172 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. If you are wondering How is Facebook Watch party different from Facebook LIVE, then in simple words, Facebook LIVE is a new video captured in real time whereas watch party is a real-time screening of pre-recorded videos to create a shared viewing experience.

      If you are wondering How is Facebook Watch party different from Facebook LIVE, then in simple words, Facebook LIVE is a new video captured in real time whereas watch party is a real-time screening of pre-recorded videos to create a shared viewing experience.

    1. A spokeswoman for Summit said in an e-mail, “We only use information for educational purposes. There are no exceptions to this.” She added, “Facebook plays no role in the Summit Learning Program and has no access to any student data.”

      As if Facebook needed it. The fact that this statement is made sort of goes to papering over the idea that Summit itself wouldn't necessarily do something as nefarious or worse with it than Facebook might.

  2. Jul 2019
    1. What should lawmakers do? First, interrupt and outlaw surveillance capitalism’s data supplies and revenue flows. This means, at the front end, outlawing the secret theft of private experience. At the back end, we can disrupt revenues by outlawing markets that trade in human futures knowing that their imperatives are fundamentally anti-democratic. We already outlaw markets that traffic in slavery or human organs. Second, research over the past decade suggests that when “users” are informed of surveillance capitalism’s backstage operations, they want protection, and they want alternatives. We need laws and regulation designed to advantage companies that want to break with surveillance capitalism. Competitors that align themselves with the actual needs of people and the norms of a market democracy are likely to attract just about every person on Earth as their customer. Third, lawmakers will need to support new forms of collective action, just as nearly a century ago workers won legal protection for their rights to organise, to bargain collectively and to strike. Lawmakers need citizen support, and citizens need the leadership of their elected officials.

      Shoshana Zuboff's answer to surveillance capitalism

  3. Jun 2019
    1. What is Facebook Business Manager? Facebook Business Manager allows advertisers to manage all their ad accounts, multiple pages, and people working on them, be it their team, vendors, or partner agencies, all in just one place. And Yes, it is free! Business Manager is simply a one-stop shop to manage all your advertising activities and Facebook marketing, and at the same time allow multi-user access to other additional resources to work with like product catalogs and Instagram accounts.

      Facebook Business Manager allows advertisers to manage all their ad accounts, multiple pages, and people working on them, be it their team, vendors, or partner agencies, all in just one place. And Yes, it is free!

    1. The cryptocurrency, called Libra, will also have to overcome concern that Facebook does not effectively protect the private information of its users — a fundamental task for a bank or anyone handling financial transactions.
    2. The company has sky-high hopes that Libra could become the foundation for a new financial system not controlled by today’s power brokers on Wall Street or central banks.

      Facebook want another way to circumvent government? Well, let's circumvent Facebook.

    1. Social media marketing has changed the way people advertised and managed their target markets. Business houses use the different types of media platforms online to ensure maximum reach and higher conversion rates. Facebook lookalike audiences are tools that are developed using Pixels and software kits to analyze and segment out preferred users. The tool finds relevant Facebook users by matching their demographics and preferences with audiences already available on your channel/page.  

      Facebook lookalike audiences are tools that are developed using Pixels and software kits to analyze and segment out preferred users.

  4. May 2019
    1. Meta co-founder and CEO Sam Molyneux writes that “Going forward, our intent is not to profit from Meta’s data and capabilities; instead we aim to ensure they get to those who need them most, across sectors and as quickly as possible, for the benefit of the world.”

      Odd statement from a company that was just acquired by Facebook founder's CVI.

    1. The more transparency in the media industry, the more publishers at all levels will be on equal playing field with new platforms. If everyone makes the shift to Facebook Instant Articles and sees a negative return, but no one talks about it, Facebook will always have all the power.
    2. Even publishers with the most social media-savvy newsrooms can feel at a disadvantage when Facebook rolls out a new product.

      The same goes in triplicate when they pull the plug without notice too!

    1. “If Facebook is providing a consumer’s data to be used for the purposes of credit screening by the third party, Facebook would be a credit reporting agency,” Reidenberg explained. “The [FCRA] statute applies when the data ‘is used or expected to be used or collected in whole or in part for the purpose of serving as a factor in establishing the consumer’s eligibility for … credit.'” If Facebook is providing data about you and your friends that eventually ends up in a corporate credit screening operation, “It’s no different from Equifax providing the data to Chase to determine whether or not to issue a credit card to the consumer,” according to Reidenberg.
    1. Unsurprisingly living up to its reputation, Facebook refuses to comply with my GDPR Subject Access Requests in an appropriate manner.

      Facebook never has cared about privacy of individuals. This is highly interesting.

