118 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jul 2021
  3. Jun 2021
    1. More points were awarded to candidates with master’s degrees and more years of experience in similar fields. While this approach seemed to provide a neutral method for evaluating candidates based on qualifications, it soon became apparent that the process, with its reliance on education and experience to the exclusion of other important qualities, was deeply flawed and created barriers to hiring talented, diverse candidates

      Historical inequity is fueled by historical practices. "The way we've always done it" can feel perfectly innocuous while at the same time actually be massively harmful. We know things aren't right, inquiry into what is wrong is our path to a more just world.

  4. May 2021
    1. Right now, fewer than half a dozen tech firms concentrate huge resources on a small number of global post-graduate AI programmes around the world. They directly and indirectly influence the training and content of those programmes, especially through access to data-sets. Compliance of senior academics is easy to gain, however they individually rationalise it.

      The dominant culture being in a position of power and wealth makes it far easier to direct the future to ensure that the dominate culture stays in power and wealth.

      How does one "break this wheel" of power?

    1. She reminded us of the challenging but extremely important truth that there are some things as instructors and even administrators that are absolutely within our control when it comes to improving equity

      I feel like many of us can relate to this! Equity is uncomfortable, it can be silencing. This reminds me of some Brene Brown (https://debbiedonsky.com/embracing-discomfort-in-equity-work-lessons-from-brene-brown-on-shame-triggers-from-an-anti-oppression-lens/) writings on diving into equitable work. Anti-oppression work requires people to feel deeply and sometimes uncomfortable - as long as they are learning from that discomfort.

    2. We need to first understand how systems of power and oppression influence how students experience college, engage with the learning process, and build knowledge before we can understand how to better assess their learning.

      Power and oppression exist in our interactions with students everyday in our instructor/student relationship. This is one of the many reasons I try to be aware and reflection on my privilege everyday in lessons, marking and conversations. Reflection on power and oppression is ongoing and we need to be mindful of this in our leadership positions.

  5. Apr 2021
    1. Darius Kazemi randomly tweets out pages from books in the Internet Archive as a means of creating discovery and serendipity.

      Library Futures, Jennie Rose Halperin @Library_futures @little_wow

      Idea of artificial scarcity being imposed on digital objects is a damaging thing for society.

      Ideas to explore:

      Libraries as a free resource could be reframed as a human right within a community.

      Librarians as local community tummelers around information.

      Joanne McNeill

  6. Feb 2021
    1. Between mass evictions, unemployment numbers soaring, unemployment benefits ending, there's a lot of people lucky to have any place to sleep. They're certainly not worrying about new clothes, or matching curtains, they're just trying to find any job and find any place to sleep, take care of their children, take care of their own mental health, etc. According to the social contract, they haven't earned the right to self-expression if they haven't even earned the right to a stable place to live.
    1. Wiley  

      Similar to CUP and IOP, Sage, and Springer Nature, many UK institutions have signed a contract to fund Wiley's publishing activities for four more years as a result of Plan S, regardless of how many authors accepted manuscripts (AAM) are openly available in repositories. This fact undermines the arguments made above by the STM Association about the rights retention strategy (RRS) undermining financial sustainability.

      Furthermore, the financial credit cap for the Wiley deal is operationally low, resulting in additional expenditure for institutions at the end of the calendar year when open access support funds are running low. This additional cost is not sustainable for many institutions and unintentionally creates inequitable access to no-additional-cost publishing.

    2. work against the shared objective of a more open and equitable scholarly ecosystem

      Again, it is not at all clear what is meant by this statement. Equity in academia is an incredibly important goal. This statement currently reads like unsubstantiated rhetoric. Libraries, Institutions and funders have found that the unintended consequences of deficient deals with publishers supported by their funds can include inequitable access to no-additional-cost publishing. However, the intention of the Rights Retention Strategy (RRS) is to arm all authors with detailed knowledge of their rights to ensure they have the same minimum opportunity to widely disseminate their work. Furthermore, by providing a version of an output with a CC BY license there is greater equity around accessing the research and therefore greater opportunity to build on it for public benefit, making a more equitable environment for all. The version of record (VoR) remains important in this scenario, so more equitable access should not undermine the sustainability of journals and platforms which are valued.

