131 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Facebook’s use of “ethnic affinity” as a proxy for race is a prime example. The platform’s interface does not offer users a way to self-identify according to race, but advertisers can nonetheless target people based on Facebook’s ascription of an “affinity” along racial lines. In other words, race is deployed as an externally assigned category for purposes of commercial exploitation and social control, not part of self-generated identity for reasons of personal expression. The ability to define one’s self and tell one’s own stories is central to being human and how one relates to others; platforms’ ascribing identity through data undermines both.
    2. Facebook’s use of “ethnic affinity” as a proxy for race is a prime example. The platform’s interface does not offer users a way to self-identify according to race, but advertisers can nonetheless target people based on Facebook’s ascription of an “affinity” along racial lines. In other words. race is deployed as an externally assigned category for purposes of commercial exploitation and social control, not part of self-generated identity for reasons of personal expression. The ability to define one’s self and tell one’s own stories is central to being human and how one relates to others; platforms’ ascribing identity through data undermines both.
  2. Oct 2018
    1. My hope is that it will somehow bring comments on Facebook back to the blog and display them as comments here.

      Sadly, Aaron Davis is right that Facebook turned off their API access for this on August 1st, so there currently aren't any services, including Brid.gy, anywhere that allow this. Even WordPress and JetPack got cut off from posting from WordPress to Facebook, much less the larger challenge of pulling responses back.

  3. Sep 2018
    1. That they can download their data, access via APIs

      Interesting concept, should you have full ownership of your data? If yes, how can we enforce this?

  4. Aug 2018
    1. At present, no more than 20 percent of its economy has been marketized, and most importantly it continues to be ruled by a self-appointed Communist party which has given no hint of wanting to devolve power.

      If Facebook were to continue to evolve at it's current rate and with it's potential power as well as political influence, I could see it attempting to work the way China does in a new political regime.

    1. M.B can’t be reduced to stereotypes, of course. But there’s also a bar to entry into this social-media network, and it’s a distinctly technophilic, first-world, Western bar.

      You can only say this because I suspect you're comparing it to platforms that are massively larger by many orders of magnitude. You can't compare it to Twitter or Facebook yet. In fact, if you were to compare it to them, then it would be to their early versions. Twitter was very technophilic for almost all of it's first three years until it crossed over into the broader conscious in early 2009.

      Your argument is somewhat akin to doing a national level political poll and only sampling a dozen people in one small town.

    1. Facebook is rating the trustworthiness of its users on a scale from zero to 1

      See also my tweet: What I coincidence! Like Facebook, I also measure people's credibility on a scale of zero to one, or what I like to think of as a scale of Pinocchio to Cassandra. It would be cool to hear what @marshallk @holden and @vgr think of this:

  5. Jul 2018
    1. Jeff Jarvis wrote over the weekend, we need to be careful what we wish for: We don’t want Facebook to become the arbiter of truth.
    1. Facebook doesn’t have a mind-control problem, it has a corruption problem. Cambridge Analytica didn’t convince decent people to become racists; they convinced racists to become voters.

      In relation to the question of mind-control verses corruption, I wonder where the difference exists. Does corruption involve some element of 'mind-control' to convince somebody that this is the answer?

    2. Facebook doesn’t have a mind-control problem, it has a corruption problem. Cambridge Analytica didn’t convince decent people to become racists; they convinced racists to become voters.
    3. Facebook isn’t a mind-control ray. It’s a tool for finding people who possess uncommon, hard-to-locate traits, whether that’s “person thinking of buying a new refrigerator,” “person with the same rare disease as you,” or “person who might participate in a genocidal pogrom,” and then pitching them on a nice side-by-side or some tiki torches, while showing them social proof of the desirability of their course of action, in the form of other people (or bots) that are doing the same thing, so they feel like they’re part of a crowd.
    1. In fact, these platforms have become inseparable from their data: we use “Facebook” to refer to both the application and the data that drives that application. The result is that nearly every Web app today tries to ask you for more and more data again and again, leading to dangling data on duplicate and inconsistent profiles we can no longer manage. And of course, this comes with significant privacy concerns.
  6. Jun 2018
    1. We believe that Facebook is also actively encouraging people to use tools like Buffer Publish for their business or organization, rather than personal use. They are continuing to support the use of Facebook Pages, rather than personal Profiles, for things like scheduling and analytics.