    1. The problem with Facebook goes beyond economics however, Hughes argues. The News Feed’s algorithms dictate the content that millions of people see every day, its content rules define what counts as hate speech, and there’s no democratic oversight of its processes.
    1. “On the ground in Syria,” he continued, “Assad is doing everything he can to make sure the physical evidence [of potential human-rights violations] is destroyed, and the digital evidence, too. The combination of all this—the filters, the machine-learning algorithms, and new laws—will make it harder for us to document what’s happening in closed societies.” That, he fears, is what dictators want.
    2. Google and Facebook break out the numbers in their quarterly transparency reports. YouTube pulled 33 million videos off its network in 2018—roughly 90,000 a day. Of the videos removed after automated systems flagged them, 73 percent were removed so fast that no community members ever saw them. Meanwhile, Facebook removed 15 million pieces of content it deemed “terrorist propaganda” from October 2017 to September 2018. In the third quarter of 2018, machines performed 99.5 percent of Facebook’s “terrorist content” takedowns. Just 0.5 percent of the purged material was reported by users first.Those statistics are deeply troubling to open-source investigators, who complain that the machine-learning tools are black boxes.
    3. “We were collecting, archiving, and geolocating evidence, doing all sorts of verification for the case,” Khatib recalled. “Then one day we noticed that all the videos that we had been going through, all of a sudden, all of them were gone.”It wasn’t a sophisticated hack attack by pro-Assad forces that wiped out their work. It was the ruthlessly efficient work of machine-learning algorithms deployed by social networks, particularly YouTube and Facebook.
  5. Apr 2019
    1. Facebook said on Wednesday that it expected to be fined up to $5 billion by the Federal Trade Commission for privacy violations. The penalty would be a record by the agency against a technology company and a sign that the United States was willing to punish big tech companies.

      This is where surveillance capitalism brings you.

      Sure, five billion American Dollars won't make much of a difference to Facebook, but it's notable.

    1. Per a Wednesday report in Business Insider, Facebook has now said that it automatically extracted contact lists from around 1.5 million email accounts it was given access to via this method without ever actually asking for their permission. Again, this is exactly the type of thing one would expect to see in a phishing attack.

      Facebook are worse than Nixon, when he said "I'm not a crook".

    1. When Wojcicki took over, in 2014, YouTube was a third of the way to the goal, she recalled in investor John Doerr’s 2018 book Measure What Matters.“They thought it would break the internet! But it seemed to me that such a clear and measurable objective would energize people, and I cheered them on,” Wojcicki told Doerr. “The billion hours of daily watch time gave our tech people a North Star.” By October, 2016, YouTube hit its goal.

      Obviously they took the easy route. You may need to measure what matters, but getting to that goal by any means necessary or using indefensible shortcuts is the fallacy here. They could have had that North Star, but it's the means they used by which to reach it that were wrong.

      This is another great example of tech ignoring basic ethics to get to a monetary goal. (Another good one is Marc Zuckerberg's "connecting people" mantra when what he should be is "connecting people for good" or "creating positive connections".

    1. “They are morally bankrupt pathological liars who enable genocide (Myanmar), facilitate foreign undermining of democratic institutions. “[They] allow the live streaming of suicides, rapes, and murders, continue to host and publish the mosque attack video, allow advertisers to target ‘Jew haters’ and other hateful market segments, and refuse to accept any responsibility for any content or harm. “They #dontgiveazuck” wrote Edwards.

      Well, I don't think he should have deleted his tweets.

    1. Have you ever moved away from a website because it took too much time to load? Ever chosen a faster website over a slower one? You’re definitely not alone. When it comes to the elements to a robust digital marketing campaign, we give higher priority to the design factor, ad targeting or conversion rate optimization. But there’s another angle that we should not forget and that is the website speed. Website visitors these days don’t prefer waiting for a long time for the page to load. 46% people say that waiting for a website to load on their mobile phones is what they hate the most. Not to forget that 40% will desert your website for a faster one if it doesn’t load within 3 seconds. This clearly means one thing – one has to find faster, more effective ways to deliver content. Facebook’s native publishing platform, Facebook Instant Articles aimed at solving this problem of slow page load time on the mobile web. Let’s find out about them in detail.

      Have you ever moved away from a website because it took too much time to load? Ever chosen a faster website over a slower one? You’re definitely not alone.

    1. Facebook users are being interrupted by an interstitial demanding they provide the password for the email account they gave to Facebook when signing up. “To continue using Facebook, you’ll need to confirm your email,” the message demands. “Since you signed up with [email address], you can do that automatically …”A form below the message asked for the users’ “email password.”

      So, Facebook tries to get users to give them their private and non-Facebook e-mail-account password.

      This practice is called spear phishing.

  6. Mar 2019
    1. While employees were up in arms because of Google’s “Dragonfly” censored search engine with China and its Project Maven’s drone surveillance program with DARPA, there exist very few mechanisms to stop these initiatives from taking flight without proper oversight. The tech community argues they are different than Big Pharma or Banking. Regulating them would strangle the internet.

      This is an old maxim with corporations, Google, Facebook, and Microsoft alike; if you don't break laws by simply doing what you want because of, well, greed, then you're hampering "evolution".

      Evolution of their wallets, yes.

