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  1. Last 7 days
    1. 2021-04-09

    2. Emails show Trump officials celebrate efforts to change CDC reports on coronavirus—The Washington Post. (n.d.). Retrieved April 12, 2021, from https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2021/04/09/cdc-covid-political-interference/

    3. Political appointees also tried to blunt scientific findings they deemed unfavorable to Trump, according to new documents from House probe.
    4. Trump officials celebrated efforts to change CDC reports on coronavirus, emails show
    1. 2021-04-05

    2. FacebookTwitterLinkedInWhatsAppMORE THAN a billion doses of covid-19 vaccine have been made. Now comes the hard part: ensuring every country in the world has access to them. Can distribution be made more equitable? Alok Jha and Natasha Loder are joined by Edward Carr, The Economist’s deputy editor, and Sondre Solstad, senior data journalist.With Seth Berkley of GAVI, the Vaccine Alliance, and John Nkengasong, director of the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. Runtime: 40 min
    3. Vaccine equity—what does fair distribution look like?
  2. Mar 2021
    1. 2021-03-26

    2. Nick Barrowman. (2021, March 26). Throughout the pandemic, a widespread inability to reason counterfactually has been on display. For example, some people apparently think lockdowns don’t work. They seem unable to imagine the situation had there not been a lockdown. Lockdowns are costly, but they work! [Tweet]. @nbarrowman. https://twitter.com/nbarrowman/status/1375240312264740870

    3. Throughout the pandemic, a widespread inability to reason counterfactually has been on display. For example, some people apparently think lockdowns don't work. They seem unable to imagine the situation had there *not* been a lockdown. Lockdowns are costly, but they work!
    1. Ashish K. Jha, MD, MPH. (2020, December 12). Michigan vs. Ohio State Football today postponed due to COVID But a comparison of MI vs OH on COVID is useful Why? While vaccines are coming, we have 6-8 hard weeks ahead And the big question is—Can we do anything to save lives? Lets look at MI, OH for insights Thread [Tweet]. @ashishkjha. https://twitter.com/ashishkjha/status/1337786831065264128

    2. 2020-12-12

    3. Two states, similar background, neighbors Only big difference is in mid-November, a policy intervention And effects are sizeable. And visible. Obviously, its just a two state comparison But compelling And should remind us we know how to save lives until vaccines arrive Fin
    4. For much of the pandemic, the two states have looked very similar Partly because both governors did a good job managing things When things got bad this fall, MI responded, OH didn’t If we need more evidence that policy matters, this graph should do it 5/6
    5. So MI: cases are down 15%, hospitalizations up 29% OH: cases are up 79%, hospitalizations up 76% And you know that deaths will follow in the following couple of weeks In fact, let's look at the picture, which tells the story perfectly OH vs MI through December 11
    6. Michigan put in restrictions on 11/15 Ohio did not What happend? Michigan 11/15 versus 12/10 Daily cases: 67 --> 57 new cases per 100K Hospitalizations: 31 --> 40 per 100K Ohio 11/15 versus 12/10 Daily cases 58 -->104 new cases per 100K Hospitalizations: 25 --> 44 per 100K
    7. On 11/15, Michigan had 67 new cases / 100K population and 31 people in the hospital per 100K pop Ohio had, per 100K pop 58 new cases, 25 people in the hospital And as the graph shows, they were both increasing rapidly Here's that graph again through November 15
    8. Similar states Similar policies But then, things changed mid-November So let’s talk data (@COVID19Tracking 7-day moving avgs) 3/9
    9. On 11/15, Michigan announced series of restrictions Ohio didn’t We can compare the two to see if Michigan policies helped Why is Ohio a good comparison? OH a neighbor of similar size, make-up (urban/rural, etc) Here's COVID cases through 11/15 (OH in red, MI in blue)
    10. Michigan vs. Ohio State Football today postponed due to COVID But a comparison of MI vs OH on COVID is useful Why? While vaccines are coming, we have 6-8 hard weeks ahead And the big question is -- can we do anything to save lives? Lets look at MI, OH for insights Thread
    1. Ghio, D., Lawes-Wickwar, S., Tang, M. Y., Epton, T., Howlett, N., Jenkinson, E., Stanescu, S., Westbrook, J., Kassianos, A., Watson, D., Sutherland, L., Stanulewicz, N., Guest, E., Scanlan, D., Carr, N., Chater, A., Hotham, S., Thorneloe, R., Armitage, C., … Keyworth, C. (2020). What influences people’s responses to public health messages for managing risks and preventing infectious diseases? A rapid systematic review of the evidence and recommendations [Preprint]. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/nz7tr

