22 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2018
    1. Groups

      Unlike other approaches to learning new concepts that leave you to your own resources, Groups provide a safe environment for meaningful open discussions, shared experiences and assets, to help you overcome change adoption hurdles.

      To participate in Groups:

      • Join the Community
      • Join groups that interest you
      • And participate in the Group discussions
  2. Nov 2017
    1. Rather than framing everything at the course level, we should be deploying these technologies for the individual.26

      Obvious question: what about groups, communities, networks, and other supra-individual entities apart from the course/cohort model?

  3. Oct 2017
    1. Twitter also facilitates collective actions such as organizingweekly Q&A sessions. For example,#AlzChatis for a live tweet chat that takes place everyMonday on the topic of Alzheimer’s disease. The conversations and joint activities form thecommunity component in CoPs.

      Yes - the weekly chat usage of Twitter is a perfect example of how people use defined and well-known hashtags to create and participate in CoPs

    2. commu-nity of practice

      Definition of Community of Practice by National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research.

      Communities of practice are formed by people who engage in a process of collective learning in a shared domain of human endeavor: a tribe learning to survive, a band of artists seeking new forms of expression, a group of engineers working on similar problems, a clique of pupils defining their identity in the school, a network of surgeons exploring novel techniques, a gathering of first-time managers helping each other cope.

  4. Mar 2017
    1. What’s more, when COP21 negotiators were asked about how confident they were in their scientific understandings of temperature rise, they showed no more confidence than the MBA students they were tested against. While it’s one thing to have a group of over-confident (probably millennial) MBA students, it’s another to have international climate negotiators reporting an average confidence level of about 4 out of 7 in their own understandings of temperature rise. 

      For me, this is not surprising, but rather a beautiful example of the Dunning-Kruger Effect. (Graph)

      They know the amount of uncertainty and lack of predictability of the severity. And they are equally sure of the trajectory of failure.

  5. Dec 2015
    1. Option 1: [The mobilization of climate finance [shall][should][other] be scaled up [in a predictable and transparent manner] [beyond previous efforts] [from USD 100 billion per year] from 2020[, recognizing the important role of the Green Climate Fund in the scaling up of financial resources for the implementation of this agreement, as well as other multilateral mechanisms and other efforts].] Option 2: [The provision and mobilization of financial resources by developed country Parties and other developed Parties included in Annex II shall represent a progression beyond their previous efforts towards achieving short-term collective quantified goals for the post 2020 period to be periodically established and reviewed. Financial resources shall be scaled up from a floor of US$100 billion per year, including a clear burden-sharing formula [among them], and in line with needs and priorities identified by developing country Parties [including Parties whose special circumstances were recognized by COP decisions] in the context of contributing to the achievement of the [objective][purpose] (Article 2/XX) of this Agreement.

      Report of the GCF and Guidance to the GCF: GCF Board Co-Chair Henrik Harboe (Norway) highlighted key milestones including: nomination of 136 National Designated Authorities; accreditation of 20 entities to channel finance into action on the ground; and signed contribution agreements representing 58% of the initial US$100 billion in pledges.

    2. [Developed country Parties shall provide developing country Parties, taking into account the needs of those that are particularly vulnerable, with long-term, scaled-up, predictable, new and additional finance

      REPORT OF THE ADAPTATION FUND BOARD: Adaptation Fund Board Chair Hans Olav Ibrekk (Norway) reported that the “fund has never been more in demand” and has delivered effectively on its mandate, but that the sustainability of the fund is “in danger.” Parties established a contact group co-chaired by Richard Muyungi (Tanzania) and Herman Sips (the Netherlands) on this item (FCCC/KP/CMP/2015/2).

    3. the rights of indigenous peoples

      INDIGENOUS PEOPLES urged, inter alia: respecting indigenous peoples’ rights; recognizing traditional knowledge and practices; and providing direct access to climate finance.

    4. Option 1: communication to 5 year time period Every 5 years, harmonised [NDMC*][INDC] Each Party shall [[communicate its [successive] [new]] [update its] [NDMC][INDC] by [year x] [2020] [2021] and every five years thereafter on a [synchronized][common] basis, [or resubmit an existing [NDMC][INDC]] [for the subsequent five-year time frame], taking into account the outcomes of the global stocktake referred to in Article 10.

      Saying “we are far from where we need to be,” Climate Action Network (CAN), for ENVIRONMENTAL NGOs (ENGOs), called for creating five-year cycles and matching conditional INDCs with finance.

    5. Option 1: [The mobilization of climate finance [shall][should][other] be scaled up [in a predictable and transparent manner] [beyond previous efforts] [from USD 100 billion per year] from 2020[, recognizing the important role of the Green Climate Fund in the scaling up of financial resources for the implementation of this agreement, as well as other multilateral mechanisms and other efforts].] Option 2: [The provision and mobilization of financial resources by developed country Parties and other developed Parties included in Annex II shall represent a progression beyond their previous efforts towards achieving short-term collective quantified goals for the post 2020 period to be periodically established and reviewed. Financial resources shall be scaled up from a floor of US$100 billion per year, including a clear burden-sharing formula [among them], and in line with needs and priorities identified by developing country Parties [including Parties whose special circumstances were recognized by COP decisions] in the context of contributing to the achievement of the [objective][purpose] (Article 2/XX) of this Agreement.

