18 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. However, PIPA is the agency's first standalone bot, meaning it can be used across multiple government agencies. Crucially, the bot can be embedded within web and mobile apps, as well as within third-party personal assistants, such as Google Home and Alexa.  According to Keenan, the gang of five digital assistants released so far by the DHS have answered "more than 2.3 million questions, reducing the need for people to have to pick up a phone or come into a service centre for help.” “This is what our digital transformation program is all about – making life simpler and easier for all Australians.”

      Scope of PIPA

    1. uman Services has a number of public-facing chatbots already. The newest of them is ‘Charles’, launched last year, which offers support for the government’s MyGov service.Others include ‘Sam’ and ‘Oliver’, both of which launched in 2017. The department’s customer-facing digital assistants have so far answered more than 2.3 million questions. Human Services also uses a number of staff-facing chatbots. In November Keenan revealed that the department had launched an Augmented Intelligence Centre of Excellence, which the minister said would boost collaboration with industry, academia and other government entities.

      Chatbots that exist

    1. The federal government has decided that all Commonwealth entities would benefit from having a chatbot, with the Department of Human Services (DHS) announcing it was working on the development of one that will be ready by the end of 2019.The Platform Independent Personal Assistant -- PIPA -- is expected to "significantly improve the customer experience for users of online government services", according to Minister for Human Services and Digital Transformation Michael Keenan.

      Federal Government creating PIPA chatbot

    1. Before implementing Alex 2.5 years ago, IP Australia staffers were taking 12,000 calls per month."Now I'm not saying Alex was the only intervention we had, but it was one of the main ones. Acting on the insights we were getting from Alex, we're now down to 5,000 calls per month and still dropping," Stokes said. "The value for money and return on investment is quite good."

      IP Australia using chatbox named Alex to reduce calls received

  2. Oct 2019
    1. No matter how well you design a system, humans will end up surprising you with how they use it. “We make it obvious that it’s a bot, a digital assistant, at the start. But sometimes customers overlook that. And they’ll say, ‘are you a bot? What’s going on here? Transfer me through!’ And they’ll get into it quite strongly,” explains David Grilli, AGL’s chatbot product owner

      Interesting to note response to chatbots

    1. “Productive engagement requires policy development and delivery staff to understand each other and to trust each other. Sometimes, policy departments are trying to keep things very quiet, because we don’t want things to leak, but that often risks not [having] a fulsome piece of advice to give to government, so a balance needs to be struck.”

      Quote from DHS Secretary

    1. Deloitte has undoubtedly been the fastest grower in the last three years, seeing a 32% jump in revenue to $2 billion. In terms of growth, market leader PwC followed in second spot at 22% growth, with revenues up to $2.4 billion. EY and KPMG both grew their turnover by 20%.

      Growth of over 20% by all the big four

    1. new data provided by the Department of Human Services showed that almost half of all pension applications received last year were not processed within the timeframe set out in their Key Performance Measure standards

      Key Performance Measure for social security processing

    1. Fourth, even when government negotiates and writes a good contract it often does not secure the outcomes it should as a result of weak contract management. Contract managers must have the capabilities and information they need to ensure good performance.3

      Theme on case study of why outsourcing failed or worked

    2. First, government did not always engage with the market early in running procurements or establish a sufficient understanding on both sides about the service that were being outsourced. This often led to problems over the lifetime of a contract, such as disputes and cost overruns.Second, an excessive focus on the lowest price and an insufficient assessment of quality in selecting bids undermined many contracts. While outsourcing can reduce costs, government must balance this against the minimum level of quality it needs in a service. Too often, it has outsourced services in pursuit of unrealistic savings and without a realistic expectation that companies would deliver efficiencies.Third, large contracts have failed when government has transferred risks that suppliers have no control over and cannot manage, rather than those which suppliers can price and manage better than government. Government should also not think that it has outsourced risks that will revert to it if a supplier fails – as the provision of public services will always do.

      Three case study themes on why contracts failed or worked

    3. It must also understand why different outsourcing projects succeed or fail. The Institute for Government has previously showed that there are several conditions that make outsourcing more likely to succeed.2 Above all, these include: •the existence of a competitive market of high-quality suppliers•the ease of measuring the value added by the provider •the service not being so integral to the nature of government as to make outsourcing inappropriate.*

      Outsourcing conditions

  3. Sep 2019
    1. Impact of staffing cap

      The impact of staffing caps has been highlighted by numerous commentators and almost certainly plays a significant role in putting pressure on the planning workforce.

    2. Staffing cap recommendation

      That government review NDIA data to determine if there are staffing issues limiting the number of planners relative to the demand for plans. If this is the case, we argue that government should relax staffing caps.

    1. Recommendation to lift staffing cap

      The NDIA to lift the staffing cap to employ more NDIA planners and ensure NDIA planners are always used for participants with complex disabilities and/or lives. Where a LAC is the NDIA representative in a planning meeting, these LACs need to ensure they are trained and encouraged to work towards understanding individual needs and goals as opposed > to pre-empting needs based on disability type and therefore misrepresenting the actual needs of the participant.

    1. Estimated economic benefit of data linkage

      the potential value from linking Census data to administrative data sets is only beginning to be realised and holds immense potential.(In other work for the Population Health Research Network, Lateral Economics concluded that data linkage generated over $16 for every dollar invested).

    2. Cost reduction suggestion

      there may be ways to reduce costs associated with the development of Census-equivalent statistics, including relying less on the general public to answer questions every five years

    3. Economic benefit of the Census.

      Our estimates suggest the benefits of running the Census easily outweigh its costs in the order of$6 of economic value for each $1 it costs. On this reckoning, the cost of the Census would have to rise to six times its current cost –to around $3 billion every five years –before it startedto become cost ineffective