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  1. Last 7 days
    1. for - recombination of proteins in higher level proteins - from - youtube - Evolution 2 podcast interview - book - Understanding Living Systems - Denis Noble - Ray Noble

      from - youtube - Evolution 2 podcast interview - book - Understanding Living Systems - Denis Noble - Ray Noble - https://hyp.is/OttWABYFEe--gLNFyeNyTw/docdrop.org/video/oHZI1zZ_BhY/

    1. we also challenge in the book The Very concept of selfishness itself

      for - book - Understanding living systems - challenging selfishness - critique - of Richard Dawkins' Selfish Gene

      • Ray Noble points out a contradiction in Richard Dawkin's use of the word selfish in his "Selfish gene".
        • Unless there is purposefulness, choice and agency, there cannot be any concept of selfishness
    2. for - Denis Noble - Ready Noble - evolutionary biology - critique of Richard Dawkins Selfish Gene theory - critique of gene centrism - book - Understanding Living Systems - human agency

      summary - In this informative interview, brothers Denis and Ray Noble discuss their new book - Understanding Living Systems, and - dispel the 70 year old narrative of Gene centrism and the selfish gene as determining the high level behaviour of living organisms

    1. for - Oded Rechavi - neurobiology - gene centrism - critique - from - youtube podcast interview - book - Understanding Living Systems - Ray Noble - Denis Noble

      summary - Rechavi performed experiments with C Elegan and demonstrated that it possesses a type of neuron that - produces RNA that in response to elevated temperature change is transmitted to reproductive cells so that the offsprings encode it in the genome, and it is better adapted to deal with elevated temperatures

      question - How many species do this? Is it generally found throughout nature?

      from - outube podcast interview - book - Understanding Living Systems - Ray Noble - Denis Noble - https://hyp.is/OUlGVBXrEe-iaBeZhH_4DQ/docdrop.org/video/oHZI1zZ_BhY/

    1. four 00:08:25 major common misunderstandings that have infected our understanding of what it is to be a living system

      for - molecular biology - paradigm shift - living system - 4 common misunderstandings - book - Understanding Living Systems - 4 common misunderstandings

      4 common misunderstandings of living systems - 1. The central dogma of molecular biology - one way causation - Genes (DNA) to - proteins to - organism - 2. The Weismann Barrier - 3. DNA as self-replicator - 4. Separation of Replicator (DNA) and Vehicle (Living cell) are completely separate

    2. biology Beyond The 00:00:19 genome

      for - book - Biology Beyond the Genome - author - scientist - biologist - Denis Noble - book - Understanding Living Systems

  2. May 2024
    1. In addition, certain stylistic rhythmic elements in the worksareanalysed. Reddy’s musicis highly syncopated. Rhythm, as Neuhaus(1973)describes in his book The art of piano playing, is comparedto the pulse of a living organism, and he is adamant that even in a toccata the pulse will vary as the pulse of a healthy person is regular, but increases or decreases under the pressure of psychological or physical experience:Music is a tonal process and being a process and not an instant, or an arrested state, it takes place in time. The rhythm of a musical composition is frequently –and not without reason –compared to the pulse of a living organism (Neuhaus 1973:30).
  3. Apr 2024
    1. essential Aliveness,

      aliveness - Living Cities Earth alignment

      comment - There is a contradiction here - Aliveness is already dualistic because it ignores death, but this is

    2. ‘Living the Life That You Are: Finding Wholeness When You Feel Lost, Isolated, and Afraid

      follow up - book - ‘Living the Life That You Are: Finding Wholeness When You Feel Lost, Isolated, and Afraid - author - Nic Higham