    1. 2021-03-16

    2. Coenen, A., & Gureckis, T. (2021). The distorting effects of deciding to stop sampling information. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/tbrea

    3. 10.31234/osf.io/tbrea
    4. This paper asks how strategies of information sampling are affected by a learner’s goal. Based on a theoretical analysis and two behavioral experiments, we show that learning goals have a crucial impact on the decision of when to stop sampling. This decision, in turn, affects the statistical properties (e.g. average values, or standard deviations) of the data collected under different goals. Specifically, we find that sampling with the goal of making a binary choice can introduce a correlation between the average value of a sample and its size (the number of values sampled). Across multiple rounds of sampling, this has the potential of biasing learn- ers’ inferences about the underlying process that generated the samples, specifically if learners ignore sample size when making these inferences. We find that people are indeed biased in this way and make different inferences about the same data-generating process when sampling with different learning goals. These findings highlight yet another danger of inferring general patterns from samples of evidence the learner had a hand in collecting.
    5. The distorting effects of deciding to stop sampling information
    1. 2020-11-19

    2. The COVID Tracking Project. (2020, November 19). Our daily update is published. States reported 1.5M tests, 164k cases, and 1,869 deaths. A record 79k people are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 in the US. Today’s death count is the highest since May 7. Https://t.co/8ps5itYiWr [Tweet]. @COVID19Tracking. https://twitter.com/COVID19Tracking/status/1329235190615474179

    3. 26 states have over 1k people currently hospitalized with COVID-19. Hospitalizations in CA, TX, and IL account for almost a quarter of all COVID-19 current hospitalizations.
    4. 12 states reported over 5k COVID-19 cases today.
    5. Our daily update is published. States reported 1.5M tests, 164k cases, and 1,869 deaths. A record 79k people are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 in the US. Today's death count is the highest since May 7.
    1. 2020-11-24

    2. Patricio R Estevez-Soto. (2020, November 24). I’m really surprised to see a lot of academics sharing their working papers/pre-prints from cloud drives (i.e. @Dropbox @googledrive) 🚨Don’t!🚨 Use @socarxiv @SSRN @ZENODO_ORG, @OSFramework, @arxiv (+ other) instead. They offer persisent DOIs and are indexed by Google scholar [Tweet]. @prestevez. https://twitter.com/prestevez/status/1331029547811213316

    3. Also, on pre-print servers, your works looks much better; they have social tools for sharing; and metrics to see how many times your paper has been downloaded. And the newest sites make it super easy to get started.
    4. Cloud drives are great to collaborate, but if you want your research to be widely read before formal publication, pre-print repositories are better alternative. Pre-print entries are persistent, meaning your work will always be available even if you delete that dropbox file.
    5. I'm really surprised to see a lot of academics sharing their working papers/pre-prints from cloud drives (i.e. @Dropbox @googledrive) Don't! Use @socarxiv @SSRN @ZENODO_ORG, @OSFramework, @arxiv (+ other) instead. They offer persisent DOIs and are indexed by Google scholar
    1. 2020-11-24

    2. Flightradar24. (2020, November 24). The skies above North America at Noon ET on the Tuesday before Thanksgiving. Active flights 2018: 6,815 2019: 7,630 2020: 6,972 📡 https://t.co/NePPWZCDVp https://t.co/WOY9j0BXpx [Tweet]. @flightradar24. https://twitter.com/flightradar24/status/1331286193875640322

