265 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. u/MushroomPuddle17 days agoGetting started with a commonplace notebook as someone who isn't creative? .t3_ojhwrb ._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; } Hello everyone!I've known about commonplace books for years and always feel a surge of inspiration when I see them but I'm really not creative. I don't know what I'd ever write in one? I don't ever really have any grand ideas or plans. I don't seem to have conversations or read things that necessarily inspire me. I just live a very regular life where nothing really sticks out to me as important. I've tried bullet journals before and had the same issue.Does anyone have any suggestions? I'd really appreciate it.

      I'm not sure what you mean by your use of the word "creative". I'm worried that you've seen too many photos of decorative and frilly commonplace books on Instagram and Pinterest. I tend to call most of those "productivity porn" as their users spend hours decorating and not enough collecting and expanding their thoughts, which is really their primary use and value. Usually whatever time they think they're "saving" in having a cpb, they're wasting in decorating it. (Though if decorating is your thing, then have at it...) My commonplace is a (boring to others) location of mostly walls of text. It is chock full of creative ideas, thoughts, and questions though. If you're having trouble with a place to start, try creating a (free) Hypothes.is account and highlighting/annotating everything you read online. (Here's what mine looks like: https://hypothes.is/users/chrisaldrich, you'll notice that it could be considered a form of searchable digital commonplace book all by itself.) Then once a day/week/month, take the best of the quotes, ideas, highlights, and your notes, replies, questions and put them into your physical or digital commonplace. Build on them, cross link them, expand on them over time. Do some research to start answering any of the questions you came up with. By starting with annotating things you're personally interested in, you'll soon have a collection of things that become highly valuable and useful to you. After a few weeks you'll start seeing something and likely see a change in the way you're reading, writing, and even thinking.

      reply to: https://www.reddit.com/r/commonplacebook/comments/ojhwrb/getting_started_with_a_commonplace_notebook_as/

    1. https://forum.obsidian.md/t/epub-support/1403

      Some interesting resources here, though none currently suit workflows I'm keen to support yet. There is a reference to FuturePress' epub.js which could be intriguing, though even here, I'm more likely to stick with Hypothes.is for annotating and note taking to keep context.

    1. Xynopxies · 5dI use hypothesis.io. But it doesn't have any functional export option available. So what I do is Copy everything that it displays and then run some regex to extract the text(removing junks like username, time,tags) using phrase express and then paste it on my obsidian. It usually takes a few seconds.

      If you mean hypothes.is, you might take a look at https://forum.obsidian.md/t/retrieve-annotations-for-hypothes-is-via-templater-plugin-hypothes-idian/17225 which has some options for doing this easily.

  2. Jul 2021
    1. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed ornare sem

      I'm annotating the text using hypothes.is - it looks like you cannot annotate an image with this. You have to sign up to annotate text like this and log in.

    1. This is pretty slick and looks pretty in its published form. Great to see others are using clever set ups like this as posting interfaces.

      I have a feeling that other TiddlyWiki users would love this sort of thing. While TW may not seem as au courant, it's still got some awesome equivalent functionality and great UI which is what most of the users in the note taking space really care about.

      I do still wish that there was a micropub set up for Hypothes.is to make this sort of thing easier for the non-technical users.

    1. Titi Lucreti Cari De Rerum Natura Libri SexWith a Translation and NotesVolume 1Edited by H. A. J. Munro Lucretius

      Testing out the OCR functionality of docdrop.org.

      I'm noticing that the pdf fingerprint of this text somehow matches that of other texts as there are a lot of non-related annotations on this page.

      Is docdrop doing something squirrelly with the fingerprint @dwhly?

  3. Jun 2021
    1. Enjoy Reading in Distributed Communities Zocurelia supports reading together, especially when your community is spread all over the world, your school, your university or your city.

      Demo'd at I Annotate 2021 by creator Axel Dürkop.

    1. This is awesome and moves a bit closer in functionality for how one might use the platform as a commonplace book. Not sure how it's different to the main search except that it's geared toward smaller groups rather than the public timeline which is too large to view.

      My first impressions:

      • It doesn't seem to show within Firefox.
      • It overloads in the Public timeline

      via: Michael mention at IAnno21

    2. This page needs to have some of the plugins for note taking added to it. Many are listed on Github. Circle back to this with a list of additions.

    1. This page is currently in public beta mode. I'm am trying to get feedback from multiple people(including you) before I publish it. To facilitate the feedback submission, I have added a highlighting and commenting option. To use that, just select any text(for eg, double click on this: DOUBLE CLICK ME). When you get a login prompt, use this login details... Username: zettelkasten Password: notes If you have any corrections or suggestions, please select the text and add a comment using this system.

