187 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. poetical descriptions extant of autumn

      In the 1970s miniseries (which huge hair) one of the Musgrove sisters asks Anne for an appropriate poem on this walk. In the 2022 adaptation Mary snipes at Anne when she tries to recite telling her she doesn't like poetry or it makes her sick (can anyone find the quote?)

  3. Jun 2022
    1. From the classroom, to the street, to the Internet, Eric’s voice carried, and carried within it the possibility of a kind of education–amplified with digital technologies– that enables other human beings to become conscious, to become responsible, to learn.

      Sadly, we seem to have othered orality and cultural practices which don't fit into the Western literate cultural box. This prevents us from moving forward as a society and a diverse culture.

      In the 90's rap was culturally appropriated by some because of its perception as "cool" within the culture. Can this coolness be leveraged as a reintroduction of oral methods in our culture without the baggage of the appropriation? Can it be added to enhance the evolving third archive? As a legitimate teaching tool?

    2. listen deeply to Eric’s story

      Beyond Eric's words here, I'm struck by the fact that he's able to do this "feat" orally in a way that I certainly cannot. Perhaps he spent ages slowly building it up and writing it down in a literal fashion, but I suspect that part of it is not and that it is raw oral poetry in a way which requires culture and oral practice that I wholly lack, but wish I had.

      How can we better teach this?! Center this.

      Link to: - Eminem's stacking ammo

    1. We can set things aside and get to them later when we arecalmer and more grounded.

      useful

      link to the idea of "poetry as memory recollected in tranquility"... quote tk

    Tags

    Annotators

  4. May 2022
    1. Technology went from being a tool to being a god and that god has pulled the wool over our eyes.

      That sounds so dam cool. This quote even has context. Count me impressed.

    1. People learned about the background, the songs associated with the tradition and about the ‘pwnco’ verse contest, with some writing their own new verses.
    1. Without accounting for what we install or add inside, the base python:3.8.6-buster weighs 882MB vs 113MB for the slim version. Of course it's at the expense of many tools such as build toolchains3 but you probably don't need them in your production image.4 Your ops teams should be happier with these lighter images: less attack surface, less code that can break, less transfer time, less disk space used, ... And our Dockerfile is still readable so it should be easy to maintain.

      See sample Dockerfile above this annotation (below there is a version tweaked even further)

  5. Apr 2022
    1. In the margins of books, in the margins of life as commonly conceived by our culture’s inherited parameters of permission and possibility, I have worked out and continue working out who I am and who I wish to be — a private inquiry irradiated by the ultimate question, the great quickening of thought, feeling, and wonder that binds us all: What is all this?

      A wonderful little poem to the marginalia of life.

    1. But there were for Leiris earlierassociations of Mallarmé’s work with more literal containers. In his preface to his1925 first edition of Igitur, a text to which Leiris refers on a variety of occasions,Dr. Bonniot, the son-in-law of the poet, had written: “Mallarmé, as we know, usedto jot down his first ideas, the first outlines of his work on eighths of half-sheets ofschool notebook size—notes he would keep in big wooden boxes of China tea.” 15

      Bonniot quoted in Michel Leiris, La Règle du jeu (Paris: Gallimard, 2003), p. 1658.

      Stéphane Mallarmé's son in law Dr. Bonniot indicates that "Mallarmé, as we know, used to jot down his first ideas, the first outlines of his work on eighths of half-sheets of school notebook size—notes he would keep in big wooden boxes of China tea.”

      Given that Mallarmé lived from 1842 to 1898, his life predated the general rise and mass manufacture of the index card, but like many of his generation and several before, he relied on self-made note tools like standard sized sheets of paper cut in eighths which he kept in somewhat standard sized boxes.

    1. Some florilegia focused on poetic excerpts and were used to teach prosody, others specialized in prose. Both kinds were likely used in teaching at many levels—from the young boys (pueri) mentioned in the Opus prosodiacum of Micon Centulensis in the mid- ninth century to the twenty- year- old Heiric who wrote under dictation from Lupus of Ferrières, ca. 859–62, a Col-lectanea comprising excerpts from Valerius Maximus and Suetonius, followed by philosophical and theological sententiae.104

      Some florilegia were used as handbooks to teach composition. Those with poetic excerpts were used to teach prosody while others specialized in prose.

      Examples of these sorts of florilegia include Micon Centulensis' Opus prosodiacum from the mid-ninth century and a Collectanea by Heiric who wrote under dictation from Lupus of Ferrières, ca. 859–62.