  4. Feb 2024
  5. Jan 2024
    1. sometimes people ask me uh is it possible that we're living in a simulation that all this is you know that reality isn't what we and and if you think about it it's not just 00:52:31 possible it's guaranteed

      for - adjacency - sensory bubble - umwelt - living in a simulation - Daisetz Suzuki - elbow doesn't bend backwards - quote - Michael Levin - illusion

      adjacency - between - sensory bubble - umwelt - living in a simulation - Daisetz Suzuki - the elbow does not bend backwards - adjacency statement - In the Tibetan Buddhist epistemology, the illusory body training is to experience both one's body and reality as an illusion in the sense that nothing is static and fixed - From this perspective, we are all temporary states of convergence of the recirculating elements of emptiness - Daisetz Suzuki, the enlightened Japanese Zen monk who is credited to be one of the ones who brought Zen to the West said that when he experienced Kensho, he could suddenly understand the puzzling koan "The elbow does not bend backwards" with great clarity. - Form is a concentration and temporary consolidation of emptiness, the limitations inherent in any form does not denigrate is absolute origins from unlimited emptiness - The Heart Sutra expresses the equivalence of form and emptiness, finite and infinite. - In Deep Humanity, we have a saying: - To be or not to be - that is the question - To be AND not to be - that is the answer

      • Quote: Michael Levin
        • Sometimes people ask me "is it possible that we're living in a simulation?
          • and and if you think about it it's not just possible it's guaranteed.
        • There's no other way it could possibly be
        • If you think about what is the opposite of that
          • the opposite of that is that you somehow have a physically embodied cognitive structure that
            • is able to,
            • is not limited in its sensory perceptions
            • is not limited in the amount of memory and computations
        • All of us are limited beings
        • All of us evolved under constraints of
          • time
          • energy and
          • everything else -We see a tiny, little, narrow slit in the electromagnetic spectrum
        • We have a few other things
          • like chemical senses of things that are right there on your tongue and
          • on your fingers and so on
          • we have a little bit of memory
          • we have this wet squishy substrate
            • that's very error prone and
            • needs to be constantly maintained
          • and all our memories have to be the actively rewritten
          • We were evolved under specific pressures under those conditions
        • Who could possibly think that that we are not living in some sort of very specific representation of reality
          • that is limited in many ways
        • That's not to say
          • it isn't adaptive and that
          • Donald Hoffman would say that in many ways it is completely wrong
        • I I think there's probably some truth to that
          • but in other ways I think the the big lesson from all this is that
          • we are all a brain and a vat
        • Of course we are a brain sitting inside this thing that gives us various stimuli
        • We try to make the best sense of it that we can and creatures will adapt to
        • This is why you can do
          • sensory substitution and
          • sensory augmentation and why
          • you can have neurons in the dish that play Pong
        • but these systems will try to make sense of whatever world they're given
          • in whatever configuration they have and we do the same
        • So yeah absolutely it's an illusion
          • but it's not an illusion in the sense that there is some other way to have perfect direct perception of some underlying reality
        • When we say it's an illusion or a simulation
          • It just acknowledges the fact that we are finite limited beings
          • whose job it is to make the best sense we can
          • using the hardware that we have
          • of what's been going on up until now and what we predict is going to be going on
        • I don't know of another story that could possibly make sense
  6. Dec 2023
    1. This is a courageous and highly important documentary. Sadly, when I share with some friends, most outright tell me to keep the negativity to myself. I guess Ignorance is bliss, but also dangerous. Thank you for sharing this work for all. I’ll do my best to spread the word to anyone open to hearing/watching.

      the only paradox = contradiction with such ignorant = shortsighted peeople<br /> is that they want to continue living, but only as long as life is easy.<br /> as soon as life gets hard, these are the first ones who run away to suicide.

      so the paradox is, that i dont have a right to kill such obviously useless people today,<br /> because i am "only" 99% certain, and they are betting on the remaining 1% that i am wrong.

      as they say:<br /> All you can do is warn them. If they dont listen, move on, so you can warn others.

  7. Nov 2023
      • for: regenerative cities, living cities, urban permaculture, Pocket hoods, relocalization, Mark Lakeman, Portland villages, people-oriented city-villages, city-village, pocket neighborhood, communititecture, urban planning, urban planning - city villages

      • summary

        • Mark gives a tour of his work at his company, Communittecture in applying permaculture principles to redesign communities in urban environments.
        • The central focus is designing based on commons principles of actually creating lived environments where healthy socialization is a primary design objective.
        • The design involves creating common areas that residents can share, from common food gardens to many mini-parks and recreation areas where families can gather.
        • The modern community has alienated socialization, creating groups of juxtapositioned strangers. There are two different design categories:
          • retrofitting existing neighborhoods
          • designing greenfield new neighborhoods
      • reference

