68 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2022
  2. bafybeicuq2jxzrw7omddwzohl5szkqv6ayjiubjy3uopjh5c3cghxq6yoe.ipfs.dweb.link bafybeicuq2jxzrw7omddwzohl5szkqv6ayjiubjy3uopjh5c3cghxq6yoe.ipfs.dweb.link
    1. This eventof cognition, or better yet the event of making sense – the primal mental event, allencompassing, both forming and dissolving boundaries, multiple4 and affirming, Ifind to be the proper stage to present my research

      !- definition : event * the event of making sense is primordial prerequisite for a conceptual life of mind and is the gateway into modern human culture, into the symbolosphere

    2. My interest goes yet further, to the metaphysical ground of cognition andmental processes and how they reflect on existence, meaning and value. There is anobvious and unavoidable strange loop (Hofstadter, 2013) here: the cognitive think-ing agent trying to make sense of these same sense-making processes that bring forthboth her as a subject and the objects of her observation while these are being broughtforth.

      !- key insight : making sense of making sense is a strange loop! * This sentence deeply resonates

    1. 5.5 Logic, reason, and common sense are your best tools for synthesizing reality and understanding what to do about it.

      5.5 Logic, reason, and common sense are your best tools for synthesizing reality and understanding what to do about it.

  3. Jun 2022
    1. She had the kind of exacting patience required for video editing.

      Beyond this, Gracie also had senses of timing and spatial skills that many also often lack. This is a sort of neurodiversity piece which some are either lifted up or pulled down by within our literacy-focused teaching system.

      It may be a skill she's focused on improving, or one which she's naturally gifted and might improve upon to use in a professional career. Focusing on a literacy-only framing for her education is the sort of thing that, instead of amplifying her talents, may have the effect of completely destroying them, and her altogether.

  4. Apr 2022
  5. Jan 2022
  6. Nov 2021
    1. When the embedded document has the same origin as the embedding page, it is strongly discouraged to use both allow-scripts and allow-same-origin, as that lets the embedded document remove the sandbox attribute — making it no more secure than not using the sandbox attribute at all.
  7. Oct 2021
  8. Jul 2021
  9. Jun 2021
  10. May 2021
  11. Apr 2021
    1. I think that depends on HOW you are using the attribute. If you're styling multiple images within a list or table so that they lay out correctly, then put the width/height in your CSS to avoid the need to add another set of tags to every image in the list. Use something like ul.gallery img: { width:117px; } On the other hand, if you are inserting an image into some content and it needs to be a certain size to make the document flow properly, then put it in the HTML. That way you don't have to muck up the style sheet for each different image in the html. And this way, if you change the content to a different image, of remove the image all together, you don't have remnants of code scattered in your CSS to remember to delete.
    1. by an Arizona man or another person's attempt to run over a Pakistani woman in a Huntington, N.Y., parking lot. It

      Well, someone needs to educate these people

    1. <aside> is appropriate if the side note "could be considered separate from the content"

      From a programmer's perspective:

      • It shouldn't be in an <aside>, if it is actually directly about what is in <main>
      • An <aside> should be able to be evaluated on its own, (almost entirely) in isolation from, and not dependent on anything in, the <main> content. This could be especially important/relevant for screen readers.
  12. Mar 2021
    1. The reason Final Form does this is so that pristine will be true if you start with an uninitialized form field (i.e. value === undefined), type into it (pristine is now false), and then empty the form field. In this case, pristine should return to true, but the value that the HTML DOM gives for that input is ''. If Final Form did not treat '' and undefined as the same, any field that was ever typed in would forever be dirty, no matter what the user did.
  13. Feb 2021
    1. Subprocess will try to match the nested ends’ semantics to the tracks it knows. You may wire custom ends using Output.
    2. Since notify sits on the “failure” track and hence is “magnetic to” :failure, find_provider will be connected to it.
    1. It requires an account to update, but the other inputs are optional. If they're missing, it'll ignore those attributes. If they're present, it'll update them.
  14. Dec 2020
    1. Huh, to be honest, I'd expect assigning multiple elements to the same slot to fail at compile time unless the multiples were inside mutually exclusive conditionals. If the multiples were outside statically resolvable mutually exclusive conditionals I'd expect to see a runtime error.
  15. Nov 2020
    1. I was originally interested in figuring out how you could figure out what’s actually true online.

      Conor was trying to figure out how to find out what's true online with Roam.