  6. Mar 2022
    1. Raymond Queneau’s 100,000,000,000,000 Poems, a collection of 10 14-line sonnets with each page cut into 14 strips to allow readers to arrange them into a astonishing number of variations; Padgett Powell’s The Interrogative Mood, a novel composed entirely of questions; and Geoff Ryman’s 253, which was originally published on the web in the form of a collection of hypertext links.
    1. But the problem with Poetry is arguably down to the way Docker’s build works: Dockerfiles are essentially glorified shell scripts, and the build system semantic units are files and complete command runs. There is no way in a normal Docker build to access the actually relevant semantic information: in a better build system, you’d only re-install the changed dependencies, not reinstall all dependencies anytime the list changed. Hopefully someday a better build system will eventually replace the Docker default. Until then, it’s square pegs into round holes.

      Problem with Poetry/Docker

    2. Third, you can use poetry-dynamic-versioning, a plug-in for Poetry that uses Git tags instead of pyproject.toml to set your application’s version. That way you won’t have to edit pyproject.toml to update the version. This seems appealing until you realize you now need to copy .git into your Docker build, which has its own downsides, like larger images unless you’re using multi-stage builds.

      Approach of using poetry-dynamic-versioning plugin

    3. But if you’re doing some sort of continuous deployment process where you’re continuously updating the version field, your Docker builds are going to be slow.

      Be careful when updating the version field of pyproject.toml around Docker

    1. கவிதை எனும் இலக்கிய வடிவத்தின் பலம் இரண்டு தளங்களில் இருக்கிறது. ஒன்று கவிதை பிற புனைவு அல்புனைவு வடிவங்களின் அலகுகளில் ஒன்றை போல ‘எடுத்துச் சொல்ல’ வந்தது அல்ல. ‘எப்படிச் சொல்கிறது’ என்பதே அதன் அடிப்படைத் தொழில். இரண்டாவதாக அதன் உடனடித் தன்மை. இந்த உடனடித் தன்மையை காலம் இடத்துக்கு கட்டுப்படாத தனக்கே உரிய பிரத்யேக தனி மொழி கொண்டு வாசகனின் புலன்களை உணர்வை நேரடியாக தீண்டுவதன் வழியே கைக்கொள்ளுகிறது.

      Poetry - Literary Analysis

  7. Feb 2022
  8. Jan 2022
    1. : Why does a god take on this task at this

      Guarino compares Leonello with a god

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. For centuries the standard work on Latin grammar was the 12th- century Doctrinale, by Alexander of Villedieu, in 2,000 lines of doggerel. Versified rules were easier to remember, though their crudity appalled Aldus Manutius when he reprinted this work in 1501.

      Alexander de Villedieu's Latin grammer Doctrinale from the 12th century was the standard work on the subject. Its 2,000 lines of doggerel were used as a mnemonic device because they were easier to remember. Famed publisher Aldus Manutius was appalled at their crude nature when he reprinted the book in 1501.

  9. Dec 2021
    1. ஒவ்வையாரும் விக்ரமாதித்யனும்

      https://youtu.be/zxZOgz1IjTU?t=337

      • ஏற்றுக உலையே ஆக்குக சோறே
      • இவ்வரி சங்க இலக்கிய மொழியியல் கூறுகளில் இருந்து வேறுபடுகின்றது
      • ஆழ்ந்த படிமங்கள் வகையில் அழகியல் இல்லாமால் நேரடி தன்மையில் உள்ளது
      • classic poetry ∨ romantic poetry
    1. The hay(na)ku is a 21st century poetic form invented by Eileen R. Tabios. It is a six-word tercet with the first line being one word, the second line being two words, and the third line being three words. An example: … blueness of sky— I am breathing
    1. Add flair to the smile they can’t seeBehind my mask.

      This is so ... of this moment.

    2. SaveMy loves and not my sentences.

      Hmm. I like this phrasing, even as I wrestle with my own interpretations. Maybe poems are made to be lost, created to to be given, designed to be buried. But love? Love is worth saving, along with the giving.

    3. mispronounce
    4. Jericho Brown

      The poet: https://www.jerichobrown.com/ and his poems:

  10. Nov 2021
    1. his very heart was sick with salt water,

      I love the phrasing here as poetry. When one's heart is sick with salt water, it's an indicator that one has been away at sea for far too long.

