewed more generally as biotoxic. Outside of fighting infections, neutrophils can harness their noxious machinery in other contexts, like cancer. Inappropriate or dysregulated neutrophil activation damages the host and contributes to autoimmune and inflammatory disease. Here we review a number of topics related to neutrophil biology based on contemporary findings.
    5. The Neutrophil
    1. 2021-07-08

    2. Telenti, A., Arvin, A., Corey, L., Corti, D., Diamond, M. S., García-Sastre, A., Garry, R. F., Holmes, E. C., Pang, P., & Virgin, H. W. (2021). After the pandemic: perspectives on the future trajectory of COVID-19. Nature, 1–14. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03792-w

    3. 10.1038/s41586-021-03792-w
    4. There is a realistic expectation that the global effort in vaccination will bring the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic under control. Nonetheless, uncertainties remain about the type of long-term association the virus will establish with the human population, particularly whether the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) will become an endemic disease. Although the trajectory is difficult to predict, the conditions, concepts, and variables that influence this transition can be anticipated. Persistence of SARS-CoV-2 as an endemic virus, perhaps with seasonal epidemic peaks, may be fueled by pockets of susceptible individuals and waning immunity after infection or vaccination, changes in the virus through antigenic drift that diminish protection, and reentries from zoonotic reservoirs. Here, we review relevant observations from previous epidemics and discuss the potential evolution of SARS-CoV-2 as it adapts during persistent transmission in the presence of a level of population immunity. Lack of effective surveillance or adequate response could enable the emergence of new epidemic or pandemic patterns from an endemic infection of SARS-CoV-2. There are key pieces of data that are urgently needed in order to make good decisions. We outline these and propose a way forward.
    5. After the pandemic: perspectives on the future trajectory of COVID-19
    1. 2021-07-14

    2. Barros-Martins, J., Hammerschmidt, S. I., Cossmann, A., Odak, I., Stankov, M. V., Morillas Ramos, G., Dopfer-Jablonka, A., Heidemann, A., Ritter, C., Friedrichsen, M., Schultze-Florey, C., Ravens, I., Willenzon, S., Bubke, A., Ristenpart, J., Janssen, A., Ssebyatika, G., Bernhardt, G., Münch, J., … Behrens, G. M. N. (2021). Immune responses against SARS-CoV-2 variants after heterologous and homologous ChAdOx1 nCoV-19/BNT162b2 vaccination. Nature Medicine, 1–5. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41591-021-01449-9

    3. 10.1038/s41591-021-01449-9
    4. Currently approved viral vector-based and mRNA-based vaccine approaches against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) consider only homologous prime-boost vaccination. After reports of thromboembolic events, several European governments recommended using AstraZeneca’s ChAdOx1-nCov-19 (ChAd) only in individuals older than 60 years, leaving millions of already ChAd-primed individuals with the decision to receive either a second shot of ChAd or a heterologous boost with mRNA-based vaccines. However, such combinations have not been tested so far. We used Hannover Medical School’s COVID-19 Contact Study cohort of healthcare professionals to monitor ChAd-primed immune responses before and 3 weeks after booster with ChAd (n = 32) or BioNTech/Pfizer’s BNT162b2 (n = 55). Although both vaccines boosted prime-induced immunity, BNT162b2 induced significantly higher frequencies of spike-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and, in particular, high titers of neutralizing antibodies against the B.1.1.7, B.1.351 and P.1 variants of concern of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.
    5. Immune responses against SARS-CoV-2 variants after heterologous and homologous ChAdOx1 nCoV-19/BNT162b2 vaccination
    1. 2021-07-10

    2. Winter, T., Jose, P., Riordan, B., Bizumic, B., Ruffman, T., Hunter, J., Hartman, T. K., & Scarf, D. (2021). Left-wing support of authoritarian submission to protect against societal threat. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/hu9ef