      China, for Brazil, South Africa, India and China, emphasized conducting work in an open, transparent, inclusive and party-driven manner, and said that the Paris agreement should be in line with CBDR and respective capabilities. On the pre-2020 period, he stressed that developed countries must meet their commitments and define a clear roadmap to achieving the US$100 billion goal.

    6. Flexibility LDCs [and SIDS][and African states] may communicate their [NDMC*][INDC] at their discretion, including information on strategies, plans and actions for low GHG development, reflecting their special circumstances.

      The Republic of Korea, for the ENVIRONMENTAL INTEGRITY GROUP, called for the adoption of an agreement that is applicable to all, includes a flexible approach to differentiation, and has common rules and a mechanism to increase ambition over time.

    7. Hold the increase in the global average temperature [below 1.5 °C] [or] [well] [below 2 °C] above preindustrial levels by ensuring deep cuts in global greenhouse gas [net] emissions;

      Angola, for the LDCs, stated that the 2°C limit is inadequate and should be strengthened to 1.5°C.

      Maldives, for the ALLIANCE OF SMALL ISLAND STATES (AOSIS), called for the agreement to establish, inter alia, medium- and long-term emission reduction pathways capable of delivering less than 1.5°C of warming.

      WOMEN AND GENDER urged countries to limit temperature rise to 1.5°C and avoid concepts such as net zero, carbon neutrality and offsetting.

      LOCAL GOVERNMENTS AND MUNICIPAL AUTHORITIES highlighted the contributions of local governments to mitigation and adaptation, while calling for a 1.5°C temperature limit.

    8. Emphasizing the need to respond to the urgent threat of climate change on the basis of the [best available] [reliable] scientific knowledge, in particular, the assessment reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change,

      Saudi Arabia, for the ARAB GROUP, emphasized that setting a goal for governments’ efforts “needs to be substantiated by proven science,” provided by the IPCC.

  6. Nov 2015
    1. Yet, there is no denying thatbeing on Whyville was for us like being in a different world, whereas our afterschoolclub participants seamlessly joined the virtual community.

      Why is there a feeling of different access to participation? In what ways did they not have the ecology of action or the resources to participate (Heath, et al. 2002)? Because, unlike the case with Nasir and Cooks, there is not specific arbiter giviing the students more resources for participation in the community of practice.

  7. Oct 2015
    1. As is commonly the case, initial coding of the data yielded a very largenumber of categories

      The coding categories, in this specific instance, name the resources that support learning and engagement (including telescopes above). These are the physical tools, the objects/concepts being looked at and the participants goals. They support the LPP and eventual participation in the community of practice of astronomers (amateur)

    2. ectures, planets(Saturn, Jupiter, Mars,andVenus), theMoon,asteroids, deep sky objects, Messier objects, star clusters, variable stars, dou-ble stars, galaxies, comets, globular clusters, periodical events(e.g.,eclipsesand planetalignments),nebula, Cassiopeia, atlasandcharts, goals

      In this specific instance, all of these are resources that support learning and engagement (including telescopes, books above). These are the physical tools, the objects/concepts being looked at and the participants goals. They support the LPP and eventual participation in the community of practice of astronomers (amateur)

    1. However, their behavior can also be interpreted as having a much more direct engagement with themuseum than others –especiallythosewho grew fatigued and retreated to their phones.

      Maybe they have discovered the key to museum going: speed walk through and only stop if you have something to say - and even then stop only shortly. What might Lave and Wenger say about their participation? Is it peripheral in the "art connoisseur" CoP? Or some tangential CoP?

    1. he expertise of oth the inter-ested child and adult scientist reflect repeated exposure to domain-specific declarative knowledge, repeated practice in interpreting new content, mak-ing inferences to connect new knowledge to existing knowledge, repeated conversations with others who share or want to support the same interest, and so on.

      Interesting because this contrasts with communities of practice a bit. Although I understand why the author does not consider interested children a community of practice, the adult scientists are because they are contributing to the goals of a community. It almost sounds like the author is arguing that in order to be an 'expert' you just need to know a lot about a topic, but not necessarily contribute to the needs of that community- just engage with a critical lens and be up-to-date with material.

  8. Sep 2015
    1. the exhibits should facilitate science learning, yet they also need to supporta diverse visiting public in making their own personal choices about where to attend,

      Okay, first sentence so it may be premature but I am thinking that another way to state this dilemma is: What happens when CoP collide? And how do we support more than one CoP with the same physical resources?

    1. A community of prac-tice is a set of relations among persons, activity, and world, over time and in relation with other tangential and overlapping communities of practice. A community of practice is an intrin-sic condition for the existence of knowledge, not least because it provides the interpretive support necessary for making sense of its heritage. Thus, participation in the cultural practice in which any knowledge exists is an epistemological principle of learning. The social structure of this practice, its power rela-tions, and its conditions for legitimacy define possibilities for learning (i.e., for legitimate peripheral participation).

      The CoP, as a site for learning

    2. For example, in most high schools there is a group of stu-dents engaged over a substantial period of time in learning physics. What community of practice is in the process of re-production? Possibly the students participate only in the repro-duction of the high school itself. But assuming that the prac-tice of physics is also being reproduced in some form, there are vast differences between the ways high school physics stu-dents participate in and give meaning to their activity and the way professional physicists do.

      Thus, the learned subject matter does not define necessarily the CoP, nor does it reproduce it

  9. Feb 2015