    1. The idea of viewing my own life as a laboratory has always appealed to me.
      • for: life as a living lab

      • comment

        • in some sense, life is the ultimate potential laboratory and the labs in science are variants of the laboratory of life.
  8. Oct 2023
  9. Sep 2023
  10. Aug 2023
      • for: sustainable living, regenerative living, greenhouse living, greenhouse
      • title: Living in a Greenhouse
      • description
        • The Tills are a couple that operate a nursery and also built their home into the same greenhouse
    1. Undoubtedly the first task of the statesman in such countriesis to raise the standard of living to such a point that thepeople may be freed from economic slavery and given thetime to get the education appropriate to free men.

      A bulk of America was stuck in a form of economic slavery in the 1950s. See description of rural Texans in Robert Caro's LBJ biography for additional context --- washing/scrubbing, carrying water, farming, etc. without electricity in comparison to their fellow Americans who did have it.

      In the 21st century there is a different form of economic slavery imposed by working to live and a culture of consumption and living on overextended credit.

      Consider also the comedic story of the capitalist and the rural fisherman and the ways they chose to live their lives.

    2. Dewey's chief reason for this recommendation is found inhis psychology of learning. "An occupation is a continuousactivity having a purpose. Education through occupations con-sequently combines within itself more of the factors condu-cive to learning than any other method. It calls instincts andhabits into play; it is a foe to passive receptivity. It has anend in view; results are to be accomplished. Hence it appealsto thought; it demands that an idea of an end be steadilymaintained, so that activity must be progressive, leadingfrom one stage to another; observation and ingenuity are re-quired at each stage to overcome obstacles and to discoverand readjust means of execution.

      Purpose for the work involved or purpose for the worker? Does it show a shift to living to work or working to live here?

    1. Four billion people are now connected to the same infrastructure, the internet, that we the science and technology community put in place just decades ago. This is creating the conditions for an explosion of open creativity and innovation never seen before. A huge wave of labs of all kinds (living labs, fablabs, social labs, edulabs, innovation spaces, even policy labs) is emerging as the new kind of groups and communities of the digital era. We are moving from the net to the lab. On the 2030 horizon, many of these labs will gather and agree in generating the first universal innovation ecosystems in regions and countries.
      • for: quote, quote - Artur Serra, quote - labs, quote - innovation, quote - internet labs
      • quote
        • Four billion people are now connected to the same infrastructure, the internet, that we the science and technology community put in place just decades ago.
        • This is creating the conditions for an explosion of open creativity and innovation never seen before.
        • A huge wave of labs of all kinds,
          • living labs,
          • fablabs,
          • social labs,
          • edulabs,
          • innovation spaces and
          • policy labs
          • citizen labs
        • is emerging as the new kind of groups and communities of the digital era.
        • We are moving from the net to the lab.
        • On the 2030 horizon, many of these labs will gather and agree in generating the first universal innovation ecosystems in regions and countries.
        • https://www.ecsite.eu/activities-and-services/news-and-publications/digital-spokes/issue-45
      • author: Artur Serra
        • deputy director of I2CQT Foundation
        • research director, Citilab, Catalonia, Spain
    1. I do want to point out one more really significant implication here which is how it affects our experience of time
      • for: the lack project, sense of lack, the reality project, sense of self, sense of self and lack, poverty mentality, sense of time, living in the future, living in the present, human DOing, human BEing
      • key insight
        • we construct different types of experiences of time, depending on the degree of sense of lack we experience
        • it means the difference between
          • living in the present
          • living in the future
      • paraphrase
        • it's the nature of lack projects insofar as we become preoccupied with them
        • that they tend to be future oriented naturally
        • I mean the whole idea of a lack project or a reality project is right here right now is not good enough
          • because I feel this sense of inadequacy this sense of lack
          • but in the future when I have what I think I need
            • when I'm rich enough or
            • when I'm famous enough or
            • my body is perfect enough or whatever
          • when I have all this then everything will be okay
          • and what of course that does is that future orientation traps Us in linear time in a way that tends to devalue the way we experience the world and ourselves in the world right here and now
          • it treats the now as a means to some better ends
          • Now isn't good enough
            • but when I have what I think I need everything is going to be just great
        • So many of the spiritual Traditions taught
        • especially the mystics and the Zen Masters
        • they end up talking about what is sometimes called
          • the Eternal now
          • or the Eternal present - a different way of experiencing the now
        • As long as the present is a means to some better end
          • this future when I'm gonna be okay
        • then the present is experienced as
          • a series of Nows that fall away
          • as we reach for that future
        • but if we're not actually needing to get somewhere that's better in the future
        • it's possible to experience the here and now
          • as lacking nothing and myself in the here and now
          • as lacking nothing
      • it's possible to experience the present as something that doesn't arise and doesn't fall away
    1. Last fall, I spent several days in New York City, during which time I visited a home owned by a group of pacifist Christians that lives from a common purse—meaning the members do not have privately held property but share their property and money. Their simple life and shared finances allow their schedules to be more flexible, making for a thicker immediate community and greater generosity to neighbors, as well as a richer life of prayer and private devotion to God, all supported by a deep commitment to their church.This is, admittedly, an extreme example. But this community was thriving not because it found ways to scale down what it asked of its members but because it found a way to scale up what they provided to one another.