    3. Percentage of total worldwide flights tracked appearing in each image above: 2018: 46% 2019: 49% 2020: 65%
    4. The skies above North America at Noon ET on the Tuesday before Thanksgiving. Active flights 2018: 6,815 2019: 7,630 2020: 6,972 https://flightradar24.com/35.17,-90.21/5
    1. Colin D’Mello CTVNews. (2020, November 25). BREAKING: CTVNews has learned McKinsey & Company was paid $1.6million to help create the COVID-19 command tables, and $3.2 million to help with the school re-opening strategy. Https://t.co/F3FQtG8ftW #onpoli [Tweet]. @ColinDMello. https://twitter.com/ColinDMello/status/1331625704501424129

    2. 2020-11-25

    3. NEW: The Minstry of Education says "The value of the contract was $942,000 for McKinsey to provide feedback on the childcare and school re-opening plans." The rest -- more than $3 million was to assist the COVID-19 recovery planning. #onpoli
    4. BREAKING: CTVNews has learned McKinsey & Company was paid $1.6million to help create the COVID-19 command tables, and $3.2 million to help with the school re-opening strategy. https://mckinsey.com/about-us/covid-response-center/home… #onpoli
    1. PANDEMIC SHOCKS, FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS, MARKETS AND BEHAVIOURS Tickets, Tue, Dec 15 2020 at 17:00 | Eventbrite. (n.d.). Retrieved March 5, 2021, from https://www.eventbrite.it/e/biglietti-pandemic-shocks-financial-institutions-markets-and-behaviours-131361717433?utm-medium=discovery&utm-campaign=social&utm-content=attendeeshare&aff=estw&utm-source=tw&utm-term=listing#

    2. could not find an upload of the webinar

    3. 2020-12-15

    4. The Seminar will try to analyze the macro, institutional and micro financial effects of pandemic shocks. Here are some of the main topics:Insurance companies and pandemic uncertainties: Is it possible to ensure businesses and families for pandemic losses?How to include periodic epidemic shocks in macroeconomic forecasting.Social distancing and the shove to e-banking innovations and changes.Investments behaviors in financial markets during pandemic turbulence.Pandemic turbulence and financial stability.Recovery fund or recovery bund for European growth.Pandemic effect on philanthropy and social finance.Changes of consumer behavior and credit during pandemic crisis.Nudging to neutralize ambiguity and uncertainty aversion of financial investment during pandemic crisis.
    5. PANDEMIC SHOCKS, FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS, MARKETS AND BEHAVIOURS
    1. Stefan Simanowitz. (2020, November 14). “Sweden hoped herd immunity would curb #COVID19. Don’t do what we did” write 25 leading Swedish scientists “Sweden’s approach to COVID has led to death, grief & suffering. The only example we’re setting is how not to deal with a deadly infectious disease” https://t.co/azOg6AxSYH https://t.co/u2IqU5iwEn [Tweet]. @StefSimanowitz. https://twitter.com/StefSimanowitz/status/1327670787617198087

    2. 2020-11-14

    3. “Sweden hoped herd immunity would curb #COVID19. Don't do what we did” write 25 leading Swedish scientists “Sweden’s approach to COVID has led to death, grief & suffering. The only example we're setting is how not to deal with a deadly infectious disease” https://usatoday.com/story/opinion/2020/07/21/coronavirus-swedish-herd-immunity-drove-up-death-toll-column/5472100002/
    1. Unrealistic optimism about future life events: A cautionary note. (n.d.). Retrieved March 4, 2021, from https://psycnet.apa.org/fulltext/2010-22979-001.pdf?auth_token=a25fd4b7f008a50b15fd7b0f1fdb222fc38373f4

