112 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Learn why Hybrid App Technologies is the right choice in 2019 and which hybrid apps are making huge a name this year? Begin your business startup with the best Hybrid mobile app solution.

      Learn why Hybrid App Technologies is the right choice in 2019 and which hybrid apps are making huge a name this year? Begin your business startup with the best Hybrid mobile app solution.

  2. Mar 2019
    1. Fortunately, we are starting to see campaigns related to the destigmatization of mental illness and an increase in public education and awareness. Join the effort by encouraging and supporting those around you to seek help if they need it. To learn more, visit the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) website (http://www.nami.org/). The nation’s largest nonprofit mental health advocacy and support organization is NAMI.

      Another way of de-stigmatizing mental illness is by offering training for people so that they can react to mental illnesses and also educate their peers about the reality of it. WSU is doing this through their mental health training program, which can be found here. https://cougarhealth.wsu.edu/mental-health-promotion/mental-health-trainings/

    2. Virginia, and Columbia University, interviews with over 1,300 U.S. adults show that they believe children with depression are prone to violence and that if a child receives treatment for a psychological disorder, then that child is more likely to be rejected by peers at school.

      Many resources are available for most university students, for example, WSU offers behavioral health services for an incredibly large number of different mental problems from anxiety and depression to phobias and insomnia. One might argue however that high school campuses don't offer enough treatment or do enough to de-stigmatize mental illnesses, especially in the wake of catastrophes like sandy hook among others.

    1. Linear perspective

      To get an idea of how the linear perspective works, imagine looking at a painting of a big city. As the buildings get smaller, the distance appears to be further away. This is because we see two parallel lines begin to converge on each other. This is just one of the ways we use monocular cues.

    2. depth perception

      Have you ever tried throwing an object at someone? In order to hit the other person, you had to determine the distance from yourself to the target. Part of being able to perceive things in a 3D world involves gauging distance. This is one of the ways we use our depth perception.

  3. Feb 2019
    1. In a 2011 Reddit IAmA, Jennings recalled how in 2004 the Democratic politicians Chuck Schumer and Harry Reid unsuccessfully asked Jennings to run for the United States Senate from Utah. Jennings commented, "That was when I realized the Democratic Party was f@#$ed in '04."[19]
    1. [First published in 1726–7.]

      To: Philbert

      Example question: When was Gulliver's Travels first published? a) 1776 b) 1726 c) 1830 d) 1945

    1. practical,

      A form of practical intelligence at Washington State University might show itself at a social function on the weekend. Say you are at your house and you notice one of your friends is stumbling and not speaking clearly. You sit them down and have the option to hand them two beverages; one beverage is a light beer, the other is a glass of water. A person that shows practical intelligence also known as street smarts or common sense would choose the glass of water, having realized their friend is probably too drunk. A person lacking practical intelligence would hand them the light beer, this would lead to a worse situation for your friend and in turn yourself, because then you would have to take care of your friend in an even worse shape then they were when you first saw them.

    2. analytical

      An example of analytical intelligence that is measured at Washington State University is done through the use of exams. Depending on the type of exam you are faced with you may have to compute numbers, either by plugging number into an equation or doing the proper order of operations on a set of numbers. Other exams might have you problem solving with a theoretical scenario, such as one that you might face in ethics. Say you are faced with a multiple choice question with four options of which only one is correct. You have no idea what the answer to the question is after reading it. You then realize that two of the options are basically saying the same thing, therefore neither can be the answer. You then move on to the next answer, you realize this answer has nothing to do with the problem. You have now established the only answer that even has a possibility of being correct. This example is analytical intelligence.

    1. 1. Explore the current situation. Paint a picture in words by including the “presenting problem,” the impact it is having, the consequences of not solving the problem, and the emotions the problem is creating for those involved.

      This step is somewhat similar to the EEC (Evidence/Example Effect Change/Challenge) model, often used with Feedback?

