40 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2019
    1. 5PH1NX: 5tudent Peer Heuristic for 1Nformation Xchange - we think of it as a “curiously trans-media” use case in peeragogical assessment.

      I'm not sure whether the beginning of the book is the right place for this. First of all, 5PH1NX is a horrible name - maybe people in edu institutions are used to this kind of naming, but others run away screaming. Second, this is about educational institutions. Peeragogy however is about society at large, including people who left school long ago and want to work with others in order to learn, independently from institutions.

  2. Jul 2019
    1. eachers must have access to high-quality UbD curriculum materials. Weak or flawed examples convey the wrong idea of what UbD curriculum should look like, and teachers who use imperfect resourc

      how can we visualize using UbD resources and structure in underfunded and failing schools, like many here in SC? How can we determine and ensure the success of those students as well, even with limited resources?

  3. Mar 2019
    1. learning in the 21st century mobile devices + social media = personalized learning This appears to be oriented toward K-12 students but several components seem applicable to professional learning. The context is schools. Key findings are listed at the beginning of the report. The report is somewhat dated but still makes some points worth considering, such as the potential for devices to serve as a distraction just as much as a tool. rating 2/5

    1. A national landscape scan of personalized learning in K-12 education in the United States This is included because it is associated with the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation, among other indicators of credibility, and because it provides (as the title suggests) a portrait of the state of personalized learning in schools, addressing topics that are not addressed by other resources in this list. rating 5/5

    1. personalize learning infographic

      This is not quite what it sounds like. It is a Pinterest style page with links to assorted articles that relate to personalized learning, most of which are presented in an infographic. It is sufficiently useful if one has the patience to click through to the infographics. Usability is satisfactory although the top half of the page is taken up with graphics that are not directly related to the content. rating 3/5

    1. what is the definition of mobile learning This is a brief article that explains mobile learning for a layperson (not an academic). It is described in the context of schooling. It does not necessarily relate to informal learning specifically. The advantages (such as motivation and distance) are discussed, as well as the disadvantages (such as the potential for distraction). It is adequate as a definition. rating 3/5

  4. Dec 2018
    1. Golden Seeds, an investment firm that provides capital to women-led businesses.

      These businesses are wonderful and the philanthropic spirit helps a lot. However, it's sadly a small portion of women who actually receive not just the grant but also the opportunity itself. Grants from businesses like this requires strenuous writing(especially when small business are writing multiple grants at a time) and a lot of valuable time to be written and then have a slim chance of being picked. Of course Golden Seeds is a good thing but it is ineffective of a larger scale.

    2. James Damore was fired from Google

      How will bigger STEM industries be affected in comparison to smaller industries. The article uses a lot of from big business like Google so how do these assessments of big business work within school environments. Sexism and abuse towards women exist outside of bug business.

    1. Girls who are encouraged in STEM by a parent are 81% more likely to say they’ll study computer science in high school than girls who haven’t been encouraged.

      How can this be institutionalized?

  5. Aug 2018
    1. Provide equal opportunity and access for all students to use ICTs that foster and improve learning

      Crucial- responsibility of teacher to make sure students have EQUAL access to the skills we want to foster and support! If ALL students do not have means of providing own resources, make sure the resources are provided to ALL students! (think- have copy of textbook for each student, why not technology?)

  6. Jul 2018
    1. In a strong culture, there are many, overlapping, and cohesive interactions among all members of the organization.

      Important for faculty development centers - being a site where interactions can happen. But how to ensure they're "cohesive" interactions?

  7. Mar 2017
    1. See the website of St. Cronan's School, Bray: http://www.stcronans.ie/

      The site includes a photograph of the school building which housed the school from 1932.

  8. Oct 2016
    1. On-Site Work

      This work was in schools with teachers, right? When foundations and funders of after school programs ask about how to "spread and scale" the work, it baffles me that they don't begin to answer their questions by turning to how to effectively bring the innovative after school work to teachers and students in schools. Working on the connections between in school and out of school learning is important!

  9. Aug 2016
    1. more than 1,500 educators and leaders of public, private and charter schools

      Do you even need teachers in this system? Perhaps we will call them concierges and pay them like Trump would pay his hotel and casino workers. You would certainly need more of them under any kind of coaching, mentoring regime.

