423 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. The world could benefit from a curated set of bookmarklets in the style of Smalltalk ("doIt", "printIt", etc buttons) that you can place in your bookmarks bar (or copy into a bookmarks document and open in it in your browser), where the purpose would be to allow you to:

      1. access a new scratch area (about:blank) for experimentation
      2. make it editable, or make any given element on a page editable
      3. let you evaluate any code written into the scratch space

      scratch.js aims for something something similar, and though laudable it falls short of what I actually crave (and what I imagine would be be most beneficial/appreciated by the public).

    1. Taking my own advice, this document was written in the world’s greatestweb authoring tool: LibreOffice Writer.

      Great. This is something that I advocate for technical people to put forth as a "serious" solution more often than I see today (which is essentially never). But next time, save it as HTML. (And ditch the stylistic "rubbish"; don't abuse "the sanctity of the written word by coercing it to serve the vanity of a graphic artist incapable of discharging his duty as a mere lieutenant".)

    2. There used to be an internet middle class, of non-commercial users whowere not overtly technical, but were still able to self-publish.

      This is probably the least flawed claim in the entire piece.

  2. Jul 2021
    1. "The earlier systems of writing were extremely difficult to learn," says Schwartz, the Whiting Professor of Archaeology in the Department of Near Eastern Studies. "There were thousands of symbols used in very complicated ways, which meant that only a very small group of people could ever learn how to write or read. With the invention of the alphabet, it meant that a much larger number of people could, in theory, learn how to read and write. And so it ultimately led to the democratization of writing. And of course it is the system that all Western European writing systems used because Greeks, who borrowed the Semitic alphabetic system, then used it to write their own language."

      Early writing systems used thousands of symbols and were thus incredibly complex and required heavy memorization. This may have been easier with earlier mnemonic systems in oral (pre-literate societies), but would have still required work.

      The innovation of a smaller alphabetic set would have dramatically decreased the cognitive load of massive memorization and made it easier for people to become literate at scale.

    1. You can use LibreOffice's Draw

      Nevermind LibreOffice Draw, you can use LibreOffice Writer to author the actual content. That this is never seriously pushed as an option (even, to my knowledge, by the LibreOffice folks themselves) is an indictment of the computing industry.

      Having said that, I guess there is some need to curate a set of templates for small and medium size businesses who want their stuff to "pop".

    1. emerging technologies such as deep fakes, facial recognition, and other applications of artificial intelligence

      this sort of language will help make the document become outdated.

  3. Jun 2021
    1. Some of the best customers of such a service will be academics.

      Indeed. Web literacy among the masses is pitifully low. Browsermakers are certainly to blame for being poor stewards. Hot Valley startups are responsible as well. (See https://quoteinvestigator.com/2017/11/30/salary/.)

    1. Slides from

      Panel: Digital Literacies

      How do the collaborative and multimodal qualities of social annotation encourage digital literacies? Join an expert panel of educators and researchers as they share their projects and perspectives, as well as discuss how social annotation exemplifies creative and interactive digital literacies. The panel will be moderated by Mary Klann (History, UC San Diego/San Diego Miramar College) and features speakers Jenae Cohn (Academic Technology, CSU Sacramento), Cherise McBride (Education, UC Berkeley), and Paul Schacht (English/Digital Learning, SUNY Geneseo).

    1. faculty assume that students know how to, for example, take notes

      are note-taking skills taught at all?

    2. reading at the college level can be a real challenge for students from any discipline

      teaching how to read is an ongoing project. Digital reading techniques need to be introduced, reinforced and practiced across courses.

    1. In Plato’s Phaedrus, Socrates bemoaned the development of writing. He feared that, as people came to rely on the written word as a substitute for the knowledge they used to carry inside their heads, they would, in the words of one of the dialogue’s characters, “cease to exercise their memory and become forgetful.” And because they would be able to “receive a quantity of information without proper instruction,” they would “be thought very knowledgeable when they are for the most part quite ignorant.” They would be “filled with the conceit of wisdom instead of real wisdom.” Socrates wasn’t wrong—the new technology did often have the effects he feared—but he was shortsighted. He couldn’t foresee the many ways that writing and reading would serve to spread information, spur fresh ideas, and expand human knowledge (if not wisdom).

      I feel like Western culture has lost so much of our memory traditions that this trite story, which I've seen often repeated, doesn't have the weight it should.