    1. By focusing on the condition of the looking glass, Joyce suggests the artist does not start his work with a clean slate. Rather there is considerable baggage he or she must overcome. This baggage might include colonial conditions or biased assumptions. Form and context influence content.

      This seems a bit analogous to Peggy McIntosh's Backpack of White Privilege I was looking at yesterday.

      cf. White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack' and 'Some Notes for Facilitators' | National SEED Project

  7. Jan 2021
    1. Let’s say you have a group of people in a room and every one of those people has the physical ability to see. The room is dark. You want to turn on the light so they can see. You turn on a light. Here’s what equity work is like. Some eyes will hurt when you turn the light on, and they will need to be coached or trained to adapt. Some will blink and adjust quickly. Some have been waiting anxiously for light. And some eyes will stay closed and never open and then will write you emails about how angry they are that you turned a light on.

      Great analogy for institutional DEI work AND could be helpful for people needing to conceptualize Equity.

  8. Oct 2020
    1. Doctoral programs are often highly unstructured learning and training environments, where individual autonomy and freedom are highly valued. Decisions as to what counts as a good idea, a worthwhile project, or adequate progress are often left to the discretion of professors, and criteria for success can be opaque for students. This is even more so for those who are not already “in the know.”
    1. Horwitz argued a fairly radical point, which I think never received wide enough recognition due to the subject matter and his extremely difficult (dense and dry) style.  He said, “I seek to show that one of the crucial choices made during the antebellum period was to promote economic growth primarily through the legal, not the tax, system, a choice which had major consequences for the distribution of wealth and power in American society”

      I'll have to add this book to my to read stack.

    2. So the costs were socialized (in economic terms, externalized) at the same time the benefits were privatized in the form of corporate profits.

      socialize costs, privatize profits

    1. If private-equity firms cannot be socially responsible stewards of capital, then Congress will need to act. One possible reform would involve fully taxing the advisory and other fees that private-equity investors extract from the companies they own. Another potential reform would impose restrictions on dividends paid out in the two years following a buyout. Since the current system allows private-equity firms to reap much of the positive gains from successful acquisitions, they could also be required to bear some of the liability for a company’s debt when the buyout ends in bankruptcy.
  9. Sep 2020
    1. make on-street parking expensive (to reflect its real costs) and to make transit cheap or free. The way we price transit, and don’t price private car storage in the public realm, is evidence of “Asphalt Socialism“–subsidies for cars and driving, and high prices and penalties for those who take transit.

      Socialism for the oligarchs, the pointy end of capitalism for everyone else.

    2. the only places where transit really works well in the United States are in the areas where cities charge for parking.  When street parking is free, people own cars and drive, depriving transit systems of customers and revenue, and skewing the transit ridership to the dispossessed and powerless.

      Though NYC has probably the most comprehensive transit capabilities in the US, and it somehow fails to charge for parking permits. Surprisingly, SF appears to be the "big winner" here, $12/month for a parking permit and $81/month for a Muni pass. (However, in these pandemic times, I wonder how much buying monthly passes has decreased. And for a compact city, so much SF stuff still assumes you have a car.)

      Also of note: huge swaths of SF are SFH yet still have (one-car) garages so you don't have to park your (first) car on the street. Compare how many cars per household in SF, in the Bay Area, and contrast with NYC.

    3. on most streets, in most cities — including, bizarrely New York City — street parking is completely unpriced almost everywhere.  In effect, the prices shown for parking in Goodman’s sample overstate what city’s actually charge for parking: it’s mostly zero.

      $70 for a monthly transit pass vs. $2.25 for a monthly parking permit. I wonder what the price for a monthly parking permit averages out to among the cities that DO charge.

  10. Aug 2020
  11. Jul 2020
  12. Jun 2020
    1. We need to remind ourselves that treating everyone the same way as an attempt to be fair does not achieve equity for all.