    2. used

      This is the difference between these two products. The agency is direct with Google. I use Google Classroom. Here it is flipped. Facebook uses you and your inputs to filter out--what? Is there any proof that what FB filters is connected well with the incredibly complexity of learner curiosity and passion. I can only say that Zuckerberg and his minions must have poured over Skinner's pigeon experiments because now he is giving us all the bird.

    3. The idea is to encourage students to develop skills, like resourcefulness and time management, that might help them succeed in college.

      I am assuming that there is strong data that establishes a strong correlation between this LMS and resourcefulness-timemanagement-college success? How many acts of faith can dance on the head of a pin?

    4. student-directed learning system

      How can they say student-directed. It's a Facebook algorithm.

    5. Facebook is out to upend the traditional student-teacher relationship.

      Which student-teacher relationship? It is not monolithic. The power relationship? The sharing relationship? Or the whole relationship? When they are done will there be teachers anymore? If it can be done by a robot algorithm then is should be done by a robot algorithm?

  10. Jul 2016
    1. They invest in tools, esp early stage.

    2. Direct Investments We make a limited number of grants outside of our challenge efforts to nonprofit entrepreneurs developing breakthrough tools and services that can strengthen the design and implementation of innovative school models and have the potential to achieve scale and sustainability.

      They make direct investments in innovative tools

  11. Jun 2016
    1. The need for workforce training and professional certificate programs will increase just as the need for more four-year degrees will, and schools must remain ahead of trends with research and training to stay competitive.

      Cue Veblen.

    1. t "[ilf Northrop Frye should write an essay attacking archetypal criticism, the article would by definition be of much greater significance than an article by another scholar attack- ing the same approach" (Schaefer 5). The reason, of course, is that the approach is not something in- dependent of what Northrop Frye has previously said about it; indeed, in large part archetypal criticism is what Northrop Frye has said about it, and therefore anything he now says about it is not so much to be measured against an independent truth as it is to be regarded, at least potentially, as a new pronouncement of what the truth will hereafter be said to be

      author-function at work: Frye is an author-concept and his work is a coherent whole--an Oeuvre.

      This is absolutely fine for literary criticism and the humanities. The same is in practice true of the sciences--what Steven Hawking says about physics is more interesting than other people, especially if he reverses his previous claims. But in contrast to Frye, where a reversal is a change in the discursive practice (cf. Foucault), in the case of science, it should not be the case that hearing a "great man" reverse himself is more significant than hearing an unknown post-doc. The reversal should be evidence-based.

  12. screen.oxfordjournals.org screen.oxfordjournals.org
    1. The initiation of a discursive practice,unlike the founding of a science, overshadows and is necessarilydetached from its later developments and transformations. As aconsequence, we define the theoretical validity of a statement withrespect to the work of the initiator, whereas in the case of Galileoor Newton, it is based on the structural and intrinsic norms estab-lished in cosmology or physics. Stated schematically, the work ofthese initiators is not situated in relation to a science or in thespace it defines; rather, it is science or discursive practice thatrelate to their works as the primary points of reference.

      On the difference between scientific and discursive schools. I don't find it convincing.

    1. By 1988

      Five years after I started teaching, and a couple of years into our work at University Heights Secondary School where we were inspired with the Coalition of Essential Schools to re-think school from the bottom up -- and in our case for African-American and Latino students in the Bronx.

    2. “separate but equal”

      But isn't this also what Roberta Davenport is doing at P.S. 307? Not waiting for racism to disappear, but accepting that it will always be with us, and trying to build an educational environment that resists injustice, that teaches the students how and why they are in segregated schools, and what we can do about it -- but also a stance that rejects judging schools by test scores and other standard measures.

    3. the possibility of my getting from there to here

      Ah-- now we are getting to a real goal. I do like that Nikole Hannah-Jones is making clear her personal frame for these issues. What's mine? I grew up in a town in Pennsylvania, where "the racial makeup of the borough was 97.32% White..." and the one high school in the town reflected this homogeneity. As a teacher (except for a couple of years in Salt Lake City), I have always taught in segregated African-American and Latino public schools in New York City -- except, I need to remember, for three years of teaching at the East-West School for International Studies in Flushing, where the diversity of students was something special. And there was a lot of diversity at the International School at LaGuardia where I also taught for a few years. SO... There are exceptions, and I suppose these exceptions are important to think about as I consider my own frames and biases on these issues.