    1. Facebook reviews are another effective strategy, that makes your business go fluent and profitable. Our discussion is all about buying Facebook reviews with quality and cheap. If you apply paid service and get a good number of reviews on your Facebook page, It makes Your business credible to the audiences.

      Facebook reviews are another effective strategy, that makes your business go fluent and profitable. Our discussion is all about buying Facebook reviews with quality and cheap. If you apply paid service and get a good number of reviews on your Facebook page, It makes Your business credible to the audiences.

  7. Feb 2019
    1. We saw the experimental development of this new “means of behavioural modification” in Facebook’s contagion experiments and the Google-incubated augmented reality game Pokémon Go.
  8. Jan 2019
    1. the calcu-lation of uses and applications that might be made of the vastly increased available means in order to devise new ends and to elimi-nate oppositions and segregations based on past competitions for scarce means. (24)

      Does this sound like Mark Zuckerberg's idealism before it devolved into a data-mining project in the service of neoliberal economics?

    1. 被修复的并不是这些互联网巨头,而是区块链本身。那些承诺将世界从资本主义的枷锁中解放出来的加密货币创业公司,现在甚至无法保证其自己员工的收益。Facebook的方法是整合区块链的碎片并紧跟潮流,从而让股东更容易接受。

      <big>评:</big><br/><br/>鲁迅先生曾说过这么一句话:「我家院子里有两棵树,一棵是枣树,另一棵也是枣树」。有趣的是,以「榨取」用户隐私商业价值起家的 Facebook,其创始人 Zuckerberg 为了避免狗仔队的骚扰,把自家房子周围的其他四所房子也给买了下来。现在,我们可以回答,what is beside the walled garden? It’s another walled garden.

    1. Do we want technology to keep giving more people a voice, or will traditional gatekeepers control what ideas can be expressed?

      Part of the unstated problem here is that Facebook has supplanted the "traditional gatekeepers" and their black box feed algorithm is now the gatekeeper which decides what people in the network either see or don't see. Things that crazy people used to decry to a non-listening crowd in the town commons are now blasted from the rooftops, spread far and wide by Facebook's algorithm, and can potentially say major elections.

      I hope they talk about this.

  9. Dec 2018
    1. hanks to a Facebook page, perhaps for the first time in history, an in-ternet user could click yes on an electronic invitation to a revolution
    1. Instagram, otra red de su propiedad. “¿Por qué debería alguien seguir creyendo en Facebook?”, fue uno de los artículos publicados. Foto: AP

      Willing to find refugee, to escape from one's own mind. The high winners. Their realities replicated in millions of minds.

    2. La crítica ha venido después de una aluvión de revelaciones que ahondan en la crisis de la empresa de Zuckerberg. Facebook compartió sus datos con decenas de compañías a las que otorgaba “un acceso especial a la información de los usuarios”. También el New York Times publicó el pasado martes una investigación que sacó a la luz las prácticas de la red social con Microsoft, Amazon, Spotify o Netflix, a las que permitía husmear entre los datos de los usuarios para que así estas ofrecieran anuncios personalizados.

      Y a cada paso que des; Publicidad. En el baño, en la sopa, en tu sexo, en la moda. Publicidad.

  10. Nov 2018
    1. While the NTK Network does not have a large audience of its own, its content is frequently picked up by popular conservative outlets, including Breitbart.

      One wonders if they're seeding it and spreading it falsely on Facebook? Why not use the problem as a feature?!

    2. Then Facebook went on the offensive. Mr. Kaplan prevailed on Ms. Sandberg to promote Kevin Martin, a former Federal Communications Commission chairman and fellow Bush administration veteran, to lead the company’s American lobbying efforts. Facebook also expanded its work with Definers.

      Why not double down on fixing the problem? I still to this day don't get the impression that they're even attempting to fix the root issues.

    3. In October 2017, Facebook also expanded its work with a Washington-based consultant, Definers Public Affairs, that had originally been hired to monitor press coverage of the company. Founded by veterans of Republican presidential politics, Definers specialized in applying political campaign tactics to corporate public relations — an approach long employed in Washington by big telecommunications firms and activist hedge fund managers, but less common in tech.
    4. Facebook’s lofty aims were emblazoned even on securities filings: “Our mission is to make the world more open and connected.”

      Why not make Facebook more open and connected? This would fix some of the problems.

      As usual, I would say that they need to have a way to put some value on the "connections" that they're creating. Not all connections are equal. Some are actively bad, particularly for a productive and positive society.

    5. “You threw us under the bus!” she yelled at Mr. Stamos, according to people who were present.

      Just imagine how all of your users feel Ms. Sandberg! And let's be honest, the fish stinks from the head.

    1. But now it was all for the best: a law of nature, a chance for the monopolists to do good for the universe. The cheerer-in-chief for the monopoly form is Peter Thiel, author of Competition Is for Losers. Labeling the competitive economy a “relic of history” and a “trap,” he proclaimed that “only one thing can allow a business to transcend the daily brute struggle for survival: monopoly profits.”