      Why can't we simultaneously have the old system AND the new? Lynne Kelly and Margo Neale touch on this in their coinage of the third archive in Songlines.

    1. I tried all the different static site generators, and I was annoyed with how everything was really complicated. I also came to the realization that I was never going to need a content management system with the amount of blogging I was doing, so I should stop overanalyzing the problem and just do the minimum thing that leads to more writing.

      Great way to put it. One thing that I keep trying to hammer is that the "minimum thing" here looks more like "open up a word processor, use the default settings, focus on capturing the content—i.e. writing things out just as you would if you were dumping these thoughts into a plain text file or keeping it to, say, the subset of Markdown that allows for paragraph breaks, headings, and maybe ordered and unordered lists—and then use your word processor's export-to-HTML support to recast it into the format that lets use their browser to read it, and then FTP/scp/rsync that to a server somewhere".

      This sounds like I'm being hyperbolic, and I kind of am, but I'm also kind of not. The process described is still more reasonable than the craziness that people (HN- and GitHub-type people) end up leaping into when they think of blogging on a personal website. Think about that. Literally uploading Microsoft Word-generated posts to a server* is better than the purpose-built workflows that people are otherwise coming up with (and pushing way too hard).

      (*Although, just please, if you are going to do this, then do at least export to HTML and don't dump them online as PDFs, a la berkshirehathaway.com.)

  4. May 2021
    1. If this is so, we literati must surrender certain cherished assumptions: that litera ture is inextricably associated with reading and writing, that lack of literacy means lack of culture.

      Lack of literacy definitely does not mean lack of culture.

      Reminder to self: I've got a strong suspicion that the Hebrew bible was transmitted orally for generations prior to being written down in a similar manner. I need to collect some additional evidence to build this case. The arc of the covenant is a first potential piece of evidence.

  5. Apr 2021
    1. Though its format can be copied and manipulated, HTML doesn’t make that easy.

      In fact, HTML makes it very easy (true for the reasons that lead Mark to write that it can be copied and manipulated). It's contemporary authoring systems and the typical author-as-publisher and the choices they make that are what makes this difficult.

      The future of rich media lies in striving to be more like dead media (or at least mining it for insights by better understanding it through thoughtful study), rather than the misguided attempts we've been living inside.

      (This is something that I've done a 180 on in the last year or so.)

    2. It’s designed so that whoever produced the video controls how it appears, and how it’s used.

      It is exactly that "timid" ("tepid"?) attempt at dynamism that has led to these circumstances.

  6. Mar 2021
  7. Feb 2021
    1. The first web browser was also an editor. The idea being that not only could everyone read content on the web, but they could also help create it. It was to be a collaborative space for everyone.

      This is really interesting. I think we have got used to the fact that the internet is mostly a passive space - where we search for things. Perhaps we sometime ask questions. And there are only some spaces, where we are actually creative ourselves.

      Hypothes.is is the powerful idea that you can annotate the web.

      Solid is a more radical solution. It is the idea that you can also control what data you share with other.

  8. Dec 2020
    1. If you give any question to a student that has a clear, definitive answer, you are tempting them to cheat.

      We should be assessing how people use information to solve problems they care about, rather than whether or not they can recall information.

  9. Oct 2020
    1. Der Guardian über das estnische Bildungssystem und den Covid-19-Lockdown. Rechtzeitige Digitalisierung hat dafür gesorgt, dass die Schulen so leistungsfähig geblieben sind wie davor.

    1. Umfrage unter amerikanischen Wählern im Jahr 2020, die zeigt, dass die Klimakrise immer noch eine geringe Priorität hat und dass die meisten die Folgen von Temperaturerhöhungen nicht einschätzen können. Via Genvieve Günther auf Twitter https://twitter.com/doctorvive/status/1308760710470676480?s=21

    1. While individuals use these tools in the hope that their training will improve their performance, this relationship is not a given. This paper proposes that an individual's level of digital literacy affects her performance through its impact on her performance and effort expectations. To explain the influence of digital li

      This is the very reason I selected this paper. Digital literacy is also a factor in determining one's technological acumen.