      fascinating example of anti toxic capitalism...

  11. Jun 2023
    1. One of Dewey’s principal concerns was for the relationship between educationand democracy. He made the point that democracy is not just a form ofgovernment—it is, rather, ‘a mode of associated living, a conjoint communicated

      experience’ (1916: 101).

  12. May 2023
    1. Living will – a powerful way to create trust is to publicly describe a plan addressing the condition under which an organisation would be wound down, how this would happen, and how any ongoing assets could be archived and preserved when passed to a successor organisation. Any such organisation would need to honour this same set of principles.

      {Living Will}

    1. depth interviews of 24 car-free people, we found that they have embraced car-free living in order to ‘go green’; pursue health and well-being; and achieve convenience and

      Test

  13. Mar 2023
    1. At the same time, the vision of a good life for all integrates our in-dividual pursuit of this goal with an immediate concern for others.In other words, we can enjoy and exercise freedoms only to the extentthat doing so does not impinge on others. Achieving this vision under-lines both the crucial role of freedom but also the necessity of limitsfor this freedom to exist. Thereby, pursuing the vision of a good lifefor all has the potential of bridging current political divides, as it is avision that all people can adhere to.

      // - Baked into the Good Life for All within Limits approach is human INTERbeing - It is something that is familiar to us - we already know and live under such limitations. This is what laws are, limitations of freedom and nobody is above the law, and the law is written to enforce social harmony, - Social harmony is the ability for people to live together - for each individual to enjoy freedoms, but not at the expense of taking away freedoms of others

    2. Theconcept of consumption corridors combines notions of human needs,individual preferences, and freedom as the basis for a good life for all.
      • Comment
      • When
        • human needs
        • individual preferences
        • individual freedom
      • are combined, it provides the individual with agency, creativity and freedom to choose a lifetsyle within ecological limits
      • Especially when we are collectively in overshoot, we must adhere to such limits
      • Limits always exist within any society. There is no such thing as absolute freedom
      • However, we have been abusing our ecological freedom and have thereby threatened our own existence by doing so
  14. Nov 2022
    1. 11/30 Youth Collaborative

      I went through some of the pieces in the collection. It is important to give a platform to the voices that are missing from the conversation usually.

      Just a few similar initiatives that you might want to check out:

      Storycorps - people can record their stories via an app

      Project Voice - spoken word poetry

      Living Library - sharing one's story

      Freedom Writers - book and curriculum based on real-life stories

  15. Aug 2022
  16. Jul 2022
    1. Both types of inauthentic existence involve running away from the awareness of death, not allowing the fact of death to penetrate into consciousness, not facing up to the human situation, and not undergoing the crucial moral catharsis. So Kierkegaard, Becker, and Socrates all agree: the denial of death is indeed at the center of human inauthenticity. Kierkegaard and Socrates would further insist that authentic human living–the open embrace of life structured by death–can only be rejected or embraced to begin with, because perishing meaning and non-perishing meaning co-constitute conscious existence.