      This is pretty cool. I've not run into anyone using an open account on Hypothes.is to solicit anonymous feedback on an article before.

    1. The fresh one, she told me afterward, felt a little lonely by comparison: she missed the meta-conversation running in the margins, the sense of another consciousness co-filtering D.F.W.’s words, the footnotes to the footnotes to the footnotes to the footnotes.

      There is definitely an art to writing interesting marginalia however. Perhaps something that requires practice?

      Sam Anderson's would be intriguing I'm sure. Dick Macksey's marvelous. Anderson provides the example of people wanting books from [[Samuel Taylor Coleridge]] earlier in the piece.

      I can only contrast this with some of the crazy minutiae an pedantry I've seen on Hypothes.is which makes me think that it's surely an art form.

      I suspect some of it is that I'm missing the personal context with a particular person---a sense of continuity. Things get even worse when it's a piece annotated by a class which can create a cacophony of annotations. I see far too many "me too" annotations floating around in the margins that don't add anything to the conversation. (Hopefully I'm not guilty of this sin myself, but really, even my public annotations are a conversation between me and a piece and are only for my own benefit.)

    2. Now, when the Coleridge of 21st-century marginalia emerges, he should be able to mark up the books of a million friends at once.

      This could be an interesting service to set up and run.

      I wonder if I could set up a private Hypothes.is group and actually charge a club rate to members for doing such a thing?

    3. This gave me an epiphany — a grand vision of the future of social reading. I imagined a stack of transparent, margin-size plastic strips containing all of my notes from “Infinite Jest.” These, I thought, could be passed out to my friends, who would paste them into their own copies of the book and then, in turn, give me their marginalia strips, which I would paste into my copy, and we’d all have a big virtual orgy of never-ending literary communion.It was a hopelessly clunky idea: a vision right out of a Library Science seminar circa 1949.

      Goofy as this physical version sounds, I could imagine a digital overlay version that could go along with digital books in much the same way that Google Maps has digital overlays.

      The problem lies with registration and location of words to do the overlay properly. The UI would also be a major bear.

      Hypothes.is has really done a spectacular job in their version, the only issue is that it requires doing it all in a browser and isn't easily usable in any e-readers.

    1. The result is to scatter our attention and diffuse our concentration.

      Computer and phone notifications can be insidious. I've personally turned most of them off.

      I also find that reading and annotating with Hypothes.is has helped me to have more focus while reading---even despite the short turnoffs to cogitate a bit, write a bit, and then return.

  4. May 2021
    1. Computing professionals are on the front lines of almost every aspect of the modern world. They’re involved in the response when hackers steal the personal information of hundreds of thousands of people from a large corporation. Their work can protect—or jeopardize—critical infrastructure like electrical grids and transportation lines. And the algorithms they write may determine who gets a job, who is approved for a bank loan or who gets released on bail.

      Up until this point, I have no idea that there is a code of ethics for computing professionals. I simply think that problems are presented and we try to solve it by creating algorithms. However, the thought of these algorithms being able to determine if a certain individual can get a job or approved for a bank loan have never crossed my mind. This new understanding will bring a new awareness to what kind of job I'm taking in the future and it will also help me determine what path I want to take in my career.

  5. Apr 2021
    1. a high level of motivation derived from thosearound them/other respected colleagues (FrancoSantos 2014 in Thomas2014)/ athletes

      fully agree with this statement as motivated people motivate others and allow for a great team working ethic with everyone pulling in the same direction

    1. Introduction

      This is a fun and curious bit of UI here relating to Hypothes.is. There's an icon/button with a link to open the via interface and it auto updates with each additional annotation.

      I'd like to look into how they implemented it and potentially add it as a social sort of feature to my own site.

    1. DM gives you simple but/and powerful tools to mark up, annotate and link your own networked collections of digital images and texts. Mark up your image and text documents with highlights that you can then annotate and link together. Identify discreet moments on images and texts with highlight tools including dots, lines, rectangles, circles, polygons, text tags, and multiple color options. Develop your projects and publications with an unlimited number of annotations on individual highlights and entire image and text documents. Highlights and entire documents can host an unlimited number of annotations, and annotations themselves can include additional layers of annotations. Once you've marked up your text and image documents with highlights and annotations, you can create links between individual highlights and entire documents, and your links are bi-directional, so you and other viewers can travel back and forth between highlights. Three kinds of tools, entire digital worlds of possible networks and connections.

      This looks like the sort of project that @judell @dwhly @remikalir and the Hypothes.is team may appreciate, if nothing else but for the user interface set up and interactions.

      I'll have to spin up a copy shortly to take a look under the hood.