      Sounds like a guy who is winning all of the spoils.

    1. Facebook Workplace is a direct competitor to Slack; this is a thoughtful exploration of experiences using both; if I decide to include any mention of Facebook, this would be a good springboard to more research (3/5)

      Note: in this scenario both are discussed as business tools not in education but other articles I've found show clear parallels

  11. Oct 2018
    1. Facebook’s use of “ethnic affinity” as a proxy for race is a prime example. The platform’s interface does not offer users a way to self-identify according to race, but advertisers can nonetheless target people based on Facebook’s ascription of an “affinity” along racial lines. In other words, race is deployed as an externally assigned category for purposes of commercial exploitation and social control, not part of self-generated identity for reasons of personal expression. The ability to define one’s self and tell one’s own stories is central to being human and how one relates to others; platforms’ ascribing identity through data undermines both.
    2. Facebook’s use of “ethnic affinity” as a proxy for race is a prime example. The platform’s interface does not offer users a way to self-identify according to race, but advertisers can nonetheless target people based on Facebook’s ascription of an “affinity” along racial lines. In other words. race is deployed as an externally assigned category for purposes of commercial exploitation and social control, not part of self-generated identity for reasons of personal expression. The ability to define one’s self and tell one’s own stories is central to being human and how one relates to others; platforms’ ascribing identity through data undermines both.
    1. My hope is that it will somehow bring comments on Facebook back to the blog and display them as comments here.

      Sadly, Aaron Davis is right that Facebook turned off their API access for this on August 1st, so there currently aren't any services, including Brid.gy, anywhere that allow this. Even WordPress and JetPack got cut off from posting from WordPress to Facebook, much less the larger challenge of pulling responses back.

  12. Sep 2018
    1. That they can download their data, access via APIs

      Interesting concept, should you have full ownership of your data? If yes, how can we enforce this?

  13. Aug 2018
    1. At present, no more than 20 percent of its economy has been marketized, and most importantly it continues to be ruled by a self-appointed Communist party which has given no hint of wanting to devolve power.

      If Facebook were to continue to evolve at it's current rate and with it's potential power as well as political influence, I could see it attempting to work the way China does in a new political regime.

    1. M.B can’t be reduced to stereotypes, of course. But there’s also a bar to entry into this social-media network, and it’s a distinctly technophilic, first-world, Western bar.

      You can only say this because I suspect you're comparing it to platforms that are massively larger by many orders of magnitude. You can't compare it to Twitter or Facebook yet. In fact, if you were to compare it to them, then it would be to their early versions. Twitter was very technophilic for almost all of it's first three years until it crossed over into the broader conscious in early 2009.

      Your argument is somewhat akin to doing a national level political poll and only sampling a dozen people in one small town.

    1. Facebook is rating the trustworthiness of its users on a scale from zero to 1

      See also my tweet: What I coincidence! Like Facebook, I also measure people's credibility on a scale of zero to one, or what I like to think of as a scale of Pinocchio to Cassandra. It would be cool to hear what @marshallk @holden and @vgr think of this:

  14. Jul 2018
    1. Jeff Jarvis wrote over the weekend, we need to be careful what we wish for: We don’t want Facebook to become the arbiter of truth.
    1. Facebook doesn’t have a mind-control problem, it has a corruption problem. Cambridge Analytica didn’t convince decent people to become racists; they convinced racists to become voters.

      In relation to the question of mind-control verses corruption, I wonder where the difference exists. Does corruption involve some element of 'mind-control' to convince somebody that this is the answer?

    2. Facebook doesn’t have a mind-control problem, it has a corruption problem. Cambridge Analytica didn’t convince decent people to become racists; they convinced racists to become voters.
    3. Facebook isn’t a mind-control ray. It’s a tool for finding people who possess uncommon, hard-to-locate traits, whether that’s “person thinking of buying a new refrigerator,” “person with the same rare disease as you,” or “person who might participate in a genocidal pogrom,” and then pitching them on a nice side-by-side or some tiki torches, while showing them social proof of the desirability of their course of action, in the form of other people (or bots) that are doing the same thing, so they feel like they’re part of a crowd.
    1. In fact, these platforms have become inseparable from their data: we use “Facebook” to refer to both the application and the data that drives that application. The result is that nearly every Web app today tries to ask you for more and more data again and again, leading to dangling data on duplicate and inconsistent profiles we can no longer manage. And of course, this comes with significant privacy concerns.
  15. Jun 2018
    1. We believe that Facebook is also actively encouraging people to use tools like Buffer Publish for their business or organization, rather than personal use. They are continuing to support the use of Facebook Pages, rather than personal Profiles, for things like scheduling and analytics.

      Of course they're encouraging people to do this. Pushing them to the business side is where they're making all the money.

  16. Apr 2018
    1. Most previous explanations had focussed on explaining how someone’s beliefs might be altered in the moment.