      Here we find Kierkegaard, Becker and Socrates all in agreement. Both types of inauthentic existence involves running away from death and disallowing the fact of our own death from penetrating into consciousness, and avoiding our human existential condition.

      This also prevents us from reaching the next stage of moral catharsis. Denial of death lay at the center of human inauthenticity.

      Hughes closes by saying that an open embrace of life structured by death is embraced when perishing and non-perishing meaning co-constitute our conscious existence. This is similar to the Buddhist principle of the middle way and the Stop Reset Go maxim:

      To be or not to be, that is the question To be AND not to be that is the answer

  17. Jun 2022
    1. Had their colonies not allowed European countries totranscend their territorial limits, it would have been necessary to findthese sources of supply elsewhere.

      Colonial exploitation between 1500 and 1800 allowed European countries to dramatically expand beyond their own dwindling natural resources and territorial limits. Had they been trapped in a closed system, the world would have seen a very different arc of history.

  18. May 2022
    1. Every bit of new information fills in the blanks of a time that has long since passed out of living memory.

      Our written records have increased incalculably because our living memory doesn't serve us or our society or culture the way it previously did in pre-literate times. The erasure of cruelties and tyrrany is all to easy when we rely only on literacy, particularly when book banning and erasure can easily become the norm.

  19. Mar 2022
    1. glas is a very old word, and while the more modern gwyrdd is used for green, glas can in fact be both blue and green, depending on context. The idea behind glas is not so much a colour itself, but the attribute you’d give to plants that are alive. The opposite is llwyd, which is connected to “dead” things like rocks, so naturally you’d translate it as gray, but sometimes it’s used as brown, too. (Again, the Welsh word brown is much newer than llwyd.)

      The older Welsh words 'glas' and 'llwyd' designate both colors (green/blue and gray/brown respectively) but also indicate the idea of 'being alive' (like plants) or 'dead' (like rocks).

      These words can sometimes be translated differently than the more modern words gwyrdd (green), glas (blue), llwyd (grey), brown (brown).

      Irish is somewhat similar, where 'glas' is green, but usually for the less vivid greens of the natural world (seaweed might be called 'glas') versus artificial vivid green (the green on the Irish flag would be 'uaine'). However a 'madra glas' is not a green or blue dog, but a grey one.

      Glasgow / Glaschu (the place name) means "green hollow".

  20. Jan 2022
    1. Kuchipudi, S. V., Surendran-Nair, M., Ruden, R. M., Yon, M., Nissly, R. H., Vandegrift, K. J., Nelli, R. K., Li, L., Jayarao, B. M., Maranas, C. D., Levine, N., Willgert, K., Conlan, A. J. K., Olsen, R. J., Davis, J. J., Musser, J. M., Hudson, P. J., & Kapur, V. (2022). Multiple spillovers from humans and onward transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in white-tailed deer. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 119(6). https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2121644119

  21. Nov 2021
  22. Oct 2021
    1. For Plessner, the living boundary is both a liminal zone that mediates between organism and the outer medium, itself being neither, and yet also an enactively self-defining and enforcing circumference and outer-limit. The organism moves outward in the expansion and assimilation of its liminal zone and moves inward, taking the outer within, re-establishing itself and reasserting its perimeter. The living boundary already introduces a subject-object status that prefigures for Plessner the overcoming of dualisms between inner and outer, interiority and exteriority. The living boundary is an on-going enactment of an exteriority that it defines and yet also reaches into and assimilates and of an interiority that is both sustained and transformed. The motive force of the dynamic living state is this double aspectivity of its existence and the dialectical tension which drives it forward.

      Plessner defines the interiority and exteriority condition of a living organism, giving a biological context for the hard problem of consciousness.

    2. Pace Dilthey, Plessner's "Levels" is not about interpreting historical contingencies, nor about the more familiar evolutionary sedimentation of frozen accidents, but rather is about looking to establish transcendental conditions (or categories) of biotic possibility that he refers to as "modals of the organic." As with Hegel he challenges us with a proposed logic of life always mobilized by dialectical tensions, albeit not on the basis of any form of idealism and bereft of a Hollywood ending. For Plessner, that which is both the sine qua non of the living state and that generative 'principle' from which organic modals can be derived is the on-going performance of a self-positioning boundary, and it is highly unlikely that anybody has ever thought as deeply about the implications of what this means.