    4. He can now walk into any room and instantly start a conversation with the people there, whether they are young mothers gathered at a housing-project tenants’ meeting or executives eating from small plates at a ritzy cocktail reception.

      Is this the goal?

    5. I didn’t know any of our middle-class neighbors, black or white, who sent their children to one of these schools. They had managed to secure seats in the more diverse and economically advantaged magnet schools or gifted-and-talented programs outside our area, or opted to pay hefty tuition to progressive but largely white private institutions

      This makes me want to take the time to figure out the argument that I heard explained on the Brian Lehrer Show about six months ago http://www.wnyc.org/story/neighborhoods-are-integrated-while-schools-stay-segregated/ Here's the study they are talking about http://www.centernyc.org/segregatedschools and the basic thesis is that even while neighborhoods are integrated (or -- as this author says about Bedford-Stuyvesant "rapidly gentrifying"), schools remain segregrated. I'm assuming that it's because middle class (and White?) parents who might be moving into segregated neighborhoods are still not sending their children to schools in those neighborhoods.

    6. the schools are a disturbing reflection of New York City’s stark racial and socioeconomic divisions. In one of the most diverse cities in the world, the children who attend these schools learn in classrooms where all of their classmates — and I mean, in most cases, every single one — are black and Latino, and nearly every student is poor.

      There is so much here to respond to. First this analysis is clearly about what happens in elementary schools, and whatever "racial and socioeconomic divisions" this mother has found in elementary school, just wait until high school. We are a segregated school system. So does this mean that we should be fighting against this and supporting policies that would lead to more integration? Or should we focus on making the schools that Black and Latino students go to are the best they can be for these students?

    1. Businesses are not saying "I want someone who went through a programme that promised them a job".

      In the Ivory Tower, we hear less about that part of the relationship between Higher Ed. and businesses. Those colleagues of ours who are so against the 100-year push for universities to become more vocational tend to assume that employers are the ones doing the pushing. While it’s quite possible that some managers wish for universities to produce optimised employees, many people on that side of the equation argue that they’re quite able to train employees, as long as they’re able to learn. Now, there’s a whole thing about the “talent pipeline” which might get faculty in a tizzy. But it’s not about moulding learners into employees. Like much of Higher Ed., it’s about identifying (and labeling) people who conform to a certain set of standards. Not less problematic, perhaps, but not so much of a distinction between academia and employability.

  13. May 2016
    1. Identifying issues important in their lives and community, and deciding on one to address

      Sometimes this takes weeks or even months. I remember taking a walk with an art teacher several years ago, and I asked him how a particular student was doing in his class, and specifically what he was working on because it was hard for me to figure out how to get him connected to my work in English. It was November, just before Thanksgiving, and my colleague said, "I haven't figured out what his project will be yet," he said, before going on to explain a couple of things he had tried without success. I was struck with how patient he was being in letting the project come to the student, and not forcing him into a prescribed curriculum. Waiting is so hard, yet the work produced once there is a "flow" for a student makes it worth the wait. This has strong implications for school structures however! We need to be with students for longer periods of time. It also has implications for how groups work together. Perhaps a student who hasn't found his/her project yet can help others?

  14. Jan 2016
    1. We have the schools we have, because people who can afford better get better. And sadly, people who can’t afford better just get less--less experienced teachers, inadequate funding and inferior facilities.

      Is this our fate? I'm afraid it might be. In other words, are we fighting to change this inequity or are we working to "innovate" within it? And what does this innovation mean really?

  15. Jul 2015
    1. How could they send us out into the streets of Baltimore, knowing all that they were, and then speak of nonviolence?

      Or Restorative Justice these days, I suppose. Yeah, there's something going on here. I need to just listen more.

    2. Maybe that saved me. Maybe it didn’t.

      And what about the other side of this? What if a school, like the Lyons Community School in Brooklyn practices Restorative Justice. Does that prepare those youths to deal with cops who treat them with disrespect and violence in the streets? See Act Three. The Talking Cure. of This American Life 538: "Is this Working?" October 17, 2014.

      the feeling that your funky little system is cool when we're in school and all, but don't try and take it and apply it to our world. You're in over your head.

      Actually listen to the whole thing to see that they also end up, like Coates, with "maybe, yes, maybe, no."