  6. Mar 2021
    1. A status emoji will appear in the top right corner of your browser. If it’s smiling, there are other people on the site right now too.

      This is pretty cool looking. I'll have to add it as an example to my list: Social Reading User Interface for Discovery.

      We definitely need more things like this on the web.

      It makes me wish the Reading.am indicator were there without needing to click on it.

      I wonder how this sort of activity might be built into social readers as well?

    2. If somebody else selects some text, it’ll be highlighted for you.

      Suddenly social annotation has taken an interesting twist. @Hypothes_is better watch out! ;)

    1. Annotations are stored in the Zotero database, not in the PDF file, which allows for much more advanced functionality as well as fast syncing.

      It would be nice to have Zotero support the same shared annotations that Hypothes.is does so that it would be easier to share them across the web.

      The tough part of this equation is that most people would probably prefer to keep their annotations private rather than open.

    1. I returned to another OER Learning Circle and wrote an ebook version of a Modern World History textbook. As I wrote this, I tested it out on my students. I taught them to use the annotation app, Hypothesis, and assigned them to highlight and comment on the chapters each week in preparation for class discussions. This had the dual benefits of engaging them with the content, and also indicating to me which parts of the text were working well and which needed improvement. Since I wasn't telling them what they had to highlight and respond to, I was able to see what elements caught students attention and interest. And possibly more important, I was able to "mind the gaps', and rework parts that were too confusing or too boring to get the attention I thought they deserved.

      This is an intriguing off-label use case for Hypothes.is which is within the realm of peer-review use cases.

      Dan is essentially using the idea of annotation as engagement within a textbook as a means of proactively improving it. He's mentioned it before in Hypothes.is Social (and Private) Annotation.

      Because one can actively see the gaps without readers necessarily being aware of their "review", this may be a far better method than asking for active reviews of materials.

      Reviewers are probably not as likely to actively mark sections they don't find engaging. Has anyone done research on this space for better improving texts? Certainly annotation provides a means for helping to do this.

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Remi Kalir & Jeremy Dean</span> in Web Annotation as Conversation and Interruption (<time class='dt-published'>03/15/2021 00:21:05</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Furthermore, web annotation also affords curation, creating a static but unstable record of this emergent and dynamic performance, accenting via hypertext particular ideas and moments from a malleable document.

      One of the pieces missing from Hypothes.is is the curateable notebook which more easily allows one to create new content from one's annotations.

      Search is certain there, but being able to move the pieces about and re-synthesize them into new emergent pieces is the second necessary step.

    1. are just discovering it,

      I know exactly what you mean. My experience? There are very few tools worth adopting for the long haul, ones that repay the time invested. Hypothes.is is a worthwhile investment of time and talent. I would not advocate for its use to my students if I did not think it was a net gain in the brain.

  7. Feb 2021
    1. Hypothesis annotators just made their 20 millionth annotation

      +1! 🎉

    2. If you’d prefer not to allow third-party cookies, and if you’re using a Chromium browser (like Chrome or Brave), you can allow cookies from the extension itself. In this case, you’ll allow cookies from [*.]bjfhmglciegochdpefhhlphglcehbmek.

      In Brave open Settings / Additional settings / Privacy and security and then under Sites that can always use cookies add [*.]bjfhmglciegochdpefhhlphglcehbmek.

      If only this was possible on Safari.

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Cory Doctorow</span> in Pluralistic: 16 Feb 2021 – Pluralistic: Daily links (<time class='dt-published'>02/25/2021 12:20:24</time>)</cite></small>

      It's interesting to note that there are already two other people who have used Hypothes and their page note functionality to tag this article as to read, one with (to read) and another with (TODO-read).

    1. Hypothes.is has both RSS and Atom Feeds. So the IFTTT “if” is a new item in your feed which creates a text post in some appropriate storage account. I use OneDrive as the “that” target, but I’m sure you could potentially use others with some experimentation. If you have something that only saves as .txt files, that’s fine, you can simply rename them as .md files for your vault later.

      I’ve described some of this before at https://boffosocko.com/2020/08/29/a-note-taking-problem-and-a-proposed-solution/ for those interested in further details.

      Hopefully this helps (until someone has a more automated version).

    1. Small world of annotation enthusiasts, but hopefully getting bigger!

      I've always wished that Hypothes.is had some additional social features built in for discovering and following others, but they do have just enough for those who are diligent.

      I've written a bit about how to follow folks and tags using a feed reader.