  11. Oct 2021
  12. Sep 2021
    1. ethodists, the Evangelicals took up the theme. Hannah More contributed her own imperishable lines on "Early Rising": Thou silent murderer, Sloth, no more My mind imprison'd keep; Nor let me waste another hour With thee, thou felon Sleep.10

      The number of quotes and passages here makes me wonder what his sources were and how he came to them?

      Did he keep a commonplace book and collect references on time? Find them via other's or from published collections? The number and types of them, particularly in the non-technical literature he's citing makes me think that something like a commonplace pattern is being leveraged here.

  13. Aug 2021
    1. I have heard at times a deep harmony thrumming in the mixture

      Another favorite phrasing ..

    2. So be it.

      There it is again

    3. When they asked me to join them I wouldn’t, and then went off by myself and did more than they would have asked.

      Ha

    4. covering myself in the earth’s brightnesses, and then stole off gray into the midst of a revel,

      My favorite phrasing of the poem ..

    5. knew it would not be resurrected by a piece of cake

      Whew ....

  14. Jul 2021
    1. PyPA still advertises pipenv all over the place and only mentions poetry a couple of times, although poetry seems to be the more mature product.

      Sounds like PyPA does not like poetry as much for political/business reasons

    1. No indication is given of how his version might be better than Stallings’ Penguin, or the Oxford verse translation of Melville, another formidable competitor Slavitt does not equal.

      David R. Slavitt's translation isn't as solid as those of A.E. Stallings or Ronald Melville.

      I've been skimming Stallings' this morning and it is quite nice. I'll have to pull up Melville's.

      Ronald Melville, Lucretius On the Nature of the Universe. Oxford, 1997. Also Anthony M. Esolen, Lucretius On the Nature of Things. Baltimore, 1995.

    1. The goal of this tutorial is to describe Python development ecosystem.

      tl;dr:

      INSTALLATION:

      1. Install Python through pyenv (don't use python.org)
      2. Install dependencies with Poetry (miniconda3 is also fine for some cases)

      TESTING:

      1. Write tests with pytest (default testing framework for Poetry)
      2. Check test coverage with pytest-cov plugin
      3. Use pre-commit for automatic checks before git commiting (for example, for automatic code refactoring)

      REFACTORING:

      1. Lint your code with flake8 to easily find bugs (it is not as strict as pylint)
      2. Format your code with Black so that it looks the same in every project (is consistent)
      3. Sort imports with isort (so that they are nicely organised: standard library, third party, local)
  15. Jun 2021
    1. Luisa: Mr. R. is the best teacher I have had and he changed my life. Mr. R is a beautiful, beautiful, beautiful human being. [Pause] I had a lot of teachers that would not … They would question me and they would ... All the stuff that I would write, they would question if I was okay mentally because of all this darkness [Chuckles] that I would write about, because a lot of my stories or a lot of my poetry was extremely dark. I don't think that's a bad thing you know. I think that's just trying to get rid of the … it's a catalyst. You're trying to get rid of everything that's inside of you, and that's how I did it.Luisa: Mr. R was the first one that recognized it as something good. We still keep in touch—beautiful human being. I knew this. He would speak to me like we were adults—like I was an adult. I was a thirteen-year-old girl and we had conversations like adults. I don't know how appropriate it was or what he saw in me, but we had conversations like adults. I would stay after class for hours just discussing books that he would give me, and he would give me books out of his collection for me to read.

      Time in the US, School, Middle School, Teachers; Time in the US, Mentors, Teachers

  16. May 2021
    1. The majority of Python packaging tools also act as virtualenv managers to gain the ability to isolate project environments. But things get tricky when it comes to nested venvs: One installs the virtualenv manager using a venv encapsulated Python, and create more venvs using the tool which is based on an encapsulated Python. One day a minor release of Python is released and one has to check all those venvs and upgrade them if required. PEP 582, on the other hand, introduces a way to decouple the Python interpreter from project environments. It is a relative new proposal and there are not many tools supporting it (one that does is pyflow), but it is written with Rust and thus can't get much help from the big Python community. For the same reason it can't act as a PEP 517 backend.

      The reason why PDM - Python Development Master may replace poetry or pipenv

    1. An overview of Milman Parry's life, work, and some of his impact on Homeric studies and orality as media.

    2. In all his writings Parry argued for a historical approach to literature, condemning the classi cists who re‐created the past in the image of the present. We must “re construct the community of thought through which the poet made him self understood to those who heard him sing.”

