173 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jan 2024
    1. Hiya - I'm just curious about how people use Obsidian in academia. I guess you could say I'm looking for examples of what it's used for (e.g. to take short notes or to link ideas) and in what kind of systems may guide people's vaults (e.g. Zettelkasten). I'm also just keen on connecting with other PhD candidates through these blogs. No one at my uni that I know of is currently using Obsidian for academic work

      Reply to Couscous at https://discord.com/channels/686053708261228577/722584061087842365/1197392837952684052


      A quick survey of currently active academics, teachers, and researchers who are blogging about note taking practices and zettelkasten-based methods.

      Individuals

      Dan Allosso is a history professor at Bemidji State University who has used Obsidian in his courses in the past. He frequently writes about related topics on his Substack channels. One can also find related videos about reading, writing, and research process as well as zettelkasten on his YouTube channel. In addition to this, Dan has a book on note taking and writing which focuses on using a card index or zettelkasten centric process.

      Shawn Graham has both a blog as well as a prior course on the history of the internet using Obsidian. In the course materials he has compiled significant details and suggestions for setting up an Obsidian vault for students interested in using the tool.

      Kathleen Fitzpatrick has a significant blog which covers a variety of topics centered around her work and research. Her current course Peculiar Genres of Academic Writing (2024) focuses on writing, note taking (including Zettelkasten) and encourages students to try out Obsidian, which she's been using herself. A syllabus for an earlier version of the course includes some big name bloggers in academia whose sites might serve as examples of academic writing in the public. The syllabus also includes a section on being an academic blogger and creating platform as a public intellectual.

      Morganeua is a Ph.D. candidate who has a fairly popular YouTube channel on note taking within the academic setting (broadly using Obsidian, though she does touch on other tools from time to time).

      Chris Aldrich is independent research who does work at the intersection of intellectual history and note taking methods and practices. He's got an active website along with a large collection of note taking, zettelkasten, commonplace books, and sense-making related articles. His practice is a hybrid one using both analog and digital methods including Obsidian and Hypothes.is.

      Bob Doto is a teacher and independent researcher who focuses on Luhmann-artig zettelkasten practice and writing. He uses Obsidian and also operates a private Discord server focused on general Zettelkasten practice.

      Manfred Kuehn, a professor of philosophy at Boston University, had an influential blog on note taking practices and culture from 2007 to 2018 on Blogspot. While he's taken the site down, the majority of his work there can be found on the Internet Archive.

      Andy Matuschak is an independent researcher who is working at the intersection of learning, knowledge management, reading and related topics. He's got a Patreon, YouTube Channel and a public wiki.

      Broader community-based efforts

      Here are some tool-specific as well as tool-agnostic web-based fora, chat rooms, etc. which are focused on academic-related note taking and will have a variety of people to follow and interact with.

      Obsidian runs a large and diverse Discord server. In addition to many others, they have channels for #Academia and #Academic-tools as well as #Knowledge-management and #zettelkasten.

      Tinderbox hosts regular meetups (see their forum for details on upcoming events and how to join). While their events are often product-focused (ways to use it, Q&A, etc.), frequently they've got invited speakers who talk about their work, processes, and methods of working. Past recorded sessions can be found on YouTube. While this is tool-specific, much of what is discussed in their meetups can broadly be applied to any tool set. Because Tinderbox has been around since the early 00s and heavily focused on academic use, the majority of participants in the community are highly tech literate academics whose age skews to the over 40 set.

      A variety of Zettelkasten practitioners including several current and retired academicians using a variety of platforms can be found at https://forum.zettelkasten.de/.

      Boris Mann and others held Tools for Thought meetups which had been regularly held through 2023. They may have some interesting archived material for perusal on both theory, practice, and a wide variety of tools.

      Others?

      I've tried to quickly tip out my own zettelkasten on this topic with a focus on larger repositories of active publicly available web-based material. Surely there is a much wider variety of people and resources not listed here, but it should be a reasonable primer for beginners. Feel free to reply with additional suggestions and resources of which you may be aware.

    1. Nearly 5 years ago, I read Watanabe Shoichi‘s “知的生活の方法 (Chiteki seikatsu no houhou = A way to intellectual life)”. His episode was very first time I realize what is card system, and it is used in academic world for long time.