      Of course they're encouraging people to do this. Pushing them to the business side is where they're making all the money.

  7. May 2018
  8. Apr 2018
    1. Most previous explanations had focussed on explaining how someone’s beliefs might be altered in the moment.

      Knowing a little of what is coming in advance here, I can't help but thinking: How can this riot theory potentially be used to influence politics and/or political campaigns? It could be particularly effective to get people "riled up" just before a particular election to create a political riot of sorts and thereby influence the outcome.

      Facebook has done several social experiments with elections in showing that their friends and family voted and thereby affecting other potential voters. When done in a way that targets people of particular political beliefs to increase turn out, one is given a means of drastically influencing elections. In some sense, this is an example of this "Riot Theory".

    1. Good news for anyone who uses the Internet as a source of information: A district court in Washington, D.C. has ruled that using automated tools to access publicly available information on the open web is not a computer crime
    1. Google doesn’t use the facebook API to scrape facebook; they just scrape it.

      really?

    2. This is an extremely important case to remember. It has implications for all Fb users who want to own their past.

  9. gobo.social gobo.social
    1. Great experiment – unfortunately Facebook blocks the most interesting part.

    1. This fall, my colleagues and I released gobo.social, a customizable news aggregator. Gobo presents you with posts from your friends, but also gives you a set of sliders that govern what news you see and what’s hidden from you. Want more serious news, less humor? Move a slider. Need to hear more female voices? Adjust the gender slider, or press the “mute all men” button for a much quieter internet. Gobo currently includes half a dozen ways to tune your news feed, with more to come.

      Gobo, a proof of concept.

  10. Mar 2018
    1. At the moment, several projects in the space are working to adopt new supplementary protocols, with the intent of building better bridges between one another. The proposed development might end up looking like this:<img class="progressiveMedia-noscript js-progressiveMedia-inner" src="https://via.hypothes.is/im_/https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/1600/1*3pEK-Fwq7bNOVcnXfVdNuQ.png">Diaspora at this time has no plans for new protocols, having just significantly upgraded its own. postActiv intends to adopt support for Diaspora federation in a future release. Mastodon just released support for ActivityPub, and Pleroma , Socialhome and GNU Social are thinking of adopting it. Nextcloud is also notably getting into the federation space, and Hubzilla and Friendica will likely both support the ActivityPub protocol as extensions.

      Where we discover that Friendica (and Hubzilla) are clearly the best options for navigating The Free Network.

      It's a shame that the connectivity to Twitter and other non-free networks and services is not better highlighted. It's clearly by being compatible with the non-free networks that the Free Network will win in the end -- by allowing people to escape en masse.

    1. For the past 100 years we have been chasing visions of data with a singular passion. Many of the best minds of each new generation have devoted themselves to delivering on the inspired data science promises of their day: intelligence testing, building the computer, cracking the genetic code, creating the internet, and now this. We have in the course of a single century built an entire society, economy and culture that runs on information. Yet we have hardly begun to engineer data ethics appropriate for our extraordinary information carnival. If we do not do so soon, data will drive democracy, and we may well lose our chance to do anything about it.

      We have hardly begun to engineer data ethincs approriate for our extraordinary information carnival.

    1. "Practically and emotionally, leaving Facebook feels like you’re leaving the internet. Worse, it feels like you’re leaving the world, unplugging from friends, news, and the daily stimulus that drives your day."
    1. People come to Google looking for information they can trust, and that information often comes from the reporting of journalists and news organizations around the world.

      Heavy hit in light of the Facebook data scandal this week on top of accusations about fake news spreading.

    2. We’re now in the early stages of testing a “Propensity to Subscribe” signal based on machine learning models in DoubleClick to make it easier for publishers to recognize potential subscribers, and to present them the right offer at the right time.