    3. 10.31234/osf.io/hu9ef
    4. New Zealand’s Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern, adopted a “go hard, go early” approach to eliminate COVID-19. Although she and her Labour party are considered left-leaning, the policies implemented during the pandemic (e.g., police road blocks) have the hallmarks of Right-Wing Authoritarianism (RWA). RWA is characterised by three attitudinal clusters (authoritarian aggression, submission, and conventionalism). The uniqueness of the clusters, and whether they react to environmental change, has been debated. Here, in the context of the pandemic, we investigate the relationship between political orientation and RWA. Specifically, we measured political orientation, support for New Zealand’s major political parties, and RWA among 1,430 adult community members. A multivariate Bayesian model demonstrated that, in the middle of a pandemic, both left-leaning and right-leaning individuals endorsed items tapping authoritarian submission. Demonstrating the multidimensional nature of RWA, this change occurred at the same time the typical relationships between political orientation and authoritarian aggression and conventionalism was observed.
    5. Left-wing support of authoritarian submission to protect against societal threat
    1. 2021-07-10

    2. Rodebaugh, T., Frumkin, M., Garg, R., LaGesse, L., McQueen, A., & Kreuter, M. (2021). Perceived vaccine safety over time in a vaccine hesitant sample: Impact of pausing due to safety concerns. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/csfte

    3. 10.31234/osf.io/csfte
    4. Perceived vaccine safety over time in a vaccine hesitant sample: Impact of pausing due to safety concerns
    5. In the current effort to vaccinate as many people as possible against COVID-19, it has been suggested that events such as the pause in the use of the Janssen vaccine would have a large effect on perceptions of vaccine safety. Further, as vaccination rates slow, there is concern that hesitancy may be stable and difficult to change among those still unvaccinated. We examined both of these issues in our ongoing study of low-income participants. We modeled the intensive longitudinal data provided by 53 individuals. We found the negative, not statistically significant effect of the Janssen pause would be overwhelmed within weeks by the statistically significant increasing perceptions of safety across time. We also observed strong variability in vaccine hesitancy in many participants. Frequent reminders about vaccine availability might catch more people when they are less hesitant, helping increase vaccination rates.
    1. 2021-06-14

    2. Davies, A., Seaton, A., Tonooka, C., & White, J. (2021). Covid-19, online workshops, and the future of intellectual exchange. Rethinking History, 25(2), 224–241. https://doi.org/10.1080/13642529.2021.1934290

    3. 10.1080/13642529.2021.1934290
    4. Covid-19 disrupted the fabric of academic collaboration. Scholars cancelled or delayed in-person talks, seminars, and conferences in an effort to reduce transmission of the virus. In many instances, the academic profession turned to various online platforms to share ideas. What are the possible long-term consequences of this development? Drawing on the experience of organizing an online workshop for early career researchers in modern British history, this article argues that virtual seminars and conferences should become a permanent part of intellectual exchange. This article provides practical guidance to others seeking to establish similar projects within and beyond the historical profession. It uses survey material from workshop presenters and attendees to assess the challenges and merits of using online platforms, and then discusses their longer term significance. Despite some drawbacks in their operation, online platforms offer advantages that include widening participation and responding to the climate crisis. Virtual collaboration facilitates the participation of scholars normally excluded from central field discussions due to location, expense, or institutional status, and it also furthers global scholarly interactions without generating a significant carbon footprint. This article argues that rather than a temporary stop-gap during a pandemic, online seminars present new opportunities for the future of collaboration if embedded as part of a mix with of in-person events. In its conclusion, it presents five proposals for improving virtual collaboration in the future.
    5. Covid-19, online workshops, and the future of intellectual exchange
    1. Home - COVID 19 scenario model hub. (n.d.). Retrieved July 5, 2021, from https://covid19scenariomodelinghub.org/

    2. Even the best models of emerging infections struggle to give accurate forecasts at time scales greater than 3-4 weeks due to unpredictable drivers such as a changing policy environment, behavior change, the development of new control measures, and stochastic events. However, policy decisions around the course of emerging infections often require projections in the time frame of months. The goal of long-term projections is to compare outbreak trajectories under different scenarios, as opposed to offering a specific, unconditional estimate of what “will” happen.
    3. Scenario Modeling Hub
  2. Jun 2021
    1. 2021-06-16

    2. Juanchich, M., Sirota, M., Jolles, D., & Whiley, L. A. (n.d.). Are COVID-19 conspiracies a threat to public health? Psychological characteristics and health protective behaviours of believers. European Journal of Social Psychology, n/a(n/a). https://doi.org/10.1002/ejsp.2796