      Hawk Sugano was introduced to index cards circa 2001 by means of Watanabe Shoichi's book “知的生活の方法” (A Method of Intellectual Life".

      https://web.archive.org/web/20170530033313/http://pileofindexcards.org/blog/2006/08/20/me-and-indexcard/

  3. Dec 2023
    1. eddy7346<br /> 2 years ago<br /> To anyone in college:<br /> If your history/government professor is extremely patriotic, do not ask about war crimes by the US... unless you want to get failed.<br /> P.S: This is just my experience, so that might not happen to you. My prof just happened to be a piece of shit

      the established "academia" is just another circlejerk, with teachers abusing their power as gatekeepers, to allow only "the good guys" to rise to power, and students cannot choose their teachers, because moving to a different school is expensive.<br /> this imbalance and injustice is so fundamental that it is "too big to fail". no matter what you do, the casino always wins...<br /> in my "crazy" hypothesis [1] i propose a radical solution for ths radical problem: all human relations must be balanced, so every one can live out his strength and delegate his weakspots to his friends.<br /> [1]: Pallas. Who are my friends. Group composition by personality type.<br /> github com milahu alchi

  4. Oct 2023
    1. Applying zettelkasten for math heavy subjects. .t3_17bqztm._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postBodyLink-VisitedLinkColor: #989898; }

      reply to u/acosmicjoke at https://www.reddit.com/r/Zettelkasten/comments/17bqztm/applying_zettelkasten_for_math_heavy_subjects/

      Most of my math section in my ZK is primarily very basic definitions and theorems. I have very few proofs of basic things outside of my own personal work. There is an occasional useful example or two or lists of various lists of things that fit certain structures (lists of groups, rings, fields, categories, etc.)

      Digital notes just don't work for me at all with respect to math, so I'm all-in on index cards and simply typeset all the necessary parts when I'm done with something if I intend to publish or share with others. Paper also makes it much easier to shuffle things around and reshape pieces as necessary to try out different structural approaches.

      I also have a short stack of method cards (not dissimilar to Eno & Schmidt's "Oblique Strategies", but with a mathematical bent) to remind me of different approaches to try out when I get stuck which has been pretty beneficial.

      I also take a fairly segmented approach between the writing I do for understanding a math text as I'm reading it and the permanent sort of notes I specifically make after-the-fact. My goal is never to recreate entire textbooks within the main section of my own zettelkasten, but create material for new works I might be writing for others to read.

  5. Sep 2023
  6. Aug 2023
    1. Blue, David. "Bandcamp: Streaming's Secret Savior." The Psalms, 21 Jul. 2018, https://bilge.world/bandcamp-streaming-music.

  7. May 2023
    1. of course I had done a lot of thinking even before I ever used a ZK, but now I can record, retrieve, and elaborate these thoughts easily so that they accumulate over time to something bigger. Now, writing a paper or grant proposal often comes down to concatenating a bunch of notes.
    1. Although Niklas Luhmann used zettelkasten on the basis of his academic works, I have seen very few sources on the academic use of zettelkasten, except for a few videos. Is there any source you can recommend on this subject?Another question I have is about the academic reuse of notes. After Luhmann used a note in one academic text, how did he use that note again in another work? Or in general, how can we avoid self-plagiarism in the academic use of zettelkasten?

      reply to u/edumanos at https://www.reddit.com/r/antinet/comments/13p0myn/academic_using_of_zettelkasten/

      The Luhmann's method was very specific to him, but the broader slip box method has been in wide use in academic settings for centuries, particularly in the humanities. I most often recommend Umberto Eco's book in conjunction with Adler/Van Doren's How to Read a Book, but below are a small selection of manuals on very closely related note taking methods. These can be found in a handful of languages and some even more specific to particular areas of study, though broadly they're all useful to almost any area. You'll note that some are available for free on archive.org as they're out of copyright, have been scanned, or are open educational resources. I've tried to link most of these for convenience.

      If this list isn't enough, or you're looking for something written for a specific subfield (sociology, for example), let me know as I'm sure there are a plethora of others, or even some fun short pieces like: - Thomas, Keith. “Diary: Working Methods.” London Review of Books, June 10, 2010. https://www.lrb.co.uk/the-paper/v32/n11/keith-thomas/diary. - Mills, C. Wright. “On Intellectual Craftsmanship (1952).” Society 17, no. 2 (January 1, 1980): 63–70. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02700062.

