218 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. To ascertain whether this decrease in confidence was as a result of the Cummings events (a Cummings effect), we carried out analyses using two types of comparisons. First, we compared the responses for people living in England to those of people living in the devolved nations of Scotland and Wales who were asked to rate their confidence in their own devolved governments. There was no evidence of a similar large decrease in confidence in the governments of the devolved nations either descriptively (appendix p 1–3) or statistically

      Trust in government

  2. Oct 2020
    1. When I received Chris’s comment, my first response was that I should delete my post or at least the incorrect part of it. It’s embarrassing to have your incorrect understandings available for public view. But I decided to leave the post as is but put in a disclaimer so that others would not be misled by my misunderstandings. This experience reminded me that learning makes us vulnerable. Admitting that you don’t know something is hard and being corrected is even harder. Chris was incredibly gentle in his correction. It makes me think about how I respond to my students’ work. Am I as gentle with their work as Chris was to mine? Could I be more gentle? How often have I graded my students’ work and only focused on what they did wrong? Or forgotten that feeling of vulnerability when you don’t know something, when you put your work out for others to judge? This experience has also reminded me that it’s important that we as teachers regularly put ourselves into situations in which we authentically grapple with not knowing something. We should regularly share our less than fully formed understandings with others for feedback. It helps us remember that even confident learners can struggle with being vulnerable. And we need to keep in mind that many of our students are not confident learners.

      I'm reminded here of the broad idea that many bloggers write about sooner or later of their website being a "thought space" or place to contemplate out in the open. More often than not, even if they don't have an audience to interact with, their writings become a way of thinking out loud, clarifying things for themselves, self-evolving, or putting themselves out there for potential public reactions (good, bad, or indifferent).

      While writing things out loud to no audience can be helpful and useful on an individual level, it's often even more helpful to have some sort of productive and constructive feedback. While a handful of likes or positive seeming responses can be useful, I always prefer the ones that make me think more broadly, deeply, or force me to consider other pieces I hadn't envisioned before. To me this is the real value of these open and often very public thought spaces.

      For those interested in the general idea, I've been bookmarking/tagging things around the idea of thought spaces I've read on my own website. Hopefully this collection helps others better understand the spectrum of these ideas for themselves.

      With respect to the vulnerability piece, I'm reminded of an episode of <cite>The Human Current</cite> I listened to a few weeks back. There was an excellent section that touched on building up trust with students or even a class when it comes to providing feedback and criticism. Having a bank of trust makes it easier to give feedback as well as to receive it. Here's a link to the audio portion and a copy of the relevant text.

  3. solidproject.org solidproject.org
    1. The last login you'll ever need Solid provides for the first time a single global logon system, so that when you log into any web site, instead of having to log in with the usual 'f' and 'g', etc, blue buttons, and then be tracked by Facebook, Google, or some other large social network, instead you can log in with any Solid provider you trust, and that won't track you.
  4. Sep 2020
  5. Aug 2020
    1. The straightforward solution to integrate WPML with third party translation services was to do it via dedicated plugins. A separate plugin for each company offering translation services could do the trick. However, this approach had a few drawbacks. For example, WPML developers would need to update and test all these plugins whenever the WPML core plugins received an update, and vice versa; when the API used by the external service changed, you needed to incorporate the change to WPML and test it as well.
  6. Jul 2020
    1. "that text has been removed from the official version on the Apache site." This itself is also not good. If you post "official" records but then quietly edit them over time, I have no choice but to assume bad faith in all the records I'm shown by you. Why should I believe anything Apache board members claim was "minuted" but which in fact it turns out they might have just edited into their records days, weeks or years later? One of the things I particularly watch for in modern news media (where no physical artefact captures whatever "mistakes" are published as once happened with newspapers) is whether when they inevitably correct a mistake they _acknowledge_ that or they instead just silently change things.
    1. If you have worked with emails before, the idea of placing a script into an email may set off alarm bells in your head! Rest assured, email providers who support AMP emails enforce fierce security checks that only allow vetted AMP scripts to run in their clients. This enables dynamic and interactive features to run directly in the recipients mailboxes with no security vulnerabilities! Read more about the required markup for AMP Emails here.
  7. Jun 2020
    1. Plenty of journalists, attorneys, and activists are equally if not more threatened by so-called evil maid attacks, in which a housekeeper or other stranger has the ability to tamper with firmware during brief physical access to a computer.
    1. but it launched with a plethora of issues that resulted in users rejecting it early on. Edge has since struggled to gain traction, thanks to its continued instability and lack of mindshare, from users and web developers.
  8. May 2020
    1. Free data-driven attribution model Use Google’s advanced machine learning to more accurately distribute credit to all ad clicks that led to a conversion

      In other words, "just trust us" to magically figure it all out.

      I'd trust you more if you explained more about how do it. Maybe if I clicked "Learn more"?

    1. Companies that show their customers that they take privacy seriously will earn their trust and loyalty.
    1. You know the type of testimonials that sound like they’re written by a marketer? The sugar-coated words that tell you how wonderful, amazing, and super-perfect a service or product is?Do you think anyone believes these fantastic testimonials? Well?
    1. The "'strict-dynamic'" source expression aims to make Content Security Policy simpler to deploy for existing applications who have a high degree of confidence in the scripts they load directly, but low confidence in their ability to provide a reasonable list of resources to load up front.
    1. Reputational damage Failure to comply with your legal obligations may lead to users negatively perceiving your business as either incompetent or malicious. This can lead to significant and lasting damage to public trust and the reputation of your organization.
    1. I know, you don't trust Mozilla but do you also not trust the developer? I absolutely do! That is the whole point of this discussion. Mozilla doesn't trust S3.Translator or jeremiahlee but I do. They blocked page-translator for pedantic reasons. Which is why I want the option to override their decision to specifically install few extensions that I'm okay with.
    1. More Trust Your customers, investors, partners, and employees are more likely to use and refer you if they feel they can trust you with their data.
  9. Apr 2020