    3. 10.1002/ejsp.2796
    4. We tested the link between COVID-19 conspiracy theories and health protective behaviours in three studies: one at the onset of the pandemic in the United Kingdom (UK), a second just before the first national lockdown, and a third during that lockdown (N = 302, 404 and 399). We focused on conspiracy theories that did not deny the existence of COVID-19 and evaluated the extent to which they predicted a range of health protective behaviours, before and after controlling for psychological and sociodemographic characteristics associated with conspiracy theory belief. COVID-19 conspiracy beliefs were positively correlated with beliefs in other unrelated conspiracies and a general conspiracy mind-set, and negatively correlated with trust in government and a tendency towards analytical thinking (vs. intuitive thinking). Unexpectedly, COVID-19 conspiracy believers adhered to basic health guidelines and advanced health protective measures as strictly as non-believers. Conspiracy believers were, however, less willing to install the contact-tracing app, get tested for and vaccinated against COVID-19, and were more likely to share COVID-19 misinformation – all of which might undermine public health initiatives. Study 3 showed conspiracy theory believers were less willing to undertake health protective behaviours that were outside of their personal control, perceiving these as having a negative balance of risks and benefits. We discuss models explaining conspiracy beliefs and health protective behaviours, and suggest practical recommendations for public health initiatives.
    5. Are COVID-19 conspiracies a threat to public health? Psychological characteristics and health protective behaviours of believers
    1. 2021-06-23

    2. Blomberg, B., Mohn, K. G.-I., Brokstad, K. A., Zhou, F., Linchausen, D. W., Hansen, B.-A., Lartey, S., Onyango, T. B., Kuwelker, K., Sævik, M., Bartsch, H., Tøndel, C., Kittang, B. R., Cox, R. J., & Langeland, N. (2021). Long COVID in a prospective cohort of home-isolated patients. Nature Medicine, 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41591-021-01433-3

    3. Long-term complications after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are common in hospitalized patients, but the spectrum of symptoms in milder cases needs further investigation. We conducted a long-term follow-up in a prospective cohort study of 312 patients—247 home-isolated and 65 hospitalized—comprising 82% of total cases in Bergen during the first pandemic wave in Norway. At 6 months, 61% (189/312) of all patients had persistent symptoms, which were independently associated with severity of initial illness, increased convalescent antibody titers and pre-existing chronic lung disease. We found that 52% (32/61) of home-isolated young adults, aged 16–30 years, had symptoms at 6 months, including loss of taste and/or smell (28%, 17/61), fatigue (21%, 13/61), dyspnea (13%, 8/61), impaired concentration (13%, 8/61) and memory problems (11%, 7/61). Our findings that young, home-isolated adults with mild COVID-19 are at risk of long-lasting dyspnea and cognitive symptoms highlight the importance of infection control measures, such as vaccination.
    4. Long COVID in a prospective cohort of home-isolated patients
    5. 10.1038/s41591-021-01433-3
    6. Long-term complications after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are common in hospitalized patients, but the spectrum of symptoms in milder cases needs further investigation. We conducted a long-term follow-up in a prospective cohort study of 312 patients—247 home-isolated and 65 hospitalized—comprising 82% of total cases in Bergen during the first pandemic wave in Norway. At 6 months, 61% (189/312) of all patients had persistent symptoms, which were independently associated with severity of initial illness, increased convalescent antibody titers and pre-existing chronic lung disease. We found that 52% (32/61) of home-isolated young adults, aged 16–30 years, had symptoms at 6 months, including loss of taste and/or smell (28%, 17/61), fatigue (21%, 13/61), dyspnea (13%, 8/61), impaired concentration (13%, 8/61) and memory problems (11%, 7/61). Our findings that young, home-isolated adults with mild COVID-19 are at risk of long-lasting dyspnea and cognitive symptoms highlight the importance of infection control measures, such as vaccination.
    7. Long COVID in a prospective cohort of home-isolated patients
    1. 2021-06-07

    2. A magnet won’t stick to a glass vaccine vial. (2021, June 7). Full Fact. https://fullfact.org/online/covid-vaccine-vial-magnetic/