    2. 10.1037/a0020997
    3. A robust finding in social psychology is that people judge negative events as less likely to happen tothemselves than to the average person, a behavior interpreted as showing that people are “unrealisticallyoptimistic” in their judgments of risk concerning future life events. However, we demonstrate howunbiased responses can result in data patterns commonly interpreted as indicative of optimism for purelystatistical reasons. Specifically, we show how extant data from unrealistic optimism studies investigatingpeople’s comparative risk judgments are plagued by the statistical consequences of sampling constraintsand the response scales used, in combination with the comparative rarity of truly negative events. Weconclude that the presence of such statistical artifacts raises questions over the very existence of anoptimistic bias about risk and implies that to the extent that such a bias exists, we know considerably lessabout its magnitude, mechanisms, and moderators than previously assumed
    4. Unrealistic Optimism About Future Life Events: A Cautionary Note
    1. 2020-11-02

    2. Oljača, M., Sadiković, S., Branovacki, B., Pajić, D., Smederevac, S., & Mitrović, D. (2020). Unrealistic optimism and HEXACO traits as predictors of risk perception and compliance with COVID-19 preventive measures during the first wave of pandemic. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/rt64j

    3. 10.31234/osf.io/rt64j
    4. The aims of this study were to examine possible differences and factors that contribute to risk perception and compliance with preventive measures at the beginning (T1) and the end (T2) of the first wave of COVID-19 pandemic. The sample consisted of 423 participants (M = 30.29, SD = 14.45; 69% female). Compliance, risk perception and trust in information were significantly higher in T1 than T2. For risk perception, significant predictors in both T1 and T2 were age, Emotionality (HEXACO-PI-R) and Unrealistic Optimism (NLE, Negative Life Events). Trust in information was a significant predictor in T1, while Unrealistic Optimism (Positive Life Events) was a signifi-cant predictor in T2. For compliance, significant predictors in T1 were gender and trust in information while in T2 were Emo-tionality, Extraversion, Conscientiousness (HEXACO-PI-R), NLE and trust in information, for both T1 and T2. In general, findings suggest a much more pronounced role of personality traits in adherence to protective measures at the end than at the beginning of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Serbia. Also, the results indicate the role of unrealistic opti-mism regarding negative life events in lower compliance with protective measures.
    5. Unrealistic optimism and HEXACO traits as predictors of risk perception and compliance with COVID-19 preventive measures during the first wave of pandemic
    1. Today, Wikipedia is the world’s leading encyclopedia. Every month, 1.5 billion unique devices worldwide access it 15 billion times, with more than 6000 page views per second. Meanwhile, Encyclopaedia Britannica—last printed in 2010—is now “all but dead” online, according to scholar Heather Ford in her essay in Wikipedia @ 20. The book’s 22 essays are wide-ranging, often intellectually engaging, and, in parts, stylishly written. Its 34 contributors include, fittingly, academics and nonacademics based in many countries, although predominantly in the United States. Its U.S.-based editors, Joseph Reagle and Jackie Koerner, are (respectively) a professor of communication studies and a qualitative research analyst for online communities who also acts as the community health consultant for the Wikimedia community.
    2. 2020-11-02

    3. Scholars reflect on Wikipedia’s 20 years of crowdsourced knowledge | Books, Et Al. (n.d.). Retrieved March 3, 2021, from https://blogs.sciencemag.org/books/2020/11/02/wikipedia-at-20/?utm_campaign=SciMag&utm_source=JHubbard&utm_medium=Twitter

    4. Scholars reflect on Wikipedia’s 20 years of crowdsourced knowledge
    1. Abadi, D., Cabot, P.-L. H., Duyvendak, J. W., & Fischer, A. (2020). Socio-Economic or Emotional Predictors of Populist Attitudes across Europe [Preprint]. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/gtm65

    2. 2020-11-25

    3. 10.31234/osf.io/gtm65
    4. Previous research on predictors of populism has predominantly focused on socio-economic (e.g., education, employment, social status), and socio-cultural factors (e.g., social identity and social status). However, during the last years, the role of negative emotions has become increasingly prominent in the study of populism. We conducted a cross-national survey in 15 European countries (N=8059), measuring emotions towards the government and the elites, perceptions of threats about the future, and socio-economic factors as predictors of populist attitudes (the latter operationalized via three existing scales, anti-elitism, Manichaean outlook, people-centrism, and a newly developed scale on nativism). We tested the role of emotional factors in a deductive research design based on a structural model. Our results show that negative emotions (anger, contempt and anxiety) are better predictors of populist attitudes than mere socio-economic and socio-cultural factors. An inductive machine learning algorithm, Random Forest (RF), reaffirmed the importance of emotions across our survey dataset.
    5. Socio-Economic or Emotional Predictors of Populist Attitudes across Europe
    1. 2020-12-08