      Interestingly the technology here isn't that different than the Facebook Data that Cambridge Analytica was using, the difference is that they're not using it to directly impact politics, but to drive sales. Does this mean they're more "ethical"?

    1. You could throw the pack away and deactivate your Facebook account altogether. It will get harder the longer you wait — the more photos you post there, or apps you connect to it.

      Links create value over time, and so destroying links typically destroys the value.

  11. Feb 2018
    1. “If we just reward content based on raw clicks and engagement, we might actually see content that is increasingly sensationalist, clickbaity, polarizing, and divisive,” she says. A social network that rewards only clicks, not subscriptions, is like a dating service that encourages one-night stands but not marriages.

      sexual/matrimony metaphor

    2. “Social networks enable malicious actors to operate at platform scale, because they were designed for fast information flows and virality,”

      why is virality the goal? venture capital, if you take away venture capital and virality, do you still get info disorder?

    3. Zuckerberg’s conference room (called the Aquarium) and Sandberg’s (called Only Good News)

      conference rooms named after our greatest weaknesses?

    4. Simultaneously, authority over the algorithm shifted to a team of engineers based in Seattle. Very quickly the module started to surface lies and fiction.

      LOL: responsibility transfers to engineer and lies ensue

    5. “We traced the creation of the Facebook accounts to IP addresses at the Apple store a block away from the MySpace offices in Santa Monica,”

      MySpace people used internet access at Apple stores to try to malign Facebook.

    6. If Facebook didn’t start offering a better deal to the publishing industry, Thomson and Murdoch conveyed in stark terms, Zuckerberg could expect News Corp executives to become much more public in their denunciations and much more open in their lobbying.

      worth thinking about before one refers to the "free press"

    7. whether News Feed should be modified to better deal with some of the most complex issues facing the product. Does it favor posts that make people angry? Does it favor simple or even false ideas over complex and true ones?

      complex issues are...complex...and not easily made into algorithms

    8. As often happens when outsiders meet with Facebook, people used the time to try to figure out how they could get more followers for their own pages.

      LOL: the idea that people drinking the koolaid of social could think clearly to regulate it

    9. Facebook decided, too, that it had to extend an olive branch to the entire American right wing, much of which was raging about the company’s supposed perfidy.

      to remain neutral, one often has to take sides

    10. But it’s hard to argue that this wasn’t an editorial decision. It may be one of the biggest ever made.

      a stylistic choice as a very profound editorial choice

    11. Facebook has long seemed to think it has immunity from those debates because it is just a technology company—one that has built a “platform for all ideas.”

      a warning to anyone who thinks technology is neutral

    12. When new recruits come in, they are treated to an orientation lecture by Chris Cox, the company’s chief product officer, who tells them Facebook is an entirely new communications platform for the 21st century, as the telephone was for the 20th. But if anyone inside Facebook is unconvinced by religion, there is also Section 230 of the 1996 Communications Decency Act to recommend the idea.

      when culture and legislation mix

  12. Dec 2017
    1. Starting Tuesday, any time someone uploads a photo that includes what Facebook thinks is your face, you’ll be notified even if you weren’t tagged.

      This is eerily like in the book The Circle where facial recognition is done over all photos and video on the web--including CCTV. No more secrets.

  13. Nov 2017
    1. Political and interest-based advertising should be under much stricter scrutiny than, say, the advertising of T-shirts or hair products.

      These ads should be listed for all to see, possibly along with their purchaser.

      That was I can see (and ask questions why) my neighbor is getting micro-targeted ads...and I am not.

    2. It’s very difficult, and in many cases impossible, for researchers to independently look at behavior on the platform.

      Also some stories last week about Facebook and Twitter going back and deleting content (and access to content) from the election. Researchers were unpacking this...and then all of a sudden things disappear.

      I believe the Internet is the dominant text of our generation. These discussions on Facebook, Twitter, and elsewhere are public discussions and documents (IMHO). There should be "rules" about deleting and obfuscating these texts...even by the companies themselves.

    3. filter

      Thinking that I'd like to have a slider scale to select the level CRAP you'd like to have in your feed.

      All of the way to one direction for honest, reputable, verified. Slide it the other direction for complete mayhem.