      This is reminiscent of an admonishment to recall that we shouldn't act as if (famous) writers never lived nor as writers never died.

  17. Apr 2021
  18. Mar 2021
  19. Feb 2021
    1. Highlight PoetryFinding poetry in other people’s webpages

      I sort of wish that I could do separate tidbits like this in hypothes.is.

  20. Jan 2021
    1. class exists

      The class exists / in our imagination / a gathering across spaces / creating lines of flight / as birds spread their wings / grazing wind drifts. The class is existential / yet moving and dynamic / coating our cortex lightly / as much as our neurons can handle.

      With a video version here https://networkedstories.blogspot.com/2021/01/does-class-exist.html

  21. Dec 2020
  22. Sep 2020
    1. Gioia, bella scintilla divina,figlia dell'Eliseo,noi entriamo ebbri e frementi,o celeste, nel tuo tempio.Il tuo incanto rende unitociò che la moda rigidamente separò,i mendichi diventano fratelli dei principidove la tua ala soave freme. Coro Abbracciatevi, moltitudini!Questo bacio vada al mondo intero!Fratelli, sopra il cielo stellatodeve abitare un padre affettuoso.

      Inno alla gioia

  23. Jul 2020
    1. In a 2014 essay, “Poet Voice and Flock Mentality,” the poet Lisa Marie Basile connects it to an overall lack of diversity in the field, and a fear of breaking the mold. The consistent use of it, she writes, “delivers two messages: I am educated, I am taught, I am part-of a group … I am afraid to tell my own story in my own voice.”
    2. when some listeners hear poets read with one or more of these characteristics—slow pitch speed, slow pitch acceleration, narrow pitch range, low rhythmic complexity, and/or slow speaking rate—they hear Poet Voice.”
  24. Jun 2020
  25. Apr 2020
    1. Let mans Soule be a Spheare

      Like so many Donne poems, he makes great use here of astronomical imagery. I love this idea of the soul being like a spinning planet in the body, "being by others hurried every day", affected by gravitational pulls of "pleasure or businesse". What is your soul's "first mover"? By what is your soul "whirld"?

  26. Dec 2019
    1. Mont Blanc;

      The Shelleys visited Mont Blanc, located in the Swiss Alps, the site of Percy Shelley's great poem "Mont Blanc; Lines Written in the Vale of Chamouni" (1816). Compare the following lines from the poem: "Mont Blanc yet gleams on high:—the power is there, The still and solemn power of many sights, And many sounds, and much of life and death. In the calm darkness of the moonless nights, In the lone glare of day, the snows descend Upon that Mountain; none beholds them there, Nor when the flakes burn in the sinking sun, Or the star-beams dart through them."

    2. Milton

      Percy Shelley especially singles out Milton among the most important classic literature, indicating his strong influence in the novel.

    3. It was indeed a paradise

      At this moment the Creature appears more strongly associated with Adam than with Satan, apparently born into a "paradise."

    4. Iliad

      The Iliad is an epic poem attributed to Homer; its action is set earlier than the plot of Homer's The Odyssey and takes place in the last year of the Trojan War.

    5. Here is our captain, and he will not allow you to perish on the open sea

      Along with reference to Coleridge's "Rime of the Ancient Manner," Victor's hopeless plight reminds us somewhat of William Cowper's (1731-1800) "The Castaway" (1799). Victor, however, does not perish "each alone," but instead in the company of his new friend Walton. The Creature, by contrast, will choose to perish alone.

    6. I am thy creature: I ought to be thy Adam; but I am rather the fallen angel

      This allusion to Milton's Paradise Lost puzzles some readers because the epigram of Volume II has previously quoted Adam's entreaty to God. Is the Creature more like Adam or more like the fallen angel Satan?

    7. the “very poetry of nature.

      Victor quotes Leigh Hunt's poem "The Story of Rimini," published in 1816--a poem Victor could not, of course, have known in the novel's fictional time frame that ends in summer 1799. Like the passage from Percy Shelley's "Mutability," this line from Hunt's poem belongs to the novel's extra-diagetic address to readers of 1818 rather than to canons of novelistic realism. Clerval is once again made an avatar of the Romantic poet that by 1818 had become solidly esconced in the British cultural imaginary.