    3. A video on Facebook shows a magnet sticking to a glass vial containing a clear solution and what appear to be small metallic objects.  The video has been shared hundreds of times and bears a similarity to viral videos in which people who have received a Covid-19 vaccine incorrectly claim their arm has since become magnetic at the site of injection.  While this video does not explicitly state that the vial contains a Covid-19 vaccine, the account that shared the video included a vaccine emoji in the caption, indicating that they are linking the clip to vaccines. 
    4. A magnet won’t stick to a glass vaccine vial
    1. 2021-06-15

    2. Divergent trajectories of antiviral memory after SARS-Cov-2 infection. (2021, June 15). https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-612205/v1

    3. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is normally controlled by effective host immunity including innate, humoral and cellular responses. However, the trajectories and correlates of acquired immunity, and the capacity of memory responses months after infection to neutralise variants of concern - which has important public health implications - is not fully understood. To address this, we studied a cohort of 78 UK healthcare workers who presented in April to June 2020 with symptomatic PCR-confirmed infection or who tested positive during an asymptomatic screening programme and tracked virus-specific B and T cell responses longitudinally at 5-6 time points each over 6 months, prior to vaccination. We observed a highly variable range of responses, some of which - T cell interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) ELISpot, N-specific antibody waned over time across the cohort, while others (spike-specific antibody, B cell memory ELISpot) were stable. In such cohorts, antiviral antibody has been linked to protection against re-infection. We used integrative analysis and a machine-learning approach (SIMON - Sequential Iterative Modeling Over Night) to explore this heterogeneity and to identify predictors of sustained immune responses. Hierarchical clustering defined a group of high and low antibody responders, which showed stability over time regardless of clinical presentation. These antibody responses correlated with IFN-γ ELISpot measures of T cell immunity and represent a subgroup of patients with a robust trajectory for longer term immunity. Importantly, this immune-phenotype associates with higher levels of neutralising antibodies not only against the infecting (Victoria) strain but also against variants B.1.1.7 (alpha) and B.1.351 (beta). Overall memory responses to SARS-CoV-2 show distinct trajectories following early priming, that may define subsequent protection against infection and severe disease from novel variants.
    4. Divergent trajectories of antiviral memory after SARS-Cov-2 infection
    1. 2021-05-21

    2. Serra-Garcia, M., & Gneezy, U. (2021). Nonreplicable publications are cited more than replicable ones. Science Advances, 7(21), eabd1705. https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.abd1705

    3. 10.1126/sciadv.abd1705
    4. We use publicly available data to show that published papers in top psychology, economics, and general interest journals that fail to replicate are cited more than those that replicate. This difference in citation does not change after the publication of the failure to replicate. Only 12% of postreplication citations of nonreplicable findings acknowledge the replication failure. Existing evidence also shows that experts predict well which papers will be replicated. Given this prediction, why are nonreplicable papers accepted for publication in the first place? A possible answer is that the review team faces a trade-off. When the results are more “interesting,” they apply lower standards regarding their reproducibility.
    5. Nonreplicable publications are cited more than replicable ones
    1. 2021-05-25

    2. Covid: Royal Bolton Hospital taking “urgent action” over virus. (2021, May 25). BBC News. https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-manchester-57242368

    3. A hospital in Bolton has said it is taking "urgent action" to manage a surge in patients with Covid-19.Royal Bolton Hospital said it had experienced "one of the busiest days ever" and urged people to attend A&E only "if absolutely necessary".Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham said the government made a "major communications error" in not announcing new Covid travel advice for the town.
    4. Covid: Royal Bolton Hospital taking 'urgent action' over virus
  3. May 2021
    1. This webinar is now available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_USXkE7ICJo

    2. Ezgi. (n.d.). SIOP/CARMA Open Science Virtual Summer Series. Consortium for the Advancement of Research Methods and Analysis (CARMA). Retrieved May 28, 2021, from https://carmattu.com/siop-carma-open-science-virtual-summer-series/