    1. Thirdly, When the signification of the word is referred to a standard, which standard is not easy to be known.

      Trying to think of good examples of this, and came up with: "They are good people" or "She has the moral high ground".... possibly even words like "Lethal" because a weapon or object doesn't need to seem dangerous to everyone to have the ability to kill someone

    1. Unlocking their potential through co-created course content

      Example 1

      This is an annotation example, comments

      Example 1.1

      Lorem ipsum text examples that can be added here

  4. Jan 2019
    1. examples

      I'll have to assume outline.com is running their own version of the H server.

  5. Nov 2018
    1. The concept of patient-centered care extends to the treatments and therapies clinicians provide. Not only are care plans customized, but medications are often customized as well. A patient’s individual genetics, metabolism, biomarkers, immune system, and other “signatures” can now be harnessed in many disease states — especially cancer — to create personalized medications and therapies, as well as companion diagnostics that help clinicians better predict the best drug for each patient.

      Patient-centered care via personalized medicine

    2. Strict visiting hours and visitor restrictions are a thing of the past in a patient-centered care model. Patients are given the authority to identify who can visit and when. Family members (as defined by the patient and not limited to blood relations) are invited to visit during rounding and shift changes so they can be part of the care team, participating in discussions and care decisions. When not in the room with the patient, they are kept informed of their loved one’s progress through direct and timely updates. A patient-centered care hospital’s infrastructure encourages family collaboration through a home-like environment that not only meets the needs of the patient, but also meets the needs of family members. For example, maternity wards are being redesigned with family-friendly postpartum rooms that can accommodate the mom, new baby, and family members, who are encouraged to spend up to 24 hours a day together in the room to foster family bonding.

      Patient-centered care in the hospital

    1. Try it on this sentence

      This is amazing. I had always wondered of the existence of such feature in a browser.

  6. Oct 2018
    1. To take an example, moral relativism, according to this approach, is the claim that the truth or justification of beliefs with moral content is relative to specific moral codes. So the sentence “It is wrong to sell people as slaves” is elliptical for “It is wrong to sell people as slaves relative to the moral code of …”. Or alternatively, as Kusch (2010) formulates the idea on behalf of the relativist: “It is wrong-relative-to-the-moral-code-of-…” to sell people as slaves. The resulting sentence(s) turns out to be true, according to the relativist, depending on how we fill in the “…”. So, “It is wrong to sell people as slaves” comes out true relative to the moral code of the United Nations Charter of Human Rights and false relative to the moral code of ancient Greece.

      This is an excellent way of summarizing moral relativism with a great example.

  7. Sep 2018
    1. HTML code in an HTML document This is some sample HTML code that an author might use: <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <body> <p>This text is normal.</p> <p><b>This text is bold.</b></p> </body> </html> This is the same HTML code with the shortcode call-out applied. <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <body> <p>This text is normal.</p> <p><b>This text is bold.</b></p> </body> </html>

      What is the point of this example? Do we need to include it? If so, there should be more explanation of why it it useful.

  8. Aug 2018
  9. libguides.nyit.edu libguides.nyit.edu
    1. How does society measure intelligence, according to Asimov? Who benefits from this system and why

      Hi Lissi, Here's an example of an annotation with this tool. You can also create a new group using the drop-down on upper-left corner.

