254 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. (((Howard Forman))). (2020, November 24). Truly good news out of #Italy. And we can all use it. Cases (23K), positive rate (12.3%), and hospitalizations all DOWN. ICU occupancy with smallest increase in months. Deaths (not surprisingly) the one exception with 3rd highest total. Https://t.co/YFh5nd2AXX [Tweet]. @thehowie. https://twitter.com/thehowie/status/1331311384626388994

    1. Pastor-Barriuso, R., Pérez-Gómez, B., Hernán, M. A., Pérez-Olmeda, M., Yotti, R., Oteo-Iglesias, J., Sanmartín, J. L., León-Gómez, I., Fernández-García, A., Fernández-Navarro, P., Cruz, I., Martín, M., Delgado-Sanz, C., Larrea, N. F. de, Paniagua, J. L., Muñoz-Montalvo, J. F., Blanco, F., Larrauri, A., & Pollán, M. (2020). Infection fatality risk for SARS-CoV-2 in community dwelling population of Spain: Nationwide seroepidemiological study. BMJ, 371, m4509. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m4509

  2. Feb 2021
    1. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter: ‘@JAndreen @ErikAngner details about human contact networks matter, as epidemiologists pointed out last spring. Https://t.co/DC5FoW5ChY If you think I am wrong about the relevant parameters for Sweden, I’d love to hear more. One place to start is saying how it differs from other Nordic countries’ / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved 21 February 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1362757183121854466

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2021, February 18). @ErikAngner I thought I joined the ‘conversation’ at the top- did I miss part of a prior thread? Post I responded to seemed to be the beginning of a thread...ie. ‘regular reminder that...’ [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1362385973603168257

    1. wsbgnl. (2021, January 26). I am disturbed by the hundreds of thousands of covid deaths...and counting. But what’s most disturbing to me now is the general reaction to it, the inexplicable lack of urgency or even interest in doing much to stop it in the short term. Its so far beyond what I had imagined. [Tweet]. @wsbgnl. https://twitter.com/wsbgnl/status/1353869830026268672

  3. Jan 2021
    1. He theorised at length about the preservative properties of the cold in his History of Life and Death, enthusiasticallyremarkingthat fruits and nuts have been known to have fallen in the snow, or have sometimes been buried in purpose built ice vaults. When recovered months laterthey have been found to be “as fresh and fine as if they had been picked yesterday.”

      One of the odder aspects of cryonics unpopularity is the simplicity of the logic involved. Suspect most of the problem is just expense, most people don't understand that it's financed through life insurance etc. Cremation was once considered taboo and heartless, but over time gained acceptance (I speculate/infer) because it was cheaper than a funeral.

  4. Dec 2020
  5. icla2020b.jonreeve.com icla2020b.jonreeve.com
    1. her mother was dead

      Along with the repeated concept of the lost innocence of the young age, we also observe the repetition of the concept of death of a guardian, like the death of Father Flynn in the first story.

  6. Nov 2020
  7. icla2020b.jonreeve.com icla2020b.jonreeve.com
    1. roused him from his stupefied doze.

      Implying that the old man may as well have been dead already. What is the difference between death and a "stupefied doze"? From the perspective of a child, there is little discernible distinction. The permanence of death does not quite carry weight to those who have not been affected by it yet, and seems like a mere natural extension of this "stupefied" state.

    2. I pretended to pray

      So here's a question that I always wonder, are funerals for the living or for the dead? In a traditional Catholic funeral prayers at funerals would be offered for the deceased so they could pass into heaven and have their sins be forgiven, but at the same time they provide catharsis for the living. In that sense, pretending to pray is the same as actually praying in terms of providing emotional support for the living.

    3. He had a beautiful death

      This reminded of Mansfield’s representation of death, where she describes it as something beautiful and peaceful. It also seems that the aunts and the nephew have contrasting interpretations of the priest’s death. The boy describes the priest’s dead body as “truculent,” whereas the aunts seem to romanticize death.