  16. Sep 2020
  17. Jul 2020
    1. make users the initiators of actions rather than the responders.

      This is a pretty good definition (?, or at least example) of what agency is.

    2. As Shneiderman claims, experienced users strongly desire the sense that they are in charge of the system and that the system responds to their actions. As designers, it is our duty to design the system to make users the initiators of actions rather than the responders.
  18. Jun 2020
  19. May 2020
    1. Allowing port 80 doesn’t introduce a larger attack surface on your server, because requests on port 80 are generally served by the same software that runs on port 443.
    1. These options have almost deceptively similar wordings, with only subtle difference that is too hard to spot at a glance (takes detailed comparison, which is fatiguing for a user):

      1. can use your browser’s information for providing advertising services for this website and for their own purposes.
      2. cannot use your browser’s information for purposes other than providing advertising services for this website.

      If you rewrite them to use consistent, easy-to-compare wording, then you can see the difference a little easier:

      1. can use your browser’s information for providing advertising services for this website and for their own purposes.
      2. can use your browser’s information for providing advertising services for this website <del>and for their own purposes</del>.

      Standard Advertising Settings

      This means our ad partners can use your browser’s information for providing advertising services for this website and for their own purposes.

      Do Not Share My Information other than for ads on this website

      This means that our ad partners cannot use your browser’s information for purposes other than providing advertising services for this website.

  20. Apr 2020
    1. If you force people to frequently change their passwords, they will use bad passwords.
    2. Stop forcing users to change their passwords every 30, 60, or 90 days, and stop forcing users to include a mixture of uppercase, lowercase, and special charactersForcing users to change their passwords should only happen if there is reason to believe an organization has been breached, or if a new third-party data breach affects employees or users.
  21. Mar 2020
    1. it really doesn’t take much clicking around the regional Internet to find a gaslighting cookie notice that pops up with a mocking message saying by using this website you’re consenting to your data being processed how the site sees fit — with just a single ‘Ok’ button to affirm your lack of say in the matter.
    1. We are not sensible, free thinking decision making people. As an individual I imagine that you will say "Yes I am". That's the beauty of the entire system. Consciously individuals believe that they are in control and make their own choices and yet I have met and experienced very few who have full autonomy
    2. saying they give people all the controls they need to manage and control access to their information. But controls with dishonest instructions on how to use them aren’t really controls at all. And opt outs that don’t exist smell rather more like a lock in. 
    3. Facebook does not even offer an absolute opt out of targeted advertising on its platform. The ‘choice’ it gives users is to agree to its targeted advertising or to delete their account and leave the service entirely. Which isn’t really a choice when balanced against the power of Facebook’s platform and the network effect it exploits to keep people using its service.
    1. that permission must be freely obtained. Ergo, a free choice must be offered.So, in other words, a “data for access” cookie wall isn’t going to cut it. (Or, as the DPA puts it: “Permission is not ‘free’ if someone has no real or free choice. Or if the person cannot refuse giving permission without adverse consequences.”)
    1. On the other hand, asking them to check a box when they have very little idea what they’re agreeing to — and not giving them any other viable options — doesn’t seem to be an ideal solution.
  22. Jan 2020
  23. Dec 2019
    1. Now using sudo to work around the root account is not only pointless, it's also dangerous: at first glance rsyncuser looks like an ordinary unprivileged account. But as I've already explained, it would be very easy for an attacker to gain full root access if he had already gained rsyncuser access. So essentially, you now have an additional root account that doesn't look like a root account at all, which is not a good thing.
    1. Four databases of citizen science and crowdsourcing projects —  SciStarter, the Citizen Science Association (CSA), CitSci.org, and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (the Wilson Center Commons Lab) — are working on a common project metadata schema to support data sharing with the goal of maintaining accurate and up to date information about citizen science projects.  The federal government is joining this conversation with a cross-agency effort to promote citizen science and crowdsourcing as a tool to advance agency missions. Specifically, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), in collaboration with the U.S. Federal Community of Practice for Citizen Science and Crowdsourcing (FCPCCS),is compiling an Open Innovation Toolkit containing resources for federal employees hoping to implement citizen science and crowdsourcing projects. Navigation through this toolkit will be facilitated in part through a system of metadata tags. In addition, the Open Innovation Toolkit will link to the Wilson Center’s database of federal citizen science and crowdsourcing projects.These groups became aware of their complementary efforts and the shared challenge of developing project metadata tags, which gave rise to the need of a workshop.  