  10. Jun 2018
    1. In business, many examples of the 80/20 Principle have been validated. 20 per cent of products usually account for about 80 per cent of dollar sales value; so do 20 per cent of customers. 20 per cent of products or customers usually also account for about 80 per cent of an organization’s profits. In society, 20 per cent of criminals account for 80 per cent of the value of all crime. 20 per cent of motorists cause 80 per cent of accidents. 20 per cent of those who marry comprise 80 per cent of the divorce statistics (those who consistently remarry and redivorce distort the statistics and give a lopsidedly pessimistic impression of the extent of marital fidelity). 20 per cent of children attain 80 per cent of educational qualifications available. In the home, 20 per cent of your carpets are likely to get 80 per cent of the wear. 20 per cent of your clothes will be worn 80 per cent of the time. And if you have an intruder alarm, 80 per cent of the false alarms will be set off by 20 per cent of the possible causes. The internal combustion engine is a great tribute to the 80/20 Principle. 80 per cent of the energy is wasted in combustion and only 20 per cent gets to the wheels; this 20 per cent of the input generates 100 per cent of the output!
    1. In one high-profile example, a human swarm challenge by CBS Interactive to predict the Kentucky Derby. The swarm correctly predicted the first four horses, in order, defying 542–1 odds and turning a $20 bet into $10,800.
    2. To accommodate this shift in scale, collective intelligence in large-scale groups been dominated by serialized polling processes such as aggregating up-votes, likes, and ratings over time
  11. Apr 2018
    1. A popular view of rhetoric is that it is a straightforward model of how communication should work: A person can speak the truth simply by using words that refer to true things in the world. If she chooses not to use sentences filled with words that refer to true things in the world, then she is engaged in rhetoric. Rhetoric, in this view, is something you add on to sentences (such as meta-phor) that decorates and obscures communication. If I say, “The cat is on the mat,” I am using language correctly. However, if I say, “The elegant feline languishes mournfully on the expensive carpet, waiting impatiently for what he sees as his lazy servants to open a can of salmon,” then I have added rhetoric to the first sentence, or chosen rhetoric over clear communication.

      Popular view of rhetoric is - a model of communication. This is what most people think. Example of how rhetoric can obscure the meaning of an otherwise clear sentence.

  12. Mar 2018
    1. our current position on the common agricultural policy. It was introduced before some of these environmental principles were refined and used in European legislation. As a result, we are now in the ridiculous position where the polluter pays principle would have helped us, as taxpayers and as water company customers and payers, avoid paying farmers twice. We are paying water companies to pay farmers to stop doing something that, as taxpayers, we are paying farmers to do. The polluter pays principle, had it existed when the common agricultural policy was first set in place, would have been a hugely valuable way of preventing that very wasteful situation.

      interesting linking of polluter pays principle to improving EU legislation

  13. Feb 2018
    1. ecount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral

      https://www.pinterest.com/pin/108860515966137341/

      This is an example of the fable The lion and the mouse and how to use it in the classroom. Going back to #1 to answer the questions about who, what, where, when, and why.

    2. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.

      In order to prepare for this standard, class debates can be very useful toward students building their opinions, arguments, evidence, and support. After the debate, students will end up with a strong argument with support.

    3. Know final -e and common vowel team conventions for representing long vowel sounds.

      Common examples for helping students reach this standard is by calling it the silent e or magic e. Also, students need to know that the silent/magic e makes the vowel say its name. Therefore, making the vowel have a long vowel sound.

  14. Jan 2018
  15. doc-0s-c0-docs.googleusercontent.com doc-0s-c0-docs.googleusercontent.com
    1. et neutrality is a grab- bag of cartoonish anti­corporate populism.The introduction of net neutrality rules by the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in late February is a threat to the freedom of the internet and its capacity for continue

      Seeing as how our class is for Net Neutrality, this article makes it obvious that Net Neutrality is not a popular option among many consumers.

  16. doc-0o-c0-docs.googleusercontent.com doc-0o-c0-docs.googleusercontent.com
    1. It wasn’t all that long ago (well, at least, when you’re my age) that one network—AT&T—ran the whole show.

      Beginning of historical example of AT&T's monopoly.

    2. In spite of all the monopolist’s alarm bells that this decision meant the end of network qualityand the end of reliable service as we knew it, just the opposite came to pass. The idea of having a network that couldn’t discriminate against innovators who wanted to improve it finallybegan to break the choke-hold that the gatekeeper had on the system.

      Conclusion to the history of AT&T example of monopoly of an industry.

    3. previous telecommunications and media technologies, also conceived in openness, eventually fell victim to consolidated control bya few powerful interests, speculative mania by investors, and mistaken government policies which assumed that wise public policywas no public policy.

      General reference to history of monopoly of telecommunications when no gov. policies are in place.

  17. doc-0g-c0-docs.googleusercontent.com doc-0g-c0-docs.googleusercontent.com
    1. Reinstates the classification of mobile broadband Internet access service as a private mobile service.