      Knowing a little of what is coming in advance here, I can't help but thinking: How can this riot theory potentially be used to influence politics and/or political campaigns? It could be particularly effective to get people "riled up" just before a particular election to create a political riot of sorts and thereby influence the outcome.

      Facebook has done several social experiments with elections in showing that their friends and family voted and thereby affecting other potential voters. When done in a way that targets people of particular political beliefs to increase turn out, one is given a means of drastically influencing elections. In some sense, this is an example of this "Riot Theory".

    1. Good news for anyone who uses the Internet as a source of information: A district court in Washington, D.C. has ruled that using automated tools to access publicly available information on the open web is not a computer crime
    1. Google doesn’t use the facebook API to scrape facebook; they just scrape it.

      really?

    2. This is an extremely important case to remember. It has implications for all Fb users who want to own their past.

  17. gobo.social gobo.social
    1. Great experiment – unfortunately Facebook blocks the most interesting part.

    1. This fall, my colleagues and I released gobo.social, a customizable news aggregator. Gobo presents you with posts from your friends, but also gives you a set of sliders that govern what news you see and what’s hidden from you. Want more serious news, less humor? Move a slider. Need to hear more female voices? Adjust the gender slider, or press the “mute all men” button for a much quieter internet. Gobo currently includes half a dozen ways to tune your news feed, with more to come.

      Gobo, a proof of concept.

  18. Mar 2018
    1. At the moment, several projects in the space are working to adopt new supplementary protocols, with the intent of building better bridges between one another. The proposed development might end up looking like this:<img class="progressiveMedia-noscript js-progressiveMedia-inner" src="https://via.hypothes.is/im_/https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/1600/1*3pEK-Fwq7bNOVcnXfVdNuQ.png">Diaspora at this time has no plans for new protocols, having just significantly upgraded its own. postActiv intends to adopt support for Diaspora federation in a future release. Mastodon just released support for ActivityPub, and Pleroma , Socialhome and GNU Social are thinking of adopting it. Nextcloud is also notably getting into the federation space, and Hubzilla and Friendica will likely both support the ActivityPub protocol as extensions.

      Where we discover that Friendica (and Hubzilla) are clearly the best options for navigating The Free Network.

      It's a shame that the connectivity to Twitter and other non-free networks and services is not better highlighted. It's clearly by being compatible with the non-free networks that the Free Network will win in the end -- by allowing people to escape en masse.

    1. For the past 100 years we have been chasing visions of data with a singular passion. Many of the best minds of each new generation have devoted themselves to delivering on the inspired data science promises of their day: intelligence testing, building the computer, cracking the genetic code, creating the internet, and now this. We have in the course of a single century built an entire society, economy and culture that runs on information. Yet we have hardly begun to engineer data ethics appropriate for our extraordinary information carnival. If we do not do so soon, data will drive democracy, and we may well lose our chance to do anything about it.

      We have hardly begun to engineer data ethincs approriate for our extraordinary information carnival.

    1. "Practically and emotionally, leaving Facebook feels like you’re leaving the internet. Worse, it feels like you’re leaving the world, unplugging from friends, news, and the daily stimulus that drives your day."
    1. People come to Google looking for information they can trust, and that information often comes from the reporting of journalists and news organizations around the world.

      Heavy hit in light of the Facebook data scandal this week on top of accusations about fake news spreading.

    2. We’re now in the early stages of testing a “Propensity to Subscribe” signal based on machine learning models in DoubleClick to make it easier for publishers to recognize potential subscribers, and to present them the right offer at the right time.

      Interestingly the technology here isn't that different than the Facebook Data that Cambridge Analytica was using, the difference is that they're not using it to directly impact politics, but to drive sales. Does this mean they're more "ethical"?

    1. You could throw the pack away and deactivate your Facebook account altogether. It will get harder the longer you wait — the more photos you post there, or apps you connect to it.

      Links create value over time, and so destroying links typically destroys the value.

  19. Feb 2018
    1. “If we just reward content based on raw clicks and engagement, we might actually see content that is increasingly sensationalist, clickbaity, polarizing, and divisive,” she says. A social network that rewards only clicks, not subscriptions, is like a dating service that encourages one-night stands but not marriages.

      sexual/matrimony metaphor

    2. “Social networks enable malicious actors to operate at platform scale, because they were designed for fast information flows and virality,”

      why is virality the goal? venture capital, if you take away venture capital and virality, do you still get info disorder?

    3. Zuckerberg’s conference room (called the Aquarium) and Sandberg’s (called Only Good News)

      conference rooms named after our greatest weaknesses?

    4. Simultaneously, authority over the algorithm shifted to a team of engineers based in Seattle. Very quickly the module started to surface lies and fiction.

      LOL: responsibility transfers to engineer and lies ensue

    5. “We traced the creation of the Facebook accounts to IP addresses at the Apple store a block away from the MySpace offices in Santa Monica,”

      MySpace people used internet access at Apple stores to try to malign Facebook.