      My favorite short/overview video is that of Victor Margolin's process: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kxyy0THLfuI.

      As for self-plagiarism, some have used a red pencil or other means to mark cards (notes) they've used in specific works as they write so that they know they've been used and can then self-cite their prior works to avoid self-plagiarism or to up their citation count.

      Good luck!

    1. Obsidian for teachers .t3_13khuxs._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postBodyLink-VisitedLinkColor: #989898; }

      This is great. I'll put it into my collection along with Shawn Graham who has some prior work for teaching with Obsidian (https://shawngraham.github.io/hist1900/#the-big-idea) as does u/danallosso who has also used it quite bit for both classes as well as Open Education Resources. If you search for Dan's YouTube & Substack, you're likely to find some of his writing/resources there.

    1. Where are the thinkers who always have “a living community before their eyes”?

      I suspect within the living community in question. The scientific model of being an outside observer falls flat in a complex environment, as any self-styled observer is part of it, and can only succeed by realising that. Brings me to action research too. If they're hard to find from outside such a living community that's probably because they don't partake in the academic status games that run separate from those living communities. How would you recognise one if you aren't at least yourself a boundary spanner to the living community they are part of?

  8. Apr 2023
    1. The ever-growing army of coordinators for Title IX — the federal law prohibiting sex-based discrimination — is one manifestation of the bureaucratic bloat, which since the 1990s has helped propel tuition costs far ahead of inflation.

      Benjamin Ginsberg has documented bureaucratic bloat since the 1970's and only the tiniest fraction is down to Title IX, which is a political red herring here. A much larger amount of bloat can be attributed to professionalization of running the university allowing professors more time for teaching and research and less administrative work. Commercial specialization of this sort has increased because of increased competition within the capitalistic system which has grown there. A sizeable portion also goes into development efforts as educational funding has shrunk (due primarily to conservative efforts) as well as administrative functions to run fringe benefits like athletic centers, activities, lazy rivers, climbing walls, etc. which are used to recruit students into a much more selective number of universities.

  9. Mar 2023
  10. Feb 2023
    1. Esto es a lo que me refiero por «liberación en elimaginario». Pensar cómo sería vivir en un mundoen el que la gente tuviera realmente el poder dedecidir por sí misma, individual y colectivamente,a qué tipo de comunidades pertenecer y qué tipode identidades adoptar, es una tareaverdaderamente difícil. Y hacer posible esemundo, algo todavía más difícil. Significaríacambiarlo casi todo y tener que enfrentarse a laoposición persistente, y en última instanciaviolenta, de quienes se están beneficiando delestado actual de cosas. Lo que sí es fácil esdedicarse a escribir como si estas identidadescreadas libremente ya existiesen, lo que nos evitatener que plantearnos los problemas complejos eintratables del grado de implicación de nuestropropio trabajo

      De ahí lo importante del diseño y estas formas de publicación hacktivista, que van más allá del trabajo y sus obligaciones, sin ser un discurso moralizante, sino una trocha visible de caminos por recorrer en colectivo, entre comunidades de base y académicos y en un sentido pendular, para ensanchar los puentes, los tránsitos y las posibles articulaciones.

    2. Elantropólogo debe demostrar constantemente quesea cual sea el mecanismo a través del cual seintenta engañar, homogeneizar o manipular a ungrupo (la publicidad, los culebrones, las formas dedisciplina laboral o los sistemas legales impuestospor el Estado), nunca se consigue. De hecho, lagente se apropia de y reinventa creativamentetodo aquello que le llega desde arriba y lo hacepor medios que ni sus autores podrían siquieraimaginar

      ¿Y qué hay de la academía hacia adentro? Cómo ocurren esas resistencias. Podríamos, en clave activista, performática, política, dar cuenta y encarnar las insurrecciones y resistencias dentro de la academía. ¿Cómo ellas, a pesar de ser visibilizadas, se resisten a la coptación?