    3. The overall focus of the workshop series is to introduce and teach attendees about open science practices that are widely believed to help researchers produce studies that are better planned and understood by all collaborators involved; more transparent and reproducible; and more accessible, useful, and impactful to the research and practice communities interested in the research. The virtual workshops will be hosted via CARMA’s resources (i.e., Zoom), and attendees can choose to attend any or all virtual workshops. By attending the summer series, you will learn critical principles and how-tos of open science practices that can be introduced into your research pipeline as well as learn about the perspectives of journal editors and associate editors hoping to encourage open science practices and enhance the robustness of our work (e.g., Lillian Eby of the Journal of Applied Psychology, Steven Rogelberg of the Journal of Business and Psychology).
    4. Welcome! SIOP/CARMA Open Science Virtual Summer Series
    1. 2021-01-22

    2. Four Steps To Help Achieve COVID-19 Vaccine Adoption: How Health Professionals Can Embrace Their Role As Messengers | Health Affairs Blog. (n.d.). Retrieved May 28, 2021, from https://www.healthaffairs.org/do/10.1377/hblog20210121.500910/full/

    3. Recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced updates about reactions to COVID-19 vaccines. They reported that—as of December 18, 2020—3,150 of the 112,807 (2.8 percent) people receiving a first dose reported “health impact events” requiring missing work or seeing a doctor. These numbers may appear frightening, but data from clinical trials are reassuring that Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccine side effects are generally mild. The country needs to ensure Americans understand that rising absolute numbers of side effects need not imply a higher rate of reactions—nor that the risk-benefit profiles have changed.
    4. Four Steps To Help Achieve COVID-19 Vaccine Adoption: How Health Professionals Can Embrace Their Role As Messengers
    5. Recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced updates about reactions to COVID-19 vaccines. They reported that—as of December 18, 2020—3,150 of the 112,807 (2.8 percent) people receiving a first dose reported “health impact events” requiring missing work or seeing a doctor. These numbers may appear frightening, but data from clinical trials are reassuring that Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccine side effects are generally mild. The country needs to ensure Americans understand that rising absolute numbers of side effects need not imply a higher rate of reactions—nor that the risk-benefit profiles have changed.
    6. Four Steps To Help Achieve COVID-19 Vaccine Adoption: How Health Professionals Can Embrace Their Role As Messengers
    1. 2021-05-18

    2. replicationnetwork. (2021, May 18). DUAN & REED: How Are Meta-Analyses Different Across Disciplines? The Replication Network. https://replicationnetwork.com/2021/05/18/duan-reed-how-are-meta-analyses-different-across-disciplines/

    3. Recently, one of us gave a workshop on how to conduct meta-analyses. The workshop was attended by participants from a number of different disciplines, including economics, finance, psychology, management, and health sciences. During the course of the workshop, it became apparent that different disciplines conduct meta-analyses differently. While there is a vague awareness that this is the case, we are unaware of any attempts to quantify those differences. That is the motivation for this blog.
    4. How Are Meta-Analyses Different Across Disciplines?
    1. 2021-05-06

    2. CohenMay. 6, J., 2021, & Pm, 2:45. (2021, May 6). Further evidence supports controversial claim that SARS-CoV-2 genes can integrate with human DNA. Science | AAAS. https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2021/05/further-evidence-offered-claim-genes-pandemic-coronavirus-can-integrate-human-dna

