379 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Schoch-Spana, M., Brunson, E. K., Long, R., Ruth, A., Ravi, S. J., Trotochaud, M., Borio, L., Brewer, J., Buccina, J., Connell, N., Hall, L. L., Kass, N., Kirkland, A., Koonin, L., Larson, H., Lu, B. F., Omer, S. B., Orenstein, W. A., Poland, G. A., … White, A. (2020). The public’s role in COVID-19 vaccination: Human-centered recommendations to enhance pandemic vaccine awareness, access, and acceptance in the United States. Vaccine. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.10.059

    1. So they want to "reduce fragmentation" OK.
    2. My biggest issue with snap is not the concept per se but that it's a mostly Ubuntu thing and FlatPak and AppImage are similar ideas. For once it would be nice if the Linux world would consolidate around a single technology instead of fragmenting like this.
  2. Jan 2021
    1. have a volunteer program to encourage community participation in its activities, which should include: identification and development of volunteer opportunities procedures for recruitment of volunteers matching the needs and interests of volunteers to those of the museum provision of appropriate training and supervision for volunteers provision of a safe and secure working environment for volunteers volunteer evaluation public and private recognition of volunteers' contributions

      (3) Volunteer program (adding on to).

    1. Hi, I Need some help regarding my Ubuntu, is there any way to reach out to you personally ? Vote: 0 0 Share Facebook Twitter Copy link to comment Reply to SAK Copy link to comment Abhishek Prakash People's Favorite with 100+ Upvotes 30 Replies 3 weeks ago This comment is awaiting moderation Use our community forum, please.
  3. Dec 2020
    1. “This isn’t him going to grab a beer with guys. He’s going to find psychological and emotional support from men who understand his problems,” Liz explains. “They’re not just getting together to have a bitch fest, gossip, or complain about their lives. They’re super intentional about what they’re talking about, why, and what’s important to them.”

      Hamlett discusses the psychological costs men being isolated (toxic masculinity/macho culture) has caused on society, especially women. She also explores the idea of support groups for men, highlighted in this passage.

    1. As Bellah points out, religion is as a way of being. We might also view it as a way of feeling, as a way of feeling together.

      Togetherness

    1. Our team is building open source community tools and Svelte fits our identity as an independent labor of love with an organic community.
    2. With some frameworks, you may find your needs at odds with the enterprise-level goals of a megacorp owner, and you may both benefit and sometimes suffer from their web-scale engineering. Svelte’s future does not depend on the continued delivery of business value to one company, and its direction is shaped in public by volunteers.
  4. Nov 2020
    1. and by the way, Rick Harris is just the public face of Svelte, the team is bigger and solid with a good growing community.
    1. a wider com-munity of people out there that cares about equity and is ready and willing to engage in talking about it seriously

      Just heard this from another MS participant too: finding a community of other people out there who share my experience and concerns when that is sometimes hard to find "locally".

    1. In Rust, we use the "No New Rationale" rule, which says that the decision to merge (or not merge) an RFC is based only on rationale that was presented and debated in public. This avoids accidents where the community feels blindsided by a decision.
    2. I'd like to go with an RFC-based governance model (similar to Rust, Ember or Swift) that looks something like this: new features go through a public RFC that describes the motivation for the change, a detailed implementation description, a description on how to document or teach the change (for kpm, that would roughly be focused around how it affected the usual workflows), any drawbacks or alternatives, and any open questions that should be addressed before merging. the change is discussed until all of the relevant arguments have been debated and the arguments are starting to become repetitive (they "reach a steady state") the RFC goes into "final comment period", allowing people who weren't paying close attention to every proposal to have a chance to weigh in with new arguments. assuming no new arguments are presented, the RFC is merged by consensus of the core team and the feature is implemented. All changes, regardless of their source, go through this process, giving active community members who aren't on the core team an opportunity to participate directly in the future direction of the project. (both because of proposals they submit and ones from the core team that they contribute to)
  5. Oct 2020
    1. By some measures distance education students are somewhat less prepared (e.g. fewer of them attended private high schools) but still have a better chance of graduating college than students who do not take distance education courses. Put simply, at a national level, even potentially less prepared students who participated in distance education early in their college careers were more likely to attain a degree than students who had not done so.