      Internet used on the phone will be charged as a service fee because they are consuming more of it than other people.

    2. In particular, the FCC’s action today has restored the jurisdiction of the Federal Trade Commission to act when broadband providers engage in anticompetitive, unfair, or deceptive acts or practices.

      The FCC has has changed an act that has been unfair for many people who pay for the internet.

  18. Dec 2017
    1. It would be unethical, for example, to include as an author someone who had made only minor contributions to the research (e.g., analyzing some of the data) or for a faculty member to make himself or herself the first author on research that was largely conducted by a student.

      This example effectively identifies and communicates what could be a minor contribution to a study as well as an improper behavior regarding the assignment of contribution.

    2. Stanley Milgram’s original study on obedience to authority

      Tragic, but interesting and easy to remember example

    3. Consider, for example, an actual study on “personal space” conducted in a public men’s room (Middlemist, Knowles, and Matter 1976). The researchers secretly observed their participants to see whether it took them longer to begin urinating when there was another man (a confederate of the researchers) at a nearby urinal. While some critics found this to be an unjustified assault on human dignity (Koocher 1977), the researchers had carefully considered the ethical conflicts, resolved them as best they could, and concluded that the benefits of the research outweighed the risks (Middlemist, Knowles, and Matter 1977). For example, they had interviewed some preliminary participants and found that none of them was bothered by the fact that they had been observed

      Helpful example of ethnical conflict.

  19. Nov 2017
  20. Jul 2017
    1. BMI

      Test if this shows up in another list.

    2. Finally found its BMI distribution... turns out to be in demographic category. So most samples from this study have BMI > 24. Good for us.

    1. Partial loss-of-func- tion alleles cause the preferential loss of ventral structures and the expansion of remaining lateral and dorsal struc- tures (Figure 1 c) (Anderson and Niisslein-Volhard, 1988). These loss-of-function mutations in spz produce the same phenotypes as maternal effect mutations in the 10 other genes of the dorsal group.

      This paper has been curated by Flybase.

    1. Obesity rs8043757 intron FTO 16 : 53,779,538 5.000 x 10-110 NHGRI 23563607

      The top match SNP with key words: Obesity, T2D and CVD is on gene FTO.

    1. Obesity was highly prevalent among the study sample; 64.6% of females and 41.2% of males were obese according to Polynesian cutoffs (BMI ≥ 32 kg/m2). Females were less likely than males to have hypertension (31.7% vs. 36.7%) but equally likely to have diabetes (17.8% vs. 16.4%).

      Those with obesity but not hypertension or diabetes can be our candidates.

      The data set can be found here: dbGaP Study Accession: phs000972.v2.p1 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/gap/cgi-bin/study.cgi?study_id=phs000972.v2.p1

    1. This T2D study measured BMI, DBP, SBP and cardiovascular disease medications as well. May have samples we need.

    1. Samoans have been studied for >40 years with a focus on the increase in, and levels of, BMI, obesity, and associated cardiometabolic conditions due to economic modernization

      This one may contain the sample we need. need to check their publications.

    1. ((obesity[Disease]) NOT type 2 diabetes mellitus[Disease]) NOT cardiovascular diseases[Disease] AND 1[s_discriminator]

      NCBI can save this query for me... I can annotate this as well.

    1. Teach Source EvaluationSkillsIf you want to teach source evaluation skills, have small groups conduct research to answer a three-part problem such as this:1.How high is Mt. Fuji in feet?2.Find a different answer to this same question.3.Which answer do you trust and why do you trust it?As you observe students begin work on the third part of the problem, you likely will see a student begin to use the strategy that you have tar-geted: locating and evaluating the source of the information. When you see someone use this strategy, perhaps by clicking on a link to “About Us,” interrupt the other groups and have this student teach the strategy to the class, explaining how he or she evaluates a source for expertise and reliability. There are many inconsistent facts online that can also be used, just like this, to teach source evaluation including: “How long is the Mis-sissippi River?” or “What is the population of San Francisco?”
    1. How do you respond to a medical emergency if the people around you speak only Spanish?