    8. a Paradise of my own creation

      Walton's imagined "paradise" of his own making suggests the power of imagination, yet also the possibility of creating a Hell of one's own. It is also one of the novel's many allusions to John Milton's Paradise Lost.

    9. Orlando

      Celebrated in Italian Renaissance works such as Orlando Innamorato and Orlando Furioso, Orlando, or sometimes Ronaldo, was a knight-errant with a sword named Durendal and a horse named Veillantif. The 1855 epic poem by Robert Browning, Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came was inspired by his tales of chivalry. As a lieutenant of Charlemagne, his great deeds were sung as early as the the eleventh-century in Chanson de Roland.

    10. Dr. Darwin

      Erasmus Darwin (1731-1802), the evolutionist and poet who lived in Birmingham, England, is clearly on Percy Shelley's mind when he introduces Mary's text in the 1818 edition. Critics of the novel have not often followed this lead in thinking about it as an early work in the British evolutionary imagination. Erasmus Darwin had made "not of impossible occurrence" that one presently visible species could mutate into another. Victor contemplates this possibility—as an alarming one—when he speculates in Volume 3, Chapter 3, that the Creature's demand that he create a "mate" could result in a new evolutionary development, "a race of devils."

    11. Paradise Lost.

      By citing Adam's question to God in John Milton's Paradise Lost, Mary Shelley makes Milton's epic the most important intertext of Frankenstein. In Book II, the Creature hears the poem read aloud, and begins to think of himself as either Adam or Satan.

    12. “the palaces of nature,”

      Shelley is probably citing "palaces of nature" from Lord Byron's Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, Canto III, published in 1816: “Above me are the Alps, / The palaces of Nature, whose vast walls / Have pinnacled in clouds their snowy scalps, / And throned Eternity in icy halls / Of cold sublimity” (lxii.590–94).

    13. sent me forth to this insupportable misery

      The Creature compares himself to Milton's Satan in Paradise Lost, which he has previously heard when Felix read the poem aloud.

    14. Because he knows a frightful fiend Doth close behind him tread

      In this passage from Part VI of "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner," the Mariner faces the apparition of the dead sailors--as if in a "charnel-dungeon"--standing to rebuke him for their deaths.

    15. I shall kill no albatross,

      This expression is a reference to Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem "Rime of the Ancient Mariner," in which the Mariner inexplicably slays an albatross. The allusion may imply that Walton will play the role of Coleridge's Wedding Guest instead: he will listen to Victor's long, obsessive story that will ultimately be a confession of guilt, like the Ancient Mariner' tale. Since the poem was not published until September 1798, this reference also places the "17--" date of these letters as the summer of 1799. On the poem's role in the novel, see Beth Lau, "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Frankenstein," in Samuel Taylor Coleridge and the Sciences of Life, ed. Nicholas Roe (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001): 207-23.

    16. Dante

      Victor refers to Italian Dante Alighieri's (1265-1321) Divine Comedy in which the poet journeys through the nine circles of Hell.

    17. Nought may endure but mutability!

      This stanza from Percy Shelley's poem "Mutability" (1816) may have helped convince readers of 1818 that the novel's author was indeed Percy rather than Mary since it is not attributed to its author. However, it also, of course, is far outside the novel's fictional eighteenth-century setting.

    18. I also became a poet

      Walton's wish to be a poet, like Henry Clerval's taste for tales of romance, attest to their imaginativeness and capacity for sympathy that seems greater than Victor's, who has no literary interests. Victor also suggests that had his fate not turned out differently, he might have been a Henry Clerval. See Volume 1, Chapter 7.

    19. “old familiar faces;”

      This phrase is likely a reference to Charles Lamb's poem "The Old Familiar Faces" (1798): "I have had playmates, I have had companions/ In my days of childhood, in my joyful school-days/ All, all are gone, the old familiar faces." If so, it is also a poignant memory of his own family as Victor narrates this tale in which so many family members will be destroyed as a consequence of his own actions.

    1. Lord Byron, who was writing the third canto of Childe Harold

      Lord Byron (1788-1824) had published the first two cantos of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, a poetic sensation across Europe that give him instant celebrity, in 1812. Canto 3 would be published in 1816 and Canto 4 in 1818.