      A followup to studies of community college students in Virginia and Washington, this national study found that students who enrolled in online classes early in their college careers were more likely to complete their degrees. This was true even though students in online classes are somewhat less prepared than those in in person classes. One difference may be that this study was published a few years after the Virginia one, and more students were enrolled in online classes by then. 9/10

    1. Accordingly, our results strongly suggest thatonlineinstructionin keyintroductorycollege-level courses, at least as currently practiced, maynot be aseffectiveasface-to-faceinstructionat2-yearcommunitycolleges.

      According to a study done across all Virginia Community Colleges, students who signed up for gatekeeper courses (basic English and Math) online did less well in those courses than did their peers who took the same classes in person. There was a higher attrition rate in the online classes as well. Students who came in with good GPAs tended to do well in online courses, but those who were struggling with academics did worse than they probably would have in person. Many statistics are included. 9/10

    1. In order to inform the development and implementation of effective online learning environments, this study was designed to explore both instructors' and students' online learning experiences while enrolled in various online courses. The study investigated what appeared to both support and hinder participants' online teaching and learning experiences.

      The authors discuss the issue of community and engagement in online graduate programs. They carried out a small case study and used a Cognitive Apprenticeship Model to examine a successful program in Higher Education. They found that students feel too many online classes are just reading and writing, regurgitating rather than applying, and lack sufficient connection with the instructor and with other students, They recommend some strategies to fix that, but admit that more work is needed. 9/10

    1. Cognitive Presence “is the extent to which learners are able to construct and confirm meaning through sustained reflection and discourse” (Community of Inquiry, n.d, para. 5). Video is often used as a unidirectional medium with information flowing from the expert or instructor to the learner. To move from transmission of content to construction of knowledge, tools such as Voice Thread (VoiceThread, 2016) support asynchronous conversation in a multimedia format.

      The author, Kendra Grant, is the Director of Professional Development and Learning for Quillsoft in Toronto Canada. Grant helps business succeed in education design and support. In this article Grant discusses how quickly the learning environment has changed through technological development. Grant explores the RAT Model, which guides instructors in the "use of technology to help transform instructional practice." Grant then examines the Community of Inquiry model, which seeks to create meaningful instruction through social, cognitive and teaching presence. Grant concludes by providing general principles for creating a positive video presence.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. Teaching Tolerance offers some clear practices that can help establish connectedness:

      Are these not "techniques", "exercises", "manoeuvers", from the "front of the room"? I suppose the answer is that technique and leadership are necessary but not sufficient for building community, and that unlike a "best practice" in a controllable process, they may or may not resonate (and thus work) for any given person or group.

    1. Useful mass transportation doesn’t suddenly appear. It is carefully nurtured from a tiny seedling of a good idea to a fully-formed organism that breathes life into a city. It is a process that takes time and effort and patience as well as money.

      Could sub out mass transportation with open scholarly infrastructure! ... "Useful mass transportation doesn’t suddenly appear. It is carefully nurtured from a tiny seedling of a good idea to a fully-formed organism that breathes life into a city. It is a process that takes time and effort and patience as well as money."

    1. As I read this while thinking about the context of the IndieWeb and it's wiki, I'm thinking two cognitively dissonant thoughts: 1. The current technical uses are creating content more for themselves and their research and use and 2. They're not creating it to help out the users who may necessarily need a ladder or a bigger platform to get to where they are.

      It's going to take a layer of intermediate users, creators, or builders to help create a better path to bring the neophytes up to a higher level to get more out of the wealth of information that's hiding in it. Or it's going to take helpers and mentors to slowly build them up to that point.

      How can we more consistently reach a hand down to pull up those coming after us? How can we encourage others to do some of the same?