    3. A team of prominent scientists has doubled down on its controversial hypothesis that genetic bits of the pandemic coronavirus can integrate into our chromosomes and stick around long after the infection is over. If they are right—skeptics have argued that their results are likely lab artifacts—the insertions could explain the rare finding that people can recover from COVID-19 but then test positive for SARS-CoV-2 again months later.
    4. Further evidence supports controversial claim that SARS-CoV-2 genes can integrate with human DNA
    1. There are 5 variants of concern and 8 variants under investigation (Table 1). VUI-21APR-02 (B.1.617.2) was escalated to a variant of concern on 6 May 2021 (VOC-21APR-02). It is assessed as having at least equivalent transmissibility to B.1.1.7 based on available data (moderate confidence). There are insufficient data currently to assess the potential for immune escape. There has been a steep recent increase in the number of cases identified (N=509 genomically confirmed) of this variant of concern in the UK, which includes both imported (n=157 confirmed after travel) and domestically-acquired cases. Postcodes of residence are most frequently identified as London and the North West. This technical briefing includes national overview data and surveillance updates for VUI-21APR-01 (B.1.617.1), VOC-21APR-02 (B.1.617.2) and VUI-21APR-03 (B.1.617.3), and a new clinical risk assessment for VOC-21APR-02 (B.1.617.2). The full update for each individual variant will be published in the next technical briefing and monthly thereafter.
    2. SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern and variants under investigation in England
    1. GDELT Summary: Television Explorer: hydroxychloroquine AND (Station:CNN OR Station:FOXNEWS OR Station:MSNBC) AND PublicationDate>=3/1/2020. (n.d.). Retrieved May 14, 2021, from https://api.gdeltproject.org/api/v2/summary/summary?d=iatv&t=summary&k=hydroxychloroquine+&ts=custom&sdt=20200301000000&fs=station%3ACNN&fs=station%3AFOXNEWS&fs=station%3AMSNBC&svt=zoom&swvt=zoom&ssc=yes&sshc=yes&swc=yes&stcl=yes&c=1

    2. Below is a visual dashboard summary of broadcast television news coverage of your search using data from the Internet Archive's Television News Archive. While the index is updated every 15 minutes, broadcasts take 24-48 hours to become available for search, so results for the past two days are incomplete. Refresh this page again in 15 minutes to see the most recent updates. Displays work best in Google Chrome.
    3. Television Explorer
    1. 2020-10-08

    2. Shahsavari, S., Holur, P., Wang, T., Tangherlini, T. R., & Roychowdhury, V. (2020). Conspiracy in the time of corona: automatic detection of emerging COVID-19 conspiracy theories in social media and the news. Journal of Computational Social Science, 3(2), 279–317. https://doi.org/10.1007/s42001-020-00086-5

    3. 10.1007/s42001-020-00086-5
    4. Rumors and conspiracy theories thrive in environments of low confidence and low trust. Consequently, it is not surprising that ones related to the COVID-19 pandemic are proliferating given the lack of scientific consensus on the virus’s spread and containment, or on the long-term social and economic ramifications of the pandemic. Among the stories currently circulating in US-focused social media forums are ones suggesting that the 5G telecommunication network activates the virus, that the pandemic is a hoax perpetrated by a global cabal, that the virus is a bio-weapon released deliberately by the Chinese, or that Bill Gates is using it as cover to launch a broad vaccination program to facilitate a global surveillance regime. While some may be quick to dismiss these stories as having little impact on real-world behavior, recent events including the destruction of cell phone towers, racially fueled attacks against Asian Americans, demonstrations espousing resistance to public health orders, and wide-scale defiance of scientifically sound public mandates such as those to wear masks and practice social distancing, countermand such conclusions. Inspired by narrative theory, we crawl social media sites and news reports and, through the application of automated machine-learning methods, discover the underlying narrative frameworks supporting the generation of rumors and conspiracy theories. We show how the various narrative frameworks fueling these stories rely on the alignment of otherwise disparate domains of knowledge, and consider how they attach to the broader reporting on the pandemic. These alignments and attachments, which can be monitored in near real time, may be useful for identifying areas in the news that are particularly vulnerable to reinterpretation by conspiracy theorists. Understanding the dynamics of storytelling on social media and the narrative frameworks that provide the generative basis for these stories may also be helpful for devising methods to disrupt their spread.
    5. Conspiracy in the time of corona: automatic detection of emerging COVID-19 conspiracy theories in social media and the news
    1. 2021-05-09

    2. Announcing The Global Numeric Graph – The GDELT Project. (n.d.). Retrieved May 14, 2021, from https://blog.gdeltproject.org/announcing-the-global-numeric-graph/

    3. We are tremendously excited to announce today the debut of the GDELT Global Numeric Graph (GNG), which compiles appearances of numeric statements across worldwide online news coverage in 152 languages. Each article monitored by GDELT is scanned for all appearances of numbers, either in the numeric characters of the given language for all 152 languages or, for around 100 languages and growing, spelled numbers (ie "one million" or "fifty" in English). Each appearance is compiled along with a brief context of how the number was used and the articles that specific number-in-context was seen in. This inaugural release compiles nearly 3.8 billion numeric references across 152 languages dating back to January 1, 2020.
    4. Announcing The Global Numeric Graph
    1. 2021-05-07