      "Modals of the organic" are the levels at which emergent qualities at the higher level cannot be explained from the lower level, and give rise to the highest constitutive level, human consciousness.

  23. Sep 2021
  24. learn-eu-central-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com learn-eu-central-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com
    1. the primary causes of extreme poverty are immaterial, theylie in certain deficiencies in education, organization, and discipline”(p. 159). Poorcountries, in his view, did not need more technology or physical infrastructure ormore foreign aid to eliminate poverty.
  25. Aug 2021
  26. Mar 2021
  27. Feb 2021
  28. Jan 2021
    1. Then 20 years,” the master responded.  Surprised, the student asked how long it would take if he worked very, very hard and became the most dedicated student in the Ashram.  “In that case, 30 years,” the master replied.  His explanation:  “If you have one eye on how close you are to achieving your goal, that leaves only one eye for your task.”

      Wow! This is very true, if one keeps applying pressure, one never achieves, because one is no longer doing it from the heart.

  29. Nov 2020
    1. Chromosomal:eory of Inheritanc

      This states that chromosomes drive the genetic heredity of living organisms. Chromosome behavior takes part in segregation, assortment, and sometimes linkage.

  30. Sep 2020
    1. Cymraeg Byw was promoted with the intention of facilitating thelearning of Welsh particularly among adults, and providing a stable ‘plat-form’ from which they could progress to fluency – and inevitably, as withLiterary Welsh, the loser once again was the native speech of ordinaryWelsh speakers, dismissed by implication as irrelevant. The counter argu-ment, now all the stronger for hindsight, must be that, as with all languages,the aim of the serious learner is competence in the living language; if thatmeans coping with dialect variation, then so be it – it has to be faced sooneror later, and it may as well be sooner.
  31. Aug 2020
  32. Jul 2020
  33. Jun 2020
    1. XML Topic Maps will be put online in that fashion, and thus, that book will become a living document.
  34. Apr 2020
  35. Mar 2020
    1. I've been meaning to remind readers that I do read the comments. Some time ago, one disappointed commenter mused that others' reflections seemed to go (as I recall) "into a void," because I remained silent to each. Perhaps I was ignoring readers' remarks? I assure you that is not the case. I read them all — although on this site, for some reason, "all" means somewhat sparse — and I find them nearly all remarkable in their perceptiveness. I especially welcome, and enjoy, intelligent disagreement. I choose not to respond, however, only because of my editorial philosophy, which holds that the comment section is, rightfully, for commenters — and commenters alone. I've already had my say, and it seems to me rather rude to take another whack in reply. Whenever I'm so substantively shaky or incoherent as to make my case unpersuasively the first time around, I figure I should live with the consequences. And whenever I find criticism flawed, I figure readers — perceptive as they are — will see the flaw as well, therefore there's no need for me to rub it in. So, I beg you not to take my silence personally.
    2. Whenever I'm so substantively shaky or incoherent as to make my case unpersuasively the first time around, I figure I should live with the consequences. And whenever I find criticism flawed, I figure readers — perceptive as they are — will see the flaw as well, therefore there's no need for me to rub it in.
  36. Aug 2019
    1. Presidential biographies also provided context, countering the tendency to think “that whatever’s going on right now is uniquely disastrous or amazing or difficult,” he said. “It just serves you well to think about Roosevelt trying to navigate through World War II.”
    2. Mr. Obama’s long view of history and the optimism (combined with a stirring reminder of the hard work required by democracy) that he articulated in his farewell speech last week are part of a hard-won faith, grounded in his reading, in his knowledge of history (and its unexpected zigs and zags), and his embrace of artists like Shakespeare who saw the human situation entire: its follies, cruelties and mad blunders, but also its resilience, decencies and acts of grace. The playwright’s tragedies, he says, have been “foundational for me in understanding how certain patterns repeat themselves and play themselves out between human beings.”