    1. I just wrote a long, considered, friendly, and I hope helpful comment here but -- sorry, I have to see the irony in this once again -- your system wouldn't let me say anything longer tahn 1,500 characters. If you want more intelligent conversations, you might want to expand past soundbite.

      In 2008, even before Twitter had become a thing at 180 characters, here's a great reason that people should be posting their commentary on their own blogs.

      This example from 2008 is particularly rich as you'll find examples on this page of Derek Powazek and Jeff Jarvis posting comments with links to much richer content and commentary on their own websites.

      We're a decade+ on and we still haven't managed to improve on this problem. In fact, we may have actually made it worse.

      I'd love to see On the Media revisit this idea. (Of course their site doesn't have comments at all anymore either.)

    1. However, when groups of readers come together and collectively read and write annotation in response to a shared text, then annotation can - under curated circumstances - spark and sustain conversation.

      I can't help but note that within the IndieWeb community, they're using a combination of online chat and wiki tools which to a great extent are a larger ongoing conversation. The conversation continues on a daily (almost hourly) basis and the substantive portions of that conversation are captured within the wiki for future reference. Interestingly, an internal chat bot, known as Loqi, allows one to actively make changes to the wiki from within the chat. In some sense, within this community there could be an analogy to which came first the chicken or the egg, but replacing those with conversation and annotation.

    1. Why can't there be more sites with solid commentary like this anymore? Do the existence of Twitter and Facebook mean whe can't have nice things anymore?

    1. This week, host Bob Garfield did a piece ostensibly about the problems newspaper sites have with website comments. Unfortunately it just came out sounding like another old journalist kvetching about how everyone on the net is an idiot. You can listen to the story here.

      Here's the new link to the audio: https://www.wnycstudios.org/podcasts/otm/episodes/131068-july-25-2008

      Here's the link to a version of the site in August 2008 with the commentary, which makes a fascinating rabbit hole to go down: https://web.archive.org/web/20080907233914/http://www.onthemedia.org/episodes/2008/07/25/segments/104537

    1. In the last few months I actually came across Derek's side of the story and so I dug back into archives (literally archive.org) to find the original show and catch the blog post conversation around this controversy. I particularly recall Ira and Jeff Jarvis' conversations. Somehow I didn't see Kevin's portion of the conversation in the comments sections of the others, but I'm glad to have it pop up just a few weeks later to complete the circle.

      Of the group, Kevin, as usual, provides some of the best analysis, but he also adds in a huge amount of additional context by way of links.

      Society seems to have ripped itself open recently and I can't help but think that we're going to need some strong tummelers and heavy work to allow everyone to speak, be heard, and create some change. Kevin's piece here may be a good starting point.

      Perhaps this is the piece some of our mainstream media have been missing from a journalistic perspective? For too long they've acted as aggregators and filters, but perhaps they should be spending a larger portion of their time doing some tummeling work on our behalf?

    1. Abneesh Roy, an analyst at Edelweiss Securities, noted that ahead of elections set for early next year, the government could be moving to appease owners of smaller shops that have been hit as customers buy more goods online. “Shopkeepers have been unhappy,” he said. “In an election year, the government will definitely listen more to voters.”

      It's nice to see foreign countries looking at what has happened to coutries like America with the rise of things like e-commerce, actually thinking about them and the longer term implications, and making rules to effect the potential outcomes.

      Now the bigger follow up question is: is this a good thing? Perhaps there won't be the community interruption we've seen in the US, but what do the overall effects look like decades hence? From a community perspective, from a competitive perspective?

    1. Political scientist Benedict An-derson called this phenomenon of unification “imagined communities.”
  6. Sep 2020
    1. alternative activities creatively solicit, collect, and even rank ideas without any assumption that community members should agree. By displaying the full range of ideas, they also put more pressure on public officials to transparently explain why they pursued a certain path without resorting to the kind of “community” talk I observed in Upham’s Corner and Mattapan.

      We did this when discussing the AM bus lane for Mass Ave in Arlington - there was an in-person presentation and people put sticky notes on a giant copy of the plan to note particular concerns. There was an online version after that meeting as well, where those who couldn't go to the meeting could submit further feedback.

