9 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2020
  2. Jun 2020
  3. May 2020
  4. Feb 2020
    1. Annual immunization against influenza (for children and young people with diabetes over the age of 6 months).Immunization against pneumococcal infection (for children and young people with diabetes who need insulin or oral hypoglycaemic drugs).

      T1DM children

      • annual flu vaccine
      • pneumoccocal vaccine
    1. Routine pneumococcal vaccination

      Routine pneumococcal vaccine for:

      Infants - PCV13 - 2m,4m,12m

      Over 65 - PPV23 - one-off

    2. Risk factors

      People at increased risk of pneumococcal disease or complications include those with:

      • Asplenia or splenic dysfunction.
      • Chronic respiratory, heart, kidney, or liver disease.
      • Diabetes requiring insulin or oral hypoglycaemic drugs.
      • Immunosuppression due to a medical condition or treatment.
      • Cochlear implants.
      • Cerebrospinal fluid leaks (including leakage following trauma or major skull surgery).
      • Occupational risks (including welders). For more details, see the section on Risk factors.
    1. For people who are allergic to egg or have had a confirmed anaphylactic reaction to egg

      Contraindications

      • Egg allergy
      • Anaphylaxis
      • Acutely unwell
      • Children who are severely immunocompromised
      • Children with respiratory symptoms
    2. Clinical risk groups in people aged 6 months and older

      Influenza vaccine for >65s and specific risk groups

      • Asplenia or splenic dysfunction.
      • Chronic respiratory, heart, kidney, or liver disease.
      • Diabetes requiring insulin or oral hypoglycaemic drugs.
      • Immunosuppression due to a medical condition or treatment.
      • Chornic neurological disease
      • Pregnant women
      • Children aged 2 to 10 years (but not aged 11 years or older) on 31 August 2019.
      • People living in long-stay residential and nursing homes or other long-stay care facilities (not including prisons, young offender's institutions, or university halls of residence).
      • Close contacts of immunocompromised people, including carers (people who expect to share living accommodation on most days over the winter).
      • All healthcare and social care workers directly involved in patient care, including students, trainees, and volunteers working with patients.