    1. How is digital fluency different from digital literacy? In learning a foreign language, a literate person can read, speak, and listen for understanding in the new language. A fluent person can create something in the language: a story, a poem, a play, or a conversation. Similarly, digital literacy is an understanding of how to use the tools; digital fluency is the ability to create something new with those tools. Digital fluency can be viewed as an evolving collection of fluencies including, but not limited to, curiosity fluency, communication fluency, creation fluency, data fluency, and innovation fluency.

      This comparison takes a narrow view of digital literacy. Often the term includes the ability to critically evaluate digital content and to create digital media (see e.g. Perspectives of digital literacies. However, the concept of digital fluency is also useful and this definition includes useful elements.

    1. Digital literacy should be positioned as an entitlement for students that supports their full participation in a society in which social, cultural, political, and financial life are increasingly mediated by digital literacies

      Positioning digital literacy as an entitlement is useful language to persuade individual educators and institutions that digital literacy is core to 21st century education, not just an optional add-on.

    1. Description: Silver-Pacuilla discusses the use of assistive technology in small tutoring groups. Students belonging to these groups are adults and have a learning disability related towards literacy. The conclusion was assistive technology can help bridge the literacy gap if used in small group settings

      Rating: 6/10

      Reason for the rating: Great discussion about students with learning disabilities. It tackles both the pros and the cons of technology, but this setting is for tutoring groups rather than classes.

    1. Description: The authors discuss the use of podcasts to engage undergraduate students and aid in their test scores. The goal of the study was to have a teacher create podcasts of their lectures for students to listen to outside of class. Though the study found no correlation between exam scores and podcasts, the majority of the students did utilize them for studying and found them useful.

      Rating: 8/10

      Reasoning for the rating: The scope of my proposal will be using audiobooks or podcasts in a general English literature class. Though this discusses the use of podcasts for a large lecture based class, it is focused at biology rather than literature. Yet, the study is comprehensive about the influence on the podcasts on student's test scores.

    1. Description: Researchers broke students into three different groups and presented the same information to students using different materials. One group was given only an e-book, another the audio-book, and the final group had access to both. They found no great correlation between comprehension and the modality which the information is given in.

      Rating: 9/10

      Reason for the rating: This test was given to college students about a non-fiction text which they were unfamiliar with. Students were randomly placed in their groups and the data analysis looks reputable. The information given in this text shows that audiobooks can be as effective as text in regards to comprehension. This will be valuable for the my proposal to incorporate audiobooks into English Literature classes.

    1. being able to follow links to “follow a conversation” that is threaded on Twitter.

      This is one of my favorite parts about my website and others supporting Webmention: the conversation is aggregated onto or more closely adjacent to the source. This helps prevent context collapse.

      Has anyone made a browser tool for encouraging lateral reading? I'd love a bookmarklet that I could click to provide some highly relevant lateral reading resources for any particular page I'm on.

    2. What’s lateral reading?

      lateral reading, noun

      When you open up the Hypothes.is sidebar on a website and read the highlights and annotations that provide additional context to the main context.

    1. Sioned Davies is Chair of Welsh at Cardiff University. Her special interest is the interplay between orality and literacy, together with the performance aspects of medieval Welsh narrative.

      Oh! This is fascinating. Perhaps some interesting tidbits for my growing theory about the borders of orality and literacy could be hiding in some of her research?

  10. Sep 2020
    1. But I end up coming back to this simple stuff because I can’t shake the feeling that digital literacy needs to start with the mirror and head-checks before it gets to automotive repair or controlled skids. Because it is these simple behaviors, applied as habits and enforced as norms, that have the power to change the web as we know it, to break our cycle of reaction and recognition, and ultimately to get even our deeper investigations off to a better start.

      I find this quite interesting because of the analogies that are given. Many people find it hard or make it seem hard to investigate what is presented on the internet when in all honesty, the process will get easier to the point that it is considered a mirror check, something we humans do constantly.

  11. Aug 2020
    1. What is Critical Literacy?

      critical

      • expressing or involving an analysis of the merits and faults of a work of literature, music, or art.

      literacy

      • the ability to read and write
      • competence or knowledge in a specified area

      The education of individuals and groups in a way that lets them gain competence and knowledge in a specified field or area, while simultaneously being able to express or analyze the merits and faults of the current and previous works.

