531 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. RESEARCHGATE RIDICULOUS POLICIES AND DEEDS:

      Members are not FREE/allowed to write comments/reviews or replies (to projects, publications, Q&A) where they promote/mention their own publications. ResearchGate (RG) lock their accounts and threatens deleting their account if they continue that behavior. This happened to me several times and my account has just been locked:

      Dumb people make sad policies! If they (RG) were smart enough, they would implement an algorithm that would automatically remove those types of comments/replies they don´t tolerate (even though I consider it a ridiculous policy) without having to bother their members with warnings and threats.

    1. RIDICULOUS POLICIES AND DEEDS:

      Members are not FREE/allowed to write comments/reviews or replies (to projects, publications, Q&A) where they promote/mention their own publications. ResearchGate (RG) lock their accounts and threatens deleting their account if they continue that behavior. This happened to me several times and my account has just been locked:

      Dumb people make sad policies! If they (RG) were smart enough, they would implement an algorithm that would automatically remove those types of comments/replies they don´t tolerate (even though I consider it a ridiculous policy) without having to bother their members with warnings and threats.

    1. RIDICULOUS POLICIES AND DEEDS:

      Members are not FREE/allowed to write comments/reviews or replies (to projects, publications, Q&A) where they promote/mention their own publications. ResearchGate (RG) lock their accounts and threatens deleting their account if they continue that behavior. This happened to me several times and my account has just been locked:

      Dumb people make sad policies! If they (RG) were smart enough, they would implement an algorithm that would automatically remove those types of comments/replies they don´t tolerate (even though I consider it a ridiculous policy) without having to bother their members with warnings and threats.

    1. Abstract

      Abstract is a sale's pitch, I would say. It summarizes the whole article, and helps the audiences like you and me, to determine whether/how this work might be relevant.

      In the following abstract, identify the research question, highlight it, and state it in your own words (because the authors ask something quite different from what they propose in the beginning).

    1. It is generally agreed that literature surveys and descriptive compilations do not meet the contribution-to-knowledge re-quirement for the dissertation

      What is not accepted.

  2. Oct 2019
    1. Positivist versus postpositivist.

      My research is postpositivist

    2. Experimental versus descriptive.

      My research is going to be descriptive.

    3. Quantitative versus qualitative.

      My research is qualitative.

    4. NEW OR IMPROVED ANALYSIS Analysis may be based on existing evidence or include new data.

      Maybe my research leads in this way, but I think is more the previous one.

    5. The evidence may be collected by an experiment, simulation, observations, questionnaire, interviews, or measurements.

      Maybe my research goes in this way: new or improved evidence.

    6. The additive contribution of a dissertation may arise from 1. new or improved evidence; 2. new or improved methodology; 3. new or improved analysis; 4. new or improved concepts or theories.

      Four kind of contributions

    7. The dissertation should be based on a significant question, problem, or hypothesis.

      The power of a good question. That's why we need to learn how and what to ask.

    8. Different approaches to testing of important results. If a researcher has reported interesting results with one research technique and a given research population, a doctoral student may consider replicating the experiment, altering either the research technique or the research population.

      Open science and reproductible science is key here.

    9. Writers of disserta-tions commonly describe further research that needs to be done.

      Work on the results of others.

    10. If there is likely to be a continuing interest, either academically or otherwise on the topic, then a student can continué to maintin scholarly capability in the área and continué to be a significant authority on the subject.

      This is like Bret Victor's Inventing on principle and the question is: what is your principle?

    11. A research project will typicaliy have more than one potential outcome. For example, a research experiment may fail to dis-prove the nuil hypothesis, it may disprove it, or it may be incon-clusive.

      A database of unsuccessful cases is a good thing to have too.

    12. The exploratory investigation, definition of problem, and writing normally take about half of the total time.

      I can use this to measure my time.

    13. If no theory base can be identified, the topic should be rejected

      Theory is mandatory

    14. Observations lead to theory to classify, explain, and predict the observations.

      Sounds like grounded theory, or at least the prediction is something very useful.

    15. Research needed and interesting

      Why my research is needed and interesting?

    16. In reading dissertations, the student should begin to formúlate a general understanding of the structure and scope of a disserta-tion, and the meaning of contribution to knowledge as applied to doctoral dissertations.

      Structure and scope.

    17. The Selection of a Dissertation Topic

      The selection of a dissertation topic

    1. . To summarize: Your aim is to explain 1. what you are writing about —I am working on the topic of... 2. what you don't know about it—because / want tofind out... 3. why you want your reader to know and care about it—m order to help my reader understand better...

      Short and sweet.

    2. add a second indirect question that explains why you asked your first question.

      Here is the so what? in the sentence you are building.

    3. When you add that because I want tofind out how/why/whether clause, you state why you are pursuing your topic: to answer a question important to you.

      Back to the beginning: a question important to you.

    4. because I want to find out who/what/when/where/whether/ why/how .

      This is the flavour: the indirect question.

    5. start by naming your project:

      Put a name to that baby.

    6. SO WHAT?

      Miles Davis was right.

    7. If you are an experienced researcher, look for questions that other researchers ask but don't answer.

      Remember: the idea is to make it interesting. It can lead you where nobody else knows.

    8. How does your topic fit into the context of a larger structure or function as part of a larger system?

      Structure and composition.