    2. ReconfigBehSci. (2020, December 8). I’ve been pondering failed predictions today. A spectacular error of mine: In the early media rush to listen to scientists and doctors, I actually thought Western societies might be seeing the end of the “influencer” and a renewed interest in people who did stuff 1/2 [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1336383952232308736

    3. any similar failures to share as the end of year stock-taking approaches? 2/2
    4. I've been pondering failed predictions today. A spectacular error of mine: in the early media rush to listen to scientists and doctors, I actually thought Western societies might be seeing the end of the "influencer" and a renewed interest in people who *did* stuff 1/2
    1. 2021-03-02

    2. Disney CEO: No “going back” to old way of movie watching. (n.d.). Retrieved March 3, 2021, from https://nypost.com/2021/03/02/disney-ceo-no-going-back-to-old-way-of-movie-watching/?utm_source=NYPTwitter&utm_campaign=SocialFlow&utm_medium=SocialFlow

    3. Disney Chief Executive Bob Chapek said the pandemic has likely permanently narrowed the window for movies to play only in theaters. Pre-pandemic, cinemas depended on an exclusive 90-day window to screen films before they were made available to home distribution channels, such as pay TV and streaming services. But now, studios are tinkering with that timeframe, either shortening it or doing away with it altogether.
    4. Disney CEO says there’s no ‘going back’ to old way of movie watching
    1. 2021-01-14

    2. Airaksinen, J., Komulainen, K., Jokela, M., & Gluschkoff, K. (2021). Big Five personality traits and COVID-19 precautionary behaviors among older adults in Europe [Preprint]. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/rvbjf

    3. Big Five personality traits and COVID-19 precautionary behaviors among older adults in Europe
    4. Objectives: Taking precaution against COVID-19 is important particularly among older adults who have a greater risk for severe illness if infected. We examined whether Big Five personality traits are associated with COVID-19 precautionary behaviors among older adults in Europe. Method: We used data from the Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe (N=34 801). Personality was self-reported in 2017 using the BFI-10 inventory. COVID-19 precautionary behaviors – wearing a mask, limiting social contacts, and keeping distance to others – were assessed in the summer of 2020 through self-reports. Associations between personality and precautionary behaviors were examined with multilevel random-intercept logistic regression models. The models were adjusted for age, gender, educational attainment, and country of residence. Results: Higher conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness were associated with a greater likelihood of wearing a face mask. Higher neuroticism was associated with a greater likelihood of limiting social contacts, and higher agreeableness with a lower likelihood of limiting social contacts. Higher conscientiousness was associated with a greater likelihood of keeping distance to others. The associations between personality and practicing precautionary behaviors were relatively weak. Discussion: Among older adults, taking COVID-19 precautionary behaviors was most consistently related to higher conscientiousness and neuroticism, suggesting that precautionary behaviors may be motivated by multiple psychological differences.
    5. 10.31234/osf.io/rvbjf
    1. JAMA Network. (2020, November 6). Herd Immunity as a Coronavirus Pandemic Strategy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2tsUTAWBJ9M

    2. 2020-11-06

    3. Herd Immunity as a Coronavirus Pandemic Strategy
    4. Would letting coronavirus infect the broad US and global population be a safe and effective means of ending the COVID-19 pandemic? Jay Bhattacharya, MD, PhD, of Stanford University's Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research is a signatory of the 'Great Barrington Declaration,' which proposes to "allow those at minimal risk of death to live their lives normally to build up immunity to the virus through natural infection, while better protecting those who are at highest risk." Marc Lipsitch, PhD, of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, a signatory of the 'John Snow Memorandum' which refutes the argument, responds.