  12. Jul 2020
    1. Online Reading Comprehension

      Sharing what they've found with one another Students getting really excited when they've found something, want to show teacher Once students get one part, challenge them to find something new Evaluate the information; what features make it good? What is definition of best? Synthesize what you are finding; bring in all the information from different sources Multimodal ways of reading

    1. Framing Internet use as a literacy issue will also make it more likely to be embraced by schools, an institution resistant to adopting new technologies

      If this is included with literacy, schools and districts may think more about the new ways that our students are constructing learning

    1. How do you ensure that students could still properly comprehend information under the SAMR model, particular in relation to literacy.

    1. xperiences invite participation and provide many different ways for individuals and groups to contribute.

      Participatory: web literacy

    1. It is important to use critical and creative thinking, even if you can pass classes without it.

    1. web-biggest misinformation engine as well as the greatest fact-checking resource

    2. reading laterally rather than deep reading a website

    3. Never ending array of content. No previous knowledge of sources.

    4. Participatory Propaganda-doing our part to get our own message out there

  13. www.literacyworldwide.org www.literacyworldwide.org
    1. Digital literacy is not about the skills of using technologies, but how we use our judgment to maintain awareness of what we are reading and writing, why we are doing it, and whom we are addressing.

      Very thoughtful post about the importance of data literacy.

    2. After students have the skill to use multiple platforms, I allow them the choice of which platform to use for the support they need, but I make sure they ask questions. When is it best to do a Google search versus ask a question on Twitter? Why would students tweet to a particular hashtag or person versus another? When they tweet to people from another country in another time zone, what kind of context do they need to consider? What should they add, remove, or modify in order to communicate better?

      This is crucially important in the teaching of literacy and detecting the biases of a particular source.

    1. Can explain concepts, principles, and processes by putting it their own words, teaching it to others, justifying their answers, and showing their reasoning.• Can interpret by making sense of data, text, and experience through images, analogies, stories, and models.• Can apply by effectively using and adapting what they know in new and complex contexts.• Demonstrate perspective by seeing the big picture and recognizing differ-ent points of view.• Display empathy by perceiving sensitively and walking in someone else’s shoes.• Have self-knowledge by showing meta-cognitive awareness, using productive habits of mind, and reflect-ing on the meaning of the learning and experience.

      These six facets are crucial for students to learn not only the facts related to a subject, but how to properly using analysis when learning and writing about the subject. This is especially crucial as technology has become more integrated into the classroom as well as the real world.

    2. think purposefully about curricular plan-ning. The UbD framework helps this process without offering a rigid process or prescriptive recipe.

      Very good definition for the term learning. As well, it seems as if UbD focuses on helping students learn in a way that is not just strictly reading and memorizing materials from the book. For me, I experienced the important of this when taking AP Euro in High School which focused heavily on analyzing source documents from history rather than simply regurgitating facts from the text. I wonder how integration of tech affects the ways in which students analyze and write for assignments in many subjects, particularly social studies.

    1. Simply stated, students are often not provided with opportunities in school to practice the web literacies necessary to read, write, and participate on the web.

      I remember having to take a computer science course in high school/middle school, but it mainly focused on developing digital skills instead of digital literacies

  14. Jun 2020
  15. May 2020
  16. Apr 2020
    1. Nous pouvons constater qu’il y a un lien entre les formes produites et les moyens mis en œuvre pour les produire.

      dans une perspective nativement numérique, écrire et produire sont alors intrinsèquement liés.

      par exemple: dans le modèle du manuscrit rédigé à la main ou tapé à la dactylo, le processus de production est au mieux analogue (consistant à reproduire des lettres que l'auteur a posées sur papier), au pire complètement hétérogène à l'acte d'écriture (il faut prendre le processus du début pour en faire un livre publiable).

  17. Mar 2020
    1. knowledge that is part of what it means to be a free person in the present historical context of the dawn of the information age

      definition - liberal as in free, as in free from control of "clever men"

    2. an extended notion of information literacy is essential to the future of democracy, if citizens are to be intelligent shapers of the information society rather than its pawns
    1. information literates.They have learned techniquesand skills for utilizing the wide range ofinformation tools as well asprimary sources in molding information solutions totheir problems

      initial definition

    2. Information has value indirect onortion to the control it rovides him overwhat he is and whathe can become

      Information has Value

  18. Feb 2020
    1. Do learners seek out texts that consider multiple perspectives and broaden their understanding of the world? Do learners critically analyze a variety of information and ideas from a variety of sources? Do learners choose texts and tools to consume, create, and share ideas that match their need and audience? Do learners create new ideas using knowledge and insights gained? Do learners analyze the credibility of information, authorial intent, and its appropriateness in meeting their needs? Do learners use information and the ideas of others to solve problems and make decisions as informed citizens? Do learners strive to see limitations and overlaps between multiple streams of information? Do learners gain new perspectives because of the texts they interact with? Do learners use tools to deepen understandings, to share ideas, and to build on others’ thinking? Do learners develop new skills strategies to meet the challenge of new texts and tools?