      Sense Collective's Climate Tagger API and Pool Party Semantic Web plug-in are perfectly suited to support The Wilson Center's metadata schema project. Creating a common metadata schema that is used across multiple organizations working within the same domain, with similar (and overlapping) data and data types, is an essential step towards realizing collective intelligence. There is significant redundancy that consumes limited resources as organizations often perform the same type of data structuring. Interoperability issues between organizations, their metadata semantics and serialization methods, prevent cumulative progress as a community. Sense Collective's MetaGrant program is working to provide a shared infastructure for NGO's and social impact investment funds and social impact bond programs to help rapidly improve the problems that are being solved by this awesome project of The Wilson Center. Now let's extend the coordinated metadata semantics to 1000 more organizations and incentivize the citizen science volunteers who make this possible, with a closer connection to the local benefits they produce through their efforts. With integration into Social impact Bond programs and public/private partnerships, we are able to incentivize collective action in ways that match the scope and scale of the problems we face.

  24. Nov 2019
    1. you probably referred to the positive case where no one overrides anything and so the property returns true, so no need to process further because it is really an automation. Yes, this is true. I just hope that it does not make websites skip the checks if this returns false.
  25. Oct 2019
  26. Aug 2019
    1. According to Polanyi the universe is not a uniform sea, it contains emergent comprehensive entities, with discernable levels of organisation, which via boundary conditions operate independently of the lower levels from which they emerge. These emergent levels realise various purposes. As Pirsig explains, each level of order has a characteristic defining Quality, material, biological, social, and intellectual. Indwelling within articulations enables us to pursue and reflect upon abstract ideals such as truth, goodness, and beauty. For Polanyi a computer, indeed every sort of machine, is contrived to achieve a purpose. A machine can be programmed to achieve this purpose if the desired behaviour can be described in a way that can be simulated by a universal machine. AI offers the prospect of machines which learn without us having to define every detail of its procedures. But they need to do the right thing in every circumstance. This returns us to our problem, because defining criteria for correct behaviour, for making the right choices, amounts to giving a machine “common sense”. Humans excel in making choices in complex situations because we are guided by our tacit awareness.
  27. Feb 2019
    1. As with neoliberalism more generally, New Public Management is invisible, part of a new “common sense” that has somehow become hegemonic, whereby the “entrepreneurial spirit” has infused the public sector, leading to “businesslike government”. As with the claims of neoliberalism more generally as to its positive outputs in terms of prosperity, NPM has never been shown to have been successful even in its own terms. NPM “introduced punishments and rewards to produce better services with lesser staff. Instead of having freed energies and creativity of employees formerly shackled by their bureaucratic turfs, NPM reforms have bound energies into theatrical audit performances at the cost of work and killed creativity in centralizing resources and hollowing out professional autonomy... Fundamental deprivation of the legitimacy of public employees . . .has traumatized many most-committed employees and driven others toward a Soviet-type double standard.” (Juha Siltala, New Public Management : The evidence-based worst practice?, Administration; Vol. 45, No. 4.; 2013 pp. 468-493) Sekera quotes Christopher Pollitt et al., who “after compiling a database of 518 studies of NPM in Europe, determined that “more than 90% of what are seen by experts as the most significant and relevant studies contain no data at all on outcomes” and that of the 10% that had outcomes information, only 44% of those, or 4% of the total, found any improvements in terms of outcomes.” But in the end, the point of NPM is less that of measureable outcomes, and more that of the ideological victory of turning the public and its good into customers exercising their “choices” (see tax revolt example in Duggan), along of course with the radical disempowering of public administration workers and their unions, instituting “cost savings” by cutting their real income and putting more and more of the public sector’s production directly into the profit-making market.
    1. prudence, excel--i Jenee is accorded to those who ferret out the WO; greatest possible number of causes

      He is defining prudence by turning scientific inquiry on its head (or just pointing out that prudence is scientific inquiry on its head).

  28. Dec 2018
    1. impugn the sense

      Sir Edward's passionate praise of the Romantic novel is reminiscent of Marianne's dramatic speeches in Sense and Sensibility. This is slightly ironic considering that Edward's earlier rejection of the novel in favor of works that can be used to better oneself falls more under Sense than Sensibility.