      I think we need to call in Bryan Mathers for a mockup of this.

    4. Facebook could also offer an optional filter that would keep any post (or share) of an unverified account from showing up. I’d use that filter.

      I'd love this for Twitter, Facebook, etc. Some "verification layer" that let's you know if the person went through extra steps and is "real."

      This would save the hassle of reading something ridiculous...and then having to click through to their profile and realizing that ALL of their other content is also ridiculous.

    5. countering misinformation, hate speech and propaganda — can take is to abandon the focus on emotional signaling-as-engagement.

      Ultimately, do they even want to do this? Is there any fiduciary responsibility to do this? Even news agencies (on various sides...all good people) are looking at the tons of revenue in subscriptions, ads, and views.

      My thinking is that they don't, and ultimately this will blow over. Ultimately, I think it depends on the objectives, goals, and whether or not they can engineer their way out of this.

    6. As they stand, and especially with algorithmic reinforcement, “reactions” and “likes” are like megaphones for echo chambers and news outrage.

      This is something that's been nagging at me for the last couple of weeks.

      Does it all matter? Does that tweet, share, thumbs up, like really matter at all? If you/we/I share out of tweet of support, outrage, or indifference, does it really matter on the grand scale.

      Yes, I might have some likeminded individuals value it, read it, use it, share it. But, ultimately aren't we really just shouting into the echo chambers that have been built up for us thanks to these algorithms and networks? We're preaching to the choir.

      I'd like to think that open can/will combat this...but unsure.

      I think this is a post for Hybrid Ped or elsewhere. Lemme know if this resonates with anyone and you want to write it out.

    1. Perhaps a future with great user experience in AR, VR, hands-free commerce and knowledge sharing could evoke an optimistic perspective for what these tech giants are building. But 25 years of the Web has gotten us used to foundational freedoms that we take for granted. We forget how useful it has been to remain anonymous and control what we share, or how easy it was to start an internet startup with its own independent servers operating with the same rights GOOG servers have. On the Trinet, if you are permanently banned from GOOG or FB, you would have no alternative.
    2. The internet will survive longer than the Web will. GOOG-FB-AMZN will still depend on submarine internet cables (the “Backbone”), because it is a technical success. That said, many aspects of the internet will lose their relevance, and the underlying infrastructure could be optimized only for GOOG traffic, FB traffic, and AMZN traffic. It wouldn’t conceptually be anymore a “network of networks”, but just a “network of three networks”, the Trinet, if you will.
    3. What has changed over the last 4 years is market share of traffic on the Web. It looks like nothing has changed, but GOOG and FB now have direct influence over 70%+ of internet traffic. Mobile internet traffic is now the majority of traffic worldwide and in Latin America alone, GOOG and FB services have had 60% of mobile traffic in 2015, growing to 70% by the end of 2016.
  14. Oct 2017
    1. It should also greatly increase the human oversight of ad targeting systems — specifically, oversee algorithmically generated categories (rather than basing them solely on user-inputted interests). Political and interest-based advertising should be under much stricter scrutiny than, say, the advertising of T-shirts or hair products.

      Should this be done internally to corps or should gov have a hand in the regulation?

    2. Facebook should allow users to sort their news feed chronologically by default on all platforms, rather than rely on an algorithmically sorted News Feed.

      Customization again.

    3. It would be interesting if Facebook offered a “vintage Facebook” setting that users could toggle to, without News Feed ads and “like” buttons.

      Or just customization in general.

    4. The key is for Facebook to be upfront about technical challenges, open about its mistakes and willing to answer the tough questions honestly. If it does that, it will continue to earn the public’s trust.

      Feel me.

    5. Companies would need additional levels of verification, and should have a label and scrutiny different from those of people. (Whistle-blowers and dissidents might need to use a different platform.)

      Great example of the tension between social media as liberating/oppressing. Like Twitter can be used by Black Lives and white supremacists. When, in this case, does anonymity become abused versus liberating?

    6. What if there were a “trust emoji”? Or respect-based emojis?

      Love this idea.

    7. keep us addicted to the social network.