      These are the goals of digital literacy.

    1. The results of the questionnaire indicated that West Town students had greater access to the Internet at home and were required to use the Internet more in school. These results suggest that a separate and independent achievement gap existed for online reading, based on income inequality.

      The achievement gap is multifaceted, so as educators, we need to attack it in more ways. Getting children library cards (internet access) and technology experiences from a younger age can help close this gap, but only if it is in a equitable way.

  19. Jan 2020
    1. Being audience and culturally aware, resolving conflict appropriately, using technology tools effectively, and taking responsibility for personal and group productivity.

      3 of these 4 are goals for my classroom without tech even on my mind, but with tech, they can transcend even further into the daily lives of digitally literate students

    2. Learning through making involves constructing new content

      design, revise, remix, MAKE SOMETHING

    3. reading online requires a basic understanding of web mechanics

      searching, determining credibility, etc.

    1. At least five processing practices occur during online research and comprehen-sion: (1) reading to identify important questions, (2) reading to locate information, (3) reading to evaluate information critically, (4) reading to synthesize informa-tion, and (5) reading to communicate information

      how do we make sure that students are not just "skimming" or doing #2???

    1. MediaSmarts has drawn on the work of academics and educators across the country to develop a curriculum framework to ensure that students from Kindergarten to Grade 12 can receive a comprehensive digital literacy education. This framework consists of lessons, classroom activities and other teacher resources that translate the five key concepts into specific digital literacy skills that are essential for each grade level. These skills are grouped into seven categories: Ethics and Empathy: This category addresses students’ social-emotional skills and empathy towards others as well as their ability to make ethical decisions in digital environments when dealing with issues such as cyberbullying, sharing other people’s content and accessing music and video. Privacy and Security: This includes essential skills for managing students’ privacy, reputation and security online, such as making good decisions about sharing their own content, understanding data collection techniques, protecting themselves from malware and other software threats, and being aware of their digital footprint. Community Engagement: Resources in this category teach students about their rights as citizens and consumers, and empower them to influence positive social norms in online spaces and to speak out as active, engaged citizens. Digital Health: Digital health skills include managing screen time and balancing students’ online and offline lives; managing online identity issues; dealing with issues relating to digital media, body image and sexuality; and understanding the differences between healthy and unhealthy online relationships. Consumer Awareness: These skills allow students to navigate highly commercialized online environments. They include recognizing and interpreting advertising, branding and consumerism; reading and understanding the implications of website Terms of Service and privacy policies; and being savvy consumers online. Finding and Verifying: Students need the skills to effectively search the Internet for information they need for personal and school purposes, and then evaluate and authenticate the sources and information they find. Making and Remixing: Making and remixing skills enable students to create digital content and use existing content for their own purposes in ways that respect legal and ethical considerations, and to use digital platforms to collaborate with others.

      all things that can easily be worked into any curriculum that involves technology

    2. citizens who lack digital literacy skills risk being disadvantaged when it comes to accessing healthcare, government services and opportunities for employment, education and civic participation

      as teachers, we need to connect them to the world around them.. this world is digital in the modern age, so we can offer them not only the opportunity to do good for others but also for themselves

    3. Today’s youth are often called “digital natives” by adults because of the seemingly effortless way they engage with all things technological.

      we can prepare them for the future workforce; many jobs require certain skills with tech - managing social media, programming, contacting customers via chat and phone, etc.

    1. "It's not interactive, ... there's one screen, and you just have to read it," he explained. "It's the same as reading a [paper] page."

      sometimes tech isn't much of an improvement >> we need to channel to the special abilities of growing tech -hashtags, hyperlinks, interactive games and level checks, etc.

    2. That makes digital writing a potentially powerful lever for social good, allowing students to "actively participate in civic society and contribute to a vibrant, informed, and engaged community," as the ALA notes. It also makes digital writing a potentially dangerous tool—decisions about when and what to share online can have repercussions for a student's safety, privacy, and reputation.