    3. la antropología es una especie depopulismo amplio. Al menos no nos posicionamos,en un momento dado, junto a las élites o junto aquien las apoya. Estamos con la gente humilde.Pero dado que en la práctica la mayoría de losantropólogos trabajamos en las universidades(que son cada día más globales), o bien enconsultorías de marketing o en la ONU, ocupandopuestos dentro del aparato de gobierno global,quizá todo se reduzca a una declaración fiel yritualizada de nuestra deslealtad hacia la éliteglobal de la cual formamos parte comoacadémicos (a pesar de nuestra marginalidad).¿Qué forma adopta este populismo en lapráctica? Ante todo implica demostrar que lagente humilde que es objeto de estudio se resistecon éxito a algún tipo de poder o influenciaglobalizadora que se le impone desde arriba

      La publicación hacktivista en puente hacia la academia activista puede ser una manera no sólo de mostrar esas resistencias de la gente humilde de "afuera" de la academía, sino de encarnarla hacia adentro y de usar nuestros privilegios para visibilizar, estratégicamente, a quienes no los tienen.

    4. Muchosantropólogos escriben como si su trabajo tuvierauna relevancia política clara, en un tono que da aentender que consideran lo que hacen algobastante radical y, desde luego, de izquierdas.¿Pero en qué consiste realmente esta política?Cada día que pasa resulta más difícil saberlo.¿Suelen los antropólogos ser anticapitalistas? Laverdad es que no resulta fácil encontrar a algunoque hable bien del capitalismo. Muchos describenla época en la que vivimos como la del«capitalismo tardío», como si solo con declararque el capitalismo está cercano a su fin pudieranacelerar el mismo. Sin embargo, resulta difícil darcon algún antropólogo que haya propuestorecientemente alguna alternativa al capitalismo.
    5. Yo no creo queesto se pueda atribuir solamente a una reaccióncomprensible frente a la propensión de la derechaa hacer grandes discursos sobre la naturalezahumana para justificar instituciones sociales muyconcretas y particularmente nefastas (la violación,la guerra, el capitalismo de libre mercado), aunquesin duda se debe en parte a ello.

      ¿Y si el discurso no fuera sobre las generalizaciones, sino sobre la forma de conectar particularidades? Al menos como resistencia diversa y alternativa a los discusos hegemónicos.

    6. Si uno combina esta actitud con una resistenciapasiva constante a las instituciones estatales y laelaboración de formas de autogobierno autónomasy relativamente igualitarias, ¿no estaríamos acasoante una revolución?

      Cfg: la lección sobre recibir plata de Facebook y feminismos.

    7. De acuerdo, pero ¿qué tienetodo esto que ver con el tipo de comunidadesinsurreccionalistas a las que se refierennormalmente los teóricos revolucionarios cuandoemplean el concepto de “contrapoder”?».Aquí quizá sea útil analizar las diferencias quehay entre los dos primeros casos y el tercero,porque las comunidades malgaches que conocí en1990 vivían en una situación en muchos sentidosinsurreccional

      ¿Pueden haber prácticas insurgentes en la academia? Por ejemplo, ¿las asociadas a otras formas y objetos para publicar, bajo otras licencias, en otros circuitos?

      Cfg: Ronin Institute

    1. Am I taking too long to finish notes? .t3_11bxjms._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postBodyLink-VisitedLinkColor: #989898; }

      reply to u/m_t_rv_s__n at https://www.reddit.com/r/Zettelkasten/comments/11bxjms/am_i_taking_too_long_to_finish_notes/

      Some of it depends on what you're reading for and what you're trying to get out of the reading. On a recent 26 page journal article, I spent several hours over a couple of days (months apart) reading and taking notes in a relatively thorough fashion. I spent another hour or so refining them further and filing them and another 15 minutes noting out references for follow up. It was in an area I'm generally very familiar with, so it wasn't difficult or dense, but has lots of material I specifically know I'll be using in the near future for some very specific writing. Because I know it's something of specific interest to me and several overlapping projects, I had a much deeper "conversation with the text" than I otherwise might have.

      Because it was done digitally, you can see the actual highlights and annotations and even check the timestamps if you like (you'll have to click through individual notes to get these timestamps): https://hypothes.is/users/chrisaldrich?q=url%3Aurn%3Ax-pdf%3A6053dd751da0fa870cad9a71a28882ba Some of it is basic data I'll use for a variety of purposes on several already well-defined projects. A few are for more slowly developing projects further out on the horizon. It's relatively easy to see the 10 or 15 permanent notes that I'll pull out of this group of about 74 notes. Since writing them, I've already referenced two of the more fleeting notes/highlights by searching for related tags on other reading which look like they may actually develop further.