    9. Ask about the History of Your Topic

      History of the topic

    10. So the best way to begin working on your focused topic is not to find all the information you can on it, but to formúlate questions that direct you to just that information you need to answer them

      What is my question to find information?

    11. If a writer asks no specific question worth asking, he can offer no specific answer worth supporting.

      The power of the questions.

    12. Caution: Don't narrow your topic so much that you can't find information on it

      Where to stop while you are narrowing.

    13. We narrowed those topics by adding words and phrases, but of a special kind: conflict, description, contribution, and developing. Those nouns are derived from verbs expressing actions or relation-ships: to conflict, to describe, to contribute, and to develop. Lacking such "action" words, your topic is a .static thing.

      Be careful: you need words that describes actions.

    14. A topic is probably too broad if you can state it in four or five words

      How to narrow a topic.

    15. Few experi-enced researchers trust Wikipedia, so under no circumstances cite it as a source of evidence (unless your topic is Wikipedia itself).

      Lucky me! I can cite Wikipedia.

    16. Google your topic,

      Or use DuckDuckGo if you care about your privacy.

    17. Once you have a list of topics, choose the one or two that inter-est you most and explore their research potential. Do this:

      Choose one or two topics.

    18. Start by listing as many interests as you can that you'd like to explore.

      Make a list

    19. But also ask yourself: What interests me about this tapie? What would interest others?

      I should answer this questions.

    20. Some questions raise problems; others do not.

      Question and problems are not the same.

    21. But other questions may intrigue only the researcher:

      Write an interesting question is key.

    22. A subject is a broad área of knowledge (e.g., climate change), while a topic is a specific interest within that área (e.g., the effect of climate change on migratory birds).

      The hierarchy is:

      • Subject
        • Topic
    23. As you begin a research project, you will want to distinguish a topic from a sub-ject.

      There is a difference between topic and subject.

    24. From Topics to Questions

      Lectura de Research Design in Social Sciences (GH)

    1. All of your main points are contained in the body, and normally this section is prepared well before you ever write the introduction or conclusion. The body of your speech will consume the largest amount of time to present; and it is the opportunity for you to elaborate on facts, evidence, examples, and opinions that support your thesis statement and do the work you have outlined in the specific purpose statement.

      Researching the topic is necessary before writing the body of the speech since you may be unaware of the most critical points.

  3. Sep 2019
    1. Shonda

      We must check online content for its accuracy and where it originated. The Internet is filled with inaccuracies and biased opinions. A public speaker must validate that the information used in a speech is true and be aware of opposing views that may invalidate a chosen source.

    1. Estimating the Effect of Asking About Citizenship on the U.S. Census March 21, 2019, 1:21 pm

      This is a really interesting article in so many ways; it speaks to a larger political issue of our time, it uses an innovative method (an experiment!), and it follows a very generic and general structure of a social science research paper. Think of this as an ideal or prototype of social science research.

    2. Research Design

      Research design is all about telling others what the researchers actually did to answer the RQ(s) they proposed earlier.

      It has to be explicit (and detailed enough), so others could replicate this research (i.e., do the same things/ follow the same procedure).

      ***Do you think this research design section is explicit enough? Would you be able to replicate their research if you wanted?

      Please identify the control and treatment group (with the independent variable) in this research, and describe it briefly why you think so. ***

  4. Aug 2019
    1. ce. We conclude with a discussion of directions for future research aimed at incorporating comments in the content design pro-cess and for enhancing the user’s experience via new design features in commenting platforms.

      changes in the interface itself could transform the situation

    1. Moreover, annotation is the agreed upon means of starting and sustaining that conversation.

      With this text appearing on bookbook.pubpub.org being an excellent example of just this. #meta

      I'm sort of hoping for some discussion of Kathleen Fitzpatrick's process behind her book Planned Obsolescence which was released in draft form for open peer review in fall 2009, much like Annotations. It's the first example I can think of a scholar doing something like this digitally in public, though there may have been other earlier examples.

    1. computational techniques can improve upon and enhance existingapproaches, providing more efficient ways of identifying some typesof anomalies and providing a historical picture of the evolution oflanguage and activity over time

      mixed methods are necessary in the digital age

  5. Jul 2019
    1. Current theories on aging suggest that changes in heterochromatin may be responsible for age-related changes in gene expression and alterations in H3K9me3 may function as a driver of aging

      As largre as the implications of this statement are, it has not been said as explicitly as this. research connections. Implied connections through thePPAR and seeking a new involvement of the Circular RNA as a super-gene family. Possible already reference. Aziz Sancar should be the one to tie circular RNA to Circadian.

    1. One reason for this is publication bias: journal editors, reviewers and authors can favour positive, sometimes eye-catching results over negative findings. But negative results waste research funds and researchers’ time if they do not reach the research community through publication, and, in the case of clinical studies, can lead to fruitless patient involvement.

      This particular issue has been highlighted by various people from time to time. No one however seems to take a note of it. I still meet people who keep saying their article was not accepted because it contained negative results.

    1. The scientists were astonished by the results: selective noradrenaline release re-wired the connectivity patterns between different brain regions in a way that was extremely similar to the changes observed in humans exposed to acute stress. Networks that process sensory stimuli, such as the visual and auditory center of the brain, exhibited the strongest increase in activity. A similar rise in activity was observed in the amygdala network, which is associated with states of anxiety.