      Project with Real world connections in the TL!

    1. We focus on a particular topic (e.g., racial prejudice), use a particular resource (e.g., To Kill a Mockingbird), and choose specific instructional methods (e.g., Socratic seminar to discuss the book and cooperative groups to analyze stereotypical images in films and on television) to cause learning to meet a given standard (e.g., the student will understand the nature of prejudice, and the difference between generalizations and stereotypes).
    1. To develop a realistic, credible, and doable action plan — onethat requires buy-in from numerous stakeholders — we mustdevise an ongoing decision-making and consensus-buildingprocess, [including] determining priorities, identifying theimplementing entities, ... and assessing available funding.

      Clearer version of this (from just below)

      "To do this, we should have a good plan, and we’ll need support from the many people who will have to carry out parts of it. That means, in turn, that we have to set up a good process for dividing the work and the cost, and for making decisions along the way."

    Tags

    Annotators

  21. Jun 2017
    1. he annotations are the highlighted portions of text, and clicking on one

      Example annotation on The Workbook Chapter 8.

    1. The annotations are the highlighted portions of text, and clicking on one

      Example annotation on The Workbook Chapter 7.

    1. The annotations are the highlighted portions of text, and clicking on one

      Example annotation on The Workbook Chapter 6.

    1. The annotations are the highlighted portions of text, and clicking on one

      Example annotation on The Workbook Chapter 5.

    1. The annotations are the highlighted portions of text, and clicking on one

      Example annotation on The Workbook Chapter 4.

    1. he annotations are the highlighted portions of text, and clicking on one

      Example annotation on The Workbook Chapter 2.

    1. he annotations are the highlighted portions of text, and clicking on one

      Example annotation on The Workbook Chapter 3.

    1. he annotations are the highlighted portions of text, and clicking on one

      Example annotation on The Workbook Chapter 1.

    1. The annotations are the highlighted portions of text, and clicking on one

      Example annotation on The Workbook Introduction.

    1. The annotations are the highlighted portions of text, and clicking on one

      Example annotation on The Workbook overview.

  22. Apr 2017
    1. Appendix. Technical demonstration of the SOMprocedure

      This is a great example of Kohonen's Self-organizing Maps and the use of the U-Matrix. The authors were very thorough in explaining how it can be used.

    1. So how does that explain what happened in Disneyland? If you have a group of 1,000 people concentrated in a small space—like oh, say, hypothetically, an amusement park—about 90 percent of them will be vaccinated (hopefully). One person, maybe someone who contracted measles on a recent trip to the Philippines, moves around, spreading the virus. Measles is crazy contagious, so of the 100 people who aren’t vaccinated, about 90 will get infected. Then, of the 900 people who are vaccinated, 3 percent—27 people—get infected because they don’t have full immunity.

      Good illustrative example

  23. Mar 2017
    1. We find that the timing of the “peak auction season”

      An example of using the hypothes.is platform to add personal &/or crowd-sourced annotations.

      'Groups' can also be formed on hypothes.is to share annotations.

    2. For example, the CV of Christie’s top sales days decreased, on average, by 71 percent between 1780 and 1835

      What is this academic talking about!? Can this possibly be true? Maybe check on http://wikipedia.org

    1. for two high school teachers to occupy a structurally equivalent position, both teachers must teach the same set of students

      This reminds me of my middle school. Rather than each class period having different students, we had one classroom with the same students and we would just switch teachers each period. They all taught the same students. It's nice to have a personal example of structural equivalence

  24. Feb 2017
    1. Member States may entrust competent authorities within the meaning of Directive (EU) 2016/680 with tasks which are not necessarily carried out for the purposes of the prevention, investigation, detection or prosecution of criminal offences or the execution of criminal penalties, including the safeguarding against and prevention of threats to public security, so that the processing of personal data for those other purposes, in so far as it is within the scope of Union law, falls within the scope of this Regulation.