      And if you want some quick links or even an OPML feed of people and material I'm following on Hypothesis: https://boffosocko.com/about/following/#Hypothesis%20Feeds

    2. Private groups are also my solution to the potential "saturation" problem that many people have asked me about. I DO think that there's a potential disincentive to students who I've asked to annotate a document, if they open it and find hundreds of comments already there. I already face a situation when I post questions for discussion that people answer in a visible way, where some students say their peers have already made the point they were going to make. It's easier to address this objection, I think, when EVERY LINE of a document isn't already yellow!

      I've run into this issue myself in a few public instances. I look at my annotations as my own "conversation" with a document. Given this, I usually flip the switch to hide all the annotations on the page and annotate for myself. Afterwards I'll then turn the annotation view back on and see and potentially interact with others if I choose.

    1. annotation on hypothes.is

      Get the Chrome extension for easier use: chrome://extensions/?id=bjfhmglciegochdpefhhlphglcehbmek

      (But you already know this).

    1. the frozen nature of the text seem more like a feature than a bug, something they’ve deliberated chosen, rather than a flaw that they didn’t have time to correct.

      The thoughtfulness and design of of Hypothes.is is incredibly valuable to me specifically because it dramatically increases my textual productivity in combination with my digital commonplace book.

      Connect this to the Jeremy Dean's idea of it helping to facilitate a conversation with texts. Nate Angell had a specific quote of it somewhere, but it might also reside in this document: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14682753.2017.1362168

    1. Should transclusion work both ways, embedding content and letting the source know that I did so?

      If one is worried about link rot for transclusion, why not just have a blockquote of the original in excerpt form along with a reference link to the original. Then you've got a permanent copy of the original and the link can send a webmention to it as a means of notification?

      If the original quoted page changes, it could potentially send a webmention (technically a salmention in function) to all the pages that had previously mentioned it to create updates.

      Automatic transclusion can also be more problematic in terms of original useful data being used as a vector of spam, graffiti, or other abuses.

      As an example, I can "transclude" a portion of your page onto my own website as a reply context for my comment and syndicate a copy to Hypothes.is. If you've got Webmentions on your site, you'll get a notification.

      For several years now I've been considering why digital gardens/zettelkasten/commonplace books don't implement webmention as a means of creating backlinks between wikis as a means of sites having conversations?

    1. Highlight PoetryFinding poetry in other people’s webpages

      I sort of wish that I could do separate tidbits like this in hypothes.is.

  8. Jan 2021
    1. How to annotate literally everything

      Comprehensive annotation tools for web/PDFs/eInk/etc

    2. Good overview of annotation tools with a lot of additional information in comments and - you guess - annotations.

  9. Nov 2020
    1. EBF was much more potent than Pax5 in inducing B celldevelopment, as its expression in MPPs yielded at least 100-foldmore B lineage progeny than did expression of Pax5 (Fig. 3band data not shown). These data suggest that promotion of B cellgeneration from MPPs by EBF is not mediated solely throughactivation of Pax5 expression.

      EBF expression represses and restricts alternative lineage genes, also help promote B cell independently of Pax 5.

    1. By the 1950s, the industry appeared to have moved beyond the horrors described in Upton Sinclair’s classic

      here is the problem this hypothes.is, -- one using Jaws cannot use the software jaws when adding a " highlight on the literature they are reading. They can read the webpage, but not trigger the highlighting - once that trigger occurs, Jaws will work with the annotation text entry. So they can't use it with Jaws.

  10. Oct 2020
    1. from tuka al-salani 60:48 and well actually it is a question but it's something that will probably 60:52 is out beyond our scope here but how would 60:56 social annotation be used as a research tool so not research into it but how 61:00 would we use it as a research tool

      Opening up social annotation and connecting it to a network of researchers' public-facing zettelkasten could create a sea-change of thought

      This is a broader concept I'm developing, but thought I'd bookmark this question here as an indicator that others are also interested in the question though they may not have a means of getting there (yet).

    1. But thirdly, and most valuably, the template gives you a big space at the bottom to write sentences that summarise the page.  That is, you start writing your critical response on the notes themselves.

      I do much this same thing, however, I'm typically doing it using Hypothes.is to annotate and highlight. These pieces go back to my own website where I can keep, categorize, and even later search them. If I like, I'll often do these sorts of summaries on related posts themselves (usually before I post them publicly if that's something I'm planning on doing for a particular piece.)

    1. Obsidian is a powerful knowledge base that works on top of a local folder of plain text Markdown files.

      Alright, I think I may now have things set to use an IFTTT applet to take my Hypothes.is feed and dump it into a file on OneDrive.

      The tiny amount of clean up to the resultant file isn't bad. In fact, a bit of it is actually good as it can count as a version of spaced repetition towards better recall of my notes.