      This relates to conversations happening in schools that use outcomes or standards-based learning. This pandemic has exposed the ways in which these standards fail to be equitable, even in mastery-based schools where teachers are designing choices that don't exist on a wide-enough spectrum.

  13. May 2020
    1. Don’t go to code academy, go to design academy. Be advocates of the user & consumer. It’s not about learning how to code, it’s about translating real-world needs to technological specifications in just ways that give end users agency and equity in design, development and delivery. Be a champion of user-centric design. Learn how to steward data and offer your help.

      The importance of learning to design, and interpreting/translating real-world needs.

    1. The idea behind ACE is that we elevate three characteristics that are clear, context sensitive, values driven and mission aligned, and we use them to plan assignment-, course- and institution-level responses to COVID-19 in the areas of our university that are connected to teaching and learning.

      You know I love a good framework, and the ACE framework from Robin DeRosa is aces! Adaptability: create flexibility for learners (and everyone). Connection: connect activities beyond the classroom. Equity: include everyone.

    1. If your company does offer you more equity, make sure you ask whether the 409A (or fair market value) of the company is being updated. With revised forecasts given the COVID-19 situation, it may be possible for your company to issue your stock at a lower strike price if the company revalues its 409A.

      Fair market value aka 409A

  14. Apr 2020
  15. Mar 2020
    1. Don’t go to code academy, go to design academy. Be advocates of the user & consumer. It’s not about learning how to code, it’s about translating real-world needs to technological specifications in just ways that give end users agency and equity in design, development and delivery. Be a champion of user-centric design. Learn how to steward data and offer your help.
  16. Dec 2019
    1. There is created in the State treasury a special fund, which shall be held separate and apart from all other State moneys, to be known as the Cannabis Business Development Fund. The Cannabis Business Development Fund shall be exclusively used for the following purposes:        (1) to provide low-interest rate loans to Qualified      Social Equity Applicants to pay for ordinary and necessary expenses to start and operate a cannabis business establishment permitted by this Act;        (2) to provide grants to Qualified Social Equity     Applicants to pay for ordinary and necessary expenses to start and operate a cannabis business establishment permitted by this Act;        (3) to compensate the Department of Commerce and     Economic Opportunity for any costs related to the provision of low-interest loans and grants to Qualified Social Equity Applicants;         (4) to pay for outreach that may be provided or     targeted to attract and support Social Equity Applicants and Qualified Social Equity Applicants;        (5) (blank);         (6) to conduct any study or research concerning the     participation of minorities, women, veterans, or people with disabilities in the cannabis industry, including, without limitation, barriers to such individuals entering the industry as equity owners of cannabis business establishments;        (7) (blank); and        (8) to assist with job training and technical     assistance for residents in Disproportionately Impacted Areas.

      The Cannabis Business Development Fund is a unique aspect of Illinois' marijuana law establishing a fund to be exclusively used for providing low interest loans and grants for qualified social equity applicants designed to help them start and operate a business.

      Funds will also go towards advertisement to attract applicants, conduct research on participation numbers and assistance with job training.

      The fund will hold money collected from early approval licenses issued before January 2021 and from license transfers from qualified social equity applicants.

      An additional $12 million dollars is in the fund from medicinal pilot program.

      The funds can not be transferred from the fund, according to the law.

    2. "Social Equity Applicant" means an applicant that is an Illinois resident that meets one of the following criteria:        (1) an applicant with at least 51% ownership and     control by one or more individuals who have resided for at least 5 of the preceding 10 years in a Disproportionately Impacted Area;         (2) an applicant with at least 51% ownership and     control by one or more individuals who:             (i) have been arrested for, convicted of, or         adjudicated delinquent for any offense that is eligible for expungement under this Act; or             (ii) is a member of an impacted family;        (3) for applicants with a minimum of 10 full-time     employees, an applicant with at least 51% of current employees who:            (i) currently reside in a Disproportionately         Impacted Area; or            (ii) have been arrested for, convicted of, or         adjudicated delinquent for any offense that is eligible for expungement under this Act or member of an impacted family.