    2. A Daily Timeline Of Key Vaccine Topics In 2021 Through A TF-IDF BigQuery Analysis Of The Global Relationship Graph – The GDELT Project. (n.d.). Retrieved May 14, 2021, from https://blog.gdeltproject.org/a-daily-timeline-of-key-vaccine-topics-in-2021-through-a-tf-idf-bigquery-analysis-of-the-global-relationship-graph/

    3. What are the most significant words and phrases associated with vaccines by day thus far this year? To explore this question further we scanned the Global Relationship Graph's (GRG) Realtime Verb-Centered NGram Pilot for all records containing the word "vaccin*" since the start of this year in English language online news coverage, yielding a total of 15.3M entries. We then aggregated the statements by day and performed a simple TF-IDF analysis entirely in BigQuery to yield a daily chronology of the most significant words and phrases found within 10 words of "vaccin*," tracing the macro level evolution of vaccine coverage thus far this year. We generated four different versions to showcase different ways of filtering the data. The first two look for significant words, while the second two look for the most significant two-word phrases. We tested a cutoff that required matching words/phrases to appear more than 20 times that day or more than 250 times that day to show how a simple filter can be used to tradeoff relevance and reach. Each is available as a CSV file.
    4. A Daily Timeline Of Key Vaccine Topics In 2021 Through A TF-IDF BigQuery Analysis Of The Global Relationship Graph
    1. 2021-05-10

    2. A Timeline Of Infection, Death And Vaccination Count Mentions In The News During Covid-19 Using The Global Numeric Graph – The GDELT Project. (n.d.). Retrieved May 14, 2021, from https://blog.gdeltproject.org/a-timeline-of-infection-death-and-vaccination-count-mentions-in-the-news-during-covid-19-using-the-global-numeric-graph/

    3. Using the new Global Numeric Graph announced yesterday, which tracks global mentions of precise numeric counts in worldwide news coverage in 152 languages in realtime back to January 1, 2020, what does the Covid-19 pandemic look like in terms of how often disease-related numbers have appeared in the news? Using the simple queries below, we searched all appearances of numeric counts across English language news coverage monitored by GDELT from January 1, 2020 through May 9, 2021 and counted the total number of numeric statements per day that mentioned either "deaths/dead/died/dying" in context with the number, "infect*" or "vaccin*" to count how many numbers across the monitored English coverage each day were associated with these three topics. Note that this counts how many times per day a number was expressed in text alongside one of these three sets of keywords, not the actual death/infection/vaccination count itself. In other words, if an article states "more than 3,000 have died in the last 24 hours", we would record that the topic of death appeared alongside a number once in the article, not that 3,000 people died. In other words, we are looking at how prevalent death, infections and vaccinations were in global English language news coverage day by day over the course of the pandemic.
    4. A Timeline Of Infection, Death And Vaccination Count Mentions In The News During Covid-19 Using The Global Numeric Graph
    1. 2021-05-01

    2. BigQuery + UDF = Identifying The Earliest Glimmers Of Covid-19 – The GDELT Project. (n.d.). Retrieved May 14, 2021, from https://blog.gdeltproject.org/bigquery-udf-identifying-the-earliest-glimmers-of-covid-19/

    3. The GKG 2.0 is essentially a realtime metadata index over the world's news in 65 languages dating back to 2015. A typical use case is to filter it to identify coverage mentioning a specific topic or location or combination of both. However, a simple filter that just looks for articles containing a given topic in the V2Themes field and a given location in the V2Locations field will yield a lot of irrelevant matches, since the topic of interest might be mentioned at the start of the article and the location of interest mentioned in an unrelated context at the bottom. Thus, when BigQuery first debuted the ability to use custom JavaScript User Defined Functions (UDF's), we showcased how a simple UDF could be used to parse through the V2Locations field to identify each distinct location mention in the article, then parse the V2Themes field and assign each theme mention to the nearest location mention in the text within a given window. In other words, it takes each location mention in an article and compiles a list of the themes mentioned within a given number of characters of that location in the text under the assumption that if "quarantine" is mentioned within a few words of "California" they are potentially related.
    4. BigQuery + UDF = Identifying The Earliest Glimmers Of Covid-19
    1. 2020-08-07