    2. What if instead of public meetings—constrained by both time and space, where the optimal outcome is consensus and therefore “no” has more power than “yes”—we invested more in low cost, ongoing exercises that produce a high volume of information, persist even after particular projects are completed, make priorities transparent, and neither seek nor assume a singular position from “the community”?

      I remember Chris Schmidt making a comment about how the online meetings for the Cambridge City Council suddenly had much higher attendance when the pandemic kicked in. But of course that means the meetings themselves got even longer.

    3. In Upham’s Corner, the community wanted a park, didn’t want a park, wanted affordable housing, didn’t want affordable housing, and on and on—there was no single community position to juxtapose against the City or a potential developer. Similar scenarios are easy to imagine; in any neighborhood, opinions will vary. The Mattapan case is complicated for additional reasons. The community simultaneously “won” and “lost”: Middle-class residents were unable to block the new station, while low-income residents gained greater access to public transit. Supporting the community did not necessarily mean supporting poor urban residents.

      Conflicting needs, and the best we can do is "nobody is satiisfied, even if they got what they wanted, because it took so long to do anything about."

    4. It’s Time to Move On From Community Consensus Public meetings often disprove the notion that communities have a unified stance on any issue. With this in mind, we must move past trying to find consensus and focus on uplifting the most marginalized voices.

      Provocative summary. How does anyone determine the most marginalized voices in a given situation without turning it into competitive Oppression Olympics?

      Two informative case studies from Boston.

    1. The initials fa in the class refer to Font Awesome, an open- source set of icons created by Dave Gandy,23 which further links this project to the open- source community and its ethos of collaboration. Font Awesome gives the community icons for making professional- grade web apps, rendering artifacts and objects legible in the contemporary web design ecology

      Font Awesome est une police d'écriture et un outil d'icônes qui se base sur CSS, LESS et SASS (Wikipédia, « Font Awesome », consulté le 22 septembre 2020).

    1. This will enable Material-UI to stay relevant in the long term.
    2. The React OSS component community is fragmented. You will find both standalone components for a specific problem, as well as and a growing number of component libraries, with a wide range of API consistency, a11y, bug density, performance, bundle size, quality, and support.
  7. Aug 2020
    1. When in need of help, students reread directions, checkwith Home-Group members (3-4 students who are inschool or at home on the same days), check the digitalPeer Expert Board, and then put their name on the digitalHelp Board

      This is a fantastic idea for building community.

      Facilitate in Google? Allow edits on a Canvas page? What about multiple editors?

      • Google Slides parking lot embedded on the homepage
        • Each student has a slide they edit
        • General questions slide for help requests
    1. It will find there is "very little evidence that the virus is transmitted in schools",

      The reporter interviewed Professor Russel Viner, president of Royal College of Pediatrics and Child Health. Apparently, a study was conducted through April to June which collected information of 20,000 students and 100 teachers yet there is no link to this study, did not get peer reviewed or published. It is all just claims at this point. We have no knowledge if these are private schools or public, if there were any safety measures in place, if this included online classes vs in class.

      However, according to CDC and the respected studies it cited, there seems to be lower transmission rates among children and transmission from child to family, but this remains inconclusive. There still needs to be more evidence to be gathered.

    1. Course as community of practice

      could thinking of guilds at work in this way be useful?

      • are they currently being done this way?
      • or could this be an option of how to run a guild, or a topic within a guild but not a replacement for the guild itself?
    2. Course as community onboarding

      I like this idea - as when joining a community figuring out the 'rules of engagement' can be hard, and also

      • who to go for what
      • what do I need to know to start
      • how does this community work

      For team on-boarding, project on-boarding, etc - it can also guide people towards other courses / resources that may be more ongoing or of other types

  8. Jul 2020
    1. This is very irresponsible of them, with respect to the number of downloads. They should finally realize this and just redirect people to LO. Continuing like this hurts the Apache Foundation credibility as well as the open source community as a whole.