      Had this been something less targeted to my specific area, say for a master's level course of general interest, I'd probably have spent far less time on it and likely not gone over about 15 or so notes. Sometimes for these, I'll just read the abstract and conclusions and scan the references. Reading lots of these in your area of interest gives you some idea of the space and types of questions you might be asking. As you hone in on a thesis, you'll begin asking more and more questions and delve more deeply into material, and if something you read in the past becomes more specific to your project then you'll likely go back to re-read it at a deeper level, but you'll still have your prior work at your fingertips as a potential guide.

      Once you know what your particular thesis is going to be your reading becomes more dense and targeted. Some things you'll read several times and go through with fine-toothed combs while others you'll skim to get the gist/context and only excerpt small specific pieces which you need and then move on.

      (If you need it, remember that you only need one or two good permanent notes per day to make some serious progress.)

    1. Regina Martínez Ponciano aka u/NomadMimi in r/ObsidianMD - PhD workflow: Obsidian, Zettelkasten, Zotero, Pandoc, and more at 2021-03-15 (accessed:: 2023-02-24 10:10:11)

      Broadly similar to my own workflow though I use Hypothes.is for fleeting notes rather than Zotero.

      Original copy at: https://martinezponciano.es/2021/04/05/research-workflow-as-a-phd-student-in-the-humanities/

    2. I find it very tiring haha. As I said in another comment, processing a single chapter can take me a full day or two. However, I keep reminding myself that I would rather spend a day processing a chapter well, and have literature notes to serve me a lifetime (potentially, at least), rather than reading a chapter in two hours and not remember a single thing the next day. When I REALLY need a reminder of this, I just look at my "Backlog" folder which contains old "notes" that are now pretty much useless: I didn't use a reference manager consistently during my first two years of PhD so there are a lot of citations which are unreliable; I didn't really summarise texts, I only read them and highlighted; I didn't use the cloud for a long time, so I lost a lot of notes; and I didn't have Obsidian, so a lot of my notes are just contained within the context of the place I read them, rather than being connected. Seeing three years worth of useless materials, and knowing that I read a couple hundred of articles/chapters but I have nothing to show for it, that makes me more patient when writing my literature notes now. However I also find it very exciting that I can future-proof some of my notes. I feel like I'm working for my future self.

      A partial answer to note taking why.

    1. Ghosting is only a problem for the ghosted if the ghosted values the opinion/support/endorsement of the ghoster.

      So the real questions are: Why does one value the ghoster? Is that valuation warranted?

  11. Jan 2023
    1. My plan is to make some sort of physical timeline eventually, but while analog does feel a little "fixed" for this purpose, I want the shear size and the speed of cards.Do you happen to know what historians used to do before computers?

      reply to u/stjeromeslibido at https://www.reddit.com/r/antinet/comments/10nlu4l/comment/j6bdgma/?utm_source=reddit&utm_medium=web2x&context=3

      I've used data from my own cards to create timelines before using the Knightlab's TimelineJS tool: https://cdn.knightlab.com/libs/timeline3/latest/embed/index.html?source=18QD2-Kx0WdFBzqDv1sTkQWOJLGHGXsvr4NBLYNiX9FA&font=Default&lang=en&initial_zoom=2&height=650%27%20width=%27100%%27%20height=%27650%27%20webkitallowfullscreen%20mozallowfullscreen%20allowfullscreen%20frameborder=%270%27

      You'll note that it's got a fun card-like flavor to its design. 🤩

      Historically, while they had certainly done so much earlier, historians began doubling down on slip-based research work flows in the late 1800's. Many in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were heavily influenced by the idea of "historical method" or the German "Wissenschaftlichen Arbeitens". Primary sources going back over a century have included:

      • Bernheim, Ernst. Lehrbuch der historischen Methode und der Geschichtsphilosophie : mit Nachweis der wichtigsten Quellen und Hilfsmittelzum Studium der Geschichte ... völlig neu bearbeitete und vermehrte Auflage. 1889. Reprint, Leipzig : Duncker, 1903. http://archive.org/details/lehrbuchderhisto00bernuoft.
      • Langlois, Charles Victor, and Charles Seignobos. Introduction to the Study of History. Translated by George Godfrey Berry. First. New York: Henry Holt and company, 1898. http://archive.org/details/cu31924027810286.
      • Dow, Earle Wilbur. Principles of a Note-System for Historical Studies. New York: Century Company, 1924.
      • Barzun, Jacques, and Henry F. Graff. The Modern Researcher. New York, Harcourt, Brace, 1957. http://archive.org/details/modernreseracher0000unse.
      • Eco, Umberto. How to Write a Thesis. Translated by Caterina Mongiat Farina and Geoff Farina. 1977. Reprint, Cambridge, MA, USA: MIT Press, 2015. https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/how-write-thesis.