      The one thing I'll potentially miss is the tags, which Hypothes.is doesn't include in their feeds (tucked into the body would be fine), but I suppose I could add them as internal wiki links directly if I wanted.

      I suspect that other storage services that work with IFTTT should work as well.

      Details in a blogpost soon...

      Testing cross-linking:

      See Also:

      • [[Obsidian]]
      • [[Hypothes.is]]
      • [[note taking]]
      • [[zettlekasten]]
      • [[commonplace books]]
      • [[productivity]]

      hat tip to Hypothesis, for such a generally wonderful user interface for making annotating, highlighting, bookmarking, and replying to web pages so easy!

    1. Screenshots are disposable, but highlights are forever.

      Highlighting this sentence on the Highly blog (on Medium) ironically using Hypothes.is. I'm syndicating a copy over to my own website because I know that most social services are not long for this world. The only highlights that live forever are the ones you keep on your own website or another location that you own and control.

      RIP Highly. Viva IndieWeb!

    1. Perhaps we want to write but we feel comfortable with our phones and so we want to write on our phones. It’s like the best camera being the one you have on you. The best writing implement is the one you have on you. These days, it might be your phone.

      I often find the quickest and easiest writing implement I've got is the Hypothes.is browser extension.

      Click a button and start writing. In the background, I've got a tool that's pulling all the content I've written and posting it quickly to my own website as a micropub post.

    1. Comments are enabled via Hypothes.is

      This may be the first time I've seen someone explicitly use Hypothes.is as the comment system on their personal website.

      I wonder if Matthew actively monitors commentary on his site, and, if so, how he's accomplishing it?

      The method I've used in the past as a quick and dirty method is Jon Udell's facet tool https://jonudell.info/h/facet/?wildcard_uri=https%3A%2F%2Fmatthewlincoln.net%2F*&max=100, though it only indicates just a few comments so far.

      Use cases like this are another good reason why Hypothes.is ought to support the Webmention spec.

    1. If anyone is aware of people or groups working on the potential integration of the IndieWeb movement (webmentions) and web annotation/highlighting, please include them in the comments below–I’d really appreciate it.

      The IndieWebCamp.com site lists a small handful of people with Hypothes.is affiliations who had websites, but none of the seem to be active any longer. Perhaps we can track some of them down via twitter?

    2. Boffo Socko Now Supports Hypothes.is Annotations

      First!

    1. Naptha, its current name, is drawn from an even more tenuous association. See, it comes from the fact that "highlighter" kind of sounds like "lighter", and that naptha is a type of fuel often used for lighters. It was in fact one of the earliest codenames of the project, and brought rise to a rather fun little easter egg which you can play with by quickly clicking about a dozen times over some block of text inside a picture.

      Now if only I could do this with my Hypothes.is annotations! Talk about highlighting!

    2. What the hand dare seize the fire?

      I find it so heartening that one can use Project Naptha to highlight, copy and paste, and even edit and translate text formerly trapped within an image.

      I'm further impressed that it also works with Hypothes.is!

    1. I find it somewhat interesting to note that with 246 public annotations on this page using Hypothes.is, that from what I can tell as of 4/2/2019 only one of them is a simple highlight. All the rest are highlights with an annotation or response of some sort.

      It makes me curious to know what the percentage distribution these two types have on the platform. Is it the case that in classroom settings, which many of these annotations appear to have been made, that much of the use of the platform dictates more annotations (versus simple highlights) due to the performative nature of the process?

      Is it possible that there are a significant number of highlights which are simply hidden because the platform automatically defaults these to private? Is the friction of making highlights so high that people don't bother?

      I know that Amazon will indicate heavily highlighted passages in e-books as a feature to draw attention to the interest relating to those passages. Perhaps it would be useful/nice if Hypothes.is would do something similar, but make the author of the highlights anonymous? (From a privacy perspective, this may not work well on articles with a small number of annotators as the presumption could be that the "private" highlights would most likely be directly attributed to those who also made public annotations.

      Perhaps the better solution is to default highlights to public and provide friction-free UI to make them private?

      A heavily highlighted section by a broad community can be a valuable thing, but surfacing it can be a difficult thing to do.

    1. appreciate your help

      I think that a major part of improving the issue of abuse and providing consent is building in notifications so that website owners will at least be aware that their site is being marked up, highlighted, annotated, and commented on in other locations or by other platforms. Then the site owner at least has the knowledge of what's happening and can then be potentially provided with information and tools to allow/disallow such interactions, particularly if they can block individual bad actors, but still support positive additions, thought, and communication. Ideally this blocking wouldn't occur site wide, which many may be tempted to do now as a knee-jerk reaction to recent events, but would be fine grained enough to filter out the worst offenders.