      Or at least keep us "in the stream."

    8. At Reddit, I was able to effect positive, lasting change (at least according to this research) to content quality and interaction quality by building a diverse executive team.

      Very interesting. Need to check this study out.

    9. “two masters” dilemma,

      Useful phrase.

    10. Instead of measuring clicks and likes, what if Facebook optimized for how much value an article or video or game gave us weeks or months afterward?

      Great, but how would you measure that?

    11. Worthy, beautiful goals, but easier said than done when Facebook is also stuck delivering ever-increasing profits and making its platform serve the needs of advertisers.

      Corporate structure at odds with idealist slogans. This is essentially why I left (Rap) Genius: it became increasingly apparent that despite the company's well-intentioned, truly felt aspirations, there were only so many avenues to monetization and all would in some way compromise the stated mission.

    12. The single most important thing Facebook must do is come clean. Tell us what you know. Tell us what you know but can’t share. Tell us what you don’t know. And tell us what you don’t know that you don’t know

      Transparency.

  15. Sep 2017
    1. connected teenagers  had decreased feelings of well-being. T

      I think this is a central question of our age--does social media make us happier? Increase democracy? Smarter? And the question always changes because the technology always changes. I now wonder about SnapChat. It functions a bit differently but with the same goal of connection. Does it produce better feelings than FB? Worse? More vicitimization? Less?

  16. Aug 2017
    1. Google in my experience knows that there are ambiguities, moral doubts, around some of what they do, and at least they try to think about it. Facebook just doesn’t care. When you’re in a room with them you can tell. They’re’ – he took a moment to find the right word – ‘scuzzy’.
    2. So Facebook knows your phone ID and can add it to your Facebook ID. It puts that together with the rest of your online activity: not just every site you’ve ever visited, but every click you’ve ever made – the Facebook button tracks every Facebook user, whether they click on it or not. Since the Facebook button is pretty much ubiquitous on the net, this means that Facebook sees you, everywhere. Now, thanks to its partnerships with the old-school credit firms, Facebook knew who everybody was, where they lived, and everything they’d ever bought with plastic in a real-world offline shop.[4]​4 All this information is used for a purpose which is, in the final analysis, profoundly bathetic. It is to sell you things via online ads.The ads work on two models. In one of them, advertisers ask Facebook to target consumers from a particular demographic – our thirty-something bourbon-drinking country music fan, or our African American in Philadelphia who was lukewarm about Hillary. But Facebook also delivers ads via a process of online auctions, which happen in real time whenever you click on a website. Because every website you’ve ever visited (more or less) has planted a cookie on your web browser, when you go to a new site, there is a real-time auction, in millionths of a second, to decide what your eyeballs are worth and what ads should be served to them, based on what your interests, and income level and whatnot, are known to be. This is the reason ads have that disconcerting tendency to follow you around, so that you look at a new telly or a pair of shoes or a holiday destination, and they’re still turning up on every site you visit weeks later. This was how, by chucking talent and resources at the problem, Facebook was able to turn mobile from a potential revenue disaster to a great hot steamy geyser of profit.
    3. Note that the company’s knowledge about its users isn’t used merely to target ads but to shape the flow of news to them.
    4. What Facebook does is watch you, and then use what it knows about you and your behaviour to sell ads. I’m not sure there has ever been a more complete disconnect between what a company says it does – ‘connect’, ‘build communities’ – and the commercial reality.
    5. Particular segments of voters too can be targeted with complete precision. One instance from 2016 was an anti-Clinton ad repeating a notorious speech she made in 1996 on the subject of ‘super-predators’. The ad was sent to African-American voters in areas where the Republicans were trying, successfully as it turned out, to suppress the Democrat vote. Nobody else saw the ads.
    6. Nothing influences people more than a recommendation from a trusted friend. A trusted referral is the Holy Grail of advertising.
    7. A version of Gresham’s law is at work, in which fake news, which gets more clicks and is free to produce, drives out real news, which often tells people things they don’t want to hear, and is expensive to produce.
    8. The mission to ‘connect’ turns out to mean, in practice, connect with people who agree with you. We can’t prove just how dangerous these ‘filter bubbles’ are to our societies, but it seems clear that they are having a severe impact on our increasingly fragmented polity. Our conception of ‘we’ is becoming narrower.
    9. No human enterprise, no new technology or utility or service, has ever been adopted so widely so quickly.