    6. If Facebook didn’t start offering a better deal to the publishing industry, Thomson and Murdoch conveyed in stark terms, Zuckerberg could expect News Corp executives to become much more public in their denunciations and much more open in their lobbying.

      worth thinking about before one refers to the "free press"

    7. whether News Feed should be modified to better deal with some of the most complex issues facing the product. Does it favor posts that make people angry? Does it favor simple or even false ideas over complex and true ones?

      complex issues are...complex...and not easily made into algorithms

    8. As often happens when outsiders meet with Facebook, people used the time to try to figure out how they could get more followers for their own pages.

      LOL: the idea that people drinking the koolaid of social could think clearly to regulate it

    9. Facebook decided, too, that it had to extend an olive branch to the entire American right wing, much of which was raging about the company’s supposed perfidy.

      to remain neutral, one often has to take sides

    10. But it’s hard to argue that this wasn’t an editorial decision. It may be one of the biggest ever made.

      a stylistic choice as a very profound editorial choice

    11. Facebook has long seemed to think it has immunity from those debates because it is just a technology company—one that has built a “platform for all ideas.”

      a warning to anyone who thinks technology is neutral

    12. When new recruits come in, they are treated to an orientation lecture by Chris Cox, the company’s chief product officer, who tells them Facebook is an entirely new communications platform for the 21st century, as the telephone was for the 20th. But if anyone inside Facebook is unconvinced by religion, there is also Section 230 of the 1996 Communications Decency Act to recommend the idea.

      when culture and legislation mix

  20. Dec 2017
    1. Starting Tuesday, any time someone uploads a photo that includes what Facebook thinks is your face, you’ll be notified even if you weren’t tagged.

      This is eerily like in the book The Circle where facial recognition is done over all photos and video on the web--including CCTV. No more secrets.

  21. Nov 2017
    1. Political and interest-based advertising should be under much stricter scrutiny than, say, the advertising of T-shirts or hair products.

      These ads should be listed for all to see, possibly along with their purchaser.

      That was I can see (and ask questions why) my neighbor is getting micro-targeted ads...and I am not.

    2. It’s very difficult, and in many cases impossible, for researchers to independently look at behavior on the platform.

      Also some stories last week about Facebook and Twitter going back and deleting content (and access to content) from the election. Researchers were unpacking this...and then all of a sudden things disappear.

      I believe the Internet is the dominant text of our generation. These discussions on Facebook, Twitter, and elsewhere are public discussions and documents (IMHO). There should be "rules" about deleting and obfuscating these texts...even by the companies themselves.

    3. filter

      Thinking that I'd like to have a slider scale to select the level CRAP you'd like to have in your feed.

      All of the way to one direction for honest, reputable, verified. Slide it the other direction for complete mayhem.

      I think we need to call in Bryan Mathers for a mockup of this.

    4. Facebook could also offer an optional filter that would keep any post (or share) of an unverified account from showing up. I’d use that filter.

      I'd love this for Twitter, Facebook, etc. Some "verification layer" that let's you know if the person went through extra steps and is "real."

      This would save the hassle of reading something ridiculous...and then having to click through to their profile and realizing that ALL of their other content is also ridiculous.

    5. countering misinformation, hate speech and propaganda — can take is to abandon the focus on emotional signaling-as-engagement.

      Ultimately, do they even want to do this? Is there any fiduciary responsibility to do this? Even news agencies (on various sides...all good people) are looking at the tons of revenue in subscriptions, ads, and views.

      My thinking is that they don't, and ultimately this will blow over. Ultimately, I think it depends on the objectives, goals, and whether or not they can engineer their way out of this.

    6. As they stand, and especially with algorithmic reinforcement, “reactions” and “likes” are like megaphones for echo chambers and news outrage.

      This is something that's been nagging at me for the last couple of weeks.

      Does it all matter? Does that tweet, share, thumbs up, like really matter at all? If you/we/I share out of tweet of support, outrage, or indifference, does it really matter on the grand scale.

      Yes, I might have some likeminded individuals value it, read it, use it, share it. But, ultimately aren't we really just shouting into the echo chambers that have been built up for us thanks to these algorithms and networks? We're preaching to the choir.

      I'd like to think that open can/will combat this...but unsure.

      I think this is a post for Hybrid Ped or elsewhere. Lemme know if this resonates with anyone and you want to write it out.