    3. The writings of Lincoln, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Gandhi and Nelson Mandela, Mr. Obama found, were “particularly helpful” when “what you wanted was a sense of solidarity,” adding “during very difficult moments, this job can be very isolating.” “So sometimes you have to sort of hop across history to find folks who have been similarly feeling isolated, and that’s been useful.” There is a handwritten copy of the Gettysburg Address in the Lincoln Bedroom, and sometimes, in the evening, Mr. Obama says, he would wander over from his home office to read it.
    4. During his eight years in the White House — in a noisy era of information overload, extreme partisanship and knee-jerk reactions — books were a sustaining source of ideas and inspiration, and gave him a renewed appreciation for the complexities and ambiguities of the human condition.“At a time when events move so quickly and so much information is transmitted,” he said, reading gave him the ability to occasionally “slow down and get perspective” and “the ability to get in somebody else’s shoes.” These two things, he added, “have been invaluable to me. Whether they’ve made me a better president I can’t say. But what I can say is that they have allowed me to sort of maintain my balance during the course of eight years, because this is a place that comes at you hard and fast and doesn’t let up.”
    5. Mr. Obama sat down in the Oval Office and talked about the indispensable role that books have played during his presidency and throughout his life — from his peripatetic and sometimes lonely boyhood, when “these worlds that were portable” provided companionship, to his youth when they helped him to figure out who he was, what he thought and what was important.
    1. What role does reading play in your life?It is one of the chief ways that I learn, and has been since I was a kid. These days, I also get to visit interesting places, meet with scientists and watch a lot of lectures online. But reading is still the main way that I both learn new things and test my understanding.For example, this year I enjoyed Richard Dawkins’s “The Magic of Reality,” which explains various scientific ideas and is aimed at teenagers. Although I already understood all the concepts, Dawkins helped me think about the topics in new ways. If you can’t explain something simply, you don’t really understand it.
    1. “You only get one mind and one body. And it’s got to last a lifetime. Now, it’s very easy to let them ride for many years. But if you don’t take care of that mind and that body, they’ll be a wreck forty years later, just like the car would be.” — Warren Buffett
    2. “There comes a time when you ought to start doing what you want. Take a job that you love. You will jump out of bed in the morning. I think you are out of your mind if you keep taking jobs that you don’t like because you think it will look good on your resume. Isn’t that a little like saving up sex for your old age?” — Warren Buffett
    3. “I insist on a lot of time being spent, almost every day, to just sit and think. That is very uncommon in American business. I read and think. so I do more reading and thinking, and make less impulse decisions than most people in business. I do it because I like this kind of life.” — Warren Buffett
    4. Cultivate positive habits and stick to them with a daily routine. How much better do you feel on the days that you do something good for yourself? Perhaps it’s the days that you exercise or maybe when you are really focused at work. Your days just seem to go smoother, don’t they? You can have that every day. It’s just a matter of deciding what you want to do and following through with it. Start small. Decide on one positive habit that you can start doing today, and then do it. Then do it again tomorrow. Once you’ve mastered one habit, you can put that momentum toward building a way to have the best day ever (every single day).
    5. Just be mindful about improving yourself. Here are some simple ways to do it: Mind: read a book (even if it’s just one page a day), journal, come up with ideas. Body: exercise (even if it’s just for 7 minutes), eat good food, drink plenty of water, get a good night’s sleep. Spirit: pray (it doesn’t matter if you’re religious or not) or just says ‘thanks’, be kind to people, write a gratitude list.
  37. Jul 2019
  38. Jan 2019
    1. No technique, no professional skill can be acquired without exercise; nor can the art of living, the technê tou biou, be learned without askesis that should be understood as a training of the self by oneself.

      Like any other skill, living "well," which differs depending on the person, requires lived experience. It involves navigating life through achievements and failures through which skills are acquired.