      A few prime examples of historians practicing this sort of card index method (though not necessarily in the same form as Niklas Luhmann) include:

      Margolin's short video is particularly lovely for its incredible depth despite its brevity.

      Beyond this there is also a very rich history of sociologists, anthropologists, philosophers, linguists, and others in the humanities using similar methods.

      Beatrice Webb has a fairly good description of how she created her "scientific notes" in the late 1880/1890s in a database-like fashion in the appendix to her memoir My Apprenticeship and expanded on some of the ideas in a more specific text a few years later.

      • Webb, Beatrice. My Apprenticeship. First Edition. New York: Longmans, Green & Co., 1926.
      • Webb, Sidney, and Beatrice Webb. Methods of Social Study. London; New York: Longmans, Green & Co., 1932. http://archive.org/details/b31357891.
    1. reply to u/rl4215 at https://www.reddit.com/r/ObsidianMD/comments/10jhlr2/using_obsidian_in_academia_a_demotutorial_vault/

      This is an awesome start.

      Some additional resources I often recommend for folks: Obsidian has a discord with a chat room specific to #academia where folks can ask questions. https://discord.com/channels/686053708261228577/@home

      Historian and professor u/DanAllosso has some great YouTube Videos on Obsidian with respect to both his own work as well as discussion on using it to teach: https://www.youtube.com/@MakingHistory2022/search?query=obsidian Because he's into Open Educational Resources, he's naturally got a great book on note taking and writing: https://boffosocko.com/2022/08/02/how-to-make-notes-and-write-a-handbook-by-dan-allosso-and-s-f-allosso/. His YouTube channel has a series of videos in which he reads the entire book making it an audio book of sorts as well. If you dig around you'll see that he's got a book club with a shared Obsidian vault that multiple can contribute to in a wiki-like manner.

      Kathleen Fitzgerald, Director of Digital Humanities has a fairly significant Obsidian practice and has some fun material on task tracking: https://kfitz.info/tasks-matter/. It looks like you've got a good start on some of this in the example vault already.

      Archaeologist Shawn Graham has a class he's teaching with Obsidian that has some great resources some may appreciate: https://mastodon.social/@electricarchaeo@scholar.social/109509678170907504. See also: https://shawngraham.github.io/hist1900/

      I haven't run into anyone in the Library Carpentries space with Obsidian resources, but I suspect they'll show up sooner or later.

      We definitely need more of these resources to share and learn from collectively.

      Thanks again!

    1. https://github.com/rlaker/Obsidian-for-Academia/issues/1

      Perhaps I can circle back around to add in more of the specifics, both for the documentation and so people better understand what's going on and how things are dovetailed. Until then, the following two articles about setting up and using Obsidian with Zotero are fairly useful templates/walk throughs: - https://www.marianamontes.me/post/obsidian-and-zotero/ - https://nataliekraneiss.com/your-academic-reading-list-in-obsidian/

    1. Around 1956: "My next task was to prepare my course. Since none of the textbooks known to me was satisfactory, I resorted to the maieutic method that Plato had attributed to Socrates. My lectures consisted essentially in questions that I distributed beforehand to the students, and an abstract of the research that they had prompted. I wrote each question on a 6 × 8 card. I had adopted this procedure a few years earlier for my own work, so I did not start from scratch. Eventually I filled several hundreds of such cards, classed them by subject, and placed them in boxes. When a box filled up, it was time to write an article or a book chapter. The boxes complemented my hanging-files cabinet, containing sketches of papers, some of them aborted, as well as some letters." (p. 129)

      This sounds somewhat similar to Mark Robertson's method of "live Roaming" (using Roam Research during his history classes) as a teaching tool on top of other prior methods.

      link to: Roland Barthes' card collection for teaching: https://hypothes.is/a/wELPGLhaEeywRnsyCfVmXQ

    1. Her work on borrowed function words was so far manifest in her Konkordanz der nichtflektierten griechischen Wörter im bohairischen Neuen Testament, Göttinger Orientforschungen VI/6, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz 1975, the tip of the iceberg as we know now.