    2. or if I should come back to you as worn and woful as the “Ancient Mariner?” You will smile at my allusion; but I will disclose a secret. I have often attributed my attachment to, my passionate enthusiasm for, the dangerous mysteries of the ocean, to that production of the most imaginative of modern poets. There is something at work in my soul, which I do not understand. I am practically industrious—pains-taking;—a workman to execute with perseverance and labour:—but besides this, there is a love for the marvellous, a belief in the marvellous, intertwined in all my projects, which hurries me out of the common pathways of men, even to the wild sea and unvisited regions I am about to explore. But to return to dearer considerations.

      In this addition to the 1831 edition, Shelley explicitly refers to her poetic source, Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner." Walton muses wistfully on the "dangerous mysteries" of the ocean, proposing their similarity to poetry like Coleridge's, and citing them as the root of his own profound yearnings for the dangerous and sublime discoveries of exploration.

    1. had a refined mind; he had no desire to be idle, and was well pleased to become his father’s partner, but he believed that a man might be a very good trader, and yet possess a cultivated understanding.loved poetry and his mind was filled with the imagery and sublime sentiments of the masters of that art. A poet himself, he turned with y disgust from the details of ordinary life. His own soul mind was all the possession that he prized, beautiful & majestic thoughts the only wealth he coveted—daring as the eagle and as free, common laws could not be applied to him; and while you gazed on him you felt his soul’s spark was more divine—more truly stolen from Apollo’s sacred fire, than the glimmering ember that animates other men.

      This lengthy revision in the Thomas Copy removes the original description of Clerval as a relatively ordinary tradesman with an interest in poetry and the arts, and transforms him instead into a figure of tremendous romantic flair and verve.

      Where before he was described as "a good trader" with a "refined mind," Victor's recollection of him is now charged with profuse admiration, casting Clerval as "daring as the eagle and as free," "his soul's spark was more divine--more truly stolen from Apollo's sacred fire". He is a poet by nature, not a trader, and we now see him resisting his father's attempt to channel his abilities into narrow pursuits of profit. In the 1831 this revision is enlarged to put Clerval's passionate interests even more decisively in opposition to his father's wishes.

  27. Nov 2019
    1. Here we are ... on the page There we are ... off the page An invite to write ... please do

  28. Oct 2019
    1. A recently-unearthed performance from David Berman, reading a poem while accompanied by Bloomington, IN legends the Impossible Shapes, at Second Story, 2005.

  29. Sep 2019
    1. lffhat Johnson is obiecting to,in short, is what he takes to be the essential artificiality of Milton's elegy andthe consequent absence of natural human feeling. The author of l-ycidas,heinsisrs, simply does not sound like a man deeply afflicted with grief- Thepoem is insincere.

      I feel that judging the sincerity of the Lycidas based on Milton's insignificant relationship to King is a bit unfair. I believe this knowledge of their relationship may have tainted Johnson's critical reception. I don't believe fictitious writing in a work of poetry dedicated to a deceased person is automatically grounds for insincerity. I've read about memorials for deceased musicians where those who attended and contributed compositions or material items in the deceased's honor had no personal interaction or close relationship to them. The legacy of the deceased drew other highly-regarded musicians to pay their respects and show their appreciation for the culture that the deceased influenced and contributed to that united them intellectually and emotionally. I feel that the case with Milton's contribution to Justa Edouardo King naufrago is a similar situation.

    1. Here we go, here we go here we go now

      Implies there's nothing wrong with him.

  30. Jul 2019
    1. THE PLAINS - A PROPHECY Joaquin Miller. Rome, 1874.

      Go ye and look upon that land, That far vast land that few behold, And none beholding understand- That old, old land which men call new-Go journey with the seasons through Its wastes, and learn how limitless. The solemn silence of that plain Is, oh! so eloquent. The blue And bended skies seem built for it, And all else seems a yesterday, An idle tale but illy told. Its story is of God alone, For man has lived and gone away And left but little heaps of stone. Lo! here yon learn how more than fit And dignified is silence, when You hear the petty jeers of men. Its awful solitndes remain Thenceforth for aye a part of you, And you have learned your littleness.

      Some silent red men cross your track; Some sun-tanned trappers come and go; Some rolling seas of buffalo Break thunder-like and far away Against the foot-hills, breaking back Like breakers of some troubled bay; Some white-tailed antelope blown by So airy like; some foxes shy And shadow-like move to and fro Like weavers' shuttles as you pass; And now and then from out the grass You hear some lone bird cluck, and call A sharp keen call for her lost brood, That only makes the solitude Seem deeper still, and that is all.