      Toward the end of notifications to site owners, it would be great if any annotating activity would trigger trackbacks, pingbacks, or the relatively newer and better webmention protocol of the WW3C out of the http://IndieWebCamp.com movement. Then site owners would at least have notifications about what is happening on their site that might otherwise be invisible to them.

      Perhaps there's a way to further implement filters or tools (a la Akismet on platforms like WordPress) that allow site users to mark materials as spam, abusive, or other so that they are then potentially moved from "public" facing to "private" so that the original highlighter can still see their notes, but that the platform isn't allowing the person's own website to act as a platform to give reach to bad actors.

      Further some site owners might appreciate graded filters (G, PG, PG-13, R, X) so that users or even parents can filter what they're willing to see. Consider also annotations on narrative forms that might be posted as spoilers--how can these be guarded against? (Possibly with CSS and a spoiler tag?) Options can be built into the platform itself as well as allowing server-side options for truly hard cases.

      My coding skills are rustier than I wish they were, but I'm available to help/consult if needed.

    1. he group has become self-described “dignity scholars” who have studied the notions and criteria of dignity in landmark legal cases. In doing so, R2L has used Hypothesis as their “human rights tool” to examine legal evidence and build an argument for legislative change.

      Hypothes.is as a human rights tool! awesome!

    2. In April of 2019, at a digital learning conference, Manuel Espinoza spoke with educators, technologists, and annotation enthusiasts about R2L.d-undefined, .lh-undefined { background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2) !important; }.d-undefined, .lh-undefined { background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5) !important; }1Nate Angell and “the role that Hypothesis plays in human rights work.”

      Manuel Espinoza, “Keynote,” AnnotatED Summit, April 2, 2018, https://youtu.be/5LNmSjDHipM.

    1. The sidebar is styled white

      I do like how you've changed the styling a little bit. Being able to have the style fit the particular website is an interesting idea.

    2. So - I’m not quite ready to ditch disqus and move completely to Hypothesis annotations

      I do quite like the idea of using Hypothes.is as a service for implementing one's website comments in a broader way. It's sort of reminiscent of how some static site generators are leveraging webmention.io as a third party comment/webmention provider. Of course this presuposes that one is comfortable offloading this to a third party that could disappear and take the data with them, though your spreadsheet set up would help to protect against that.

    1. About this time I met with an odd volume of the Spectator.[18] It was the third. I had never before seen any of them. I bought it, read it over and over, and was much delighted with it. I thought the writing excellent, and wished, if possible, to imitate it. With this view I took some of the papers, and, making short hints of the sentiment in each sentence, laid them by a few days, and then, without looking at the book, try'd to compleat the papers again, by expressing each hinted sentiment at length, and as fully as it had been expressed before, in any suitable words that should come to hand. Then I compared my Spectator with the original, discovered some of my faults, and corrected them. But I found I wanted a stock of words, or a readiness in recollecting and using them, which I thought I should have acquired before that time if I had gone on making verses; since the continual occasion for words of the same import, but of different length, to suit the measure, or of different sound for the rhyme, would have laid me under a constant necessity of searching for variety, and also have tended to fix that variety in my mind, and make me master of it. Therefore I took some of the tales and turned them into verse; and, after a time, when I had pretty well forgotten the prose, turned them back again. I also sometimes jumbled my collections of hints into confusion, and after some weeks endeavored to reduce them into the best order, before I began to form the full sentences and compleat the paper. This was to teach me method in the arrangement of thoughts. By comparing my work afterwards with the original, I discovered many faults and amended them; but I sometimes had the pleasure of fancying that, in certain particulars of small import, I had been lucky enough to improve the method of the language, and this encouraged me to think I might possibly in time come to be a tolerable English writer, of which I was extremely ambitious. My time for these exercises and for reading was at night, after work or before it began in the morning, or on Sundays, when I contrived to be in the printing-house alone, evading as much as I could the common attendance on public worship which my father used to exact of me when I was under his care, and which indeed I still thought a duty, thought I could not, as it seemed to me, afford time to practise it.

      Even the greats copied or loosely plagiarized the "masters" to learn how to write.The key is to continually work at it until you get to the point where it's yours and it is no longer plagiarism.

      This was also the general premise behind the plotline of the movie Finding Forrester.

    1. There’s also a robust ecosystem of tools to follow users, monitor site annotations etc.

      Wait? What!? I've been wanting to be able to follow users annotations and I'd love the ability to monitor site annotations!! (I've even suggested that they added Webmention before to do direct notifications for site annotations.)

      Where have you seen these things hiding Tom?