    1. Perhaps a future with great user experience in AR, VR, hands-free commerce and knowledge sharing could evoke an optimistic perspective for what these tech giants are building. But 25 years of the Web has gotten us used to foundational freedoms that we take for granted. We forget how useful it has been to remain anonymous and control what we share, or how easy it was to start an internet startup with its own independent servers operating with the same rights GOOG servers have. On the Trinet, if you are permanently banned from GOOG or FB, you would have no alternative.
    2. The internet will survive longer than the Web will. GOOG-FB-AMZN will still depend on submarine internet cables (the “Backbone”), because it is a technical success. That said, many aspects of the internet will lose their relevance, and the underlying infrastructure could be optimized only for GOOG traffic, FB traffic, and AMZN traffic. It wouldn’t conceptually be anymore a “network of networks”, but just a “network of three networks”, the Trinet, if you will.
    3. What has changed over the last 4 years is market share of traffic on the Web. It looks like nothing has changed, but GOOG and FB now have direct influence over 70%+ of internet traffic. Mobile internet traffic is now the majority of traffic worldwide and in Latin America alone, GOOG and FB services have had 60% of mobile traffic in 2015, growing to 70% by the end of 2016.
  22. Oct 2017
    1. It should also greatly increase the human oversight of ad targeting systems — specifically, oversee algorithmically generated categories (rather than basing them solely on user-inputted interests). Political and interest-based advertising should be under much stricter scrutiny than, say, the advertising of T-shirts or hair products.

      Should this be done internally to corps or should gov have a hand in the regulation?

    2. Facebook should allow users to sort their news feed chronologically by default on all platforms, rather than rely on an algorithmically sorted News Feed.

      Customization again.

    3. It would be interesting if Facebook offered a “vintage Facebook” setting that users could toggle to, without News Feed ads and “like” buttons.

      Or just customization in general.

    4. The key is for Facebook to be upfront about technical challenges, open about its mistakes and willing to answer the tough questions honestly. If it does that, it will continue to earn the public’s trust.

      Feel me.

    5. Companies would need additional levels of verification, and should have a label and scrutiny different from those of people. (Whistle-blowers and dissidents might need to use a different platform.)

      Great example of the tension between social media as liberating/oppressing. Like Twitter can be used by Black Lives and white supremacists. When, in this case, does anonymity become abused versus liberating?

    6. What if there were a “trust emoji”? Or respect-based emojis?

      Love this idea.

    7. keep us addicted to the social network.

      Or at least keep us "in the stream."

    8. At Reddit, I was able to effect positive, lasting change (at least according to this research) to content quality and interaction quality by building a diverse executive team.

      Very interesting. Need to check this study out.

    9. “two masters” dilemma,

      Useful phrase.

    10. Instead of measuring clicks and likes, what if Facebook optimized for how much value an article or video or game gave us weeks or months afterward?

      Great, but how would you measure that?

    11. Worthy, beautiful goals, but easier said than done when Facebook is also stuck delivering ever-increasing profits and making its platform serve the needs of advertisers.

      Corporate structure at odds with idealist slogans. This is essentially why I left (Rap) Genius: it became increasingly apparent that despite the company's well-intentioned, truly felt aspirations, there were only so many avenues to monetization and all would in some way compromise the stated mission.

    12. The single most important thing Facebook must do is come clean. Tell us what you know. Tell us what you know but can’t share. Tell us what you don’t know. And tell us what you don’t know that you don’t know

      Transparency.

  23. Sep 2017
    1. connected teenagers  had decreased feelings of well-being. T

      I think this is a central question of our age--does social media make us happier? Increase democracy? Smarter? And the question always changes because the technology always changes. I now wonder about SnapChat. It functions a bit differently but with the same goal of connection. Does it produce better feelings than FB? Worse? More vicitimization? Less?

  24. Aug 2017
    1. Google in my experience knows that there are ambiguities, moral doubts, around some of what they do, and at least they try to think about it. Facebook just doesn’t care. When you’re in a room with them you can tell. They’re’ – he took a moment to find the right word – ‘scuzzy’.
    2. So Facebook knows your phone ID and can add it to your Facebook ID. It puts that together with the rest of your online activity: not just every site you’ve ever visited, but every click you’ve ever made – the Facebook button tracks every Facebook user, whether they click on it or not. Since the Facebook button is pretty much ubiquitous on the net, this means that Facebook sees you, everywhere. Now, thanks to its partnerships with the old-school credit firms, Facebook knew who everybody was, where they lived, and everything they’d ever bought with plastic in a real-world offline shop.[4]​4 All this information is used for a purpose which is, in the final analysis, profoundly bathetic. It is to sell you things via online ads.The ads work on two models. In one of them, advertisers ask Facebook to target consumers from a particular demographic – our thirty-something bourbon-drinking country music fan, or our African American in Philadelphia who was lukewarm about Hillary. But Facebook also delivers ads via a process of online auctions, which happen in real time whenever you click on a website. Because every website you’ve ever visited (more or less) has planted a cookie on your web browser, when you go to a new site, there is a real-time auction, in millionths of a second, to decide what your eyeballs are worth and what ads should be served to them, based on what your interests, and income level and whatnot, are known to be. This is the reason ads have that disconcerting tendency to follow you around, so that you look at a new telly or a pair of shoes or a holiday destination, and they’re still turning up on every site you visit weeks later. This was how, by chucking talent and resources at the problem, Facebook was able to turn mobile from a potential revenue disaster to a great hot steamy geyser of profit.
    3. Note that the company’s knowledge about its users isn’t used merely to target ads but to shape the flow of news to them.
    4. What Facebook does is watch you, and then use what it knows about you and your behaviour to sell ads. I’m not sure there has ever been a more complete disconnect between what a company says it does – ‘connect’, ‘build communities’ – and the commercial reality.
    5. Particular segments of voters too can be targeted with complete precision. One instance from 2016 was an anti-Clinton ad repeating a notorious speech she made in 1996 on the subject of ‘super-predators’. The ad was sent to African-American voters in areas where the Republicans were trying, successfully as it turned out, to suppress the Democrat vote. Nobody else saw the ads.
    6. Nothing influences people more than a recommendation from a trusted friend. A trusted referral is the Holy Grail of advertising.
    7. A version of Gresham’s law is at work, in which fake news, which gets more clicks and is free to produce, drives out real news, which often tells people things they don’t want to hear, and is expensive to produce.
    8. The mission to ‘connect’ turns out to mean, in practice, connect with people who agree with you. We can’t prove just how dangerous these ‘filter bubbles’ are to our societies, but it seems clear that they are having a severe impact on our increasingly fragmented polity. Our conception of ‘we’ is becoming narrower.
    9. No human enterprise, no new technology or utility or service, has ever been adopted so widely so quickly.