      I love how digital literacy allows so many to have access to so much and to communicate easily with others. But there is a definite dark side to sharing in any digital format and many don't think about that.

  20. Nov 2019
    1. Using Technology to Enhance Teaching & Learning

      This website provides technology teaching resources as part of the Southern Methodist University (SMU) Center for Teaching Excellence. Users can find informational links to various technology tools that can be used for enhancing teaching and learning in online, hybrid, or face-to-face courses. On the right of the page under "Technology," users can click on the tech tools for additional resources/research on their implementation. Examples of these technologies include Blackboard LMS, PowerPoint presentation software, Google Suite products, blogs, and social media sites. Rating 8/10

    1. Digital Literacy Initiatives

      This website outlines digital literacy initiatives provided by the Literacy Information and Communication System (LINCS). The U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) implements these intitatives to aid adult learners in the successful use of technology in their education and careers. Students have free access to learning material on different subjects under the "LINCS Learner Center" tab. Teachers and tutors also have access to resoruces on implementing educational technology for professional development and effective instruction. Rating 8/10

    1. Section 1.5 Online Learner Characteristics, Technology and Skill Requirements

      This website outlines Section 1.5 of Angelo State University's guide to instructional design and online teaching. Section 1.5 describes key characteristics of online learners, as well as the technology and computer skills that research has identified as being important for online learners. Successful online learners are described as self-directed, motivated, well-organized, and dedicated to their education. The article also notes that online learners should understand how to use technology such as multimedia tools, email, internet browsers. and LMS systems. This resource serves as a guide to effective online teaching. Rating 10/10

    1. Computer literacy is considered a very important skill to possess. Employers want their workers to have basic computer skills because their company becomes ever more dependent on computers

      Learning the basic about computers is essential to employers.

    1. Tech Literacy Resources

      This website is the "Resources" archive for the IgniteED Labs at Arizona State University's Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College. The IgniteED Labs allow students, staff, and faculty to explore innovative and emerging learning technology such as virtual reality (VR), artifical intelligence (AI), 3-D printing, and robotics. The left side of this site provides several resources on understanding and effectively using various technologies available in the IgniteED labs. Each resources directs you to external websites, such as product tutorials on Youtube, setup guides, and the products' websites. The right column, "Tech Literacy Resources," contains a variety of guides on how students can effectively and strategically use different technologies. Resources include "how-to" user guides, online academic integrity policies, and technology support services. Rating: 9/10

  21. Oct 2019
    1. "Digital literacy is the ability to use information and communication technologies to find, evaluate, create, and communicate information, requiring both cognitive and technical skills."

      Definition of digital literacy.

  22. Sep 2019
    1. There is a growing need to establish literacies around open education, copyright, social media and networked learning as a foundational skill.

      Among both students AND instructors. Instructors teach what they know, and if they do not feel comfortable themselves working in these environments b/c they lack digital skills, then they will not encourage students to work openly.

    1. The learner’s key skills shift away from certainty and towards decision making between various options.

      from certainty to decision making - moving from simplicity to complexity, from knowing what to do to knowing ways to do things

  23. Aug 2019
  24. languagedev.wikispaces.com languagedev.wikispaces.com
    1. It forms the foundation of our perceptions, com-municntion!f and daily interactions.

      Interesting question: does language shape reality or does reality shape language?

    1. verall literacy are often larger than gender differences within countries.[34] However, the gap between men and women would narrow from 1990 onwards, after the increase of male adult literacy rates at 80 per cent (see image).[27]

      literacy can be used as a motivating factor

    2. "The written word was all around them, in both public and private life: laws, calendars, regulations at shrines, and funeral epitaphs were engraved in stone or bronze. The Republic amassed huge archives of reports on every aspect of public life"

      even in ancient times literacy was being utilized. not necessarily in the traditional sense of the word that we always think of, but literacy was found in private and public life. interesting way of thinking about literacy

    3. an important role in literacy development, gains in childhood literacy often occur in primary school settings. Continuing the global expansion of public education is thus a frequent focus of literacy advocates.

      Literacy seems to be strongly embedded in the education of an individual. Education being a way of achieving growth in reading and writing ability, speech, and listening skills.