    2. Especially on mobile.

      I've found in the past that highlighting on Chrome for Android was nearly impossible. I've switched to using Firefox when I need to use hypothes.is on mobile.

    1. merely stops you from writing in the margins here on this website.

      Does the script Audrey Watters is using really stop people from annotating her site directly?

      Based on my quick test, one can still (carefully) use Hypothes.is to highlight and annotate her site, but the script at least prevents Hypothes.is from showing that annotation. When visiting her site with Hypothes.is' Chrome browser extension on, it does show that there is one annotation on the page. It then requires some hunting to find this comment.

    2. I have added a script to my websites today that will block annotations

      I’ve spent some time thinking about this type of blocking in the past and written about a potential solution. Kevin Marks had created a script to help prevent this type of abuse as well; his solution and some additional variants are freely available. — {cja}

    1. It’s not the same thing as being face to face in a room together, but it’s a much closer match than a discussion forum or conventional social media where there’s just too much distance between the conversation and the text itself and, quite often, between the comments and commenters themselves.

      This suggests an interesting tagline for Hypothesis: "Shortening the distance between the text and its readers."

    2. Recipes for AnnotationWe are also establishing a hub for teaching materials related to collaborative, digital annotation where we will share resources to help instructors get started with practices other teachers are already using. We would be grateful if veterans of Hypothesis, social reading, and online learning would share their lesson plans and activities with us so we can share with others and credit your work. Annotate this post with your ideas or email your contributions to education@hypothes.is. Your Content Goes Here

      Interesting... earlier today I was actually thinking about how it might be easier to help both students and teachers in their onboarding process. I had thought that a set up like Terry Green's Open Patchbooks might be an interesting way to do this: see http://openlearnerpatchbook.org/ and https://facultypatchbook.pressbooks.com/

    3. Once you have selected text on the page and used our a keyboard shortcut, your browser’s focus will shift to a text box in the Hypothesis sidebar. Here you’ll be able to type a note to accompany your text selection.

      Testing out making annotations in the browser with Hypothes.is by only using my keyboard.

      • F7 to turn on Carrot browsing extension
      • Ctrl+Shift+H to turn on Hypothesis
      • Use Ctrl and arrow keys to move about the page
      • Shift + arrow keys to highlight section
      • Alternately Shift+Ctrl+ arrow keys to go by word
      • Tap a or h to open up an annotation or highlight respectively
      • For annotations, type the note, tab to add tags, and then post.
    1. The New York Times

      I'm wondering if the NY Times used the summit to figure out how to prevent annotating at all? Somehow I'm not able to reasonably use either Hypothes.is or Genius with it in multiple browsers.

      In particular I just can't highlight anything on the page, and attempts usually end up moving me to a new article. Blech!

    1. HYPOTHESIS

      FYI: There's a second copy of this article on the Hypothes.is blog, but because it has a different "fingerprint" this copy and the copy on the Hypothes.is site have two different sets of annotations.

    1. This blog was written and published by Shannon Griffiths

      I notice that this page and the original have two different rel="canonical" links which means that they have completely different sets of annotations on them. I'm curious if she was given the chance to have them be the same or different as making them the same means that the annotations for each would have been mirrored across rather than having two different sets?

    1. "Come for the tool, stay for the network" wrote Chris Dixon, in perhaps the most memorable maxim for how this works.

      I sort of feel like this is the missing piece of Hypothes.is. I came for and love the tool, but wish there were more of a network available.

    1. They both obviously point to the same specific page, and their beginnings are identical. The second one has a # followed by the words “I’m not looking” with some code for blank spaces and an apostrophe. Clicking on the fragmention URL will take you to the root page which then triggers a snippet of JavaScript on my site that causes the closest container with the text following the hash to be highlighted in a bright yellow color. The browser also automatically scrolls down to the location of the highlight.
    2. Create an IFTTT.com recipe to port your Hypothesis RSS feed into WordPress posts. Generally chose an “If RSS, then WordPress” setup and use the following data to build the recipe: Input feed: https://hypothes.is/stream.atom?user=username (change username to your user name) Optional title: {{EntryTitle}} Body: {{EntryContent}} from {{EntryUrl}} <br />{{EntryPublished}} Categories: Highlight (use whatever categories you prefer, but be aware they’ll apply to all your future posts from this feed) Tags: hypothes.is Post status (optional): I set mine to “Draft” so I have the option to keep it privately or to publish it publicly at a later date.

      Posting this solely to compare my Hypothes.is highlights and annotations on my website with Will's version.

      I'm still tinkering with mine and should have a Micropub based version using IFTTT and Webhooks done soon.