      Applicants for social equity measures must be majority owners or employ at least 10 full-time employs that qualify. Qualifications include living in an area that was over policed during the war on drugs. Family members of those incarcerated for a marijuana offense are also eligible, along with the individual.

    3. Sec. 7-30. Reporting. By January 1, 2021, and on January 1 of every year thereafter, or upon request by the Illinois Cannabis Regulation Oversight Officer, each cannabis business establishment licensed under this Act shall report to the Illinois Cannabis Regulation Oversight Officer, on a form to be provided by the Illinois Cannabis Regulation Oversight Officer, information that will allow it to assess the extent of diversity in the medical and adult use cannabis industry and methods for reducing or eliminating any identified barriers to entry, including access to capital. The information to be collected shall be designed to identify the following:        (1) the number and percentage of licenses provided to     Social Equity Applicants and to businesses owned by minorities, women, veterans, and people with disabilities;        (2) the total number and percentage of employees in     the cannabis industry who meet the criteria in (3)(i) or (3)(ii) in the definition of Social Equity Applicant or who are minorities, women, veterans, or people with disabilities;         (3) the total number and percentage of contractors     and subcontractors in the cannabis industry that meet the definition of a Social Equity Applicant or who are owned by minorities, women, veterans, or people with disabilities, if known to the cannabis business establishment; and        (4) recommendations on reducing or eliminating any     identified barriers to entry, including access to capital, in the cannabis industry.

      Each year, the Illinois Cannabis Regulation Oversight Officer, currently former State Sen. Toi Hutchinson, shall receive a report from each business allowing the office to assess diversity in the recreational and medicinal industry.

    4.  Sec. 7-25. Transfer of license awarded to Qualified Social Equity Applicant.     (a) In the event a Qualified Social Equity Applicant seeks to transfer, sell, or grant a cannabis business establishment license within 5 years after it was issued to a person or entity that does not qualify as a Social Equity Applicant, the transfer agreement shall require the new license holder to pay the Cannabis Business Development Fund an amount equal to:         (1) any fees that were waived by any State agency     based on the applicant's status as a Social Equity Applicant, if applicable;        (2) any outstanding amount owed by the Qualified     Social Equity Applicant for a loan through the Cannabis Business Development Fund, if applicable; and        (3) the full amount of any grants that the Qualified     Social Equity Applicant received from the Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, if applicable.     (b) Transfers of cannabis business establishment licenses awarded to a Social Equity Applicant are subject to all other provisions of this Act, the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Program Act, and rules regarding transfers. (Source: P.A. 101-27, eff. 6-25-19; 101-593, eff. 12-4-19.)

      All fees waived for qualified social equity applicants must be paid back before the license can be transferred to a new license holder. That money would go towards the Cannabis Business Development Fund.

    1. In international collaborations, an agreement may be imposed on local researchers with no possibility of negotiating favourable terms on confidentiality, intellectual property rights, return of results and benefit sharing.

      Clear example of equity being neglected

  17. Aug 2019
  18. Jul 2019
    1. NGSS is a more deliberate coming together of educational members who were given the task to make equity and diversity issues prominent in framing the standards

      big step forward, diversity exists! This view shows a step up (backwards/deeper?) of a level in ones awareness-system. Public acknowledgement is a first step...

    2. not as an add-on but as a transformative approach to teaching and learning (Mensah, 2010)

      Yes! Elect her. and may I add to the end of that quote: "... and to the teaching profession."

    3. It is critical to understand that within systems, there is no isolation from the context, though we often view context as the invisible elephant in the room. When context is not addressed explicitly, equity issues are overlooked, and conversations about diversity in the science curriculum become only necessary for the poor, or students of color, or bilingual students. Issues of equity and context must be integrated in a wider systemic approach for the implementation of the NGSS to be deemed useful. We have to allow for boundary crossing and interdisciplinary connections into domains that make context and students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds, girls, students of cultural and linguistic diversity, and students in urban, suburban, and rural areas want to engage in science and see themselves in science. We believe that a culturally responsive approach to the implementation of the NGSS will achieve this goal.