      That wide domain of mysteries And signs that men misunderstand; A land of space and dreams; a land Of sea-salt lakes and dried-up seas; A land of caves and caravans And lonely wells and pools; a land That hath its purposes and plans, That seems so like dead Palestine, Save that its wastes have no confine Till pushed against the leveled skies; A land from out whose depths shall rise The new-time prophets; the domain From out whose awful depths shall come, All clad in skins, with dusty feet, A man fresh from his Maker's hand, A singer singing oversweet, A charmer charming very wise; And then all men shall not be dumb-Nay, not be dumb, for he shall say, "Take heed, for I prepare the. way For weary feet i" and from this land The Christ shall come when next the race Of man shall look upon his face.

  31. Jun 2019
  32. May 2019
    1. "I sound my barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world." Walt Whitman, 1855.

      from Song of Myself, 52 https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/song-myself-52

      Which is also played out in a scene from The Dead Poet's Society https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S6xyHna-NuM

    1. destruction of Sennacherib

      From MCCONNELL 289: "'The Destruction of Sennacherib' is the title of one of the most famous poems of Lord Byron (1788-1824). In II Kings: 19 it is related how the Assyrian King Sennacherib brought a great army to war against the Israelites; but, thanks to the prayers of the Israelites, the Lord killed Sennacherib's whole army in a single night. The legend has an obvious relevance to the sudden, total, and unhoped-for obliteration of the Martian invaders."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 224: "In a single night, in answer to the prayers of the Israelites, God destroyed the Assyrian army led by King Sennacherib (II Kings 19:35-37). This is the subject of Byron's celebrated poem 'the Destruction of Sennacherib'."

      From DANAHAY 182: "reference to II Kings: 19 in which an entire army is wiped out by God in one night"

  33. Apr 2019
  34. quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com
    1. I'd rather be a tall, ugly weed

    2. "Drop a Mouse into Poetry"
    3. learned to breathe fresh air

      Fresh air; breathing -

      seemingly uncaring, deepening

      the world, packed full of sharing,

      pairing up city rhymes to street rhythms

      in a line of ideas - go on and fill 'em -

      feel 'em, they're all about the scaring you -

      white 'burbs with earbuds dangling -

      regaling you with words you've never heard,

      the air fresh, from the breathing:

      this is the season for believing in the poem

    4. Funny it seems, but by keeping it's dreams

      I am a sucker for internal rhymes. Although these lyrics (for me) don't always hold up as a poem on its own, the art of internal rhyme to create rhythm against the backdrop of bass and drums is a key element of HipHop that I greatly admire. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfgR2bEjAFg

    5. concrete
    6. I'd rather be unseen

      Making a choice? Or maybe not ...

    7. the abyss of the bizarre

      This is where

      we go when we

      have no other place

      to take us

  35. Mar 2019
    1. But it’s far more that just a cultural signpost. The reason Coney Island of the Mind has held up so well is that it also marks the first full flowering of Ferlinghetti’s considerable poetic gifts. Employing open elastic lines that often seesaw across the page, Ferlinghetti’s verse is a unique combination of Whitmanesque proclamation and Dionysian celebration, where a deep love for life and art is interlaced with call for the human race to finally begin living up to its potential. … Fifty years on, Coney Island of the Mind, Ferlinghetti’s artistic and commercial breakthrough, still stands as an excellent example of both his social and poetic contributions, and is not only a worthy but probably a necessary volume for the library of anyone truly serious about understanding where English-language poetry has been and where it is going.

      Go, Ferlinghetti, for at least another 100 years.

  36. Feb 2019
    1. and omit<; the use of the true signs of the passions, which are, tones, looks, and gestures.

      This happens in poetry all the time. When we just read the words on the page (which we'll often do internally), we miss so much of the tonal and sonic qualities of the work. Listening to a poet actually read their work aloud is always fascinating, because suddenly you're thinking "oh, this was meant to be performed, and I'm supposed to actually feel these things."

  37. Jan 2019
  38. Dec 2018
  39. gutenberg.net.au gutenberg.net.au
    1. irregularities

      This presumably is in reference to Robert Burns's well known love affairs. See section "The Life of a Lover and Writer": https://www.biography.com/people/robert-burns-9232194

    2. 'Some feelings

      This is from Scott's "Lady of the Lake," and Sir Edward Denham seems to quickly forget the rest of the lines.

