11 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Sep 2018
    1. “Archaic Torso of Apollo.”

      Archaic Torso of Apollo Rainer Maria Rilke, 1875 - 1926

      We cannot know his legendary head with eyes like ripening fruit. And yet his torso is still suffused with brilliance from inside, like a lamp, in which his gaze, now turned to low,

      gleams in all its power. Otherwise the curved breast could not dazzle you so, nor could a smile run through the placid hips and thighs to that dark center where procreation flared.

      Otherwise this stone would seem defaced beneath the translucent cascade of the shoulders and would not glisten like a wild beast’s fur:

      would not, from all the borders of itself, burst like a star: for here there is no place that does not see you. You must change your life.

  3. Jun 2018
    1. Here is my sense of the topics that resonated most clearly:

      Here is my sense of what you say in translation:

      A Numbered LIst

      1. I am aware, so aware, that definitions rule. They make us imagine our practice.
      2. I am aware that less is so often more.
      3. The R&D arm of each generation is already at work constraining and cajoling.
      4. Our poets and dogs drag home the damndest things: bones, mirrors and seeds.
      5. And still it is not enough.
      6. The margins are a moving target that even its authors may no longer recognize.
      7. Even if Yeats is right and the best lack all conviction and the worst are full of passionate hootery, we still note our thanks, we continue to add to the pile, and we keep open and keep on. and get down now.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BARAHLk-8dk

  4. Sep 2017
    1. Calling people out using the constructionist ideals — The American government is not living up to their high ideals.

      Poetry as a way to express frustration when there is no way to go up against actual US military power. A weapon of the weak; a powerful message.

  5. Feb 2017
  6. Jan 2017
      1. What is the speaker saying about the perspectives of a grown-up?
      2. To what extent would you consider the poet's use of humour successful?
  7. Oct 2016
  8. Apr 2016
  9. Jul 2015
  10. May 2015
    1. The Flyting of Grief and Joy

      Flyting is fighting with words, a verbal contest between two adversaries who trade barbed insults and boasts, often in verse (Wikipedia entry). In working with this form, Alasdair Roberts is very probably inspired by Hamish Henderson's sung poem The Flyting o' Life and Daith (words, recording). The Tobar an Duchlais site notes that

      Hamish Henderson finished this poem in 1963, having drawn on an anonymous German poem he had seen in 1939. Referring to the melody that he composed in order for it to be performed as a song, he stated: "[it] somewhat resembles the 'urlar' (or 'ground') of a pibroch". The poem was first published in 'The Scottish Broadsheet' (May, 1963).

  11. Mar 2015