      Amazing!

  25. Jun 2017
    1. You might think it’s hyperbole for Winer to say that Facebook is trying to kill the open web. But they are. I complain about Google AMP, but AMP is just a dangerous step toward a Google-owned walled garden — Facebook is designed from the ground up as an all-out attack on the open web.

  26. May 2017
    1. Inside Facebook's plan to eat another $350 billion IT market

      Three months later the group had a working prototype. Six months later, on November 1, the company announced it to the world as a real product called Voyager.

    1. How do we reassert humanity’s moral compass over these alien algorithms? We may need to develop a version of Isaac Asimov’s “Three Laws of Robotics” for algorithms.

      A proposed solution to bad effects of info algorithms.

    1. Recently, Facebook tried to introduce Beacon, a program that would broadcast particular purchases on a user's news feed. This kind of covert advertising, what Ari Melber calls "social advertising," was soundly rejected by users (22). While the messages were touted as innocent recommendations, in actuality they served up commodification and commercialism at the expense of homemaking. By analogy, consider the effect of inhabiting a house with a subclause, more or less unbeknown to you, that allows marketers to publish your purchases as endorsements.

      There is a scene in "The Social Network" when Eduardo and Mark are debating whether or not the site should start gaining revenue... would pair nicely here if I could find it...

  27. Apr 2017
    1. The digital social networks that have quickly become ubiquitous have made visiblemany of the patterns underlying existing academic personal and professional relationships,and the ways in which reputation and reliability circulate in these structures. Social andintellectual networks have long constituted the professional contexts of scholars, but digi-tal networks representing some subset of those contexts have exposed more of what takesplace at the margins of those networks.

      Digital Social Networks, particularly Facebook and Twitter.

      Makes an interesting point about homogenisation in Facebook and Twitter (i.e. people are a binary of friend or not friend, categories that collapse all different categories.

      Interestingly, both Facebook and Twitter have taken steps to address this recently.

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. Marketers would prefer to have their own predictive marketing platforms, helping them collect and activate their own proprietary data. Enterprise technology companies want that future as well. They want to be the ones to sell and provision those tech platforms, integrating and packaging them with all of the other systems they sell into the enterprise, from CRM to call center management to finance and sales force automation. Quite naturally, they worry that it will be easier for Google and Facebook to add their own CRM and related systems than it will be for them to replicate Google and Facebook’s digital marketing system.Agencies? They just want to keep themselves in the middle. Whether as consultants, media brokers, system integrators or owners of syndicated data, agencies just want to stay relevant and find ways to reverse their declining margins.

      That is most certainly their wishlist. But it overlooks the reason why Google and Facebook get all the ad dollars in the first place: they have all the users & their data. That's why most advertisers will have to play by their rules as the chances to succeed with their own offerings aren't great.

      Telcos/ISPs meanwhile, particularly Verizon, are to watch indeed (The new FCC rules play right into their hands as well). Since they own many users & their data, they are a force to be reckoned with. But: ISPs aren't global players and regulated differently in each country.

  28. Mar 2017
    1. Meta, with the stated intent of making the “AI-powered research search engine…free to all in a few months after enhancing the product.”

      Interesting how they see this fitting in with their mission.

  29. Feb 2017
    1. Facebook has built its neural net so it will work on the phone itself.

      Now that's cool!

    2. “Facebook today cannot exist without AI. Every time you use Facebook or Instagram or Messenger, you may not realize it, but your experiences are being powered by AI.”

      Need to learn more about this.

  30. Dec 2016
    1. The ubiquitous social network not only allows advertisers to target users by their interests or background, it also gives advertisers the ability to exclude specific groups it calls “Ethnic Affinities.”

      why aren't we seeing more about this in the news?? How is this not ILLEGAL???

  31. Nov 2016
  32. Oct 2016