      Another example of an annotation in Hypothes.is

    2. protection of natural persons

      An example of an annotation using Hypothes.is

    1. trut/1

      Although, it may not be entirely relevant, this seems to be like a very interesting representation of the "Truth" that we kept alluding to after our first set of readings, but adapted to a more understandable scenario.

  25. Sep 2016
    1. Over the years the NCAA has changed rules that do not always align with pure amateurism. According to Zimbalist, in 1973 the NCAA altered scholarship terms so that they needed to be renewed each year.[6] This would imply that no athletes position was safe, a notion that does not fit with the love of the game

      implying an athletes position is not safe does not correlate with loving the game

    2. Areas in which the NCAA defies its own devotion to amateurism are the sale of video games licenses, game merchandise, footage, etc., that provide direct profit for the association. The players directly promote these examples, but the benefits received are to the NCAA and schools alone.

      strong argument presented against the NCAA

    3. A key point as to why the NCAA would not want to pay athletes is to maintain the amateur status of its reputation.

      one of the NCAA's main arguments against paying college athletes - they're amateurs

    1. Look at Sandra Lidice Aldama, who chose to start a small business.  Cubans, she said, can “innovate and adapt without losing our identity…our secret is in not copying or imitating but simply being ourselves.”

      Here President Obama is using an example to show how Cuban people can still maintain their cultural identity while starting a new economic endeavor. He's trying to ease some of the people who may think they'll lose part of themselves by doing capitalistic things like starting a business.

    2. Now, there’s no secret that our governments disagree on many of these issues.  I’ve had frank conversations with President Castro.  For many years, he has pointed out the flaws in the American system -- economic inequality; the death penalty; racial discrimination; wars abroad.  That’s just a sample.  He has a much longer list.

      Here, President Obama used the rhetorical strategy of example. "Economic inequality, the death penalty, racial discrimination, wars abroad"—all of these are examples of how President Castro thinks the American system is flawed. President Obama lists these things out in order to help illustrate his argument.

  26. Aug 2016
    1. Flickr deploy to production morethan 10 times per day

      "Before CI, it took SuperChoice entire day to perform a single build and deploy. Today, the same build takes just 15 minutes. Without CI, we would need three to four times the staff we have now just to support half as many builds" Atlassian Customer SuperChoice.

    2. For example, such automation has

      Additional Examples: NASA is a powering a continuous deployment pipeline that delivers software updates to JPL’s private cloud as fast as the Ensemble engineers can crank them out. Code from six active branches is built using custom scripts that sit on top of Eclipse and SVN, and invoked by Atlassian Bamboo. Each successful build is then deployed to, and rigorously tested on, two preliminary environments before going into operation.

      Ensemble’s engineers have what may be the best bragging rights in the world (or universe): The code they write on Monday is driving rovers on Mars come Tuesday.

  27. Jun 2016
  28. Jan 2016
    1. the evils arising from the unjust and unequal distribution of wealth, which are becoming more and more apparent as modern civilization goes on, are not incidents of progress, but tendencies which must bring progress to a halt

      Paraphrase: There is no coincidence that inequality is occurring in the world due to certain evils that are becoming more apparent as time passes and will lead to the end of progress.

      Context: People are beginning to recognize and voice their opinions about social inequality during this time period, such as unequal distribution of wealth. When before only a few people spoke out about this injustice. The inequality that is occurring is not an accident that occurs as time moves forward, but is the direct result of the corrupt mindset of some individuals. This mindset will cause civilization to stop progressing.

      Example: For example, some people still have the mindset that only prestigious citizens (meaning political figures or people whose family has had a legacy of being wealthy or well known) should be wealthy. This mindset hinders a community because everyone does not have equal access to resources and this inequality is the very thing that leads to poverty and an accumulation of poverty does not equal progress.