      Amazing!

  17. Jun 2017
    1. You might think it’s hyperbole for Winer to say that Facebook is trying to kill the open web. But they are. I complain about Google AMP, but AMP is just a dangerous step toward a Google-owned walled garden — Facebook is designed from the ground up as an all-out attack on the open web.

  18. May 2017
    1. Inside Facebook's plan to eat another $350 billion IT market

      Three months later the group had a working prototype. Six months later, on November 1, the company announced it to the world as a real product called Voyager.

    1. How do we reassert humanity’s moral compass over these alien algorithms? We may need to develop a version of Isaac Asimov’s “Three Laws of Robotics” for algorithms.

      A proposed solution to bad effects of info algorithms.

    1. Recently, Facebook tried to introduce Beacon, a program that would broadcast particular purchases on a user's news feed. This kind of covert advertising, what Ari Melber calls "social advertising," was soundly rejected by users (22). While the messages were touted as innocent recommendations, in actuality they served up commodification and commercialism at the expense of homemaking. By analogy, consider the effect of inhabiting a house with a subclause, more or less unbeknown to you, that allows marketers to publish your purchases as endorsements.

      There is a scene in "The Social Network" when Eduardo and Mark are debating whether or not the site should start gaining revenue... would pair nicely here if I could find it...

  19. Apr 2017
    1. The digital social networks that have quickly become ubiquitous have made visiblemany of the patterns underlying existing academic personal and professional relationships,and the ways in which reputation and reliability circulate in these structures. Social andintellectual networks have long constituted the professional contexts of scholars, but digi-tal networks representing some subset of those contexts have exposed more of what takesplace at the margins of those networks.

      Digital Social Networks, particularly Facebook and Twitter.

      Makes an interesting point about homogenisation in Facebook and Twitter (i.e. people are a binary of friend or not friend, categories that collapse all different categories.

      Interestingly, both Facebook and Twitter have taken steps to address this recently.

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. Marketers would prefer to have their own predictive marketing platforms, helping them collect and activate their own proprietary data. Enterprise technology companies want that future as well. They want to be the ones to sell and provision those tech platforms, integrating and packaging them with all of the other systems they sell into the enterprise, from CRM to call center management to finance and sales force automation. Quite naturally, they worry that it will be easier for Google and Facebook to add their own CRM and related systems than it will be for them to replicate Google and Facebook’s digital marketing system.Agencies? They just want to keep themselves in the middle. Whether as consultants, media brokers, system integrators or owners of syndicated data, agencies just want to stay relevant and find ways to reverse their declining margins.

      That is most certainly their wishlist. But it overlooks the reason why Google and Facebook get all the ad dollars in the first place: they have all the users & their data. That's why most advertisers will have to play by their rules as the chances to succeed with their own offerings aren't great.

      Telcos/ISPs meanwhile, particularly Verizon, are to watch indeed (The new FCC rules play right into their hands as well). Since they own many users & their data, they are a force to be reckoned with. But: ISPs aren't global players and regulated differently in each country.

  20. Mar 2017
    1. Meta, with the stated intent of making the “AI-powered research search engine…free to all in a few months after enhancing the product.”

      Interesting how they see this fitting in with their mission.

  21. Feb 2017
    1. Facebook has built its neural net so it will work on the phone itself.

      Now that's cool!

    2. “Facebook today cannot exist without AI. Every time you use Facebook or Instagram or Messenger, you may not realize it, but your experiences are being powered by AI.”

      Need to learn more about this.

  22. Dec 2016
    1. The ubiquitous social network not only allows advertisers to target users by their interests or background, it also gives advertisers the ability to exclude specific groups it calls “Ethnic Affinities.”

      why aren't we seeing more about this in the news?? How is this not ILLEGAL???