  39. Mar 2018
    1. Describing the creation of Superorganism's songs, Orono Noguchi says, "It usually starts with us listening to music and talking about music, art, and all kinds of stuff in the kitchen. Then, one of us would come up with a very basic idea for a song. We'd then send the file back and forth among the group and add on some random ideas that we have. We'd keep working on it until we have a final product."[9] "We've got the guy making the videos downstairs, mixing in the other room, [and] singing going on [elsewhere]," Harry says in regards to their live-in studio. "We've created this kind of warped version of a pop production house."[1]
  40. Oct 2017
  41. Feb 2017
  42. Dec 2016
    1. Living The Way of Knowledge BUILDING THE FOUNDATION FOR BECOMING A MAN OR WOMAN OF KNOWLEDGE IN AN EMERGING WORLD

      Living The Way of Knowledge is the New Message Teaching on how to bring the grace, the guidance and the power of Knowledge into the Four Pillars of your life: The Pillar of Relationships, The Pillar of Work, The Pillar of Health and The Pillar of Spiritual Development. Like the four legs of a table, the Four Pillars provide the stable foundation for building a greater life in an unstable and uncertain world. Living The Way of Knowledge presents one of the great practices in learning and living the New Message from God. By building the Four Pillars of your life, you develop a true foundation and a greater certainty, stability and direction in your experience. It is the great wisdom in Living The Way of Knowledge that will provide the day-to-day insight needed as you pass through the great thresholds on the journey of discovering and following Knowledge.

      What is Knowledge?

      What is The Greater Community Way of Knowledge?

  43. Oct 2016
    1. Terpenoids have been found to be useful in the prevention and therapy of several diseases, including cancer, and also to have antimicrobial, antifungal, antiparasitic, antiviral, anti-allergenic, antispasmodic, antihyperglycemic, antiinflammatory, and immunomodulatory properties[45-48]. In addition, terpenoids can be used as protective substances in storing agriculture products as they are known to have insecticidal properties[49].

      Terpenoids are not only good for human uses but as an alternative for insecticide. just as a small at home example here is a link for homemade bug spray using plant essential oils. [http://wellnessmama.com/2565/homemade-bug-spray/]

    1. I see crowds of people, walking round in a ring.

      Circle of life? a ring is never-ending and maybe it's saying he feels crowded with so many people. I also think it could be that most people have the same, daily routine that they can't get out of school.

    2. Living nor dead

      So far, there seems to be a lot of connections between what we consider the living and dead. Such as the Lilacs(living) and dead land. Dull roots since the word dull seems like a dark, gloomy word compared to roots.Life and dried,etc.

  44. Mar 2016
  45. Nov 2015
    1. —Yet when we came back, late, from the Hyacinth garden, Your arms full, and your hair wet, I could not Speak, and my eyes failed, I was neither Living nor dead, and I knew nothing,   40 Looking into the heart of light, the silence.

      Image Description

      Elliot evokes the image of Hyacinth, the tragic divine hero who embodies the death and rebirth of nature. A motif throughout the poem is one of living dead, things that are neither and both. Ovid writes of Hyacinth being immortal, though dead since he rises each year, much like plants in nature. The hyacinth girl, having her "arms full" and "hair wet" are both motifs of life, as we see water is a life force throughout the poem. Elliot juxtaposes an image of a woman full of life against his "I" character who is "neither living nor dead" to show how cruel life is, being so full only to end in death.

      If we look at William Carlos Williams' poem, To Elsie, (written a year later) we see that he deals with similar themes of nature being a cruel reminder. Nature exists outside of the human experience, especially with the rise of industry and the suburban landscape. Nature is constantly growing out of the dead; it in fact needs death to thrive.

      Ovid took Greek myths and retold them, gave dead stories new life; going back to Elliot's undead motif, we see that he looks to literature in addition to nature to understand this concept of living dead. If we think of the time period, Elliot was grappling with constant change in technology and industrialization. It seems as though he was seeking a sense of permanence or understanding of how the world can constantly remake itself.

      Elliot's motif of the undead is almost always paired with nature, as if to show how nature constantly is changing and being reborn. Humans, on the other hand, are in a permanent state of living dead; being alive, but actively dying. "Looking into the heart of light" is Elliot's truth; that humanity is apart from nature. Humanity cannot be immortal in the sense of being literally reborn, but we can find other ways to remain permanent in an impermanent world (The Wasteland).

  46. Dec 2014
    1. his grammar feud

      Yeah, grammar marmism is rampant in our worlds. Some people mistake language for a machine when it is really a joshua tree or a redwood or some kind of fungus. The only disease that would kill language would be the evolution of telepathy and I don't think that would do it. To adapt Johnny Paycheck: take your rules Mr. Heller and shove 'em.