      It would be amazing to re-conceptualize the problem/s identified here using Popper's/Bereiter's 3-world ontology, specifically the affordances provided by World-3. W3 is 'inhabited by' abstract knowledge objects (aka cultural artifacts) created, worked-on, ignored, fought-over and rejected...or transformed/improved. The standards conceptualized like this and then engaging communities to develop relationships with these objects, apply and 'improve' them in their own worlds, as innovators, as professionals... This is a way to frame addressing the problem of 'implementation' of standards because, "...within systems, there is no isolation from the context..." This idea/description might need further development.

    4. How will all educators and society have a deliberate coming together to envision equity as a guiding framework for the implementation of NGSS?

      question interrogates problem of... wow, hard for me to encapsulate in a sentence. How about: Us teachers and other stakeholders need to engage in dialogue/action around equity and NGSS in our own local connections yet be aware of and engage with other local dialogues and furthermore transform/be-transformed-by the emerging, higher level discourse. np

    5. Equity and diversity have not been a dominant focus of previous national reform initiatives in science education (Rodriguez, 1997)

      color blind...

  19. Feb 2019
    1. knowledge commons

      The idea of a "knowledge commons" was referenced in the book, "Campesino a Campesino: Voices from Latin America’s Farmer to Farmer Movement for Sustainable Agriculture" by Eric Holt-Giménez in the context of agroecological knowledge inherent in agrarian communities in Latin America.

  20. Jan 2019
    1. The plan alone is groundbreaking, having been directly created by current Section 8 residents in partnership with Piedmont Housing Alliance

      Jordy Yager works for both the Daily Progress and cvilletomorrow

    1. Design Justice: towards an intersectional feminist framework for design theory and practice

      Design is key to our collective liberation, but most design processes today reproduce inequalities structured by what Black feminist scholars call the matrix of domination. Intersecting inequalities are manifest at all levels of the design process. This paper builds upon the Design Justice Principles, developed by an emerging network of designers and community organizers, to propose a working definition of design justice: Design justice is a field of theory and practice that is concerned with how the design of objects and systems influences the distribution of risks, harms, and benefits among various groups of people. Design justice focuses on the ways that design reproduces, is reproduced by, and/or challenges the matrix of domination (white supremacy, heteropatriarchy, capitalism, and settler colonialism). Design justice is also a growing social movement that aims to ensure a more equitable distribution of design’s benefits and burdens; fair and meaningful participation in design decisions; and recognition of community based design traditions, knowledge, and practices.

    1. A Social Justice Framework for Understanding Open Educational Resources and Practices in the Global South

      Abstract: At the heart of the open educational resources (OER) movement is the intention to provide affordable access to culturally relevant education to all. This imperative could be described as a desire to provide education in a manner consistent with social justice which, according to Fraser (2005), is understood as “parity of participation”. Drawing on her concept of social justice, we suggest a slight modification of Fraser’s framework for critically analysing ways in which the adoption and impact of OER and their undergirding open educational practices (OEP) might be considered socially just. We then provide illustrative examples from the cross-regional Research on Open Educational Resources for Development (ROER4D) project (2014-2017) to show how this framework can assist in determining in what ways, if at all, the adoption of OER and enactment of OEP have responded to economic inequalities, cultural inequities and political exclusions in education. Furthermore, we employ Fraser’s (2005) concepts to identify whether these social changes are either “affirmative” (i.e., ameliorative) or “transformative” in their economic, cultural and political effects in the Global South education context.