    4. truculent

      This is such an interesting way of describing a dead body. Why does the face look with such defiance?

  8. Oct 2020
    1. I am conten

      I wonder if Laura's amazement at the body and finding beauty in it is meant to show the beauty of death and how it allows an escape from the rigidly socioeconomically divided world of the living, or that's another sign of how disconnected from the lives of these people she and her family are, that she sees the loss of life as some romantic portrait laid out before her and not the reality of the loss his family feels and the economic struggles they'll come to face having lost the head of the household. Maybe it's both? Who knows...

    2. It was simply marvellous

      The way this story is handling death seems to be almost positive in a way. Laura found the body of the man to be extremely beautiful, and here it seems again like she is struck by the beauty of death.

    1. He died in my arms

      Is it just me, or is the latter half of the novel substantially more somber that the former? The deaths of Lady Verinder, Ezra Jennings, and Godfrey Ablewhite are each pretty substantia blows, and feel as though they bring the novel into a much more serious tone.

  9. Sep 2020
    1. then he told the rest of us that Lady Verinder was no more

      Could this be attributed to the curse of the moonstone? Was this merely a random event, or is there a connection between Lady Verinder's death and the fact that the moonstone passed through Rachel at some point? Interested to see if those two events are interelated somehow in the end, as well as the first death that was introduced in the book (Rossana).

      So far, a pattern of tragic events surrounding the family seems to unfold, with the second death of another female character. Could there be some kind of explanation that ties them both?

    2. As I got near the shore, the clouds gathered black, and the rain came down, drifting in great white sheets of water before the wind. I heard the thunder of the sea on the sand-bank at the mouth of the bay

      The description of the environment (terrible weather near the shore, which is Rosanna's favorite place) implies something bad is about to happen (Rosanna's death).

    3. Why Superintendent Seegrave should have appeared to be several sizes smaller than life, on being presented to Sergeant Cuff, I can’t undertake to explain. I can only state the fact. They retired together; and remained a weary long time shut up from all mortal intrusion.

      It's unclear why for the moment, but there are several references to death here. See"grave", "smaller than life", "undertake", "retire", "weary long time", "mortal". My initial guess is that Seegrave will be witness to a death given the pun on his name. As for Cuff, it remains to be seen what role he will have in the story, but this passage does hint at some entanglement with death at some point.

    4. Shivering Sand

      Not quite sure if this place exists in real life, but I think Collins using this name for the specific scene with Betteredge, Spearman, and Blake was brilliant. The site itself foreshadows a sense of frightening thoughts and shocking news--the kind of conversation Betteredge would have with the two characters.

    1. Williamson, E. J., Walker, A. J., Bhaskaran, K., Bacon, S., Bates, C., Morton, C. E., Curtis, H. J., Mehrkar, A., Evans, D., Inglesby, P., Cockburn, J., McDonald, H. I., MacKenna, B., Tomlinson, L., Douglas, I. J., Rentsch, C. T., Mathur, R., Wong, A. Y. S., Grieve, R., … Goldacre, B. (2020). OpenSAFELY: Factors associated with COVID-19 death in 17 million patients. Nature, 1–11. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2521-4

  10. Aug 2020
    1. Ray, E. L., Wattanachit, N., Niemi, J., Kanji, A. H., House, K., Cramer, E. Y., Bracher, J., Zheng, A., Yamana, T. K., Xiong, X., Woody, S., Wang, Y., Wang, L., Walraven, R. L., Tomar, V., Sherratt, K., Sheldon, D., Reiner, R. C., Prakash, B. A., … Consortium, C.-19 F. H. (2020). Ensemble Forecasts of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S. MedRxiv, 2020.08.19.20177493. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.08.19.20177493

    1. Berger, D. W., Herkenhoff, K. F., & Mongey, S. (2020). An SEIR Infectious Disease Model with Testing and Conditional Quarantine (Working Paper No. 26901; Working Paper Series). National Bureau of Economic Research. https://doi.org/10.3386/w26901