    3. I’ll get you something Chris. That’s the old logo
    1. Art by O’Hare and Bell highlight - both visually and conceptually - the dialogic quality of annotation expressing power.

      While I'm reading this, I can't help but wishing that Hypothes.is would add a redaction functionality to their product. They could potentially effect it by using the highlighter functionality, but changing the CSS to have the color shown be the same as that of the (body) text instead of being yellow.

    1. and started testing the functionality on HTML pages last year

      According to Kevin Marks, this is the GitHub Repo they've been using for creating this work: https://github.com/WICG/scroll-to-text-fragment#:~:text=the%20worst&text=a%20Google&text=serious%20breakage&text=behavior

    2. Clicking the snippet still takes you to the webpage that it pulled the information from, but now the text from the snippet will be highlighted in yellow, and the browser will automatically scroll down to the section in question.

      This is a feature that's been implemented in most browsers for a while as fragmentions.

      Hypothes.is has supported this sort of functionality for a few years now as well.

      I'm curious how these different implementations differ?

    1. I gave this keynote this morning at the ICLS Conference, not in Nashville as originally planned

      Outline seems to allow one to get around the issues of annotating Audrey Watters' content. Oh dear.

    1. This is the first post in the wild that I've come across which is using Quotebacks.

      I also notice that there's something odd going on with it that prevents me from annotating/highlighting the quote using Hypothes.is.

    1. Neither ought anything to be collected whilst you are busied in reading; if by taking the pen in hand the thread of your reading be broken off, for that will make the reading both tedious and unpleasant.

      This is incredibly important for me, though in a more technology friendly age, I've got tools like Hypothes.is for quickly highlighting and annotating pages and can then later collect them into my commonplace book as notes to work with and manage after-the-fact.

    1. Long comment threads on blog posts are a mixed blessing. It is great to have stirred up such great community discussion. But anything beyond, say, 20 comments is beginning to get beyond what anyone is willing to actually read. What likely happens is people read the article, read the first few comments, then start just scanning them (at increasingly swift rates) until they hit the bottom, then read the last one or two. At least, that’s what I do.

      Doing a quick test of Hypothes.is notes to Obsidian.via a storage source.

      Also checking the difference between html as a source and markdown as a source.

    1. Interestingly, I’ve found that Kindle is useful in this respect. I buy Kindle versions of books that I need for work, and highlight passages and bookmark pages as I go. And when I’ve finished the software obligingly has a collection of all the passages I’ve highlighted.

      John, you should spend a minute or two to learn about Hypothes.is (https://web.hypothes.is/) as an online tool for doing this. It's a free account or you can self-host the software yourself if you like. There are also functionalities to have public, private, or group annotations. I often pull my own annotations to my personal website similar to your own Memex and publish them there (example: https://boffosocko.com/kind/annotation/)

      Syndicated copy: https://boffosocko.com/2020/05/21/55771248/)

  11. Sep 2020
    1. If you would like to delete your account, please email us at support@hypothes.is

      This reminds me of closed systems, pretty much the opposite of what Dan Whaley (Founder, CEO of Hypothes.is) is talking about here:

      https://youtu.be/RYjOfTv0Tjs?t=603

  12. Jul 2020
  13. Jun 2020
    1. Collaborative annotation is an effective methodology that increases student participation, expands reading comprehension, and builds critical-thinking skills and community in class. Annotating together makes reading visible, active, and social, enabling students to engage with their texts, teachers, ideas, and each other in deeper, more meaningful ways.

      Love this description!

  14. May 2020
  15. Apr 2020
    1. Adobe AcrobatPro.

      gImageReader is an excellent open source alternative. It runs both on Windows and Linux, and it provides a simple (yet powerful) frontend GUI to Google's robust open source OCR engine, Tesseract.

      I think an open source tool as this is a better fit to the open annotation ecosystem, based on libre software and standards, that Hypothesis promotes, instead of a proprietary (and expensive) tool such as Adobe AcrobatPro.

    1. scoped to a particular domain.

      Climate Feedback group (see here and here) seems to be one of these Restricted Publisher Groups. However, it doesn't seem to be "scoped to a particular domain" (see for example here, here, or here).

      Is this a third configuration of Publisher Groups? Or a different kind of groups altogether? Or have these domains been enabled one by one to the Publisher Group scope? Is this behaviour explained somewhere?

    2. at any time,

      It would be nice that it said here that Hypothes.is will notify its users if the Privacy Policy is changed.

    3. Hypothesis already deals with minor changes to a document thanks to our fuzzy anchoring algorithm, which can cleverly locate the original annotated selection even if it or its surrounding context has changed slightly or been moved around.

      Summary: Small changes in the document should be okay.