    2. Quantifying The COVID-19 Public Health Media Narrative Through TV & Radio News Analysis – The GDELT Project. (n.d.). Retrieved May 14, 2021, from https://blog.gdeltproject.org/quantifying-the-covid-19-public-health-media-narrative-through-tv-radio-news-analysis/

    3. How does the COVID-19 narrative differ across television, radio and online news and across outlets? Is COVID-19 being covered differently than past disease outbreaks like Ebola or Zika and what can we learn from those communication efforts that could help inform public health communication about the current pandemic? To help answer these critical questions, the M-DRC is working with GDELT to use Google’s Cloud Video and Cloud Speech To Text APIs to non-consumptively analyze selections of the Internet Archive’s Television News Archive and Radio News Archive in a secure research environment, analyzing in total more than 4.9 million minutes of television news across 1,113 days 2009-present and 2.5 million minutes of radio since the start of this year to create an open set of non-consumptive annotations to enable public health communication research on how the COVID-19 pandemic has been communicated to the public and how those communicative efforts compare with the pandemics of the past decade, including Cholera, Ebola, E. coli, Measles, MERS, Salmonella and Zika and a portion of the opioid epidemic.
    4. Quantifying The COVID-19 Public Health Media Narrative Through TV & Radio News Analysis
    5. 2020-08-07

    6. How does the COVID-19 narrative differ across television, radio and online news and across outlets? Is COVID-19 being covered differently than past disease outbreaks like Ebola or Zika and what can we learn from those communication efforts that could help inform public health communication about the current pandemic? To help answer these critical questions, the M-DRC is working with GDELT to use Google’s Cloud Video and Cloud Speech To Text APIs to non-consumptively analyze selections of the Internet Archive’s Television News Archive and Radio News Archive in a secure research environment, analyzing in total more than 4.9 million minutes of television news across 1,113 days 2009-present and 2.5 million minutes of radio since the start of this year to create an open set of non-consumptive annotations to enable public health communication research on how the COVID-19 pandemic has been communicated to the public and how those communicative efforts compare with the pandemics of the past decade, including Cholera, Ebola, E. coli, Measles, MERS, Salmonella and Zika and a portion of the opioid epidemic.
    7. Quantifying The COVID-19 Public Health Media Narrative Through TV & Radio News Analysis
    1. 2021-02-02

    2. Using The Global Quotation Graph To Examine Statements About Covid-19 Vaccination And Infertility Or Bell’s Palsy – The GDELT Project. (n.d.). Retrieved May 14, 2021, from https://blog.gdeltproject.org/using-the-global-quotation-graph-to-examine-statements-about-covid-19-vaccination-and-infertility-or-bells-palsy/

    3. Using the Global Quotation Graph (GQG), what can we learn about public statements quoted in English language online media about links between Covid-19 vaccinations and infertility or Bell's Palsy? The query below searches across the quote itself and the text immediately before and after it, searching the English portion of the full GQG, which totals 164 million quoted statements across 152 languages spanning January 1, 2020 through present:
    4. Using The Global Quotation Graph To Examine Statements About Covid-19 Vaccination And Infertility Or Bell's Palsy
    1. 2021-02-02

    2. Using The Global Relationship Graph To Examine Claims About Covid-19 Vaccination And Infertility Or Bell’s Palsy – The GDELT Project. (n.d.). Retrieved May 14, 2021, from https://blog.gdeltproject.org/using-the-global-relationship-graph-to-examine-claims-about-covid-19-vaccination-and-infertility-or-bells-palsy/

    3. Using the Global Relationship Graph's (GRG) Realtime Verb-Centered NGram Pilot, what can we learn about claims in English language media coverage about links between Covid-19 vaccinations and infertility or Bell's Palsy? The query below searches across the GRG, which today totals more than 850M relationships across English language news coverage dating back to October 27, 2020:
    4. Using The Global Relationship Graph To Examine Claims About Covid-19 Vaccination And Infertility Or Bell's Palsy
  4. Mar 2021