    4. "Literacy involves a continuum of learning in enabling individuals to achieve their goals, to develop their knowledge and potential, and to participate fully in their community and wider society".[7]

      I believe literacy is the ability to understand, speak, communicate, etc. but also the continuous learning and practicing. It is important to be literate in almost all real-life situations and it would be impossible to fulfill your potential if you were illiterate. It gives us opportunities to connect and further educate ourselves to be successful.

    5. defining literacy as the "ability to identify, understand, interpret, create, communicate and compute, using printed and written materials associated with varying contexts".
    6. Reading development involves a range of complex language-underpinnings including awareness of speech sounds (phonology), spelling patterns (orthography), word meaning (semantics), grammar (syntax) and patterns of word formation (morphology), all of which provide a necessary platform for reading fluency and comprehension.

      When thinking of literacy many people are just thinking of reading and being able to understand language. But there is so much more to being literate in a language.

    7. iteracy, which includes the abilities to apply to printed material critical analysis, inference and synthesis;

      How can this encompass digital literacy and non-printed texts; how does being literate change as the world of tech is constantly changing?

    8. The key to literacy is reading development, a progression of skills which begins with the ability to understand spoken words and decode written words, and which culminates in the deep understanding of text.

      This is a focus on text in literacy.

    1. Divergent responses to annotation demonstrate what Foucault means by power running through the whole social body.

      How would this have worked in pre-literate societies? Examples?

      "the whole social body" also reminds me of the idea of the "Great Chain of Being" to consider how differences in annotation may change and evolve in societies over long periods of time. I can't help but consider Richard Dawkins' original conceptualization of the "meme" and how they move through societies with or without literacy skills.

    1. Video Games (Is School Enough? Series)

      I love the idea for my students coding and creating games. I bought a robot to start getting students to code and start engaging in other ideas.

      I love the view the student has on feedback. Knowing what constructive criticism is really helpful is great growth-mindset. Using peers to give constructive criticism is a great way to help students out.

    1. Cultural Anthropologist Mimi Ito on Connected Learning, Children, and Digital Media

      This is a great question and a great start. I think teachers want o do this but do not know how or where to start. The question has been posed and I am sure little by little we will figure out how to do it.

  25. Jul 2019
  26. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. I, Pseudocoder

      This made me chuckle--both because I am living in a pseudocoding space myself, so I identify with the self-deprecating humor, and because of the riff on "I, Robot"

    1. Interpretive Mode

      Good ideas for the World Language Classroom and a good opportunity to teach digital literacy skills, especially reading. Students can look for the information instead of the information just being handed to them.

    1. However, this does not nec-essarily mean they are skilled in the effective use of online information, perhaps the most important aspect of the Internet. Studies show that stu-dents lack critical evaluation skills when reading online (Bennet, Maton, & Kervin, 2008; Forzani & Maykel, 2013; Graham & Metaxas, 2003) and that they are not especially skilled with reading to locate information online (Kuiper & Volman, 2008

      I completely agree with this. They can use the internet but they lack the skills to sift through information in a timely manner that does not make them give up in 10 seconds.

    2. One might even suggest that, over a lifetime, learning how to learn New Literacies is more important than learning a specific literacy of reading or writing.

      This is learning how to learn. When we learn how to learn we can figure out new technologies and we can problem solve

    1. By creating a curriculum that allows for problem-based inquiry learning, high-level discussion, and collaboration

      building skills to prepare students for digital world.

    2. In addition, the rise of the Internet means that teachers must shift how they teach reading and writing

      important to consider; the world is no longer simply paper and pen or type-writers. The literacy tools we have now are virtuously endless.

    1. five phases:
      1. students collaborative with instructor to pick area of interest and work on a DQ to guide their research.
      2. students engage in OCI as the do research and use digital tools to make discoveries 3.Students use critical thinking to evaluate online info by analyzing credibility of their info. 4.Students synthesize what they learned/researched by combining info in multiple, multimodal sources.
      3. Students engage in online content construction by putting their research into their own words and choosing the best digital tool/text before sharing their answers.
    2. The Internet Inquiry Project is an online research project that helps students develop the important digital knowledge and skills needed as they build their web literacies.

      IIQ helps students develop and craft web literacy by cultivating web knowledge and skills.

    1. Open learning, also known as open education

      requires a open, sharing, collaborative environment. Promotes pedagogical dialogue. OER have potential to transcend "geographic, economic, or language barriers". Also, OER strengthens digital literacy.