      Gertrud Bauer used her zettelkasten on Coptic and Greek to write Konkordanz der nichtflektierten griechischen Wörter im bohairischen Neuen Testament, Göttinger Orientforschungen VI/6, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz 1975, a work on borrowed function words.

  12. Dec 2022
    1. Contemporary academia engages, more or less permanently, in self-critique on any and every front it can imagine. In a tech-centered world, language matters, voice and style matter, the study of eloquence matters, history matters, ethical systems matter. But the situation requires humanists to explain why they matter, not constantly undermine their own intellectual foundations. The humanities promise students a journey to an irrelevant, self-consuming future; then they wonder why their enrollments are collapsing. Is it any surprise that nearly half of humanities graduates regret their choice of major?
  13. Nov 2022
    1. Productivity drops off 20% after female faculty members become parents

      This just means that they're measuring productivity incorrectly. If they worked out productivity per work hour, they'd likely find the drop in productivity was much less, if present at all.

  14. Oct 2022
    1. I have always been impressed by those academics who can sit impassively through a complex lecture by some visiting luminary without finding it necessary to make a single note, even a furtive one on the back of an envelope. They’d lose face, no doubt, if they were seen copying it all down, like a first-year undergraduate.

      In academia, the act of not taking notes can act as an external signal of superiority or even indifference.

    1. Furthermore, in extreme cases, any opposition to CRT could be painted as ‘upholding white supremacy’, a view essentially justified on the grounds of Foucaldian postmodern philosophy rather than objective reality.

      In addition to the concerns about CRT generally, this popularization, and bastardization, of CRT speaks to the danger of releasing too much information from academia into the popular sphere. When incompletely considered theories, arguments, and models are made widely available, they will be taken advantage of by unscrupulous and malicious people.

  15. Jul 2022
    1. One of the risks I heard mentioned is that of becoming/ being perceived as an ”arm of the university bureaucracy”, as CTLs become more involved in decision-making on educational issues.

      Interesting problem. Why is the CTL not seen as an "arm of shared governance" in these cases? Or at least a venue of it?

    2. Dilemma: should/ can the CTL be neutral territory (and can it be?)

      Fascinating to see what "neutral" means here. There's the "non-evaluative"/"non-supervisory" sense, where "neutrality" is essentially with respect to office politics, and the "not advancing an argument" sense, which in the strictest sense seems almost impossible to reconcile with any kind of developmental work.

  16. Jun 2022
  17. May 2022
    1. commenting in an interview: “By the way, many people havecome here to see that.”13 The writing tool became an object of desire, especially foryoung academics seeking to add a carefully planned card index to their carefully plannedcareers: “After all, Fred wants to be a professor.” 1

      Luhmann indicates that aspiring academics came to visit to see his card collection in potentially planning their own.

      1. Ralf Klassen, “Bezaubernde Jeannie oder Liebe ist nur ein Zeitvertreib,” in Wir Fernsehkinder. Eine Generation ohne Programm, ed. Walter Wüllenweber (Berlin: Rowohlt Berlin Verlag, 1994), 81 – 97, at 84.
    1. xml <link rel="related" type="application/atom+xml;profile=opds-catalog" title="theses.fr > Flux ATOM et OPDS des thèses accessibles en ligne" href="/?q=&sort=dateSoutenance+desc&access=oui&format=atom"/>

  18. Mar 2022
  19. Jan 2022
  20. Dec 2021
  21. Nov 2021
  22. Oct 2021
  23. Jul 2021
    1. Can A.I. Grade Your Next Test?Neural networks could give online education a boost by providing automated feedback to students.

      What problem is AI solving in education?

    1. Prof Nichola Raihani on Twitter: “Submitted a paper reporting null results to a mid tier journal. Guess how it went. I literally don’t care at this point but I do feel bad for the first author (who I won’t name here). Https://t.co/sX5lTcEl29” / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved July 16, 2021, from https://twitter.com/nicholaraihani/status/1415308025179656194

  24. Jun 2021
    1. hey suggest annotation presents a vital means by which academics can re-engage with each other and the wider world.