    2. Women are the only correspondents to be depended on

      A common theme across Austen novels is that women tend to be more meticulous about writing letters than men. In Mansfield Park, for instance, Mary Crawford laments the fact that her brother Henry writes very short letters, if at all. Similarly, in Sense and Sensibility there is frequent correspondence between Marianne, Eleanor, and their mother. It is relevant that Austen herself frequently wrote letters to her sister Cassandra. Here is a sample of their correspondence: http://www.bl.uk/learning/timeline/item126754.html

    3. Links to common words/themes throughout the annotations

  29. Sep 2018
    1. What order, so contriv'd as not to mix Tastes, not well joynd, inelegant, but bring [ 335 ] Taste after taste upheld with kindliest change,

      We may interpret it according to the Indian thought, e.g. by enjoying our sensual pleasure it is never fulfilled rather it increases.

  30. Jun 2018
    1. Here is my sense of the topics that resonated most clearly:

      Here is my sense of what you say in translation:

      A Numbered LIst

      1. I am aware, so aware, that definitions rule. They make us imagine our practice.
      2. I am aware that less is so often more.
      3. The R&D arm of each generation is already at work constraining and cajoling.
      4. Our poets and dogs drag home the damndest things: bones, mirrors and seeds.
      5. And still it is not enough.
      6. The margins are a moving target that even its authors may no longer recognize.
      7. Even if Yeats is right and the best lack all conviction and the worst are full of passionate hootery, we still note our thanks, we continue to add to the pile, and we keep open and keep on. and get down now.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BARAHLk-8dk

  31. Mar 2017
    1. Dr. Max Dunbar

      Dr. Maxwell John Dunbar, mentioned later in the text as the author of Environment and Common Sense which was published in 1971, began his “lifelong involvement with the Arctic” in August 1935 during an expedition to map the western Greenland coast (Grainger 1995, 306). Dunbar was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, attended the Merchiston Preparatory School followed by the Dalhousie Castle School, and finally, Fettes College. In 1933, Dunbar began attending the Trinity College in Oxford, England to study zoology where he met ecologist Charles Elton. After meeting Elton, Dunbar was introduced to the Oxford University Exploration Club. Through this club, Dunbar was invited to join the expedition in Greenland. He received a B.A. in 1937 and subsequently attended Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut on a Henry Fellowship (for more information on the Henry Fellowship see Yale University’s webpage https://yale.communityforce.com/Funds/FundDetails.aspx?4438534B376C50326C63483341496C39582F4435696B6F6554694364593150486764566B344156473663736768494B34585863553574432B646D5868384E6275). While studying at Yale University, Dunbar was able to take a trip to explore the glaciers of Alaska. He returned to Oxford, England, when Elton offered him the opportunity to join the 1939 eastern Canadian Arctic patrol. After accepting Elton’s offer, Dunbar enrolled at McGill University in Montreal, Canada as a graduate student. During his time at McGill University, Dunbar experienced the Canadian arctic for the first time by joining the R.M.S Nascopie. Dunbar began serving as the consular representative of the Canadian consulate in Greenland in 1942, and again in 1946. After leaving Greenland, Dunbar was employed by McGill University in the Department of Zoology. After beginning research for the Fisheries Research Board of Canada, he designed the first Canadian arctic research vessel Calanus. In 1947, Dunbar founded the Eastern Arctic Investigations laboratory at McGill University. His active involvement with McGill University continued until he retired and was appointed Professor Emeritus in 1982. He continued his quest for knowledge after “retiring” and published at least 32 articles after 1982 (Grainger 1995, 306-307).

      References

      Grainger, E. H. "Maxwell John Dunbar (1914-1995)." Arctic 48, no. 3 (1995): 306-07. http://www.jstor.org/stable/40511670.

  32. Feb 2017
    1. The first question that occurs concerning it is, whether it is to be considered as an internal sense, or as an exertion of reason?

      Taste is different for everyone versus taste is universal, but everyone perceives it differently?

    2. Providence seems plainly lo have pointed out this useful purpose lo which the pleasures of taste may be applied, by interposing them in a middle station between the pleasures of sense and those of pure intellect.

      According to Blair, taste is a nice mixture between emotions/feelings and reason. He also recognizes that both are important for an individual to achieve satisfaction.

  33. Jul 2016
  34. Apr 2016
  35. Jun 2015
    1. the ancients were sensitive primarily to such things as luminosity, saturation and texture, or even less obvious variables such as smell, agitation and liquidity.

      So this is helping me think of sensitivity as the condition of possibility for "sensibility" or sense-ability. Before a thing is available to be sensed, the sensitivity has to be open/operating.