  29. Mar 2015
  30. Feb 2014
    1. For instance, if a certain individual owns the idea for airplanes, there are always ideas for gliders, helicopters, and devices yet unknown for other individuals to own. On the other hand, each idea is unique, so the taking of any idea as private property leaves none of that idea for others (Locke, 1690, Chap. V, Sect. 27). The first perspective would assert that there are always other ideas, while the second perspective would assert that ideas build upon each other, and that just because ideas are similar in one respect does not mean they are similar in other respects. Under the first perspective, the taking of intelle ctual property passes the Lockean Proviso, and under the second perspective, it fails.
    1. The breakthrough patent that produces a Polaroid company is more the exception than the rule. The rule is the modestly successful novelist, the minor [*292] poet, and the university researcher -- all of whom may profit by licensing or selling their creations.

      Breakthrough patent of Polaroid (the exception) vs modestly successful novelist (the more common case)

    2. In the eighteenth century, Edmund Burke argued that property stabilized society and prevented political and social turmoil that, he believed, would result from a purely meritocratic order. n8 Property served as a counterweight protecting the class of persons who possessed it against competition from nonpropertied people of natural ability and talent. To Burke, the French National Assembly -- dominated by upstart lawyers from the provinces -- exemplified the risk of disorder and inexperience of an unpropertied leadership. n9 In contrast, the British parliament, a proper mix of talented commoners and propertied Lords, ruled successfully.
    1. C e n s u s t a k e r s , f o r e x a m p l e , d o n o t " c r e a t e " t h e p o p u l a t i o n f i g u r e s t h a t e m e r g e f r o m t h e i r e f f o r t s ; i n a s e n s e , t h e y c o p y t h e s e f i g u r e s f r o m t h e w o r l d a r o u n d t h e m . D e n i c o l a , C o p y r i g h t i n C o l l e c t i o n s o f F a c t s : A T h e o r y f o r t h e P r o t e c t i o n o f N o n f i c t i o n L i t e r a r y W o r k s , 8 1 C o l u m . L . R e v . 5 1 6 , 5 2 5 ( 1 9 8 1 ) ( h e r e i n a f t e r D e n i c o l a ) . C e n s u s d a t a t h e r e f o r e d o n o t t r i g g e r c o p y r i g h t b e c a u s e t h e s e d a t a a r e n o t " o r i g i n a l " i n t h e c o n s t i t u t i o n a l s e n s e . N i m m e r § 2 . 0 3 [ E ] . T h e s a m e i s t r u e o f a l l f a c t s — s c i e n t i f i c , h i s t o r i c a l , b i o g r a p h i c a l , a n d n e w s o f t h e d a y . " [ T ] h e y m a y n o t b e c o p y r i g h t e d a n d a r e p a r t o f t h e p u b l i c d o m a i n a v a i l a b l e t o e v e r y p e r s o n . " M i l l e r , s u p r a , a t 1 3 6 9 .

      Census takers do not create; they merely copy the figured from the world around them. All facts-- scientific, historical, biographical, and news of the day-- may not be copyrighted and are part of the public domain.

  31. Jan 2014
    1. So when I wrote to her boss, I included this: “When I get to be rich, I’m going to hire someone like your assistant — to protect me from people like me. She was helpful, friendly, feisty vs. boring and yet guarded access to you like a loyal pit bull. If she doesn’t know how valuable she is to you, you are making a big managerial mistake and YOU should know better.”

      Evocative

  32. Nov 2013
    1. Cameron Neylon

      See also Cameron's personal blog (with posts before he joined PLOS) at http://cameronneylon.net/category/blog/

    2. But as this vista opens up, we also have to make choices.
  33. Oct 2013
    1. let his manner of living be an eloquent sermon in itself

      Can actions be considered a type of rhetoric?

    2. For men of quick intellect and glowing temperament find it easier to become eloquent by reading and listening to eloquent speakers than by following rules for eloquence.

      It is an art best learned through exposure and example

    1. would exercise the pupils under his care in the reading of history and even still more in that of speeches,

      Read examples and surround students with good rhetoric

    1. Examples are either (a) historical parallels, or (b) invented parallels, viz. either (a) illustrations or (b) fables, such as those of Aesop.

      More details of examples.

    1. Every one who effects persuasion through proof does in fact use either enthymemes or examples: there is no other way.

      Enthymemes and examples are elements for proof.

  34. Sep 2013