      I suggest that the real power of annotation is not necessarily with academia. We need to go beyond academics and find ways to engage with others outside. For example, I have tried to engage Matt Taibbi on his substack article: https://hyp.is/go?url=https%3A%2F%2Ftaibbi.substack.com%2Fp%2Fcongratulations-elitists-liberals&group=__world__

    1. being gainfully employed, I don't have to worry about graduation or tenure

      Again Morningstar shows a lack of recognition that academia (most especially in the USA) operates in a marketplace, even though he describes some of its market characteristics elsewhere.

  25. May 2021
    1. Before introducing the KPIs, a majority of polish science was basically people milking the system and doing barely any (valueable) research. It was seen as an easy, safe and ok paying job where the only major hassle is having to teach the students. You often needed connections to get in. It was partially like that because of the communist legacy, where playing ball with the communist party was the most important merit for promotion, which, over the course of 45 years (the span of communism in Poland), filled the academia management ranks with conformist mediocrities.Now, after a series of major reforms, there's a ton of KPIs, and people are now doing plenty of makework research to collect the required points, but still little valueable work gets done. Also, people interested in doing genuine science who would be doing it under the old system are now discouraged from joining academia, because in the system they're expected to game the points system and not to do real work.What is the lesson from this is? Creating institutionalized science is hard? It requires a long tradition and scientific cultural standards and can't be just wished into place by bureaucrats? Also, perhaps it's good to be doing the science for some purpose, which in the US case are often DoD grants, where the military expects some practical application. This application may be extremely distant, vague and uncertain (they fund pure math research!), but still, they're the client and they expect results. Whereas the (unstated) goal of science in Poland seems to be just to increase the prestige of Polish science and its Universities by getting papers into prestigious journals, whereas the actual science being done doesn't matter at all - basically state-level navel gazing.

      .

    1. Anyone who treats research as a business tends not to be well received in academia, but they likely have the funding necessary to drive advances, and they may eventually be wealthy.

      There can be clear benefits to treating academia like a business.

  26. Mar 2021
    1. I hadn't really thought that much about the pedagogical aspects (they don't really teach PhD historians pedagogy where I went to school, or I missed it somehow, so I've been trying to educate myself since then).

      Don't feel bad, I don't think many (any?!) programs do this. It's a terrible disservice to academia.

      Examples of programs that do this would be fantastic to have. Or even an Open Education based course that covers some of this would be an awesome thing to see.

  27. Feb 2021
    1. David Dye. (2021, January 26). So if you work somewhere already like this maybe suggest how to really run a WFH/mobile collaboration uni, and how we re-tool the physical meeting place we then in light of that? Maybe the philosophers already know this?? [Tweet]. @DavidDye9. https://twitter.com/DavidDye9/status/1354176181042556929

  28. Jan 2021
    1. Are the books that much better than the disses? Mostly, no, I'd say. So what's the deal? I think it's that we just like books. And by "we" I mean the whole industry of academe.

      Often when I see this pattern happening, the dissertation is the new and original research and the subsequent book is a rewriting of that research into a form meant to help popularize and distribute it into a broader public.

      This is similar, in a way to journal articles being written about by science journalists which then usually massively broadens the audience of the work. Usually this version helps the work to reach more eyeballs than the dissertation to book route does.

      Another version of this might be the translation of a screenplay and a move into a novelization for popular movies. Some of the goal here however is just to make more money.

      It's worth looking at who is (privileged to be) doing the writing in each of these cases.

  29. Dec 2020
    1. But by default, reports also let managers drill down into data on individual employees, to find those who participate less in group chat conversations, send fewer emails, or fail to collaborate in shared documents.

      This is going to be awesome when it debuts in universities. I can't imagine that any academics will be concerned when a departmental chair or administrator asks you why you're not sending more emails.

    1. Microsoft says it will make changes in its new Productivity Score feature, including removing the ability for companies to see data about individual users, to address concerns from privacy experts that the tech giant had effectively rolled out a new tool for snooping on workers.

      It's great that MS has reacted so quickly to the outcry around the privacy of workers.

      I thought it would be super-interesting to see how academics might have responded to the idea of institutional administrators keeping tabs on the number of hours that they'd spent in meetings (via Teams), composing and reading emails (via Outlook), writing articles (via Word), and so on.

      And yet these would be the same academics who do this kind of monitoring of student work.

  30. Oct 2020
  31. Sep 2020
  32. Aug 2020
  33. Jul 2020
  34. Jun 2020