  23. Nov 2016
  24. Oct 2016
    1. Facebook is allowing advertisers to exclude users based on race.

      The ad we purchased was targeted to Facebook members who were house hunting and excluded anyone with an “affinity” for African-American, Asian-American, or Hispanic people.

      When we showed Facebook’s racial exclusion options to a prominent civil rights lawyer John Relman, he gasped and said, “This is horrifying. This is massively illegal. This is about as blatant a violation of the federal Fair Housing Act as one can find.”

    1. Minimum Image Size The minimum image size is 200 x 200 pixels. If you try to use an image smaller than this you will see an error in the Sharing Debugger.
  25. Aug 2016
  26. Jul 2016
    1. So its really 1894 to 2100- correct -without the Supers. She didnt cross the threshold, the author needs to be corrected.

      I can even annotate folks comments WITHIN threads.. hmm Yet it will all pop up here.. as opposed to being linked to the actual post.. hmmm

    1. Here’s a presentation at the 2013 Personal Democracy Forum that provides a little more context for our project.

      Where is the Facebook shareable link for this video? I would like to hit share, for it to look pretty and for you -hypothes.is- to earn and retain new subscribers?

      (If I share this via youtube, the funnel flows to youtube. Do you have a dedicated "landing page" with simply this vid? I'll reply here if I find a "pretty" way.. Thanks Guys!)

  27. May 2016
    1. He realised that if Internet.org took hold in India, Facebook would be the gatekeeper to the web for hundreds of millions who had no idea what the internet was, or what it could do for them.

      The idea that some internet is better than no internet is ridiculous. Poor people in developing nations deserve the same Internet as the rest of the world.

    2. He assured the children inside, and the villagers outside, that their connectivity problems would be fixed before his next visit.

      the arrogance

  28. Apr 2016
    1. It feels like a carefully crafted downtown, full of many different things but where building codes have enforced a standardization of design.

      I love love love this geographic analogy: Facebook Stream as New Urbanism.

    1. Telegram's server-side software is closed-source and proprietary. Pavel Durov has said that it would require a major architectural redesign of the server-side software to connect independent servers to the Telegram cloud.[50]

      Does that fact actually make Telegram a real alternative to WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger?

  29. Mar 2016
    1. I'm talking about optimizing the economy for the velocity of money rather than for the conversion of money into capital. It's going from a growth model to a flow model. Why are we, for instance, taxing capital gains at almost nothing but taxing dividends and earnings so high? That's a tax policy that is meant to favor the extraction of capital and to punish the exchange of things.
  30. Jan 2016
    1. No molestarás, intimidarás ni acosarás a ningún usuario.

      Gracias facebook por garanzatizar que nadie acose ni moleste a nadie

  31. Dec 2015
  32. Sep 2015
    1. Hello world!

      This is my first post.

      Testing Hypothesis on Facebook.

  33. Aug 2015
  34. Jun 2015
    1. Yet ad-based financing means that the companies have an interest in manipulating our attention on behalf of advertisers, instead of letting us connect as we wish. Many users think their feed shows everything that their friends post.

      This is the crucial point for me: we are not really "connecting" through Facebook if the connection is not on our own terms, so the very concept that underlies the service is problematic.

      The same can be said of Google: our search for information is not authentic if the search results are taking into consideration ad-partners, etc.

      I'm personally much more concerned about this paradox in the latter case as it pertains to knowledge production.

  35. May 2015
    1. another layer not controlled by the content owners

      This takes Facebook discussion into a whole new realm. Imagine the potentially meaningful dialogue that could be had on this Hypothesis layer!

  36. Apr 2015
    1. The West End farmer's Market was THE place to be on Easter well, is the place to be every Sunday for that matter. Swing by
  37. Jan 2015
    1. A client-side Javascript SDK for authenticating with OAuth2 (and OAuth1 with a oauth proxy) web services and querying their REST API's. HelloJS standardizes paths and responses to common API's like Google Data Services, Facebook Graph and Windows Live Connect. It's modular, so that list is growing. No more spaghetti code!

      javascript facebook client

  38. Dec 2014
    1. Home

      This is where you click to get back to the beginning.