  21. Nov 2018
    1. Paasche-Orlow et al. (18) suggested 3 principles to ameliorate health literacy disparities. The first is to promote productive interactions. Clinicians need to develop better communication abilities and take appropriate measures to ensure adequate comprehension of health information. Educating youth and establishing health literacy standards in the educational system can help improve existing and future health literacy rates. Incorporating health literacy classes as a component of training for health professionals and in studies of preventive services can increase awareness among providers, facilitating better communication and quality of care (19). Additionally, transmitting complex ideas can be aided with the use of technology platforms. Yin et al. (25) investigated the plausibility of a pictogram-based intervention program to reduce medication administration errors. The authors found that when the intervention was used as part of medication counseling, there was a decrease in medication dosage errors compared with standard medication counseling.The second principle is concerned with addressing the organization of health care. Paasche-Orlow et al. advocated patient-centered care, streamlined access to health care, and incentives to promote collaboration to address the needs of the health illiterate population. The U.S. government created and enacted several major policies that address this principle to diminish the adverse effects of poor health literacy. The first is the Affordable Care Act, which stipulates that health plans and insurers must provide understandable and clear health information regarding coverage and benefits (11). Because most Americans receiving coverage through the new legislative act have limited health literacy, standardized information about health care would greatly assist these Americans in making better-informed health decisions (15). Another policy is the National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy (22). This is the first plan of its kind to create health literacy goals for the entire country. It intends to provide all Americans with access to accurate health information, deliver patient-focused services, and support learning and skills that improve health. All of these acts and policies have the potential to improve 3 keys to health care: access, quality, and cost.The third principle from the study by Paasche-Orlaw et al. involves establishing an objective and sincere voice for better delivery of health information to the community. Individuals may have appropriate health literacy levels, but other personal or environmental factors can contribute to a lower understanding of vital health information. Ito (9) analyzed Vietnamese refugees who tested positive for inactive tuberculosis and their response to prophylactic tuberculosis treatment. Ito found that the immigrants were more hesitant to complete the medication regimen because the side effects were too “hot.” Instead, the immigrants preferred Asian herbal medications as they were considered “cooling.” Von Goeler et al. (23) investigated diabetes self-management among Puerto Rican adults with type 2 diabetes and found that the participants regularly self-monitored their blood glucose levels. However, they did not use that information to control their diabetes properly because of financial and social barriers such as competing family concerns. Situations such as these call for a voice, a cultural broker, who understands the environmental obstacles to comprehending and using health information fully.

      Ameliorate health literacy disparities

  22. Oct 2018
    1. OER is an equity strategy for higher education: providing all students with access to course materials on the first day of class serves to level the academic playing field in course settings

      OER and equity

  23. Sep 2018
  24. Aug 2018
    1. This could be useful when talking with someone who does not recognize the importance of identifying and serving gifted students.

  25. Jul 2018
  26. Jun 2018
    1. One of the things that we’re doing is we really want to change the city charter to include privacy provisions in New York City.
    2. How do you think creatively and find the right language to illustrate to people that their online identity is just as valuable and just as rich as their tangible identity? How do you instill a sense of urgency in them?
  27. Apr 2018
    1. Who is Jordan Peterson, favorite figure of the alt-right

      Except alt-right do not like JP. Lying news outlets have no dignity or integrity. That is why no one watches them on youtube. Old media is on its way out. Truth is the future.

    1. Louis C.K.’s message is clear — white men have nothing to complain about.

      Not only Renee Graham is factually incorrect, she does not understand comedy. What a sad person.

  28. Feb 2018
    1. hould be assessed in the global stocktaking process of the UNFCCC

      Something to ask for in our work? Something for the CSO equity review report?

  29. Jan 2018
    1. Or are they merely symbols? My night students’ lives overran with death—from gunshots and overdoses and chronic disease and battery. They were indeed haunted. My day stu-dents, many of them well-heeled and all of them well-insured, were still mostly too young to understand what it means to carry the past around within you.

      The risk factors her night students endure are assets that help them make meaning of the text better than her more privileged day students. Asset focused teaching.

  30. Dec 2017
    1. In global terms, digital inequalities continue to be well-documented and, in many instances, divides across lines of geography, gender, age, physical abilities, socio-economic status, language, and educational attainment are growing.

      The digital divide, internationally.

  31. Oct 2017
  32. Sep 2017
  33. Jul 2017
  34. Jun 2017