      Here is a synopsis of "Lady of the Lake" and link to full work: http://www.walterscott.lib.ed.ac.uk/works/poetry/lady.html

    3. 'Oh! Woman

      These lines are from Sir Walter Scott's "Marmion."

      "O woman! In our hours of ease Uncertain, coy, and hard to please, And variable as the shade By the light, quivering aspen made; When pain and anguish wring the brow, A ministering angel thou!"

      This is not the greatest description of women, and Austen seems pointed in how she uses Scott's work.

      The full poem: https://archive.org/stream/marmion05077gut/marmn10a.txt

    4. either

      This may imply that despite having other published work at the time, "Lady of the Lake" and "Marmion," quoted below, were the most popular/wide read.

      Lady of the Lake: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/3011/3011-h/3011-h.htm

      Marmion: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/4010/4010-h/4010-h.htm

    5. Scott's beautiful lines

      Austen is referring to the Romanticism poetry of Sir Walter Scott, a popular poet and novelist at the time.

      Biography of Scott for context: https://www.britannica.com/biography/Sir-Walter-Scott-1st-Baronet See particularly his "literary gifts," interest in German Romanticism, and ambiguity of his feelings towards Scotland.

    6. description of the religious cottager

      Austen's reference is to a section of William Cowper's lengthy poem "Truth," with which many of her readers would likely have been familiar. Cowper's dig at Voltaire, who commented that "if God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him," has often been misconstrued as evidence of Voltaire's atheism. In fact, he was a deist. See https://graceonlinelibrary.org/church-history/sermons-tracts/truth-by-william-cowper/

    7. Campbell

      Pleasures of Hope by Thomas Campbell: http://spenserians.cath.vt.edu/TextRecord.php?textsid=37917

    8. Wordsworth

      William Wordsworth, Romantic poet.

      https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/william-wordsworth

    9. Montgomery

      James Montogomery, Scottish-born poet and jounalist.

      https://www.britannica.com/biography/James-Montgomery

    10. lines

      Poet and musician Robert Burns wrote of Mary "Highland Mary" Campbell

      http://www.robertburns.org/encyclopedia/CampbellHighlandMary176315186.180.shtml

    11. Links to common words/themes throughout the annotations

    12. interrupt my enjoyment

      Charlotte cannot enjoy Burn's poetry due to his known indiscretions.

    13. Scott

      A reference to the poet Walter Scott.

  40. Oct 2018
    1. Lowth seems to have been the first modern Bible scholar to notice or draw attention to the poetic structure of the Psalms and much of the prophetic literature of the Old Testament.
  41. Sep 2018
  42. Jul 2018
  43. Feb 2018
    1. The mental energy required for readers to constantly jump from the present text to an older one is considerable, and if readers must supply the gaps in their ‘allusive competency’ by engaging in ‘textual archaeology,’35or going outside the text to research its allusions, the demand is indeed extreme.

      This demand seems especially daunting in poetry, with few words as it is. Does the novel or film have an easier go of connecting the reader to the demands of allusion? Less of a loss in understanding the idea of the work if the reader doesn't bat a thousand with the allusions because other elements carry the storyline.

  44. Jan 2018
    1. Sometimes
    2. Some time back, I was writing about how one might use digital annotation to a text with media only, no words. How would this work? Would it allow the reader to be more strongly connected to the text? What would be lost without words? Gained, with video and audio and media? I still am not sure, but this experiment with this wonderful poem by Mark Irwin allowed me to closely read his text, and use the margins for adding media. I used keywords both from his text itself and my reactions to the text. I don't know if it works for you, reader, but it worked for me. You are invited to annotate, too. --Kevin

    3. remember
    4. ghost ruining the sky
    5. child
    6. pages into the fire
    7. tilt the paper
    8. letters
    9. listen
    10. blindfolded
    11. emotions
    12. space
    13. white paper
    14. pencil
    15. sit in the sun
    16. notebook with water
    17. crumple the paper
  45. Oct 2017
    1. Emotion is an important factor in literary works. It is the motive force of creation, the yeast of imagination and the element of artistic charm. Therefore, all literature and art activities are inseparable from emotion. In a sense, there is no art without emotion

  46. Sep 2017
    1. Calling people out using the constructionist ideals — The American government is not living up to their high ideals.

      Poetry as a way to express frustration when there is no way to go up against actual US military power. A weapon of the weak; a powerful message.

  47. Apr 2017
  48. Mar 2017