22 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2019
    1. BrainHQ, is an online brain-training software also developed by Posit Science. It is the only software available in Greek being used to any portable computing device (tablet, smartphone, etc.) as an application either on Android or on IOS provided in different languages. Undoubtedly, improvement of brain performance can bring multiple benefits to everyday life. Both research studies and the testimonials of users themselves show that BrainHQ offers benefits in improving thinking, memory and hearing, attention and vision, improving reaction speed, safer driving, self-confidence, quality discussion and good mood. BrainHQ includes 29 exercises divided into 6 categories: Attention, Speed, Memory, Skills, Intelligence and Navigation.

      In this conference paper the author is discussing about the different methods to interactively help learn people with disability, how their concentration and enthusiasm/motivation increases, if the right tool is used to teach them

    1. espite the potential of emerging technologies to assist persons with cognitive disabilities,significant practical impediments remain to be overcome in commercialization, consumerabandonment, and in the design and development of useful products. Barriers also exist in terms of the financial and organizational feasibility of specific envisionedproducts, and their limited potential to reach the consumer market. Innovative engineeringapproaches, effective needs analysis, user-centered design, and rapid evolutionary developmentare essential to ensure that technically feasible products meet the real needs of persons withcognitive disabilities. Efforts must be made by advocates, designers and manufacturers to promote betterintegration of future software and hardware systems so that forthcoming iterations of personalsupport technologies and assisted care systems technologies do not quickly become obsolete.They will need to operate seamlessly across multiple real-world environments in the home,school, community, and workplace

      This journal clearly explains the use of technologies with special aid people how a certain group can leverage it, while also touch basing on what are the challenges which special aid people face financially.

  2. Sep 2019
    1. Recommendation to lift staffing cap

      The NDIA to lift the staffing cap to employ more NDIA planners and ensure NDIA planners are always used for participants with complex disabilities and/or lives. Where a LAC is the NDIA representative in a planning meeting, these LACs need to ensure they are trained and encouraged to work towards understanding individual needs and goals as opposed > to pre-empting needs based on disability type and therefore misrepresenting the actual needs of the participant.

  3. Mar 2019
    1. Adult students have a higher incidence of disability and are less likely to seek accommodations than the general student population, so it is critical that institutions of higher education anticipate their needs, especially in online classes.

      This article provides statistics about the number of adult learners who learn online with a disability and how these numbers need to be addressed. The author observes that adult learning are least likely to ask for help and it's the designers job to assess their work to make it more accessible. This article provides recommendations on how to become more familiar with technology and what guidelines people should be following. Rating: 10/10 for addressing accessibility among adult learners and providing recommendations.

    1. The project reported here aimed to highlight the advantages and weaknesses of web‐based learning for adults with learning disability, and to suggest improvements.

      This article reviews challenges faced by adult learners with learning disabilities as it related to online learning. This article discusses how adults with learning disabilities might not adopt new technologies in a productive way and highlights positive and negative aspects of this scenario. Additionally the author provides solutions to identify advantages and disadvantages of online learning for adults. Rating: 9/10 for addressing accessibility and disability concerns among adult learners.

  4. Feb 2019
    1. as the names of colours to a blind man, or sounds to a deaf man, need not here be mentioned.

      Ah, a disability connection to be made here. So, words don't necessarily serve all humans, but are considered natural? An interesting turn to take, Locke.

  5. Jun 2018
    1. I had a learning disability when I was in school. But I could do factory work. Factory work is what we did. Now robots do that job. What happens to people like me?
  6. Dec 2017
  7. Apr 2017
    1. This is why people can play the piano with their fingers but not with their toes.

      That does not really explain why there are very talented musicians that have limb defects, but I suppose that similar to a blind person being able to hear better, their brains adjust (like complex-adaptive systems do) and reassign a new input-element (e.g. the feet) to a left-over motoric system(e.g. the hands).

  8. Mar 2017
    1. nature

      Words having naturally no signification, the idea which each stands for must be learned and retained, by those who would exchange thoughts, and hold intelligible discourse with others, in any language. But this is the hardest to be done where,

      First, The ideas they stand for are very complex, and made up of a great number of ideas put together.

      Secondly, Where the ideas they stand for have no certain connection in nature; and so no settled standard anywhere in nature existing, to rectify and adjust them by.

      Thirdly, When the signification of the word is referred to a standard, which standard is not easy to be know.

      Fourthly, Where the signification of the world and the real essence of the thing are not exactly the same.

      These are difficulties that attend the signification of several words that are intelligible. Those which are not intelligible at all, such as names standing for any simple ideas which another has not organs of faculties to attain; as the names of colours to a blind man, or sounds to a deaf man, need not here be mentioned.

      In all these cases we shall find an imperfection in words; which I shall more at large explain, in their particular application to our several sorts of ideas: for if we examine them, we shall find that the names of mixed modes are most liable to doubtfulness and imperfection, for the two first of these reasons; and the names of substances chiefly for the two latter. (818)

    2. naturally

      See Jay Dolmage's book Disability Rhetoric

      Is this Elaboration an attempt to think in a similar way? Or maybe even copy?

      Disability Rhetoric is the first book to view rhetorical theory and history through the lens of disability studies. Traditionally, the body has been seen as, at best, a rhetorical distraction; at worst, those whose bodies do not conform to a narrow range of norms are disqualified from speaking. Yet, Dolmage argues that communication has always been obsessed with the meaning of the body and that bodily difference is always highly rhetorical. Following from this rewriting of rhetorical history, he outlines the development of a new theory, affirming the ideas that all communication is embodied, that the body plays a central role in all expression, and that greater attention to a range of bodies is therefore essential to a better understanding of rhetorical histories, theories, and possibilities.

    3. bedetermined

      In some ways this feels a little too close to the saying "there is no normal." Conversely, because of my interests in disabilities studies, this gets a little too close to the belief that "we are all disabled." How closely does this proposal align with those (verging on banal) mottos?

  9. Jan 2017
    1. defects

      For Hume, taste and judgement rely on the senses, and the practice to perfect the senses, to develop a "delicacy of taste." I think it's hard not to agree with this, but how does disability fit in with this? Illness comes up A LOT in this piece, even in calling art that has some sort of problem deformed or defective. But how can understandings of delicate taste and judgement incorporate people with varying degrees of sight, hearing, taste, smell--people who surely have a "delicacy of imagination" but encounter art differently?

    1. Underpinning these discussions was the belief that the materiality of the body, one’s physical features were a catalogue of signs to be interpreted not only for the sake one’s own body, as was the case for bedside medicine, but rather and mainly for the body politic.

      So many sources to share here, but here is one in particular that I think is especially relevant today, particularly as we think about enforcement of norms based on appearance and how it...defines (?)...national identity: "Disabled Upon Arrival: The Rhetorical Construction of Disability and Race at Ellis Island" by Jay Dolmage. Hopefully this link takes you to the PDF.

      Important quote: "Ellis Island was designed to process the immigrant body—through an industrialized choreography, through a regime of vision, and through layers of anti-immigration discourse. Ellis Island became the key laboratory and operating theater for American eugenics, the scientific racism that can be seen to define a unique era of Western history, the effects of which can still be felt today. I will argue that Ellis Island, as a rhetorical space, can be seen as a nexus—and a special point of origin—for eugenics and the rhetorical construction of disability and race in the early twentieth century" (27).

      Also, here's a video of this paper presented as a lecture.

  10. Nov 2016
  11. Jun 2015